Agenda

Date and TimeTitle
Mar 12, 2021
9:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
Affordable Learning Solutions for HBCUs: Sharing Practices, Tools, and Resources - Part 1 | Pre-conference Workshop

The 5th Annual Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs workshop will feature HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators sharing their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. The workshop will include demonstrations and practice using MERLOT and SkillsCommons to support adopting no-cost course materials as well guidelines for planning your own AL$ program for your own campus.

Outline of Activities

Morning Session:

  • What is Affordable Learning Solutions and what difference can it make at your campus?
  • Institutional showcases of AL$ programs
  • Lessons learned and recommended requirements
  • Participants discussing and identifying opportunities for developing their AL$ plans

This pre-conference workshop is free for registered conference attendees interested in Affordable Learning Solutions for HBCUs. Access will be granted through the conference platform on Friday, March 12, 2021 fifteen minutes prior to the session start time. 

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Extended Abstract

The 5th Annual Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs workshop will feature HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators sharing their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. The workshop will include demonstrations and practice using MERLOT and SkillsCommons to support adopting no-cost course materials as well guidelines for planning your own AL$ program for your own campus.

This first session will focus on:

  • What is Affordable Learning Solutions and what difference can it make at your campus?
  • Institutional showcases of AL$ programs
  • Lessons learned and recommended requirements
  • Participants discussing and identifying opportunities for developing their AL$ plans

This summit, in partnership with MERLOT and Tennessee State University, has been designed for educators at HBCUs to engage in key strategies and outcomes that create access to online education in support of student success. Focusing on the quality characteristics of online learning as well as digital strategies prioritized by HBCUs in their work in online education, this multipart summit uses actionable design practices and collaborative work to create a community of practice supporting work well beyond the conference. Join us for two distinct events as part of the HBCU Summit, as well as special networking opportunities for educators from HBCUs across the nation. Learn more on the HBCU Summit Website.

Mar 12, 2021
10:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
AnnotatED: Making Reading Active, Visible and Social With Collaborative Annotation | Pre-conference Workshop

In collaboration with the Online Learning Consortium, MERLOT and AnnotatED, the community for annotation in education, Hypothesis is convening a free workshop on collaborative annotation at OLC Innovate 2021. Register now to join us 10am–12pm CT Friday 12 March 2021.

The workshop will start with a quick orientation to collaborative annotation for social reading: What is it, and how are people using it to enrich online learning?

Then we'll shift to a hands-on activity to explore, discuss, and augment readings selected by our special guest educators, focused on topics related to their OLC Innovate presentation on connecting with students through intentional instructor presence. We'll practice reading together to see firsthand how social annotation can build understanding, connections, and community with Rebecca Cottrell, Ann Obermann, Adjoa Robinson, and Lee Scriggins from the Department of Social Work, and Meredith Jeffers from the Department of Modern Languages at Metropolitan State University of Denver. Our conversation will be anchored in text — literally — and spread out to engage other texts, ideas, and people beyond the workshop itself.

The second half of the workshop will combine with a special edition of Liquid Margins, the show where we gather to talk about collaborative annotation, social learning, and other ways we make knowledge together. You'll join episode 20, "Making Sense of Science With Social Annotation," to meet up with educators using social annotation to help students read, interpret, and comment on scientific texts — and share their “findings” with each other. Hypothesis scholar in residence Remi Kalir will moderate a conversation with Erin McKenney, Assistant Professor of Applied Ecology, and Carlos Goller, Associate Teaching Professor, both from North Carolina State University; and Melissa McCartney, Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences at Florida International University and the Director of Research at Science in the Classroom, an AAAS program that helps students learn to read real-world scientific literature. 

Read more about the AnnotatED Workshop in the Hypothes.is blog.

To participate in this free workshop, please register online.

Note: You do not need to be a registered attendee of OLC Innovate 2021 to participate in this workshop. Hypothesis will send registrants Zoom connection information prior to the workshop.  Registered OLC Innovate attendees will, however, also be able to access the workshop through the OLC Innovate 2021 virtual conference venue.

 

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 12, 2021
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
OLC Innovate 2021 Pre-Conference Workshop Networking Event | Other

Searching for a fun way to end your week and launch your OLC Innovate experience? Look no further! Whether you're new to the OLC or been with us for years, join us for light networking and insider tips into how to get the most out of your online conference experience. We'll show you tips and tricks for engaging with Zoom, and crowdsource ideas for how you might run virtual networking in your own contexts. And of course, you'll leave with new connections and friends to navigate your OLC Innovate experience with.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 12, 2021
1:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Affordable Learning Solutions for HBCUs: Sharing Practices, Tools, and Resources - Part 2 | Pre-conference Workshop

The 5th Annual Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs workshop will feature HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators sharing their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. The workshop will include demonstrations and practice using MERLOT and SkillsCommons to support adopting no-cost course materials as well guidelines for planning your own AL$ program for your own campus.

Outline of Activities

Afternoon Session:

  • More institutional showcases
  • Measuring the impact of your program:  Dollars saved
  • Building your institutional capacities for AL$
  • More lessons learned and recommended requirements
  • Participants draft their AL$ plans for their campus

This pre-conference workshop is free for registered conference attendees interested in Affordable Learning Solutions for HBCUs. Access will be granted through the conference platform on Friday, March 12, 2021 fifteen minutes prior to the session start time. 

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

 

The 5th Annual Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs workshop will feature HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators sharing their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. The workshop will include demonstrations and practice using MERLOT and SkillsCommons to support adopting no-cost course materials as well guidelines for planning your own AL$ program for your own campus.

This session will focus on:

  • More institutional showcases
  • Measuring the impact of your program:  Dollars saved
  • Building your institutional capacities for AL$
  • More lessons learned and recommended requirements
  • Participants draft their AL$ plans for their campus

This summit, in partnership with MERLOT and Tennessee State University, has been designed for educators at HBCUs to engage in key strategies and outcomes that create access to online education in support of student success. Focusing on the quality characteristics of online learning as well as digital strategies prioritized by HBCUs in their work in online education, this multipart summit uses actionable design practices and collaborative work to create a community of practice supporting work well beyond the conference. Join us for two distinct events as part of the HBCU Summit, as well as special networking opportunities for educators from HBCUs across the nation. Learn more on the HBCU Summit Website.

 

Mar 12, 2021
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Central)
OLC Innovate 2021 Conference Preview | Other

Large professional development opportunities like conferences can be difficult to plan for, particularly in today's climate when most of us are attending alongside or in between work committments (as opposed to having the flexibility to travel for and focus on the event itself). With this in mind, we've designed this session to help you make the most of your conference experience. Join members of the OLC team and our amazing group of volunteers for an engaging preview of the conference. Get a sense of what all the conference has to offer, hear from others who've attended before about the things you shouldn't miss, and importantly kick off your OLC Innovate experience with fun community building.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 15, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Field Guide "Power Hour" | Other

Come join other conference attendees online and create an OLC Accelerate game plan. During this power hour you’ll have the chance to organize your conference schedule and select presentations and activities you want to attend. The OLC Field Guides will be present to suggest interesting presentations and activities, train you on the use of the OLC conference site, and show you Engagement Maps. We’ll also discuss ways to participate virtually - including Slack and Twitter!  Meet old friends, make new acquaintances, and plan your schedule.  We can't wait to see you there!

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Field Guide sponsored by:

 

Mar 15, 2021
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
OLC Live: The Innovate Experience | Other

Make the most out of your conference experience by joining OLC Live! hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr in a kickoff discussion with engagement chairs about specially designed opportunities to engage with fellow attendees virtually at the conference!

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Avoiding Overreach: How Online Proctoring With PSI Bridge Alleviates Remote Testing Anxiety For Students | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

PSI’s human-first approach to intelligent Online Proctoring assures students that their personal information is secure and their privacy respected during every phase of their testing experience.

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Extended Abstract

Remote learning is increasing at warp speed, and at-home testing is now a reality for students and teachers around the world. Research shows that, like in a traditional classroom setting, instances of malpractice increase substantially if an online test is not proctored. Some level of surveillance is needed if you want to prevent students from trying to circumvent exam rules while testing remotely.

It is vital that exam monitoring technology, especially online proctoring solutions, alleviate – not compound – security concerns for test-takers and faculty. Unlike other online proctoring solutions in the market, PSI Bridge is designed to support and foster a culture of academic honesty without sacrificing student privacy. Join us to learn how non-invasive online proctoring won’t leave students exposed.

Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Putting Student Care Into Context And Action | Education Session

Looking for easy ways to put caring for students at the center of your teaching and design efforts? Join us as we bring together experienced educators to share their stories, tips, and tricks for promoting care and connection in courses.

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Extended Abstract

 

Over the past year the higher education teaching and learning community has seen unprecedented shifts to blended and online learning to preserve academic continuity in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the year has been challenging, much has been learned about the importance of caring for students and strategies to support their success--both inside and outside of the classroom, wherever that might be!

Join us as we bring together leaders from the higher education teaching, learning, and support community to answer key questions like:

  • Why do we need to put care at the center of our course design and teaching efforts?
  • What easy to implement strategies can be used as a course is designed to promote caring and connection?
  • What can be done during a course to promote caring and connection?
  • How can we use technology to humanize and connect to students?

By participating in this session, you will:

  • Explore the importance of caring as courses are designed and taught;
  • Identify at least one strategy that can be used to promote caring as courses are designed;
  • Identify at least one strategy that can be used during teaching that can be leveraged to promote caring; and
  • Identify at least one technology strategy that can be used to humanize and connect with students.
Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 12:15pm (Central)
Agile Leadership with Heart | Workshop

The Global Pandemic has taken a toll on every aspect of our society and education is no exception. As leaders, we need to shift our mindset to provide a more agile structure for supporting our teams, our institutions, and most importantly, our students. Come learn about agile leadership, with heart.

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Extended Abstract

The Global Pandemic has taken a massive toll on every aspect of our society and online education is no exception. As our teams have dispersed to working remotely, there is greater need for flexibility, understanding, trust, and compassion. Our traditional leadership roles have been challenged and will continue to evolve as we navigate this uncertain future. As leaders, we need to shift our mindset and strategies to provide a more agile structure for supporting our teams, our institutions, and most importantly, our students. 

Borrowing from the software development sector, agile leadership equips us with proven techniques our teams need to thrive in our current unpredictable circumstances. At the core of agile is servant leadership and trust. Employing agile is often accompanied with a mindset shift, valuing people above all else. This highly motivating method instills confidence in the expertise of team members while bolstering morale, thereby improving the team dynamic as well as delivering value from the onset, failing fast to provide efficiency in the process, and involving key stakeholders as true partners. 

As agile leaders, this requires our engagement in critical, timely conversations to choreograph a collaborative vision that illuminates a meaningful path forward for our teams and institutions. Our role as leaders need to shift from managing to coaching the members of our teams towards self-directed and self-organized work. Providing the structure and processes to self-organize when issues arise and removing roadblocks to teams’ success. It empowers our teams to truly own their skill sets and to take the initiative to deliver value-laden solutions as needs arise. By building a community among teams, relationships are strengthened overall. 

While successfully inspiring others to become agents of change is important, so is compassion and leading with the heart. The distanced working situation we find ourselves in currently means we need to come up with more creative and meaningful ways to really connect with one another. Without the ability to casually strike up a conversation in the office hallway, colleagues can feel disconnected and even isolated. As leaders, we also need to be aware of this dynamic and understand how to keep our teams connected and thriving. Leaders can leverage principles of Agile leadership to better support the members of their team, further supporting an environment of inclusivity and fostering a sense of belonging and connectedness. Creating this culture shift in our professional environments can bring positive changes which will help us thrive in the current times and guide us to long-term success.

 

Interactivity:

In this workshop, you will learn about the affordances of agile leadership and why it is critical for leading during a pandemic, and beyond. Through self assessments and sharing activities with your peers, you will determine your readiness to implement this approach. You will explore strategies for helping your team transition, and you will develop an ‘Agile Toolkit’ you can use to equip your team for future success.

 

Takeaways:

Attendees of this session will 

  • Identify the basic principles of agile leadership
  • Discuss strategies for transitioning to an agile approach
  • Develop a custom toolkit for helping their teams transition to an agile approach
Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Anywhere & Anytime: Mobile learning and student engagement in online courses | Education Session

Students seem to use their phones for everything even their online classes. But what impact might this have on their engagement? The answer might surprise you. This session presents the findings of research on the impact of mobile learning use on student engagement in fully online courses. Mobile learning matters! 

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Extended Abstract

Online learning has enjoyed strong growth and development over the last two decades, and at the same time, mobile technologies have become an indispensable part of our lives. Even as the boundaries of access to higher education have been diminishing and our lives have become more mobile, educational technology has been slower to harness the full benefits of that mobility. Accessing and participating in an online course with a mobile device is the foundation of mobile learning, and this behavior is increasing among college students. Scholarship on mobile learning theory assumes fluidity of learning in time, content, and context, and that learning is mediated through technology. However, much of the current research on online engagement or student success does not factor in the mode of access. Understanding the connection between mobile learning and student engagement is important for the development of the theory and scholarship of mobile learning, online learning, and student success online. But also, understanding the impact of mobile learning on student engagement is made even more consequential now because of shifts to virtual and online learning due to COVID-19. 

This session will present research findings on the impact of mobile learning use on engagement and student success in fully online courses. The presentation will have 2 primary aims: to describe the research design and to describe and discuss the findings and implications of the research. 

Level of participation 

Compelling questions will be possed to session attendees to engage their thinking on the content. They will be encouraged to discuss those questions with fellow attendees either in informal small groups in a live session or in chat and polling in a virtual session. Discussion of the implications of the research will be fostered by question sets that can be used in the same manner, and attendees will be encouraged to pose questions to the presenter. If the session is delivered in a live session, online interactive tools will be used to prompt attendees to use their mobile devices throughout the session.

Session Goals:

Session attendees will be able to identify relevant theories for the scholarship of mobile learning and discuss approaches to measurement and research. Attendees will also be able to discuss implications for online pedagogy, course design, and online student support. 

Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Developing 21st Century Skills Through Discussion | Education Session

Online discussions can provide an ideal opportunity to support develop of critical 21st-century-skills.

This presentation will help participants:

  1. Explain the importance adding the development of 21st-century-skills to existing curriculum
  2. Apply a framework for assessing 21st-century-skills in their learners
  3. Utilize online discussions to develop 21st-century-skills in their learner

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Extended Abstract

Today, there can hardly be a discussion about the value of higher education without mention of the need to develop 21st century skills.

While employers expect college graduates to have certain content knowledge, so too do they expect students to possess a variety of complementary soft-skills. The challenge is, employers continue to find that college graduates are unable to demonstrate competence in many of these 21st century skills.

Attempting to address this challenge, colleges and universities continue to attempt to embed 21st century skill development within existing curriculum. However, adjusting concrete, content-based curriculum to support these more abstract skills can be quite challenge and success in doing so is rare (Murugiah, 2020).

Though the skills thought to be requisite for success in the 21st century varies, given that  communication, collaboration, and social intelligence have been shown to be the most sought-after skills by employers (Rios et al., 2020), adjusting curriculum to help develop these skills can be simpler that often realized.

When done effectively, online discussions can provide an ideal opportunity to support develop of these critical 21st century skills.

This presentation will showcase results from a mixed-methods study into the effectiveness of developing 21st century skills through discussion.
Participants for the study completed online training modules utilizing a new learner-driven online discussion platform.

Results indicated that engagement in highly collaborative tasks and communications increased learners' empathy, critical thinking, and overall communication.

Through this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of adjusting curriculum to accommodate the development of 21st century skills
  2. Apply a framework for assessing 21st century skills in their learners
  3. Utilize online discussions to develop 21st century skills in their learner
Mar 15, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Focus on the Essentials: A Flexible Model to Prepare Hundreds of Faculty for Online Teaching in Just a Few Weeks | Education Session

Creation of new faculty development programs can be a lengthy process and may be limited to small enrollment. However, circumstances such as the recent pandemic presented the need to quickly prepare large amounts of faculty to teach online. This presentation will explore a model used to quickly create a quality faculty development course focused on the essentials of online teaching, which can be scaled based on individual institutional needs.

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Extended Abstract

Creation of new faculty development programs can be a lengthy process and the resulting programs or courses may be limited to small enrollments. However, circumstances such as the recent pandemic presented the need to quickly prepare very large amounts of faculty to teach online. This presentation will explore a model used to quickly create a quality faculty development course focused on the essentials of online teaching, which can be scaled based on individual institutional needs.

The primary motivation that led to the development of this model -- and resulting professional development course -- was fueled by the current global pandemic and the immediate need to quickly prepare large amounts of faculty to migrate to more flexible formats (online and blended) as needed while also maintaining student access to quality instruction, and to encourage student satisfaction and reduce disruptions (Thompson and Moskal, 2020). 

At our institution, faculty need to be credentialed to design and deliver online or blended courses and during the initial impacts of the global pandemic in the spring 2020 semester, 354 faculty (22% of the faculty teaching in the spring term) had not completed any of the existing digital learning credentialing programs (Thompson and Moskal, 2020). Consequently, there was a need to prepare hundreds of faculty members to transition face-to-face courses to quality online/blended modalities as a result of the impacts of the pandemic. However, the existing credentialing programs are also not designed to accommodate large faculty enrollments.

The traditional process for the development of a new faculty development program is typically very arduous and can span very lengthy periods. However, the current global pandemic presented a unique opportunity where inventive practices could be employed to rapidly design quality and successful faculty development courses. Agile practices, which are rooted in effective project management principles, were adapted by a small team of instructional designers to produce a brand-new, quickly-completable faculty development course that would enable hundreds of faculty members to successfully design and deliver new online and blended courses. The model utilized can be summarized into three primary phases – planning, development, and implementation – which was adapted from multiple models for rapid project management and course development (Pappas, 2015; Read, Morel and Hennington, 2015; Trust and Pektas, 2019).

In this presentation, we will explore this model used to develop the new faculty development course. The presenters will focus on the model employed rather than the newly-developed course itself, though the course will also be briefly discussed. Each of the three primary phases of the model will be detailed in the presentation, along with challenges & “lessons learned” as well as outcomes & data. The presenters will also discuss potential modifications for practitioners looking to adopt and implement this model, which can be scaled up or down based on individual institutional needs -- whether faced with a crisis or not.

References

Mar 15, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
The Journey from Chaos to Clarity: Teaching Research Fully Online | Education Session

This session will tell the story about the development of a two course research methods sequence and present a framework for teaching research methods fully online. The story of the design process will take attendees on a journey through the conceptualization, initial design, formative evaluation, and redesign of the courses.

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Extended Abstract

The presenters had a challenge: To redevelop a research methods course that was part of a two course sequence. The first course was the research methods course and the second was the capstone project course where students would implement their planned research. Additionally, this was to be a fully online endeavor that was part of a nationally ranked Master's of Education program. Previous attempts to teach this course in a fully online format had resulted in low student evaluations and low student performance in relation to course goals. For the students and for the teaching faculty, it was a chaotic experience.  Through the use of a framework that emphasized the implementation of critical course components that included: scaffolding, differentiation, effective communication across multiple levels, accessibility, pacing, and uniting course content with research processes, we were able to turn the chaos into clarity for students and instructors. During this session, we will share our story about the initial need for this course redesign, the goals that guided the course design processes, major barriers that occured during course design that required critical problem solving and divergent solutions, projected student outcomes, and our general framework for developing and teaching research in the fully online format. This framework has the potential to support higher education professionals as they seek to develop and teach similar methodolgy courses and other courses where project development is required of the students. We will take attendees on a journey through the conceptualization, initial design, formative evaluation, and redesign of the courses- from chaos to clarity. 

During the session, presenters will:

  • Discuss practical experiences about developing research methods courses in the asynchronous online learning space
  • Articulate how practical experience and foundational theories of education led to the development of an interactive framework for developing research courses in the online environment
  • Provide an interactive experience to participants that will help them explore the possibilities of moving their research courses online and/or further developing their current online research courses 

We will provide additional audience engagement:

  • Through the use interactive polling to poll the audience about key concepts within the presentation
  • Provide the session attendees with an interactive framework workspace as a lens to evaluate their own context
  • Interact one-on-one with attendees to define possible contextual barriers to moving research courses online and ideate possible solutions to those barriers

 

Mar 15, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Strategies for Culturally Responsive Online Teaching in STEM | Education Session

The instructor-centered method adopted by the STEM field with its emphasis on Eurocentric values is not always conducive to addressing achievement barriers for diverse students in the online classroom. This session will focus on how integration strategies using Culturally Responsive Online Teaching in STEM will enhance engagement for diverse students.

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Extended Abstract

Culturally Responsive Teaching pedagogy in the online environment is key to maintaining student engagement, acquiring knowledge about the course content, developing critical thinking skills, promoting a sense of belonging and community, and succeeding in their academic and professional careers. For educators, integrating a culturally responsive teaching curriculum in online STEM courses is a challenging task, especially during the  COVID-19 Pandemic, where many institutions have transitioned to the online setting.

In a traditional face-to-face class modality, students of color encounter barriers to successfully completing course work in the STEM field. Estrada et al. (2016) state that according to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), African-American students are the most likely ethnic group to leave STEM majors by dropping out of college (29%) or switching to a non-STEM degree (36%). There are relatively few reports of institutional-level tracking of STEM performance and persistence and fewer that provide analysis by ethnicity. According to Cullinane (2009), research indicates that lack of interest is not the primary cause of achievement gaps of underrepresented minorities in STEM but that it is attributed to academic preparation and economic factors.

Typically, online instructors embrace a traditional teaching model in which the learning environment is considered a culture-free zone (Kumi-Yeboah 2018). When instructors either ignore or dismiss the importance of cultural diversity, the students’ ability to become successful learners are minimized (Kumi-Yeboah 2018). This session will challenge the assumption of depleted cultural capital for students of color. Rather, this session will explore a new theoretical framework and its application to online teaching practices. The proposal will examine the integration of strategies for culturally responsive teaching to maximize student learning in the online classroom for STEM courses.

Gloria Ladson-Billings (1995) introduced theory of culturally relevant teaching, which she defined as an instructor using the experiences of diverse students as a pedagogical tool. Ladson-Billings (1995) built her framework on a three-leg stool of academic success, cultural competency and social awareness to challenge social inequality.

Several years later, Geneva Gay (2010) expanded the theory of culturally relevant teaching to construct a culturally responsive teaching model. Similar to Ladson-Billings , Gay (2010) contends instructors should acquire data on the cultural practices of diverse student groups to enhance learning and create a positive learning environment while at the same time maintain high academic standards. A point of distinction between Gay (2010) and Ladson-Billings (1995) is the recommendation from Gay (2010) that instructors revise the course curriculum to promote equity in the classroom for all students.

Curriculum revision is a labor-intensive process for many higher education instructors. Combining both curriculum revision and cultural diversity competency will be a challenging endeavor for many instructors. Indeed,  Kumi-Yeboah (2018) found in his research that online  instructors  did not promote cross-cultural collaborative activities in their online classes. Cross-cultural collaborative activities were described as group  work,  self-introductions  and  cultural awareness  activity. Kumi-Yeboah (2018) recommends educational institutions offer online instructors training to promote culturally responsive teaching in the online classroom.

In order to accomplish a culturally responsive teaching pedagogical method in the online classroom for STEM courses, the authors propose a Culturally Responsive Online Teaching Model (CROTM) expanding on the scholarship of Ladson-Billings (1995) and Gay (2010). The process to develop a CROTM model includes seven features: one, prejudice reduction; two,  academic success; three, knowledge building during course delivery; four,  course curriculum revision; five, social justice; six, an online classroom community; and seven, the appropriation of technology to facilitate an interactive communication space for students of color.

During this session, the presenters will describe CROTM and its theoretical application to a sample Earth Science lesson on Water Quality and Ground Water Contamination to make it culturally relevant.

The presenters will modify an Earth Science lesson on Water Quality and Ground Water Contamination, and then apply a new theoretical framework by implementing the following CROTM strategies:

  • Taking active steps to reduce prejudice:
  • Maintaining high academic standards:
  • Facilitating knowledge during course delivery: Instead of just providing the water quality data near the College, the instructor can provide the resources for students to find the water quality data for their own neighborhoods.
  • Integrating diverse experiences into the course curriculum:
  • Calling attention to social inequity in society:
  • Creating a sense of community in the online classroom:.
  • Introducing technology to aide knowledge construction and interactional currency of diverse students in the online classroom:

The session  will be interactive and the presentation will include the following elements:

  • Powerpoint slides and visual imagery for discussion and activity.
  • Live online polling questions to solicit information from the participants.
  • Group activities requiring participation via chat messaging and posting comments on Padlet.

 

Work Cited

Cullinane J, Leewater LH. 2009. Diversifying the STEM Pipeline: The Model Replication Institutions Program, Washington, DC: Institute for Higher Education Policy.

Estrada, Mica., Burnett, Myra., Campbell, Andrew. G., Denetclaw, Wilfred. F., Gutiérrez, Carlos. G., Hurtado, Sylvia., Gilbert, John., Matsui, John., Okpodu, Camellia M., Robinson, Joan T., Summers, Michael F., Werner-Washburne, Maggie., Zavala, MariaElena., and Marstelle, Pat. 2016. “Improving underrepresented Minority student persistence in STEM.” CBE—Life Sciences Education, 15(3), es5. doi: 10.1187/cbe.16-01-0038

Gay, Geneva. 2010. Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research, and Practice (2nd ed.). New York: Teachers College Press.

Kumi-Yeboah, Alex. 2018. “Designing a cross-cultural collaborative online learning framework for online instructors.” Online Learning, 22(4), 181-201.

Ladson-Billings, Gloria. 1995. “Toward a Theory of Culturally Relevant Pedagogy.” American Educational Research Journal.  32( 3): 465-491.

 

 

Mar 15, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Supporting Faculty Through The Transition Online: The Collaborative Creation and Implementation of Faculty Development in Response to COVID-19 | Education Session

Panelists from a large urban research university share their experiences participating in an innovative faculty professional development initiative in response to COVID-19. This initiative provided the opportunity for various groups across campus to come together and support faculty’s transition to online, hybrid, and blended instruction in preparation for the Fall 2020 semester.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has not only impacted students’ readiness for online learning, but it has also had a profound impact on faculty’s readiness to teach online. The rapid expansion of online course offerings has challenged faculty to transform how they teach and deliver their courses like never before. During this online transition, providing adequate professional development to faculty has been critical to promoting student success. Educators need to be familiar with the learning management system and provided with adequate pedagogical resources to promote student success in a digital environment.  

As such, university leadership at a large urban research university created an initiative to provide such support to faculty during the summer of 2020. Leadership reached out to instructional designers and instructional technologists on campus to provide training and resources for successfully designing, developing and delivering courses in an online learning environment. While all online program faculty are regularly provided training and support, this professional development was the first comprehensive online training of its kind made available to all faculty on campus, regardless of their online teaching experience.  

The purpose of this particular professional development program was to introduce all faculty to online course standards in order to ensure consistent quality across all online/remote/blended courses as well as create a community of support for faculty as they continued to navigate the transition online. As such, the professional development program, Faculty Summer Institute, was designed to provide professional development specific to the university’s online design, development, and delivery standards while also providing faculty with a solid support system as they built or modified their Fall 2020 courses. University leadership encouraged all faculty to register for the Institute and provided compensation for completing the professional development. 

Instructional designers created the professional development experience and worked with instructional technologists to train six hundred faculty on evidence-based instructional practices as well as technology tools. Faculty fellows were recruited by leadership and instructional designers to provide additional faculty support and a level of mentorship/community. While the roles of university leadership, instructional designers, and faculty fellows were uniquely different during this initiative, the Faculty Summer Institute provided an experience for stakeholders to come together and support faculty across campus. 

What exactly did the Faculty Summer Institute look like? How was it designed? What were the outcomes? Has the Institute influenced other initiatives on campus? How can you leverage support teams across your campus to continue assisting faculty during this unique time in higher education? During this panel discussion, these questions and those of attendees will be answered by representatives who participated in various ways during the 2020 Summer Institute. Come join us to learn more about lessons learned and the impact of this innovative faculty development initiative. By participating, we hope you will leave our session with practical ways you can implement a supportive online faculty development experience that continues to prepare faculty with the strategies and tools needed to design, develop, and deliver quality online, hybrid, and/or blended instruction in response to the current health crisis.

Key Takeaways:

  • Participants will gain insight into various stakeholders’ involvement in the creation and implementation of the 2020 Faculty Summer Institute.

  • Participants will engage in dialogue with the panelists regarding challenges and successes of designing and offering this type of faculty development.

Participants will have access to the following materials during the presentation:

  • Presentation slides

  • Demo account to review components of the 2020 Faculty Summer Institute Course

Mar 15, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Internet of Things (IOT) Enabled Paradigms for Online Chemistry Labs | Education Session

This presentation describes actual IOT enhanced online chemistry labs where students in Zoom breakout rooms collaboratively designed experiments, gathered data and analyzed results while working in Google Docs and Sheets.  We will demonstrate in real time an IOT-enhanced online lab, while going over multiple paradigms for their use in academia.

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Extended Abstract

The Internet of Things (IOT) refers to the digital networking of physical objects or "things" embedded with computers, software, actuators and physical sensors. This generates a new relationship between humans with computers and physical devices that has been postulated as web 4.0 or the "symbiotic web".  The COVID-19 pandemic has placed extra challenges on academic science teaching labs that typically require hands-on activities with students in close proximity to each other and instructors, as students access equipment and perform experiments. This presentation is on the application of IOT technologies to remote learning and we will demonstrate some of the paradigms for running IOT enhanced online chemistry labs.  In addition to initiating a discussion of IOT paradigms for remote labs we also seek to discuss the issue of safety in remote labs, and the importance of integrating safety into the online laboratory curriculum. Throughout the presentation we will be covering open education resources on IOT that we have developed and made available to the public through the LibreText HyperLibrary.

The IOT-enhanced remote labs we are reporting on are made possible through the use of $35 Raspberry Pi microcomputers connected to a variety of sensors (pressure, temperature, pH,...) that are connected to the internet and can be used in multiple disciplines.  The software resources we developed are open source and posted on the instructional resources section of the Summer 2020 UALR general chemistry LibreText lab manual. We posted to LibreTexts a second course on the "Internet of Science Things" that introduces students to Python programming and how to set up a Raspberry Pi, download and install an open source operating system, build basic circuits and run code to operate them. This additional OER can assist schools in implementing IOT-enhanced science labs.

The resources within LibreText include collaborative online activities involving hands-on experiments, virtual labs and simulations (Phet and ChemCollective), in addition to IOT enabled data streams, where students design experiments, gather data and analyze the results. These activities were performed in Zoom breakout rooms where students collectively worked on Google Docs and Sheets that were integrated into their LibreText lab manual. Although the experiments we ran involved a TA streaming data to the class through a Google Sheet in real time, we will demonstrate a different paradigm where students use their own Raspberry Pi and sensors to stream data to group-specific tabs on a class Google Sheet, where the front page is a dashboard automatically graphing each group's data as they generate it. This realtime IOT-enhanced lab demonstration will involve participants at SUNY Brockport, the University of Health Sciences and Pharmacy in St. Louis and the University of Arkansas Little Rock.

By connecting laboratory devices across the internet, IOT enables advances in the science curriculum that can be of great value to online learning in all STEM disciplines. Interested parties are welcome to check our Google group devoted to IOT in STEM, https://groups.google.com/forum/#!forum/iosted where they can meet other interested parties and find additional resources.

 

Mar 15, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
An Authentic Laboratory Experience for Online Learners | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

In this demonstration, we will present how hands-on science laboratories can be translated to an online environment, and how our Cloud platform supports student and faculty engagement and success.

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Extended Abstract

Instructors have questioned teaching science courses online due to concerns regarding the hands-on laboratory components of these courses, particularly the need to provide an authentic laboratory experience comparable to an on-campus laboratory. However, the shutdown of campuses due to COVID-19 heightened the need to identify methods to provide rigorous and engaging laboratories online. This session will discuss the concerns and solutions related to providing science laboratories for online students. We will present how hands-on science labs can be translated to an online environment, and how our Cloud platform supports student and faculty engagement and success.

Mar 15, 2021
12:30pm - 1:45pm (Central)
Advancing Online Teaching: Creating Equity-Based Digital Learning Environments | Keynote Address

Over the past year, most higher education courses were taught online, amplifying equity issues for a variety of learners. Kevin Kelly will share practical strategies for increasing learning equity in online course design and facilitation. Together we’ll reimagine a learning experience that supports success for students of all identities, cultures and backgrounds. 

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
A GIF is worth a thousand pictures: How to use animated imagery to enhance your course content | Education Session

Creating GIFs, or animated images, is a fun, creative, and effective way to introduce interactivity into your courses.  These short snippets are ubiquitous on social media post and memes across the internet.  In this session we will explore the SnagIt platform to demonstrate the principles and applications of classroom GIFs.

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Extended Abstract

Animated GIFs are different than videos; they tend to be short and silent – more like flipbooks.  Teachers can use GIFs in their classrooms to engage their learner through micro-educational interactions, such as brief tutorials, simulations, or demonstrations.  By utilizing well-designed GIFs, teachers can show students how to use a technology platform, sign into an account, or embed content into an online discussion post. 

Science teachers can use GIFs to effectively demonstrate principles of physics, chemical reactions, or even the scale of the known universe.  Math teachers can easily demonstrate the Pythagorean Theorem and other teachers can show how cheetahs keep balance with their tails or how chains are made.  Any teacher can incorporate GIFs into their lessons (LMS pages, PowerPoint presentations, blog posts, twitter feeds, etc.) to make their content interesting and fun while captivating students through innovative storytelling.

This session will explore what GIFs are, how to create and use them, and why you should incorporate them into your course content.  We will demonstrate where to find GIFs online, as well as (and more importantly) how to use the SnagIt platform to create your own fantastic content.  We will also provide a moderated platform throughout the session where participants can share their favorite GIFs.  Expect this session to be a fast-paced and engaging. 

 

Learning outcomes

Participants of the session will:

  1. Discover how to create effective GIFs.
  2. Explore applications for using GIFs to enhance teaching and learning.
  3. Review examples of GIFs in an online learning environment
Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Eagles Assemble: Introverts Collaborating, leveraging and delivering a summer online teaching workshop using the Faculty Playbook | Workshop

The session showcases a series of summer online teaching workshops developed and delivered collaboratively among faculty, Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, Distance Education and the Undergraduate Education & Student Success division. Participants will participate in the discussion and activities covering student success, course design, UDL, assessment, communication, and technology.

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Extended Abstract

While many institutions of higher education have embraced online learning, it is no surprise that even these still rely heavily on the traditional in-person classroom. The global COVID-19 pandemic forced many universities to pivot almost instantly to a fully online learning environment. This quick turn-round to a fully online format demonstrated many faculty were under-prepared and frustrated with the new delivery platform. The goal of this session is to share insights gleaned from a series of online teaching workshops delivered during the summer of 2020. The purpose of this session is to relay how needs of faculty can be met with a collaborative effort across the university community.  The workshops were developed and delivered by faculty with experience in teaching online, the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, the Office of Distance Education and Instructional Design, and the Office for Undergraduate Education and Student Success. Presenters will provide how the workshops were developed, using the Faculty Playbook and good practices of Quality Matters through collaborative efforts of all involved.  The workshops were presented with two overall goals: 1) to provide faculty with informative training to support online teaching strategies and tactics and 2) to prepare and encourage faculty to be better prepared to quickly pivot back to a fully online teaching environment, should the need arise during the pandemic.

The major topics from the workshop that this session will address are: course design, alignment of learning outcomes and content/activities, Universal Design for Learning, assessment, communication and engagement strategies, as well as LMS (Blackboard) technology tools and tips.  As each of the four workshops commenced, it was clearly evident that the faculty had divergent experience and technological skills. Based upon survey feedback and the level of demand for the workshops, additional training on the LMS and shortened workshops have been added for the fall semester.

The presenters will provide the audience opportunities to inquire and participate throughout the presentation, and will follow a format similar to the workshops that allow for interactive sharing of participants to provide additional insights into good practice, and successful online strategies.  The open dialogue between faculty who have concerns based upon similar disciplines were able to share insights for others without similar experience. Interactivity with the audience is encouraged, modelling the approach taken in the workshop sessions. 

The presenters will share insights into faculty concerns, successful strategies, faculty preparedness, institutional perspectives, and concerns regarding student success.

Eagles Assemble OLC Innovate – 90 minutes

  • Intro 10 min:
    • Attendees will introduce themselves, their departments, and experience with online teaching and learning
  • 10 min: Course Design
    • Participants will dialogue on online learning and remote teaching
    • Success stories and pain points
  • 10 min: Alignment of Learning Outcomes and Content/Activities
    • Participants will begin a Course Map
  • 10 min: Universal Design for Learning (UDL)
    • Discussion and sharing of UDL strategies and accessibility statements
  • 10 min: Assessment
    • Assessment tools overview & discussion
    • Rubrics discussion
  • 10 min: Communication and Engagement Strategies
    • Sharing and participating in community building activities
    • Communication strategies and research
  • 10 min: LMS (Blackboard) Technology Tools and Tips
    • Personalization
    • Synchronous sessions
    • Feedback with anonymous surveys
  • 10 min: Wrap-Up
    • Survey data presentation
    • Discussion
  • 10 min: Q & A

 

Reference

O’Keefe, L., Rafferty, J., Gunder, A., Vignare, K. (2020, May 18). Delivering high-quality instruction online in response to COVID-19: Faculty playbook. Every Learner Everywhere

Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
The Pandemic Hangover | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Tired of change? Aren't we all. In this presentation we'll discuss the biggest challenges facing higher education in the next 3-5 years and what we collectively can do to prepare for success.

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Extended Abstract

Higher Education has experienced an unprecedented amount of changes as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic. In this presentation we'll discuss the biggest challenges facing higher education in the next 3-5 years and what colleges and universities and their technology partners can do to prepare their educators, their students and their institutions for success.

Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
An Evidence-Based Framework for Building Robust Online Learning Programs | Education Session

With COVID, were you scrambling to move programs online?  Searching for best practices? Wondering if what you were doing was effective?  In this session, the presenters will provide an evidence-based framework for building robust, sustainable online programs including faculty training,  leadership, and quality rubrics. 

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Extended Abstract

COVID-19 has forced many traditionally residential programs to move swiftly to online and hybrid learning environments.  A dizzying array of resources were shared on how to teach online effectively.  Many of the resources were anecdotal stories that were not evidence-based or scaleable.   Dozens of articles pointed people to hundreds of different websites.  Many schools quickly built continuity pages with links to resources and best practices. 

 

We are now moving into a new normal, from stop gap emergency remote teaching to more robust online teaching methods.  In this session, the presenters will provide a framework for building robust online environments that includes vision, governance, organizational structure, faculty training, curriculum, student support and quality rubrics.  Additionally, the presenters will provide evidence-based best practices based on decades of research.  Participants will walk away from this session with a framework that can be used to design robust online programs, a white paper on Community of Inquiry (CoI), and several handouts that have practical tips for building community, increasing teacher effectiveness, measuring quality of courses, and improving student learning.

 

Attendees will walk away from this session with: 

  • A clear understanding of the difference between emergency remote teaching and quality online teaching

  • A framework for building robust online programs: Vision, Governance, Organizational Structure, Faculty Training and Support, Curriculum, Student Support and Quality Rubrics

  • A white paper on the Community of Inquiry (CoI) research framework for online learning

  • Tip sheet: 20 Ways to Increase Social Presence in Online Courses

  • Tip sheet: 20 Ways to Increase Teaching Presence in Online Courses

  • Tip sheet: 20 Ways to Increase Cognitive Presence in Online Courses

  • The OLC Quality Course Teaching and Instructional Practice (QCTIP) Rubric

Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Learning Across Realities: How Virtual And Augmented Realities Empower Learning | Industry Showcase - Presentation

How can VR and AR support learning? We've played the games and scoured the literature. Join the authors of the "Learning Across Realities" report, Dan Roy (MIT) and Iulian Radu (Harvard), in a panel discussion with Paul Martin (HP). Leave with guidelines for creators and curators of XR learning experiences.

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Extended Abstract

Extended Realities (XR) including Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR) have the potential to transform learning. They can immerse learners in virtual worlds or bring virtual objects into their world. They have the power to create a sense of presence, of being there or an illusion of reality. Presence has the power to persuade, help overcome fears, transfer learning across environments, change how we see ourselves, help us think with our bodies, avoid hazards, think spatially, remap the world to human scale, feel together even when apart, and create joy. Media literacy is as important now as ever, to help us create, curate, and consume in ways that uplift.

To create presence, consider media forms (e.g. headsets), media content, and personal characteristics. The ideal media form is vivid and invisible, like an open window, or transformed, like a social robot, so we can focus on the experience, not the technology. It should coherently surround the senses, minimize distractions, and track our bodies responsively.

Media content should be designed for coherence, interactivity, embodied cognition, intuitiveness, and socialization. Meaningful environments with many possible actions and great body tracking, that are intuitive and social are great foundations for learning.

Experience of presence may vary across learners, so consider access and equity. People likely to feel more presence enjoy being immersed in decision-making, think spatially, are introverted, like getting involved in watching or reading, can build mental models, are empathetic, feeling, and sensitive, have a creative imagination, are younger, open to new experiences, and willing to suspend disbelief.

Presence and embodiment each strengthen each other. We have evolved to think with our bodies, so they are powerful tools for learning. Natural gestures reduce cognitive load, aiding focus on spatial thinking and memorization. Gestures also support conceptual understanding, like rearranging parts of an equation, creating centripetal motion, or walking the path of an asteroid.

Embodiment supports empathy, allowing us to walk in another’s shoes. Participants generally show more care and helping behaviors after embodied experiences as someone else, like abuse victims, the color blind, schizophrenics, dementia sufferers, children, and other races. We can also inhabit what we wish to become, like being a surgeon or sculptor holding a robotic pen that helps perform expert tasks with dexterity.

Schools using immersive learning should only replicate the classroom sparingly, if at all, and instead focus on surpassing the limitations of the classroom. Field trips can help, but often have less interactivity and embodiment. Labs can fit well, and slot in well with specific learning objectives, but can be dry and linear depending on design. Creation through project-based learning has significant potential. Flipped classrooms and station rotation can leverage class time for immersive learning. Let students be the experts.

By the end of this session, attendees will leave with useful guidelines for creating and curating XR learning experiences. The attendees will also get a glimpse of a new solution, HP Omnicept, and learn how it can enhance such learning experiences with bio-analytics.

Mar 15, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Research Summit: Part 1- What Does The Research Say? | Summit

 This panel session will feature leading researchers sharing their insights and research around key trends in digital, blended, and online learning. 

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Extended Abstract

Join us for an exciting panel presentation where Tanya Joosten (Director of the National Research Center for Distance Education and Technological Advancements - DETA), Patsy Moskal (Director of the Digital Learning Impact Evaluation at the Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness at the University of Central Florida - UCF), and Eric Loepp (Assistant Professor, Political Science, University of Wisconsin-Whitewater) will share key trends in digital, blended, and online learning, as well as share their own research in the area!

 

Research Summit sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
How Did You Navigate Covid-19 With Your Lab Science Course? | Networking Coffee Talk

Let's discuss the different ways we navigated teaching lab science courses in the online modality over the past year.  Join other instructors, instructional designers, and administrators to share what worked well and not so well. What will you continue to do in the future?

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 15, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Online Student Services, How Small Institutions Got Creative in the Covid-19 Era | Conversation, Not Presentation

Research, using OLC’s Online Student Services Scorecard, indicates that size and funding of an institution are indicators of service level.  In the Covid-19 era, smaller institutions found creative ways to improve service.  Join us to exchange ideas about better serving our students through this time and brainstorm for the future.   

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Extended Abstract

Institutions have been using the OLC Online Student Services Scorecard for several years now.  Research on early results indicated that larger, better funded, institutions were able to offer more complete student services as a matter of course.  Services such as counseling, student life and veterans’ services were just three areas that state funded colleges (two-year and four year institutions) scored lower on than universities.  Other services, such as the online library materials, are available at most small colleges in Florida through collaborative models.  

With most institutions being forced to move operations fully online in March 2020, these small institutions were also forced to offer online student services that they likely never had in the past.  We have often said that services for online students are services for all students.  This transition to online learning made all students online students. 

In this conversation, a brief introduction to  the OLC Online Student Services Scorecard will be provided. We will introduce you to several areas where smaller institutions scored relatively lower in a statewide study of Florida Institutions. You will have an opportunity to share how your institution was able to provide those services during the transition to fully online learning and to brainstorm ideas with others facing similar challenges.

The second part of the discussion will explore how to maintain online support services  beyond the Covid-19 Pandemic . Many of our institutions turned to the CARES Act or reserve funding to provide these much need online services. While it will be in the institutions’, and students’, best interests for those services to be continued, the sources that funded them are non-recurring.  Although it is unknown what the world will look like post-pandemic, we know there will be some amount of lasting change. We will move forward with new perspectives and ideas for operating businesses and obtaining an education. In the post-pandemic world, many believe instructors are going to be open to teaching online and students more likely to seek online education. Maintaining some level of online services may be the future of higher education institutions. Through open discussion, ideas for how to continue supporting the growing online population of student as higher education institutions continue to respond to a world changed by the Covid-19 pandemic.  

Mar 15, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Research Summit: Part 2 - What Are Our Research Questions? How Do We Find Our Answers? | Summit

Have you ever wanted to design a research study, but didn’t know how to get started? This session will provide participants with the opportunity to brainstorm research questions they are interested in exploring and identify strategies they can leverage to find their answers! 

 

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Extended Abstract

We’ve all been in that moment--the one where the articles you’ve read on a subject don’t quite answer your question or you want to understand how technology impacts the learning experience at your own university.  But, how do you get started?

This 45-minute session will provide an overview of the research process, as well as the approaches and strategies you can leverage to answer your burning questions related to digital, blended, and online learning. More specifically, during this session you can expect to learn about and get tips on: 

Conducting literature reviews; 

  • Designing research questions;  
  • Choosing methodological approaches (i.e., is quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods right for my question?); and
  • Utilizing strategies (e.g., surveys, focus groups) to collect information. 

In addition, you will have the opportunity to: 

  • Brainstorm research questions you may be interested in pursuing; 
  • Determine which methodological approach supports answering your research question(s); and
  • Identify strategies that can support you in finding the answers you seek! 

During the session participants will be provided a collaborative document with additional resources and opportunities to reflect and collaborate with other session participants to advance their research work. 

 

Research Summit sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Remixing And Revising OER To Customize Course Content For Your Students: ecoText+MERLOT=Easy Customization | Education Session

Open Educational Resources need to be delivered within an engaging platform that enable faculty to remix and revise the educational content into blend coherently with the faculty’s goals, the students’ needs, and the institutional vision. The presentation will demonstrate how the ecoText platform and MERLOT’s OER can create customizable OER easily.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 15, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Improve Instructor Productivity and Student Outcomes with Brightspace by D2L! | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

You’re busy and quickly become inundated by requests from students and administrators. So why not take advantage of the most powerful tool at your disposal – your LMS?

Join me as we walk through the incredible tools Brightspace offers to improve efficiencies and increase engagement, all while providing personalized learning experiences!

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Extended Abstract

As educators, we have a lot on the go. We may teach multiple courses and we can quickly become inundated by requests from students and administrators. So why not make the most of one of the most powerful tools we have at our disposal – our LMS?

Learn how Brightspace can help improve efficiency and put time back in your schedule, all while providing a tailored and personalized learning experience for every student! Join me as we walk through some of the incredible tools Brightspace offers instructors to help them save time while improving student engagement!

In this session, we will be exploring the features and benefits of Brightspace and how you can use these tools to get the most you possibly can for your students and yourself! Learning how to effectively utilize the platform will allow you to free up time to do what you love to do – teach!

Imagine being able to have messages sent to your students based on how they’re doing, without lifting a finger! We will explore features such as release conditions, automated messages and personalized communication as they allow for massive time savings without compromising the tailored and personal approach every educator hopes to deliver to their students.

What if your platform allowed you to create personalized learning paths? Or gated learning experiences? Good news, with Brightspace this is all possible! We will go through a demonstration of how these tools can be used as well as look at the use of multi-media and data to help improve student engagement as well as retention!

Not a Brightspace user? Maybe you don’t have a platform currently or rather, you’re looking at different platforms to replace your current solution. Whether you’re evaluating or even just curious about what’s out there, I encourage you to still join us to learn the world of possibilities that this platform has to offer. I would love to chat, hear your feedback and answer any questions you may have about Brightspace!

D2L believes learning is the foundation upon which all progress and achievement rests. Working closely with organizations globally, D2L has transformed the way millions of people learn online and in the classroom. Learn more about D2L’s Brightspace platform at www.d2l.com
 

Mar 15, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Group Work in an Asynchronous Mathematics Course: Maximizing Benefits and Minimizing Obstacles | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

Student-to-student collaboration in the classroom has immeasurable value. The rise in online classes and platforms has instructors investigating best practices and pedagogies that allow for students to collaborate asynchronously. This session will investigate asynchronous group dynamics, and pedagogies that are effective vehicles of collaboration.

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Extended Abstract

Collaboration in any classroom has immeasurable value. Students who collaborate stay engaged, retain information longer, and participate in higher-order thinking skills more frequently. However, it can be difficult to implement peer-to-peer student collaboration in an asynchronous online environment. Instructors may face many obstacles while designing asynchronous class activities and assignments that require student-to-student collaboration. However, the benefits for collaboration outweigh the difficulties and many course designers and faculty are discovering new ways to provide collaboration in an increasingly online environment. As the need and desire for better quality and more interactive online courses arise, faculty are being asked to design curriculum and change pedagogies to rise to the challenge of implementing effective asynchronous group work in their courses.

This session will discuss the challenges and benefits of asynchronous peer-to-peer collaboration. The participants will explore different types of pedagogies and technologies that can minimize the students’ discomfort and maximize the benefits of working in an asynchronous collaborative group.

Because this session will be virtual, the technology utilized must allow both large and small group discussions. Although this does not mirror the environment being discussed, it will help the participants come to a better understanding of the potential solutions. The presentation will require the use of break-out rooms to be fully functional.

When designing projects and assignments for the online environment, faculty often take an already existing project that is done in a face-to-face class and simply post the project online for students to do. At best, there is a reference to working in groups, but no specific instructions on what that means.

Additionally, these types of projects can often be done by a lone individual who, with the best of intentions, completes the entire assignment before the group even has a chance to engage with it. This may happen in a face-to-face environment, but can readily be remedied because the instructor and students are all present together in a classroom at the time the assignment is given.

The need to change pedagogy for the group projects and assignments will be developed and discussed. Many projects and assignments often have a single answer which can be reached by following specific plans. While this can reinforce skills and techniques, it does not lend itself well to collaborative projects and does not provide the scholarly experience that allows for academic growth. Collaborative projects and assignments that are open-ended, based in real life, allow for customization and require decision making lends themselves to foster organic collaboration in asynchronous environments. In addition, these types of projects capture the interest of students and will assist in mitigating the negative reaction that many students express to group work.

Additionally instructors will find that students do not inherently understand what group work means in an online environment. By relying on past experience, many have learned that group work doesn’t work, and it is up to them to complete the assignments on their own. Changing the beliefs of the students does require scaffolding of assignments in the course, as well as clear and precise instructions about how groups are expected to function.

A major focus in this presentation is on how to correctly create projects that address both course objectives and an effective working group dynamic. To do this, we will follow the plan outlined below.

Participants will be asked to take an existing project that is normally facilitated in an in person class, and redesign it for an asynchronous platform. During this small exercise, participants will note the need for more support and direction in creating group projects and assignments in an asynchronous environment. Participants will also be asked to think about the common complaints from students about group work in general. How does an instructor mitigate the discomfort of students who complete group work, and allow for fairness in the assignment?

Participants will be presented with a project about ordering concrete to pour a concrete slab in a backyard. This project was designed to be done in class with the students working together in a face-to-face environment. Participants are instructed that this project will be redesigned for the instructor to give to students who are participating in an asynchronous online class. Students in the asynchronous class will be asked to work on the assignment in groups.

The very nature of an asynchronous environment makes the project harder to be done by a group of students, but also mirrors many current trends in the workforce of working asynchronously from home. Although groups may find times to meet synchronously, this may not occur for many students. Therefore, the instructor cannot rely on synchronous communication as students work on the project. And, students who simply pass work from one person to the next often do not communicate enough to help the project reach a successful conclusion. To demonstrate these difficulties, after seeing the original project, the participants will be given a project with the first step completed and will be asked how they would go about continuing the work for that project.

This process will constitute the first five minutes of the session (i.e., the Prompt section), allowing us to set up the problem and demonstrate some of the already recognized difficulties.

Depending on the number of total participants, we will then divide the session up into groups of four to six people each. This will constitute the “Brainstorming: Understanding the Challenge” portion of the session.

Groups will take time to brainstorm ways to encourage students to communicate and properly manage projects in an asynchronous environment such that individuals gain the insights and skills the project is seeking to build while groups complete required work. Prompts to encourage brainstorming meaningful methods of grading and providing feedback will also be discussed.

During this time, the facilitators of the conversation will visit the different groups to observe what is happening, answer questions, and provide additional prompts, if necessary, to encourage discussion. Some of these prompts will include the following:

·         How much synchronous interaction should take place in the course?

·         How can we encourage more proactive communication between students in a group?

·         What software can be used to facilitate communication?

·         Are there roles that students should adopt while working in groups? If so, should those roles rotate?

·         How will you handle conflict that occurs in the groups?

·         How will you grade the assignment? Will you account for individual contribution, or simply group accomplishment?

Once the Brainstorming portion of the session has passed, we will move to the Prototyping portion of the session. For this, participants will be given time to sort out their thoughts and ideas and create a two minute presentation explaining the insights they have gained in how to best facilitate asynchronous group work. 

Depending on time, each group may present their findings to the session as a whole, or volunteers will be asked to share and all groups will be asked to distribute their presentations following the meeting. Shared presentations will be discussed, and all participants are asked to provide meaningful insights into what they have learned. The primary goal of this portion of the meeting will be to come up with meaningful solutions to the problem of creating meaningful group assignments for asynchronous classes.

Because it is unlikely that all groups will have the opportunity to present their ideas, participants will be asked to send their presentations to the facilitators who will provide the collection to all participants.

The principle deliverable from this session is this presentation. By sharing with others, each participant will also receive additional presentations to think over. In addition, connections can be made and a community of peers can grow where ideas can be further explored, explained, investigated, and shared.

Participants will have a better understanding of the problems that make online group work different than group work in face-to-face environments. In addition, they will have explored potential solutions to maximize the online environment for group work while also minimizing the challenges. By exploring these concepts with an example project, they will also see potential ways to incorporate what they are learning into their own classes.

 

Innovation Studio sponsored by:

 

Mar 15, 2021
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live: Beyond the Keynote | Other

Join OLC Live hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr for a post-keynote discussion focused on open learning trends, strategies, and collaborative efforts.

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Dimensions Of Diversity, Equity And Inclusion: Leading With Care In The Online, Blended And Digital Learning Environment | Featured Session

In this session, we bring together a panel of leaders from across the field to guide participants in an exploration of the various dimensions of care. In the style of a fireside chat, the invited speakers will share prevalent challenges, cases of leading with care across the field, and meaningful calls to action. Participants will leave with new insights and opportunities for collaboration around reimagining our teaching and learning contexts as centered in care that can be sustained well beyond the pandemic.

 

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Extended Abstract

One of the foundational tenets of diversity, equity, and inclusion work is care. The pandemic has brought this essential security to bear, providing countless examples of challenges within our current educational practices, systems and environments for providing care to students, faculty, staff, and leaders alike. This current state of affairs reinforces that establishing cultures of care across our field remains a significant need. It also represents an exigent charge not just of those of us committed to change work, but the sum of our community. Care asks us to question whether our values align with the task of supporting the basic needs of others. How do we sustainably build learning and working environments that genuinely work to rectify systems which have resulted in struggle, exhaustion, stress, and oppression? How do we center structural changes with care in mind and not simply efficiency or productivity?

As we’ve discovered, there is no single answer to what care looks like in practice. It requires responsiveness and flexibility and must attend to the unique needs of the individuals in any given community. As such, in this session we bring together a panel of leaders from across the field to share about and explore the various dimensions of care. In the style of a fireside chat, the invited speakers will share prevalent challenges, cases of leading with care across the field, and meaningful calls to action. Participants will leave with new insights and opportunities for collaboration around reimagining our teaching and learning contexts as centered in care that can be sustained well beyond the pandemic. 

 

Featured Sessions Series sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
5:15pm - 5:45pm (Central)
Learn How Instructors and Students Can Engage More in their Online Discussions | Networking Coffee Talk

Trying to engage your students more in your online discussions? Pulling them into the discussion multiple times each week is key to ensuring they are present and active in their class. Hear from Marcus Popetz and Jonathan Gallion, PhD, during this coffee talk as they discuss how multiple due dates each week not only increases the opportunity to engage with more of their fellow students, but how it can extend learning opportunities.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Leveraging Partnerships To Transform Institutional Mindset And Culture For Effective Online Education | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Institutional leaders are challenged with balancing the needs for quality in online learning and scaling programs. Strategic planning and change management are necessary to sustainably grow online programs. This presentation will review lessons learned by embracing OPX partners. The presenters will provide specific challenges and successes while transforming entrenched practices and culture regarding online education at the institution.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
From Office Hours to Outreach Hours: A Proactive Approach to Student Engagement and Success | Conversation, Not Presentation

An evidence-based conversation that will explore through audience participation how moving to a proactive outreach approach in place of a traditional office hours model can increase student engagement and success.

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Extended Abstract

Moving away from a traditional office hours approach to a more proactive outreach approach can result in increased student engagement and success, particularly during the current pandemic.  The conversation will begin with a brief overview of the strategies that have proven successful with evidence for the success of this outreach approach.  Then, the facitator will solicit from the audience other strategies that have been implemented by participants.  Ultimately, the session will compile a collection of strategies for each participant's future knowledge and use.

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Preparing Pre-Service Teachers for Computational Thinking | Education Session

The paper analyzes the teaching and learning of computational thinking and data literacy as it impacts pres-service teachers, and provides two research-based instructional design strategies. 

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Extended Abstract

     United States education has experienced a big push for students to learn coding as part of computer science and more explicitly address computational thinking. Some of this focus stems from the 2013 Next Generation Science Standards, which asserts “In both science and engineering, mathematics and computation are fundamental tools for representing physical variables and their relationships. They are used for a range of tasks such as constructing simulations; statistically analyzing data; and recognizing, expressing, and applying quantitative relationships.” Additionally, the 2016 International Society for Technology in Education standards for students and for educators directly addresses computational thinking and its benefits.

     Computational thinking (CT) is often associated with mathematics, which remains a challenging subject for many students, including pre-service teachers. CT also overlaps computer science, which tends to be offered as an elective course in P-16 education. In K-8 settings, specially, teachera often use pre-packaged lessons that are unrelted to existing curriculum. Furthermore, even fewer pre-service teachers were taught STEM problem-solving such that their solutions were derived in ways that a computer could execute them. In short, pre-service students usually do not have foundational knowledge to guide them in integrating computer science and computational thinking into the curriculum that they will eventually teach as instructors themselves.

     Pre-service teacher instruction about computational thinking sometimes mirrors K-12 approach: that is, a short-term unit that covers CT principles and applications in core curriculum through lesson planning. Sometimes students evaluate CT materials and CT-related tools, which they might adapt for a specific setting. Other times, computational thinking and computer science are combined in a separate course, which might be required or optional. In such courses, students typically do some coding. In either case, instructors and learners usually find it hard to integrate CT in non-STEM disciplines. 

   Two research-based strategies hold promise. In an educational technology course, a module on teaching problem-solving with technology defined CT and explained its benefits. Course students examined CT lessons and projects. CT was also linked to the design process, and the students did a learning activity on the engineering design process. Students then blogged about their design process experience and how it might inform teaching how to solve problems using computational thinking. As their signature assignment, the students had to create a WebQuest that focused on computational thinking.  In another course, focusing on math methods for K-8 settings, pre-service teachers also learned about CT concepts and collaborated to create CT lessons for K-8 students that linked CT to everyday life. 

     In some, this session explains computational thinking in light of K-12 education, identifies issues integrating computational thinking into K-12 curriculum, and discusses pre-service teachers’ preparation that can lead to their successful incorporation of CT into the curriculum.

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Research Summit: Part 3 - How Do We Move Our Research Ideas Forward? | Summit

You’ve reviewed the existing literature and landscape, you’ve designed your study, and you’re ready to get started with the research project. But - let’s pause for a moment. Before you dive in, let’s think about research and publication outcomes.

 

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Extended Abstract

So. You’ve got the research plan. Or do you? Have you thought about where you’ll share, publish, and amplify your project and findings?

This 45-minute session will consist of a conversation on moving your research forward, including:

  • Considering publication avenues as a part of your research plan; 
  • Alternatives to traditional publication;  
  • Deciding what publication channels are right for you and your work;

In addition, you will have the opportunity to: 

  • Analyze different publication methods and discuss the pros and cons of each;
  • Converse with other researchers about their experiences and what has worked for them;
  • Get started on a publication planning timeline that can help you think about your research schedule in the context of identifying desired outlets;

During the session participants will be provided a collaborative document with additional resources and opportunities to reflect and collaborate with other session participants to advance their research work. 

Ultimately, these three, interconnected sessions at the OLC Accelerate 2020 Research Summit will provide us with new avenues of supporting student success through empirical research that is generative, connected, and impactful.

 

Research Summit sponsored by:

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Jumpstarting College Success: Developing Students’ Active Learning Skills | Education Session

AAA099 - Active Learning Skills is a 1-credit hour course designed to orient students to the college experience with personalized review in both math and English, alongside the exploration of a variety of proven learning strategies. EdReady, an adaptive learning technology, was incorporated as a central component of this online course. We will learn how the course was designed to engage students and increase retention, and we will explore results and student and instructor feedback.

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Extended Abstract

AAA099 - Active Learning Skills is a 1-credit hour course offered to students in the Colorado Community College System (CCCS) through Colorado Community Colleges Online (CCCOnline). Complementing statewide changes in approaches to college readiness and developmental education, this 10-week session is designed to orient students to the college experience with personalized review in both math and English, alongside the exploration of a variety of proven learning strategies. EdReady, an adaptive learning technology, was incorporated as a central component of this online course, which equips students with the foundational knowledge and skills necessary for postsecondary success. We will learn how the course was designed to engage students and increase retention, and we will explore results and student and instructor feedback.

Mar 15, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Building Connections Virtually: Engaging Students with the Library | Education Session

In this session, participants will learn how a librarian transitioned their in-person library instruction - online, in both synchronous and asynchronous formats, during the fall 2020 semester. Utilizing the campus learning management system Canvas and developing active learning workshops via Zoom, we will examine how instruction was moved virtually.  

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply affected how library instruction, typically one-shot sessions, was and will continue to be provided to students. It created a situation where librarians had to be thoughtful and take into consideration how exactly to shift library instruction to a socially distant virtual environment. Distance education comes with its own set of challenges, for example, are you teaching in a synchronous or asynchronous environment? And how will students engage with the content? Over the summer of 2020 instructional design needed to be updated to fit the virtual reality of our campus that moved fully remotely for the fall 2020 semester.

California State University Northridge is one of the twenty-three California State Universities, located in Los Angeles’ San Fernando Valley. One example of a course that transitioned to virtual library instruction was University 100 (U100), a freshman seminar course that introduces first-time freshmen to the University. The library is one of the campus partners associated with the course. Typically, each U100 section sees a librarian twice in one semester. In the first library session students learn about library services and resources, while the second library visit is dedicated to their research assignment, an annotated bibliography and group presentation on various topics, often using themes from the Freshman Common Read.

After careful consideration and collaboration with the teaching faculty, it was clear they wanted both asynchronous and synchronous library content. The best place to make this available was in Canvas, the campus Learning Management System and synchronous instruction via Zoom.

Here is the lesson plan that will be reviewed during the presentation:

Description & format of session(s):

Asynchronous Canvas Library Modules

Students must self-enroll into the Library’s Canvas Course Site and complete the Library Orientation and the U100 Student Library Module. A U100 Library Faculty module is available in Canvas Commons with all of the directions for students. At the end of the Library Orientation and U100 Student Library Module, students will earn a badge and are told to screen shot or take a photo of the badge as proof of completion. Assignment is automatically worth 10 points and has a due date of September 13th. Feel free to adjust either the due date or point value to fit your course needs. Students must complete the modules prior to the library Zoom session. Please embed the librarian teaching your course into your Canvas course page so they can help trouble shoot or answer any questions from students. It should take approximately 1.5 to 2 hours for students to complete all this content. Instructions on how to embed the Library Module are in the tab to the left labeled Canvas Modules.

Synchronous Zoom Session

Schedule a 45- or 75-minute library Zoom session to take place while students are working on their Information Competence assignment. Students (and your librarian) will need to have their specific U100 information competence/ research assignment on hand. Students should know their group members (if you are proceeding with groups) and their general topic. Schedule the due date for the Annotated Bibliography a week or two after the zoom session.

  • 45 minute session Annotated Bibliography Activity - With short introduction and Q & A.
  • 75 minute session Annotated Bibliography Activity -  With extra time to review their assignment, answer research questions, review updates on library reopening and/or changes.

The presentation will also include student feedback, active learning annotated bibliography exercise, and best practices working with guest speakers.

Mar 15, 2021
6:45pm - 8:45pm (Central)
2021 OLC & MERLOT Awards Gala and Social | Evening Event

The OLC & MERLOT Awards Gala marks a time of ceremony and celebration as we spotlight the achievements, elevate the innovations, and honor the commitments of this year’s award recipients. We are privileged to have these leaders join us on the virtual stage as we thank them for their dedication to quality online, digital, and blended learning, and engage them in dialogue on their perspectives on what’s to come. In line with the celebratory nature of the session, we invite you to select your most festive Zoom background, prepare a celebratory beverage or snacks, and join us for an enlightening evening filled with accolades and new ideas, featuring some of the amazing individuals in our field!

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OLC & MERLOT Awards Gala & Social event sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
8:15am - 8:45am (Central)
Meditation and Mindfulness - A Guided Meditation Session for Beginners | Other

Join us for some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Innovate Virtual Conference in a healthy and present way together.  Whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned practitioner, all levels are welcome to join us for this session.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Utilizing Pedagogical Technology To Facilitate Peer Feedback And Evaluation In Hybrid Classroom | A Case Study | Industry Showcase - Presentation

When facilitating group evaluation or peer feedback activities within online environments, teachers often have to juggle between maintaining effective feedback and avoiding several issues like free-riding or disengagement. This session tackles these challenges by discussing the implementation of our tools - Peer Review and Group Member Evaluation, and how they help enhance student engagement and collaborative learning.

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Extended Abstract

Assessment is at the heart of education, being a driving force behind effective learning. To craft a good assessment means to cultivate a learning environment that encourages frequent feedback, collaboration, and diverse evaluation methods. It is crucial, yet challenging to maintain the presence of these components in any learning context. Teachers often find themselves facing several pedagogical challenges, such as free-riding in group work, low feedback quality, or result-oriented assessment. Therefore, there is a need for effective, innovative practices to tackle these issues.

In this session, we will share with you how we collaborated with universities to embrace the challenge of free-riding and feedback facilitation in hybrid classrooms by implementing two FeedbackFruits tools: Peer Review and Group Member Evaluation. These tools can be integrated into the LMS and allow for feedback delivery among peers and group members. The Peer Review tool allows instructors to facilitate the peer review feedback process, from creating assignments, developing rubric / assessment criteria, assigning peer reviewers, to monitoring the deadlines. The Group Member Evaluation (GME) tool helps add structure to the evaluation process, by getting students to grade each others’ contributions anonymously based on a set of criteria set by the teacher. The teachers oversee the quality and quantity of feedback being given and intervene when needed. By utilising an algorithm that compares ratings of each student to the group average, GME allows group grades to be personalised according to individual contribution.

In this case study, students worked together on an assignment and uploaded it into the Peer Review tool. This is where students reviewed each other's work based on a list of criteria and proposed discussion questions. In the end, students evaluated their group members’ contributions using the Group Member Evaluation tool. Besides, face-to-face discussions were held in between to address feedback points, and help students to reflect and improve on their performance within the group and individually.


Are you curious about the results of our case study, and how did our tools contribute to the course success? Then join our session for in-depth sharing about an innovative approach to leverage learning technology in teaching and learning. Through interactive discussion and demonstration, you will be able to:

  1. Understand the process of facilitating peer review and group member evaluation in synchronous and asynchronous context; along with the main features of the two pedagogical tools
  2. Gain insights into the positive outcomes of peer/group assessment integration, in terms of deep learning, free-riding prevention, and group work quality
  3. Explore future implications, directions in further developing this pedagogical approach
Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
I'm Stressed, Fatigued, and Burned Out: Self-Care for Pandemic-Induced Online Instructors | Conversation, Not Presentation

For some instructors, the jolt and sudden switch to online teaching has created an imbalance in routines, priorities, and habits of self-care.  Instructors may find themselves buried under grading and content creation, all while managing multiple other personal and professional priorities.  Join us to discuss self-care strategies for the pandemic-induced online instructor.

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Extended Abstract

"Do you know that feeling of being underwater a bit too long and you start to feel the pressure on your lungs wanting to gasp quickly for air? Then the panic sets in as you try to reach the surface and it feels like it is taking forever to get there.  You feel like you are going to drown. Luckily, you finally reach the surface, relieved to get that air.  You take your first few breaths, feeling exhilarated and alive!  Then you look around and see you are in the middle of the ocean, with 20-foot waves around you.  That's what online teaching feels like for me right now."

Am I the only one who feels this way?

Dear Colleague,

You are not alone. 

We hear you. We know you are working harder than you have ever worked before.  We know you are sitting at your computer for long hours. We know you are giving incredible amounts of time and energy to your students. 

You might be behind on your grading.  You may be planning one day ahead of your next class session.  You might be scrambling to find a good internet connection. 

All of this "balancing and managing" is happening while you are negotiating and navigating through the priorities of families, partners, friends, pets, elders, coworkers, and your own self-care. 

You are not alone. We hear you.  We are here for you. Join us for this critical conversation to take a moment to pause, to take a breath.  During this breath, let us find ways to build self-care into our daily routines to give pause, extend grace, and more importantly, step out of the stress and fatigue towards a more healthy and balanced self-care strategy.

The purpose of this session is to start a conversation about the burnout, fatigue, and stress online instructors may be experiencing, especially during the pandemic-induced push to move classes online.  In this honest, personal, informative, and engaged conversation session, participants will explore their self-care routines and strategies (or lack thereof) and how they might find new ways to build self-care practices and strategies into their daily practices moving forward. 

Join us as we explore self-care strategies for pandemic-induced online instructors through the following guiding questions:

  • How do you describe your current situation to someone who may not understand your pandemic online teaching reality?
  • What is the biggest change or adaptation you have had to make to account for the demands of teaching online during the pandemic?
  • What is something you currently practice or want to practice to establish healthy "work" boundaries at home?
  • What are some examples of instances, experiences, or actions (such as connecting to a group of colleagues) that has helped diminish fatigue, burnout, and stress?  How has this been beneficial to your personal and professional life?
  • How have people supported you while working from home? For example, maybe your kiddos drew you a picture, your partner lent a listening ear, or a colleague shared a useful resource?
  • What is one tip or strategy you would offer to an online teaching colleague who is struggling with their own self-care during this pandemic?
  • What is a teaching-related change you have made to address stress, fatigue, or burnout?

By participating in this session, you will...

  1. Identify at least one strategy you use to infuse self-care into your daily routine.
  2. Identify at least one person you will actively build a network with and together further support and mentor one another to address burnout, fatigue, and self-care.
  3. Discuss strategies for rewriting one's fatigue, burnout, and stress dialogue.
  4. Identify possible teaching-focused strategies that could reduce stress, fatigue, and burnout.

 

 

Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
HBCU Summit - Part 1: HBCU Approaches and Opportunities for Student Support | Summit

Student support, particularly in the current environment of COVID-19 and social unrest, encompasses a broad swath of challenges and considerations at HBCUs. In this session, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities for student support, ranging from students’ physical and financial ability to attend, equitable access to technology, their mental and physical health, and the provision of the rich cultural and experiential opportunities at an HBCU.

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Extended Abstract

Student support, particularly in the current environment of COVID-19 and social unrest, encompasses a broad swath of challenges and considerations at HBCUs. In this session, we will discuss the challenges and opportunities for student support, ranging from students’ physical and financial ability to attend, equitable access to technology,  their mental and physical health, and the provision of the rich cultural and experiential opportunities at an HBCU.

This summit, in partnership with MERLOT and Tennessee State University, has been designed for educators at HBCUs to engage in key strategies and outcomes that create access to online education in support of student success. Focusing on the quality characteristics of online learning as well as digital strategies prioritized by HBCUs in their work in online education, this multipart summit uses actionable design practices and collaborative work to create a community of practice supporting work well beyond the conference. Join us for two distinct events as part of the HBCU Summit, as well as special networking opportunities for educators from HBCUs across the nation. Learn more on the HBCU Summit Website.

 

HBCU Summit is sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Building Inclusive Online Learning Upon a Universal Design Framework | Education Session

Universal design (UD) has emerged as a paradigm for addressing diversity and equity issues in the design of a broad range of applications in education. Learn about aspects of a UD framework that you can flesh out to develop inclusive online learning practices at your institution. 

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Extended Abstract

Universal design (UD) has emerged as a paradigm to address diversity and equity in the design of offerings in higher education that include on-site and online learning resources and activities. UD requires that a broad spectrum of abilities and other characteristics of potential students be considered when developing instructional products and environments, rather than simply designing for the average student and relying on accommodations alone for individual students with disabilities. UD is defined by the Center for Universal Design (n.d.) as “the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialized design.”

Principles for the UD of any product or environment ensure:
•    Equitable use: The design is useful and marketable to people with diverse abilities.
•    Flexibility in use: The design accommodates a wide range of individual preferences and abilities.
•    Simple and intuitive use: Use of the design is easy to understand, regardless of the user’s experience, knowledge, language skills, or current concentration level.
•    Perceptible information: The design communicates necessary information effectively to the user, regardless of ambient conditions or the user’s sensory abilities.
•    Tolerance for error: The design minimizes hazards and the adverse consequences of accidental or unintended actions.
•    Low physical effort: The design can be used efficiently, comfortably, and with a minimum of fatigue.
•    Size and space for approach and use: Appropriate size and space is provided for approach, reach, manipulation, and use regardless of the user’s body size, posture, or mobility. (Story, Mueller, & Mace, 1998, pp. 34–35)

These principles, originally applied to the design of architecture and commercial products, have also been broadly applied to the design of IT, instruction, and student services (Burgstahler, 2015). Many UD-inspired frameworks have emerged to specifically address instructional applications. Each is based upon a common finding in educational research: that learners are highly variable with respect to their abilities and responses to instruction. The most common UD-inspired framework applied in K-12 settings is called Universal Design for Learning (UDL). Developed by the Center for Applied Special Technology (CAST), UDL promotes offering students multiple means of 
•    Engagement: For purposeful, motivated learners, stimulate interest and motivation for learning.
•    Representation: For resourceful, knowledgeable learners, present information and content in different ways.
•    Action and expression: For strategic, goal-directed learners, differentiate the ways that students can express what they know (Center for Applied Special Technology, 2018).

Many specific barriers to digital tools and content faced by individuals with disabilities in online components of courses today have well-documented solutions. These include those articulated by the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), originally published in 1999 by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and most recently updated to WCAG 2.1 (2018). The Guidelines dictate that all information and user interface components must follow the four guiding principles that ensure that IT is:
•    Perceivable: Users must be able to perceive the content, regardless of the device or configuration they’re using.
•    Operable: Users must be able to operate the controls, buttons, sliders, menus, etc., regardless of the device they’re using.
•    Understandable: Users must be able to understand the content and interface; and
•    Robust: Content must be coded in compliance with relevant coding standards in order to ensure its accurately and meaningfully interpreted by devices, browsers, and assistive technologies.

While the WCAG standards were developed to apply to web-based technologies, their principles, guidelines, and success criteria can also be applied to digital media, software, and other technologies

Applying the combination of UD, UDL, and WCAG principles is particularly suitable for addressing both technological and pedagogical aspects of online learning in order to ensure that students are offered multiple, accessible ways to gain knowledge, demonstrate understanding, and interact. Although the need is minimized with this approach, reasonable accommodations will in some cases still be necessary to ensure full access and engagement to a particular student when the universally designed offering does not already do so. For example, a student with a learning disability engaging in a universally-designed online course may require extra time on an examination as determined by a special education teacher or a postsecondary disability services office.

Online learning technologies and pedagogies that are engaging and effective for all learners result when designers assume that users will have a wide variety of abilities, understand challenges individuals with disabilities often face, and engage in design approaches that result in accessible, usable, and inclusive online learning applications. Even as online learning research pushes the boundaries of current practices, practitioners and researchers can trust that UD, UDL, and WCAG principles will stand the test of time.
 
As a wide range of digital technologies become more abundant in formal and informal learning opportunities, the need to make technological innovations and pedagogical practices more inclusive of potential students and instructors with disabilities is critical. This presentation will reveal that
•    US civil rights legislation requires that students with disabilities have access to educational opportunities, including opportunities that make use of IT;
•    There is little evidence that online learning technology and pedagogy research and practice routinely address access issues for individuals with disabilities.
•    Established principles, guidelines, and practices currently exist to guide the development and use of accessible, usable, and inclusive online learning technology and pedagogy.
•    Some accessible design practices that focus on disabilities benefit other groups as well.
•    To achieve systemic change toward more inclusive online learning, it is important that researchers, instructors and course designers, computing faculty, IT companies, funding agencies, and other stakeholder groups be engaged.
•    Stakeholders need training and resources tailored to their particular roles in ensuring that future online earning innovations are more inclusive of individuals with disabilities.

The ideal state for future online learning research is that researchers routinely include individuals with disabilities and accessibility considerations within every phase of research, design, development, and evaluation processes. Reaching this goal requires a paradigm shift from designing for some to designing for everyone.

The presenter of this onference session will share aspects of the UDHE Framework—including scope, definition, principles, guidelines, exemplary practices, process—and explore with participants how they can flesh it out to support diversity and equity goals on their campuses overall and to online learning courses specifically. The presenter will also share useful resources (e.g., Burgstahler & Thompson, 2019) that include the Center for Universal Design in Education and encourage participants to share their resources as well.

References
Burgstahler, S. (Ed). (2015). Universal design in higher education: From principles to practice. Cambridge: Harvard Education Press.

Burgstahler, S., & Thompson, T. (Eds). (2019). Designing accessible cyberlearning: Current state and pathway forward. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from https://www.washington.edu/doit/accessible-cyberlearning-community-report

Center for Universal Design. (n.d.). History of universal design. Retrieved from https://projects.ncsu.edu/design/cud/about_ud/udhistory.htm

Center for Universal Design in Education. (n.d.). Retrieved from http:/uw.edu/doit/cude

Story, M. F., Mueller, J. L., & Mace, R. L. (1998). The principles of universal design and their application. In M. F. Story, M. L. Mueller, & R. L. Mace (Eds.), The universal design file: Designing for people of all ages and abilities (pp. 32–36). Raleigh, NC: Center for Universal Design. Retrieved from http://www.ncsu.edu/ncsu/design/cud/pubs_p/docs/udffile/chap_3.pdf

World Wide Web Consortium. (2018). Web content accessibility guidelines, 2.1. Retrieved from http://www.w3.org/TR/wcag21/

Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Beyond Mobile Learning Design: Considering Students who Self-Initiate Mobile Device Use for Online Courses | Education Session

As more students elect to use mobile devices for courses not designed specifically for mobile learning, challenges faced by this group should not be overlooked. The focus of this session will be on current research in this area and how institutions may support this group toward an improved student experience.

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Extended Abstract

Think for a moment about the rapid evolution of the mobile device (i.e. smart phones or tablets). What were once described as “personal digital assistants” not too long ago are now minicomputers, offering much of the same functionality as a PC or laptop at one’s fingertips. Technology advancement has influenced a continued increase in the number of students who choose to use their mobile device to engage in their online coursework. This shift illuminates the need to further explore the experiences of this group of learners, and ways institutions can support them.  Research focused on students who self-initiate mobile device use for coursework or course-related activities is minimal; yet they should not be overlooked (Vasudeva et al., 2017).

In addition to portability, students value the use of mobile devices for courses or course-related activities for a variety of reasons. Not only are they efficient collaboration and communication tools (Dabbagh et al., 2019; Heflin et al., 2017; Tang & Bradshaw, 2016), but they also allow for socialization and relationship development (Dahya & Dryden-Peterson, 2016; Jiang & Zhang, 2020 ; Sun et al., 2017). This is particularly important in online learning, where the absence of face-to-face interactions may be viewed as a missing aspect of the student experience, overall. Mobile learning (or, M-learning) considers these, and other features and benefits of mobile devices in the design of course elements. Yet, as Grant (2019) notes, the terms have been “unsystemic”, with no clear picture of the “attributes of successful mobile learners” (p.361).  Students who self-initiate mobile device use for online learning are often doing so in a course or course-related elements not necessarily designed for M-learning. Their experiences provide valuable insights to designers, faculty, and institutional leaders. Institutions focused only on M-learning, without considering wider mobile-friendly design concerns, may unknowingly create challenges or overlook barriers to the student experience for those who self-initiate mobile device use.

Presentation Format and Learning Objectives:

In this session, presenters will:

  • Provide an overview of the literature focused on students who self-initiate mobile device use in online learning;
  • Discuss key considerations in supporting learning and the overall student experience for this group; and
  • Present implications for future research.

We will begin the session with an engaging activity focused on challenges faced by students who self-initiate mobile device use in online learning. Presenters plan to further engage participants through guided discussion and a question-and-answer session.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the challenges faced by students who self-initiate mobile device use for online courses or course-related activities;
  • Identify ways they may be able to support this group of students; and
  • Consider future areas of research related to self-initiated mobile device users in online learning.

References:

Dabbagh, N., Fake, H., & Zhang, Z. (2019). Student perspectives of technology use for learning in higher education. Revista Iberoamericana de Educación a Distancia, 22(1), 127-152. https://doi.org/10.5944/ried.22.1.22102

Dahya, N., & Dryden-Peterson, S. (2017). Tracing pathways to higher education for refugees: the role of virtual support networks and mobile phones for women in refugee camps. Comparative Education, 53(2), 284-301. https://doi.org/10.1080/03050068.2016.1259877

Grant, M. M. (2019). Difficulties in defining mobile learning: Analysis, design characteristics, and implications. Educational Technology Research and Development67(2), 361-388.

Heflin, H., Shewmaker, J., & Nguyen, J. (2017). Impact of mobile technology on student attitudes, engagement, and learning. Computers & Education107, 91-99.

Jiang, D., & Zhang, L. J. (2020). Collaborating with ‘familiar ‘strangers in mobile-assisted environments: The effect of socializing activities on learning EFL writing. Computers & Education, 150, 103841. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2020.103841

Sun, Z., Lin, C. H., Wu, M., Zhou, J., & Luo, L. (2018). A tale of two communication tools: Discussion‐forum and mobile instant‐messaging apps in collaborative learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 49(2), 248-261. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjet.12571

Tang, C.M., & Bradshaw, A. (2016, October 27-28). The role of text messaging in team collaborative learning [Conference session]. European Conference on E-Learning, Prague, Czech Republic. https://researchonline.jcu.edu.au/46307/

Vasudeva, S., Colthorpe, K., & Ernst, H. (2017, October). Student-initiated Mobile Learning in Higher Education [Conference session]. World Conference on Mobile and Contextual Learning. https://doi.org/10.1145/3136907.3136914

Mar 16, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Program Management Strategies and Student Success Practices for a Fully Asynchronous Online Professional Master’s Program | Education Session

This session will cover program management strategies and student success practices for the Master of Engineering Management (MEM) which is a fully asynchronous online professional master’s degree for working engineers. Faculty and student onboarding practices are discussed as well as strategies used in advising and building community in the program.

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Extended Abstract

The Master of Engineering Management (MEM) program is an asynchronous, web-based, fully online program with no residency component. MEM students are engineers who work full-time, and are geographically dispersed. Many of them are located either regionally or nationally, and a few even globally. Naturally, design, administration, and delivery of such a program requires care, both in terms of student-staff interactions as well as course and curriculum issues and interactions.

We have implemented some big and small changes and started a few practices in hopes of improving MEM student interactions and overall quality of their experiences with staff and in courses. This session highlights a few of those changes and practices, including:

  • MEM Student Success Center: An information repository and a venue for communication
  • Effective student advising practices
  • Minor changes to improve rankings
  • Onboarding practices for new adjuncts and faculty
  • Development of course and instructional design template (using multiple sources)
  • Use of Syllabus and Canvas templates for consistency
  • Syllabus and course review
  • Plans to build a platform for networking opportunities and to create a sense of community between MEM graduates and current students

Outcomes for the audience

  1. Improve LMS course design and students’ experience
  2. Implement consistency across the program
  3. Enhance student engagement from a distance
  4. Establish onboarding processes for both faculty and students
Mar 16, 2021
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
Where Do Humans Fit into Advanced Proctoring Technology? | Networking Coffee Talk

Despite significant technological advancements, there will always be a need for human interaction when it comes to high-quality online proctoring. Jarrod Morgan, Chief Strategy Officer and Founder of ProctorU, will lead a discussion about how institutions can combine complex technology with the human element. Bring your questions and experience to this explorative topic.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 16, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
HBCU Summit: Part 2 - Funding Models for HBCUs During and Beyond the Pandemic | Summit

HBCUs make up approximately 3 percent of public and private higher education institutions in the United States, and graduate 17 percent of Black undergraduate students, particularly in STEM fields (ACE, 2019). However, they remain underfunded compared to primarily white institutions. Panelists and participants in this session will discuss three primary sources of funding: legislative funding, partnerships, and fundraising.

     

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Extended Abstract

HBCUs make up approximately 3 percent of public and private higher education institutions in the United States, and graduate 17 percent of Black undergraduate students, particularly in STEM fields (ACE, 2019). However, they remain underfunded compared to primarily white institutions. Panelists and participants in this session will discuss three primary sources of funding: legislative funding, partnerships, and fundraising.

This summit, in partnership with MERLOT and Tennessee State University, has been designed for educators at HBCUs to engage in key strategies and outcomes that create access to online education in support of student success. Focusing on the quality characteristics of online learning as well as digital strategies prioritized by HBCUs in their work in online education, this multipart summit uses actionable design practices and collaborative work to create a community of practice supporting work well beyond the conference. Join us for two distinct events as part of the HBCU Summit, as well as special networking opportunities for educators from HBCUs across the nation. Learn more on the HBCU Summit Website.

 

HBCU Summit is sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Interview Results From Long-Term Online Instructors: Perspectives, Experiences, and Lessons Learned | Education Session

This research presentation shares results from an interview-based study of 33 faculty with 10 or more years of online teaching experience. Faculty reported their motivations for teaching online, important skills for online instructors, advice for new online instructors, and discussed the future of online education.

 

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Extended Abstract

Context:

For many institutions of higher education, online learning is a new endeavor. There is still skepticism from faculty and higher education leaders about the quality of education that is received online. In a 2016 report on online learning by Allen, Seaman, Poulin, & Straut, they found that 28.6% of academic leaders “believe the learning outcomes for online education are inferior to those of face-to-face instruction” (p. 6). Moreover, the report noted that “only 29% of chief academic officers believe that their faculty accept the value and legitimacy of online education” (Allen, Seaman, Poulin, & Straut, 2016, p. 6). Although more than six million students currently take online courses (Seaman, Allen, Seaman, 2018), questions remain about whether and how to best educate students in distance settings. This uncertainty exits despite the widely cited research that demonstrates the equivalency of learning outcomes for online versus face-to-face modalities (see for example, Means, B., Toyama, Y., Murphy, R., Bakia, M., & Jones, K., 2010).

Despite the skepticism among their peers, there is a population of online instructors who have taught online for many years, and some have made online learning their career choice and area of expertise. Few colleges/universities have a substantial population of faculty who are long-term online instructors (teaching online for 10 years or more) and little research exists on their experiences. Some recent literature (see for example, Mansbach & Austin, 2018) explores the online faculty experience, but not those who have taught for several years in online environments.

This research presentation shares results of an interview-based study of 33 faculty who have taught online for 10 years or more at a large comprehensive R1 institution. Data were collected in two stages. First, participants filled out a pre-survey that asked for basic demographic information and some information about their online teaching history. The next stage included a series of three, one-hour virtual interviews in which instructors were asked to reflect on their experiences as an online educator and how their perspectives have changed over time. Interview questions sought to collect instructors' experiences in the following five areas:

  • how they got started with online teaching;
  • their teaching and course development practices;
  • the professional development they have completed related to online teaching;
  • their attitudes toward and beliefs about online teaching; and
  • their perceptions of how online education has changed over time.

The instructors in this study had taught online at their current institution for an average of 14 years, with one who had taught online for 31 years. The largest percentage (45%) of the instructors were in the 55-64 age range and 59% identified as female. The majority (67%) were full time faculty/instructors.

Questions:

The presentation focuses on results of several analyses from this study. A qualitative analysis of the instructor responses to the following questions will be discussed: What has kept you teaching online?, What skills do you think are most valuable for online instructors to have?, What advice do you have for new online instructors, and What do you think is the future of online learning?

Methods:

Each of the research questions were initially coded by a member of our research team. After initial coding and codebook generation for each question, a second member of the research team double-coded each of the responses. Then, the two researchers met together to discuss coding until they reached full agreement on the codebook and results.

Results:

What has kept you teaching online? Instructors cited several motivations for continuing to teach online for over ten years. Some of these motivations were specific to online education, while other motivations related to the motivation to teach, regardless of the medium. For example, instructors appreciated the diversity of online students, as well as the option to create their own schedules and work from anywhere with internet access. Instructors also expressed a general passion for their content areas, as well as passion for pedagogy and seeing students grow and succeed. Lastly, instructors expressed that they felt like they were making an impact by teaching online, as they were offering education to students of diverse backgrounds and opportunities.

What skills do you think are most valuable for online instructors to have? One of the most prominent skills long-term online instructors discussed was communication skills, both written and oral. Most of the instructors indicated that clear communication with students was central to effective online instruction. Another prominent skill suggested by these instructors was time management. Many of the long-term instructors discussed the complexities of time management specific teaching online courses. Other skills for instructors that will be discussed include: organization, flexibility, and creativity

What advice do you have for new online instructors? The experienced instructors in this study advised new online instructors to learn from others as they navigate teaching online. For example, they recommended meeting with current and experienced online instructors, as well as taking advantage of available resources and trainings. They also recommended utilizing the online medium in course design, communicating with online students frequently and regularly, considering the students’ perspective in course design and policy, and building an online community. Additionally, instructors recommended that those new to teaching online believe that they can teach effectively online, and that they focus on what they love about online teaching.

What do you think is the future of online learning? Most of the instructors in the sample predicted that online learning would continue to grow, and that online learning would increase access and accessibility to higher education. Additionally, instructors cited reasons that online learning could replace brick and mortar institutions, and also cited reasons why online learning should not replace brick and mortar institutions. Other common themes included the idea that online learning could facilitate modularized and disaggregated degree programs, increase collaboration between individuals around the world, and that online learning could be an important component as institutions consider how they can best fulfill their missions. 

Conclusions:

This research provides insight into the experiences of long-term online instructors, provides advice for instructors who are just getting started with online teaching, and discusses what may be the future of online education. This research is relevant as an increasing number of faculty have been transitioning to online and remote teaching environments, and may continue in the future.

Discussion/Interpretation: Participants will be asked to reflect on the study results and consider their current role(s) at their institutions. In a live discussion, I will ask participants to share these thoughts, either verbally, or using the chat function.  

Other Information: Slides will be used throughout the presentation. Additionally, a handout that summarizes the study results will be provided for participants on the website.

Session Objectives

Participants will leave this session with:

1) an understanding of what motivated the instructors in the study to keep teaching online for over ten years

2) an awareness of important skills for teaching online

3) consideration of what the instructors in the study predicted for the future of online learning
4) useful information and advice about online teaching that can be applicable for participants in diverse roles and institutions

References
 
Allen, I. E., Seaman, J., Poulin, R., & Straut, T. T. (2016). Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group and Quahog Research Group.

Mansbach, J. & Austin, A.E. (2018). Nuanced perspectives about online teaching: Mid-career and senior faculty voices reflecting on academic work in the digital age. Innovative Higher Education (published online 16 February 2018).

Means, B., Toyama, Y., Murphy, R., Bakia, M., & Jones, K. (2010). Evaluation of evidence-based practices in online learning: A meta-analysis and review of online learning studies. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

Seaman, J. E., Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2018). Grade Increase: Tracking Distance Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group.

Mar 16, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Utilizing Innovative Strategies to Collaborate with and Support Novice or Nontraditional Faculty in Their Move to Online Instruction | Education Session

 How can we effectively engage faculty at all levels when the nature of pedagogy requires specific knowledge and support? How can we collaborate with faculty who would normally be unwilling or unable to teach online? This presentation will discuss and have participants collaborate on strategies and solutions.

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Extended Abstract

The Covid19 pandemic revealed just how unprepared many faculty were when it came to teaching online. This dearth in online teaching knowledge and skills was seen in faculty across a wide array of disciplines; with significant pedagogical and technical issues. While in the past this has been handled by limiting online courses to faculty whom were fully willing and capable of embracing online best practices and tools, the pandemic has rendered that untenable. To succeed and thrive in our new paradigm, we must embrace strategies that allow us to effectively reach faculty at all levels. 

Online pedagogical best practices by its very nature can be extremely subject and discipline specific. If one course relies wholly on direct instruction, and another relies heavily on in-class discussion, peodogical advice can come across as so broad as to be useless. Given many novice online faculty have never attempted to imagine what their course could look like online, faculty may not even know where to start, which tools to explore, or which tools would be best suited for that course goal. Therefore, they hit a wall as they are unable to articulate their issue, may feel embarrassed and thus don’t reach out at all.

Existing strategies lean towards dedicated instructional technology teams who work on improving knowledge and access for technology and quality online pedagogy for faculty. That strategy may have been effective when a faculty member knows what they want, but when they don’t, or are ineffectively trying to “copy and paste” the face to face class in the online frame, they often get frustrated and give up. Further, such teams rarely if ever have sufficient staffing to arrange dedicated one on one collaborations for every single faculty member. Instead, they use a “self selection model” where faculty who are interested in exploring new pedagogical strategies or best practices reach out. 

 Our campus has a Center for Teaching and Learning as well dedicated to solving this exact issue, but our numbers weren’t adding up. Even though the team was spending every waking hour supporting faculty, we found by the time faculty reached out, they were already frustrated and overtaxed. Discussions with overtaxed faculty were by definition less productive, with the faculty less willing to explore and embrace best practices that differed from their existing work. How then do we reach faculty before they hit that “frustration wall?” How do we tailor support and discussions for faculty when we ourselves have limited skilled personnel? 

After presenting the broad problem, the session will go into breakout rooms for people to discuss how their specific campus handled these issues. This discussion will be focused on challenges the particular participants encountered, what strategies they found effective, and what they implemented going forward. These ideas will be collected in a collaborative Google Slides presentation, which can serve as a valuable resource for participants well after the session concludes.

The session will continue with everyone returning to the main room to discuss takeaways and commonalities the peers have faced. The presenters will then discuss strategies we found to be effective on our campus. Solving this issue for us required a multitiered approach done in conjunction with several of our ongoing “Best Practices for Teaching Online” workshops. The workshop modules focused on broader best practices and tools that can be applied in a variety of disciplines and types with resources geared towards more specific strategies that can apply depending on an individuals specific aims. 

To target the more specific needs of faculty (be it due to pedagogical specificity, lack of technical knowledge, or any combination of the above), we hosted regular “ video open office hours” where faculty could drop in to ask any question about technical issues, pedagogical advice, troubleshooting, or teaching help. The drop in, open-ended nature of the hours mitigated the articulation issues of faculty who weren’t quite sure what they needed help with. The video nature of the technology added a needed human element that put faculty at ease. The screen sharing capability was essential as a support person could easily see and advise faculty on how to work through issues. The encompassing nature of this support meant faculty felt more confident exploring new technologies since they knew the office hours were there to fall back on ( even if they ended up rarely reaching out, they were willing to try since they had the option).  We scaled hours and days up and down depending on the volume of the faculty requests at that given point. For example, at the start of the pandemic, drop in hours were held 7 days a week, for 8 hours a day. 

Since this was obviously a resource intensive endeavor, we trained student workers, interns, and other part time college workers (whose previous positions were funded, but unutilized in the virtual climate) to supplement support for the main instructional technology team. This also allowed a tiered response system (enabled through a backend Slack)  so front line support staff passed higher level issues to the appropriate party, allowing them to focus more specifically on issues that took advantage of their specific skillsets. 

For the final portion of the talk, participants will move to specific breakout rooms to discuss in a focused manner the topic participants are interested in. These will be geared towards what participants expressed the most interest in the first breakout room, but some general ideas we have are “extremely technically limited faculty”, “dealing with difficult faculty who are not willing learn”, “the faculty perspective”, and “train the trainers: When the trainers are new to online.” Participants will then return to the main room to discuss final takeaways, strategies going forward, and questions for the presenters.

Level of Participation:
The session is extremely collaborative and participatory. After presenting the broad problem, participants will move into breakout rooms to discuss the issues on a more granular level. The strategies discussed thereof will be shared in a collaborative document allowing resources and continued collaboration beyond the session itself. 

Towards the end of the session, participants will move into another breakout group that focuses on the issue that they want to discuss in the greatest detail, allowing participants to collaborate with like-minded peers in the most effective manner possible. This collaboration will also be in a collaborative document as a shared resource which can be utilized later.

Session Goals:
Individuals attending this discussion will discuss several strategies and challenges with online faculty, focused specifically on supporting them on using best practices in their online course. They will be able to discuss with peers at large about similar challenges, as well as discuss specific topics they are interested in exploring in greater detail. All of these vital resources will be shared with participants in a collaborative document, allowing them to utilize knowledge of the presenters and their peers beyond the session.

Mar 16, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Stories from the Herald & Guardian: Utilizing Simulations, Role-Playing, Storytelling, and Games in Teaching | Education Session

Stay a while, and listen to our tale across multiple gameful projects as we share where our stories intersect and what we’ve learned from our journey. From simulations in undergraduate courses to role-playing in professional development, we wish to inform and inspire others looking for the call to adventure.

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Extended Abstract

Teaching students how to manage systems of data has been better through experience than exposition. Executing on strategies and navigating unforeseen road blocks. Building community among instructors using shared challenges has been a phenomenal way to insight growth. Wielding curiosity through roleplaying in a fantasy world has been a great way to inspire intrinsic learning. Introducing fun into our work has helped us connect with learners and enjoy our work all the more. These are only a few of the insights we wish to share with others engaging in online learning. We hope, by showcasing our gameful assignments and learning communities, we can inform and inspire you to introduce new methods into your own courses and professional development.

During this session the presenters will share and contrast their experiences with simulations, role-playing games, and storytelling across many environments, including undergraduate courses, professional development, and online communities. For instance, attendees will see a recent implementation of a simulation for an entrepreneurship project in an undergraduate course where students competed in developing businesses. Comparing and contrasting this higher education project with various gameful professional development programs previously hosted by the presenters, we wish to share the range of insights we’ve collected from the intersections of our journeys.

Lastly we’ll discuss the impact of our journey in our professional lives. In particular, how our work is more fulfilling and fun through the student engagement and teaching we experienced.

Participants will leave having an introductory look at various gameful programs, engagement statistics from different projects, and research collected by the presenters.

We offer you our stories as you embark on your own journey. Stay a while, and listen to our tale.

Mar 16, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Chemistry Labs - Navigating Through The Pandemic With Lab Kits | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Join Dr. Matthew Wise, Director of Chemistry Instruction at The University of Colorado Boulder and Carolina Distance Learning as we discuss how the Boulder campus used Lab kits to navigate the recent pandemic.

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Extended Abstract

Join Dr. Matthew Wise, Director of Chemistry Instruction at The University of Colorado Boulder and Carolina Distance Learning as we discuss how the Boulder campus used Carolina Distance Learning Lab kits to navigate the recent pandemic. The general chemistry laboratory program at the University of Colorado, Boulder (UCB) instructs approximately two thousand students enrolled in over one hundred laboratory sections each semester (Fall and Spring). The COVID-19 pandemic forced significant changes in the modes of delivery for all Fall 2020 general chemistry laboratory courses. UCB required each course to offer sections in one of two modes: hybrid in-person/remote (HY) or fully remote. Students enrolled in HY sections faced an additional social distancing constraint. The capacity of the in-person labs was reduced from twenty to ten students. UCB utilized custom laboratory kits from Carolina Distance Learning to overcome COVID-19 public health restrictions while providing students with an educationally sound laboratory experience.

Mar 16, 2021
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
OLC Live: The Innovate Experience | Other

Dive deeper into the conference experience with OLC Live! Hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr as they lead focused conversations with presenters and participants focused on this year’s conference themes:

  • Blended Teaching and Learning
  • Career and Technical Education
  • Instructional Technologies and Tools
  • Leadership and Advocacy
  • Open Learning
  • Process, Problems, and Practices
  • Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
  • Teaching and Learning Practice

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
New Frontiers Of Security: Unpacking IMS Global’s New Online Proctoring Certification | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Concerns about privacy remain at the forefront of the national discourse. The IMS Global Learning Consortium released its LTI® Proctoring Services standard, a specification recognizing cutting-edge innovation in test security and integrity. How can it be implemented at your institution? This session provides an overview from a higher education perspective.

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Extended Abstract

The changing landscape of online learning has led a growing number of higher education institutions, certification providers, and other organizations to rethink their relationship with remote assessments. During a tumultuous year, online proctoring demonstrated tremendous potential to meet students where they are, while providing a streamlined, equal experience for all users. At the same time, concerns about privacy and security remain at the forefront of the national discourse. Against that backdrop, the IMS Global Learning Consortium -- the pioneering standards-setting body in education technology -- developed and recently released its LTI® Proctoring Services standard, a new specification designed to recognize cutting-edge innovation in test security and integrity. Designed to align with the pioneering IMS Learning Tools Interoperability® standard, the LTI Proctoring Services Certification recognizes providers that work with best-in-class learning management systems to deliver a streamlined and secure user experience for students, instructors, and proctors.

Simply put, the LTI Proctoring Services Certification enables the seamless and secure integration of LMSs with proctoring technologies. But how does it work in practice? How can it be implemented at your institution? This session will provide an overview from IMS Global’s approach from a higher education perspective, including a detailed overview of the Proctoring Services Certification.

Mar 16, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
HBCU Summit: Part 3 - Looking At The Operations Landscape Across HBCU Institutions | Summit

Providing academic, technical/access/device, and social support for students, as well as course design and delivery and technical/access/device support for faculty emerge as universal challenges. Participants in this session will discuss operations, including infrastructure, logistics and implementation, and student and faculty support as key areas impacted by the pandemic.

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Extended Abstract

Providing academic, technical/access/device, and social support for students, as well as course design and delivery and technical/access/device support for faculty emerge as universal challenges. Participants in this session will discuss operations, including infrastructure, logistics and implementation, and student and faculty support as key areas impacted by the pandemic. 

This summit, in partnership with MERLOT and Tennessee State University, has been designed for educators at HBCUs to engage in key strategies and outcomes that create access to online education in support of student success. Focusing on the quality characteristics of online learning as well as digital strategies prioritized by HBCUs in their work in online education, this multipart summit uses actionable design practices and collaborative work to create a community of practice supporting work well beyond the conference. Join us for two distinct events as part of the HBCU Summit, as well as special networking opportunities for educators from HBCUs across the nation. Learn more on the HBCU Summit Website.

 

HBCU Summit is sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Connecting Students and Learning in a Pandemic Era: Enhancing Student Engagement and Persistence | Education Session

Join us to learn how we excelled (despite Covid-19 challenges) by employing recent research and online best practices.  Our Fall 2020 journey of CCF’s primarily online courses and PBA’s return to primarily in person courses (with live online elements) including the planning, successes and opportunities for improvement will be shared. 

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Extended Abstract

Join us to learn how the Palm Beach Atlantic University (PBA) and College of Central Florida (CCF)  institutions and others excelled despite the Covid-19 challenges in the past year.  We will share how CCF continued courses primarily online this Fall and PBA returned primarily to courses in person (with live online elements). We will share both journeys as well as the successes and opportunities for improvement.  In addition, we will share how we seek to develop lifelong learners through active student engagement in online or live online courses.  Due to Covid-19, many colleges quickly rolled out “online” courses this past Spring, Summer and Fall.  We will share statistics on the number of institutions who had no courses available online in 2019 and then the amount that shifted to in 2020.  Many online course design and instructional best practices are still being used in institutions as they return to in person learning due to those learners who are at risk, ill, isolating or quarantining and must participate in class in a “live online” format.  

 

As more higher education institutions offer more courses fully online, it’s important that instructional designers, faculty and others in academic leadership understand some of the recent data regarding online learning students.  The presenters will share information on the number of students enrolled in fully online programs and institutions with fully online programs using the data points from Public, Private and For-Profit institutions. We also plan to share recent demographic data on today’s online student (average 60% female, 64% white, 59% employed full time, 55% single, etc.) as well as data on the current age groupings of online students.  We want to engage our audience to further explore the recent research which shows one in three online students have been out of school five or more years.  In what ways should this change our course design, instruction or student services?  A brief review of the OLC Scorecard will be included and implementation shared.

 

In addition, this presentation will share several best practice strategies and tools that we’ve found successful in engaging CCF and PBA students such as:  

  • Create an Ease of Navigation- have “Micro Pages” of relevant Information 
  • Diversity of Materials-creating a variety of avenues for learners to gain content information
  • Alternative Assessments-valuable for online learners and faculty, ADA compliance
  • Discussion Boards -quality question writing and adding dimension, use of critical thinking and metacognition encouraged
  • Dropboxes/Assignment Folders-aids in quick feedback to students and provides faculty efficiency
  • Surveys -traditional and non-traditional uses, suggested questions and tools
  • Quizzes -self assessments for students prior to exams, use of automatic grading and question feedback to increase student learning and teaching efficiency 
  • Adding Visual Appeal -options to increase visual appeal of course elements to spark learner interest
  • Using push notifications to quickly reach students
  • Use of small groups to introduce or reinforce content-zoom breakout rooms or LMS groups

 

In addition, our presenters will share how they are using “safety” technology systems to aid in institutional communication and processes (i.e. daily health alerts, security notifications, severe weather alerts and contact tracing).  Finally, we will discuss current educational trends and issues such as virtual office hours, cross listing courses, workload calculations, attendance policies (considering Covid),  and how technology can assist faculty and educational support team members. The presentation will include information on several free and low-cost instructional technology tools to aid in teaching and learning (i.e. use https://youcanbook.me for scheduling faculty in person or virtual office hours).   

 

The information in this educational session will be shared via PowerPoint slides and web links from our institution (slides will be posted online with the URL given at the presentation start) as well as posted on the conference web site.

 

While our research on these topics have provided many answers to questions we seek, we believe we can learn much from others.  So we may engage the participants, the presenters will employ the following Engagement Strategies for our Audience:  Carousel Brainstorming (creating a poster on key topics) combined with Jigsaw (a participant-centered method to generate data about a group’s collective prior knowledge or beliefs on a variety of issues associated with a single topic in the presentation (engagement tools-dropbox, discussion board, chat, etc. as well as classroom management and engagement strategies-breakout rooms/small groups, critical thinking questioning, Jigsaw, turn and talk, four corners, etc.)).  This activity will be followed by the Gallery Walk so the groups can rotate around the room and all participants may take notes from the tools/strategies they need to learn more about. After all groups have rotated through all the posters, participants can ask each poster’s creators questions if they feel they need even more information or clarification for a point of confusion.  We also plan to employ a few Stand Up Survey’s in the beginning of the presentation.  Depending on room set up, time  and Covid safety considerations we may alternatively employ other participant engagement methods such as Turn and Talk, Kahotz and a Wordle.net exercise. Throughout the presentation we also plan to offer several interactive question and answer sessions such as:  “This presentation has shared some online best practices, how can this be paralleled into a ‘live online’ class or ‘hybrid’ class?”.

Mar 16, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Level Up: How we created a level framework for learning experience designers | Career Forum Roundtable

This facilitated roundtable discussion explores the challenge around career advancement for instructional designers and related positions. We’ll discuss challenges around defining the role of instructional designers, identifying skill sets for instructional design positions, and how to establish a level framework for growth.

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Extended Abstract

Over the past few years our department has grown with academic specialists and instructional designers. Between our rapid expansion and the flat culture we sought to maintain, we had a bit of a mess. We had a lot of staff and no sense of a classification system and no clear pathway for growth. Over the past year, we have worked to establish a level framework to clearly identify and differentiate the positions, roles, and responsibilities within our department. We began by identifying the core skill sets necessary for work in our department, and building a framework around these skill sets. Next, we referred to a design organization level framework developed by Merholz and Skinner (2016) to inform our framework structure. By creating a framework rooted in our core skill sets, we have created a clear classification system within our department and a corresponding pathway for growth. 

At this roundtable discussion, we will discuss the challenge of career advancement for instructional designers, learning experience designers, and related positions. We will share the process we followed to create our level framework and discuss the opportunity for creating a framework and pathway for growth. The goal of this discussion will be for participants to identify the challenges with career advancement they experience and how they can begin to clarify the work and identify a corresponding structure to represent this work. 

The primary audience for this career forum is instructional designers, learning experience designers, education technologists, directors, administrators, consultants, and related specialists who experience the challenge of career advancement. 

This career forum will be structured similarly to a previous roundtable conducted by this team at the OLC Innovate 2018 Conference: Role and Identity of an Instructional Designer, White and Yaklin, (2018). In the 2018 presentation, our team posed questions around the role of instructional designers, related titles, power dynamics, and career challenges. In this presentation, we will pick up with one of the questions we discussed in our 2018 presentation and continue the conversation forward: 

  1. What are some of the challenges you have faced in defining your role? In the role you have played?

  2. Is there a classification system and pathway for growth at your institution? If so, what does it look like? If not, what needs do you have?

  3. What are the core skill sets necessary for success in your department? How can you identify these with your team?

  4. How can you identify a framework to fit your needs? 

As presenters, we will pose these questions to participants and share how we worked to address these questions. Participants will walk away with examples of our core skill set and level framework. 

Works Cited:

Merholz, P., & Skinner, K. (2016). Developing the Team: Professional Growth and Managing People. In Org Design for Design Orgs: Building and Managing In-House Design Teams (1st ed., pp. 111–133). Sebastopol, CA: O’Reilly Media.

White, C. & Yaklin, B. (2018). Role and Identity of an Instructional Designer. Presentation at the Online Learning Consortium Innovate 2018. Nashville, TN.

 

Mar 16, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Supporting Faculty Adoption of Open Ed Access Materials through MERLOT | Education Session

The adoption of open, freely available instructional materials has gained interest and merit in recent years,  making education more affordable to students.  This presentation provides faculty, chairs, and administrators with guidelines for reviewing and selecting affordable, high-quality learning materials for  individual classes and guidance on more effectively supporting Open Ed programs. 

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Extended Abstract

 

In our 2020 OLC Innovate presentation entitled “Creator or Curator? An OER Decision-Making Strategy for Content Development in Online and Blended Courses,” we mapped a process that faculty members could follow when deciding whether to use OER content in their courses. Building on this model—and encouraged by the feedback we received from our Innovate 2020 participants—we propose to delve more deeply into this topic by reviewing selected open education resource (OER) collections and providing specific illustrations of how faculty can expertly sift through and select from a vast array of open education resources (OERs) in service of high-quality course development and pedagogy.  

The 2019 Campus Computing Survey revealed a six-year, steady rise in the number of higher education institutions with policies that “encourage faculty to use OER content for courses” and that provide “formal institutional support for OER course materials.” Still, while 89% of the participating CIOs agreed that “OER course materials and textbooks will be an important source of instructional resources in the next five years,” only 43% reported that “faculty at my campus believe that the quality of OER course materials is about the same as comparable commercial products.” 

Continuing faculty concerns about the quality of open education resources point to the value of lasering our focus on available OER collections and developing guidelines for assessing the learning objects they contain, along with selecting and implementing these to afford students the opportunity to enroll in and complete courses at a lower- or even zero-cost option for course materials.

The presentation will offer the following primary objectives for participants:

  1. OER SOURCES: Cover a spectrum of OER content and resource providers selected as top tier recommendations from the presenters.

  2. OER GUIDELINES for REVIEW: Provide overarching best practice guidelines for reviewing and selecting affordable, high-quality OER content.

  3. Deep-Dive into MERLOT: We will take a deep-dive into a long-time forerunner in the field of open education as an illustration of applying guidelines for OER review and selection.

 

Takeaways and Engagement Activities: 

  • All attendees will leave the session with personalized OER content evaluation and selection guidelines.

  • The presenters also will develop and share a reference document listing high-quality, OER-related resources.

  • Throughout the presentation, on-screen prompts will engage the audience with interactive feedback, and general questions also will be solicited at the end of the presentation

References

The 2019 Campus Computing Survey. (2020, September 20). https://www.campuscomputing.net/content/2019/10/15/the-2019-campus-computing-survey

 

Mar 16, 2021
12:15pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Lunch and Learn Featured Session: Taking @OLCToday into Tomorrow: An OLC Twitter Chat | Featured Session

Twitter Chats (as seen by #edtechchat and #UDLchat) are great ways to reflect as a community, share resources, crowdsource ideas and strategies, and connect with new colleagues. At this year's OLC Innovate, we'll be leaning into this model to gather as a community virtually with the goal of not only deepening the dialogues we have at the conference, but additionally beginning to imagine together what it might look like to sustain them beyond the live event. Not on Twitter or unsure what a Twitter Chat is? No worries, this session is designed with that in mind and will include ways for you to participate regardless of your previous Twitter experience. Follow us at @OLCToday and using the hashtag #OLCInnovateChat to access the chat prompts in preparation or simply join the live Zoom session and await further instructions on how to join in on the fun!

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Featured Sessions Series sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
1:00pm - 2:00pm (Central)
The OLC Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning - Meet & Greet | Other

Are you interested in strategies and proven methods for expanding your leadership capabilities? Are you looking for a cross-institutional peer network to broaden your perspective and help you solve local challenges?  Then this is the session for you!  

Join several faculty from The OLC Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (IELOL) and get a sneak-peak into this unique leadership development program. IELOL Co-Directors and faculty will discuss the program structure and outcomes, and alumni will share success stories.   Designed to build healthy peer cohorts while developing projects to pitch to senior higher ed leaders, the program provides access to a prestigious cadre of faculty who bring a diverse wealth of knowledge about leadership in digital learning.  In its 13th year, this premiere OLC program has prepared over 380 leaders representing diverse institutions of higher education from across the globe to position themselves to take the next big step in their careers.  As higher education continues to evolve and change rapidly in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, our field needs more leaders who are prepared to address the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead of us.

OLC will develop and host the 2021 program in partnership with Arizona State University, named the Most Innovative University by the US News and World Report for six years in a row. ASU’s approach to digital education, unique programs like Starbucks College Achievement Plan, Uber educational benefit, and adaptive education have significantly contributed to the ranking. 

 

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 16, 2021
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Fill Your Cup: Setting Expectations for the Speed Networking Lounge | Other

The OLC Speed Networking Lounge is all about casual conversation and connecting with colleagues. What might that look like for OLC Innovate 2021? Join this kick-off session to help session co-chairs, Clea and Lara, shape upcoming Speed Networking sessions to meet your needs and interests.

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Virtual Speed Networking sponsored by:

 

Mar 16, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Driven by Teaching: Promoting Pathways for Faculty Development in a 1-Day Self-Paced Course | Education Session

In this session, we’ll discuss the design of a 1-day course for online and hybrid faculty. We’ll cover course elements and share feedback received from our target audience as well as anticipated course outcomes. By participating, you’ll walk away with practical ideas for implementing an efficient and engaging online faculty development experience.

 

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Extended Abstract

Join us for a discussion on our latest online faculty development course, Driven by Teaching. During the session we’ll cover outcomes and lessons learned related to the conceptualization of the course, feedback that led to course development, breakdown of content, and course design elements. We’ll also dive into input received during the course planning and development stages, as well as anticipated course outcomes and feedback received from our target audience. Throughout the presentation, you will have an opportunity to ask questions and reflect on your personal experiences with online faculty development solutions. Our goal is for you to walk away with practical concepts for systematically designing, developing, and delivering (a) efficient and flexible online faculty development solutions and (b) courses that facilitate the advancement of online and hybrid instruction.

 

As a result of a campus-wide move to online instruction in spring 2020, our instructional design team developed and facilitated a 2-month professional development program for faculty who were new to teaching online courses. Resulting from this course was a wealth of data regarding how faculty learn in online environments and what they find useful and beneficial in self-paced professional development opportunities. Most recently, these opportunities have been critical in helping faculty differentiate emergency remote teaching from evidence-based online teaching practices and effective instructional design methodologies. Our overall goal was to provide faculty new to teaching online courses a meaningful professional development solution that (a) efficiently moves them from novice to intermediate level within a predefined period of time, and (b) effectively motivates them to apply new approaches in their teaching, both during and immediately after the program.

To support institution-wide training to quickly advance faculty online teaching skills, we redesigned a portion of the 2-month professional development program as a 1-day self-paced professional development course. This redesigned course, titled Driven by Teaching, focuses specifically on online and hybrid teaching methods with goals of helping faculty more effectively and efficiently: (a) deliver online, hybrid, and blended course content with evidence-based practices in mind; (b) implement online student support solutions; (c) use key learning management system and course delivery tools; and (d) collaborate with support teams and peers in the delivery of online, hybrid, and blended courses. These goals were determined based on prior outcomes of faculty development solutions and increasing needs to close institution-wide skill gaps pertaining to online and remote instruction.

While building this new course, we incorporated feedback from the prior 2-month program, including participants who were new to teaching online and/or hybrid courses. This feedback helped us identify pathways for course redesign around key areas such as: course readiness, setting expectations, progress tracking, navigation, time management, and various content recommendations. Participants also frequently highlighted their preference for a simple and efficient learning experience, specifically in the context of rapidly changing teaching expectations and expanding academic responsibilities.

The course content was broken into five units, each covering topics and skills relevant to teaching online, remote, and/or hybrid courses. Course activities and assessments were designed to encourage participants to (a) compare and contrast different modalities for online instruction; (b) identify approaches for integrating online content, activities, and/or assessments; (c) recognize evidence-based approaches for online, hybrid, and blended teaching; (d) identify key online teaching tools; (e) understand the basic purpose/function of key online teaching tools; (f) identify strategies that support student engagement; (g) recognize the varied responsibilities of being a course instructor; (h) identify student support resources; and (i) understand the roles of various support teams and resources.

Based on prior feedback received on online faculty development initiatives, we anticipate early trends and improvements related to flexibility, ease of use, and time management. Feedback from reviewers of the course also suggests participants are likely to recommend this course to other faculty or recommend it be required by their department. In our session, we’ll do a deep dive on the full design of the course as well as opportunities to consider in future iterations.

With this course as an example, we look forward to sharing our perspectives on faculty development pathways and discussing ways to build robust, yet simple and sustainable online faculty development solutions on your campus.

 

Mar 16, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Just sit right back and you’ll hear a tale: Development of an interactive, baseline professional development initiative | Education Session

(To the tune of The Ballad of Gilligan's Isle)

Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale
a tale of a fateful trip,
that started from a virus,
that grew to epidemic.

It caused everything to close,
All schools had to go online
All faculty needed to be trained,
How would that fly?
Come hear how & why!

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Extended Abstract

(To the tune of The Ballad of Gilligan's Isle)

Just sit right back and you'll hear a tale
a tale of a fateful trip,
that started from a virus,
that grew to epidemic.

It caused everything to close,
All schools had to go online
All faculty needed to be trained,
How would that fly?
We’ll tell you by and by...

The ID Team then built a course,
For the faculty to take.
Now that we are through the term...
Was it a make or break?
Was it a make or break?

In Spring of 2020, COVID hit the world and changed online education forever. Every institution dealt with it and continues to deal with it in their own way. We’ve made a significant institutional change in regards to our knowledge base and experience level of online education.

When COVID hit and we pivoted to remote instruction, our instructional design team immediately began to deploy professional development webinars for our faculty on different online education topics. These webinars were widely attended and successful, so we knew there was a need and desire for more. We thought about how higher education may not be back to “normal” for quite awhile and how we could improve our faculty and students’ experiences with the online education that we would offer in the near future. 

We had never engaged our faculty so widely in online education training, as most of our courses have historically been face-to-face. How could we provide an experience for faculty that would be more structured and thorough, and would allow our faculty to hit the ground running for both summer and fall online and blended courses? How would we get them to participate in such an experience and find it useful? What could we do that was innovative? How could we engage faculty together, across programs, departments, and schools?

Time was short! Conversations with our Provost proved that our thoughts on providing a baseline of skills in online education to all faculty was an emergency institutional goal. We immediately jumped into planning a workshop, and upon the Provost’s approval of the plan, we proceeded to build and deploy the workshop to the first cohort within the next few weeks. We called this workshop RISE (Reframing Instruction for Success Everywhere).

Many challenges drove the structure, content, and management of this 6-week workshop for faculty. Some of these challenges are common to many professional development initiatives at many institutions, which is why we want to share this project with others. 

Some of these challenges included: 

  • designing for a very diverse participant base;

  • supporting an interactive workshop with assessments for several hundred faculty members;

  • balancing time that could be devoted to the workshop by both the participants and facilitators, and;

  • deciding on the most critical content & skills to be covered. 

For example, when it came to our participant base, with the goal being to train all faculty, there are varied skill, comfort, and confidence levels in online learning, technology, and course development. At the least skilled level, we set out to train professor emeriti who had never taught with any technology but who are now valued adjuncts, all the way up to those faculty that had previously taught several online courses but may have some holes we could fill. We needed to reach faculty from each of our campuses, majors, departments, programs, and schools.

How did it go? Make or break? You decide!

During this presentation, we will tell the story from start to finish (and beyond) of this professional development initiative. We will showcase our plan, discuss challenges, outline management and recap with statistics, reflections, and evidence. We will ask presentation participants to interact by voting and engaging in discussion at different points in the presentation on whether they see our initiative as being successful and something they could implement at their own institution. 

Participants will also walk away from the presentation with a tangible professional development project planning aid document they can use to plan a future training initiative in online education.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Determine whether a workshop style similar to RISE would fit with their institution’s needs

  • Develop a tailored workshop project plan

  • Prioritize training content based upon their specific institutional needs

  • Use the RISE workshop data for comparison analysis

Mar 16, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Student-Generated OERs | Education Session

The case for OERs has largely focused on cost-effective benefits, which can result in students having greater access to -- and engagement with -- information. However, OERs have much greater impact when students can use generative learning strategies to act upon those OERs in personally meaningful ways and generate new information in the form of OERS. This session details how classroom teachers, librarians and students can collaborate to facilitate student-generated OERs.

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Extended Abstract

Open Educational Resources (OERs) constitute a growing trend in instructional materials. Teachers, librarians, and students all impact the use and creation of OERs. Throughout the instructional design and delivery process, librarians can collaborate with teachers to include students in leveraging OERs to optimize learning. Students can locate, evaluate, select, use, and generate OERs, building their information literacy skills and applying content knowledge. Students can also contribute existing and their own original OERs to educational repositories for possible peer review and inclusion, which enables them to participate in the scholarship “conversation” and add to the discipline’s knowledge base. This session provides a background and literature review on the status of OER integration into the curriculum. It then uses the conceptual frameworks of TPACK, Community of Practice and generative learning theory as the based for identifying the librarian’ roles in OERs, particularly in supporting student information literacy and contributions to the OER knowledge base and use.

Mar 16, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Community College Summit: Part 1 - Culturally Responsive Curriculum Analysis | Summit
An investment in building culturally responsive teaching environments requires structural changes to the curriculum. This session will introduce an adaptive version of NYU Steinhardt’s Culturally Responsive Curriculum Scorecard as a tool for faculty to take a deep look into the content of the curriculum to critically analyze whose knowledge the texts’ privilege, and how different groups are being represented. The scorecard looks at a few dimensions of the curriculum including 1) Representation, 2) Social Justice and 3) Instructor’s Materials. Attendees will leave with an action plan that will include short and long-term changes that they can make to their curriculum that will validate their student’s cultural funds of knowledge and activate their culturally-bound prior knowledge. 
 

 

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Extended Abstract

How do we ensure that every students’ academic experiences are equitable, accessible, and relevant? What is possible when full-time and adjunct faculty use inclusive, evidence-based instructional practices to engage students and foster their learning? How can faculty engage as key collaborators in the college’s student success efforts? When designing online college courses, it is critical to ensure an equitable environment where each student receives a high-quality experience that aligns with their academic readiness and goals. Through intentionally unbiased and inclusive teaching practices, faculty play an important role in improving learning outcomes and therefore increasing course completion and graduation rates. Zaretta Hammond’s 2014 book, Culturally Responsive Teaching and the Brain. Speaks to the three “levels” of culturally responsive teaching which are helpful for consideration in the post-Pandemic world:

  • Surface — observable and concrete elements of culture, such as food and music
  • Shallow — cultural norms and attitudes, communication styles, nonverbal cues
  • Deep — tacit cultural knowledge, worldview, guiding ethics

Community College Summit sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
2:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Formative assessment with Kahoot!: Intercultural Sensitivity in the online classroom | Workshop

 Workshop using the latest Kahoot tools to formative assess intercultural sensitivity in the classroom.

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Extended Abstract

 One of the objectives of formative assessment is to monitor student learning. This workshop will allow creating a lesson plan where you can formative assess intercultural sensitivity. On the contrary, the summative assessment does not provide feedback, leaving the students in the dark (and teachers) We will explore a cultural topic, how to teach a cultural topic in your online classroom, and monitor intercultural sensitivity in hands one workshop using the latest Kahoot tools.

Mar 16, 2021
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Bring Your Questions For The Digital Learning Pulse Survey Researchers | Exposition Foundry Live

Discussion of the fourth installment of a quarterly survey series concerning the state of digital learning. With samples of over 600 institutions across the country, both faculty and administrators have responded with their perspectives on how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting today’s teaching and learning.

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Extended Abstract

Starting in April of 2020, Bay View Analytics, OLC, WCET, UPCEA and Cengage have been working together on a series of quarterly surveys on the state of digital learning. With samples of over 600 institutions across the country, both faculty and administrators have responded with their perspectives on how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting today’s teaching and learning. With the fourth installment of the research in development now, this survey has covered a number of topics from digital learning materials to attitudes about online learning to professional development. The research has been featured in Campus Technology, Inside Higher Ed and more. Now is your chance to connect directly with the research team and ask your questions. Join Jeff Seaman of Bay View Analytics, Nicole Johnson of Canadian Distance Learning Association, and Corrina Preuschoff of Cengage as we discuss the latest insights in digital learning. We look forward to sharing our work with you!

Mar 16, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Community College Summit: Part 2 | Summit

Join us for this second session of three sessions at OLC’s Community College Summit, where we bring together educators and advocates of community colleges. This session will focus on creating and implementing online, blended and digital learning innovations within community colleges that can be sustained over time. Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) Online will highlight its virtual student union as an exemplar innovative practice. The NOVA Virtual Student Union (VSU) is a digital hub for students to connect with the college and each other without physically being on campus. When the COVID-19 Pandemic hit, Student Life college-wide rallied to migrate all Student Life resources into the online campus’ portal, scaling up consistent support to its 75,000 students. This success and opportunity to engage diverse students across the college community will now be extended beyond the pandemic. Throughout this engagement hub, students have access to participate in Student Life activities, join discussion forums and connect with many educational resources, all online.

 

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Extended Abstract

Powered by the Office of Student Life's vision to engage all students beyond the classroom, Northern Virginia Community College (NOVA) seamlessly responded to the COVID-19 Pandemic in preserving Student Life programming through its Virtual Student Union (VSU). The VSU is housed within the college learning management system, Canvas, and is strategically placed to meet students where they are at. Throughout the semester, NOVA Student Life staff across six campuses collaborated with NOVA Online Student Services to host student-led discussion boards, asynchronous and synchronous programming, and cross-departmental collaborations. The VSU is a driving mechanism to inspire students to become active members of the campus and community. The platform connects NOVA's diverse student body to foster meaningful interactions and maintains space and resources for students in a virtual setting.

The VSU amplifies efforts of the Office of Student Life to provide access to initiatives that enrich College culture, engage student leaders to discover new knowledge that enables them to critically evaluate evidence, make informed judgments, balance multiple perspectives and act ethically, and expand opportunities for experimental learning, civic engagement, cultural enrichment, leadership development, recreation and service-learning. These initiatives will continue post-Pandemic based on NOVA’s success during the remote shift and how it has drawn in more diverse students seeking connection and support. Learn what we’ve experienced and where we are thinking of heading.

 

Community College Summit sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
How To Protect Exam Integrity In A Global Pandemic | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Institutions around the world were faced with the challenge of preserving the value of online programs and the integrity of their online assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn how Proctorio’s Learning Integrity Platform has provided institutions around the world with a reliable, scalable, and secure solution for remote integrity protection.

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Extended Abstract

How are educational institutions supposed to preserve the value of online programs and the integrity of online assessments during a global pandemic?

Over 1,200 higher ed, K-12, corporate, and federal institutions have trusted Proctorio’s Learning Integrity Platform to provide secure and scalable Identity Verification, Automated and Live Proctoring, Content Protection, and Plagiarism Detection.

Proctorio is an industry leader in remote proctoring. Since inception, Proctorio has maintained a 99.991% uptime, has been the first and only remote proctoring solution to leverage Zero-Knowledge Encryption, and does not use biometric identifiers. Proctorio seamlessly integrates with most commonly-used Learning Management Systems via LTI in just 5-10 minutes, has the lowest system requirements in the industry (supporting devices up to 10 years old!), provides instant exam results within the Proctorio Gradebook, and offers 24/7/365 support. To date, Proctorio has proctored over 32.5 million exams to serve test-takers in all but four countries around the world, 20 million of these exams were proctored in 2020 alone.

Join Connor Koper, Head of North American Sales at Proctorio, to learn about Proctorio’s full suite of customizable settings and to hear about how online Proctorio has secured integrity for thousands of institutions worldwide before and during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Mar 16, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
A Successful Faculty Development Program for Effective LMS Implementation | Education Session

This session discusses the results and experiences of a successful faculty development program for the use of LMS with an innovative training approach using the TPACK model to build faculty technical skills and pedagogical knowledge while remaining contextually relevant to their discipline. The session goal is to showcase evidence-based approaches for improving instituionally mandated faculty development efforts.

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Extended Abstract

The most significant investment educational institutions invest in to support teaching and learning is the Learning Management System (LMS). Expenditures on LMS’s include vendor licensing, initial installation, training system administrators, administrator salaries, migration costs (from other systems, resource costs stemming from technicians, size of migration, and time), faculty development sessions (orientation for new users, continuing development as features added or changed), instructional designer salaries, and so on. Yet, for all the investment dollars institutions make, use of LMS features is inconsistent among faculty. To explore this claim and seek an approach to a solution, this session presents a successful faculty development program for effective use of LMS using the TPACK Model*.

Source: http://tpack.org/

Figure 1. Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) MODEL

The need is to train faculty not only on how to use the LMS tool but also to integrate it with their pedagogy and subject matter. The training approach uses the 3 pieces of the TPACK model (Technology, Pedagogy, and Content) to develop asynchronous modules (for faculty to complete), perform workshops, develop instructional materials, and software applications. 

This presentation will discuss the experience and share data on a faculty development program that took place at Southern California University of Health Sciences (SCUHS) over the entire Fall 2020 term. This program was an effort to help faculty at this institution train on the LMS and use it effectively due to the remote teaching situation (COVID-19). The goal was to help faculty make effective use of LMS in these unprecedented times and also use the same when we get back to normality (after COVID-19) in a blended approach. This faculty development program involved faculty to participate in asynchronous modules designed on each feature of an LMS (sample Canvas). This program involves effective use of Canvas LMS. But the same strategies and faculty development approach could be used for any other LMS for any institution. The faculty development program was titled as ‘Optimizing Canvas for Student Learning.’ It was initiated/started on August 17th, 2020 and will end on December 18th, 2020. It involves asynchronous training using 8 modules on Canvas LMS. Each module was spread across 2 weeks and required 1 hour per week from each faculty to complete the activities. Each module thus required 2 hours overall spread over 2 weeks to complete all the activities related to the LMS feature. See list below.

Hands-on workshops also took place on the side for those faculty who were not very technologically savvy. For faculty who participated in the hands-on workshops did not have to complete the activities in the asynchronous modules.

Schedule for all the asynchronous activities for all the modules: 

Module 1 (Aug 17th- Sep 6th, 2020): ‘Pages’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 2 (Sep 7th- Sep 20th, 2020): ‘Quizzes’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 3 (Sep 21st- Oct 4th, 2020): ‘Assignments’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 4 (Oct 5th - Oct 18th, 2020): ‘Discussions’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 5 (Oct 19th- Nov 1st, 2020): ‘Rubrics’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 6 (Nov 2nd- Nov 15th, 2020): ‘Modules’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 7 (Nov 16th - Nov 29th, 2020): ‘Homepage’ feature in Canvas LMS

Module 8 (Nov 30th- Dec 13th, 2020): ‘Canvas Studio’ feature in Canvas LMS

 

Schedule for Hands-on Workshops:

‘Pages’ Feature- Tuesday, September 1st, 2020 12 pm to 2 pm

‘Assignments’ Feature- Friday, October 2nd, 2020 12 pm to 2 pm

‘Modules’ Feature- Friday, November 13th, 2020 12 pm to 2 pm

‘Canvas Studio’ Feature- Friday, December 11th, 2020 12 pm to 2 pm

 

You can access the Faculty Development Timeline here and the Welcome Letter here

 

The session will present the details on the faculty development program and share data on the following:

  1. How it helped faculty improve the use of LMS for their remote/blended teaching 

  2. Faculty growth in pedagogical knowledge and development

  3. Institutional data on effective use of LMS

  4. Quantitative data on faculty training completion, time, reviews, feedback, and use of LMS

  5. Qualitative data on faculty responses, discussions, reflection notes, feedback and so on. 

  6. Qualitative and Qualitative data to demonstrate the success at the institutional level.

This presentation is intended for Academic Administrators, Design Thinkers, Instructional Support Staff, Faculty, Training Professionals and Educational Technologists. This presentation can be helpful to schools who are moving from one LMS to another and also those institutions who struggle to motivate their faculty to use their LMS effectively. The same faculty development approach can also be used to help faculty move towards a blended teaching and learning approach. This program prepares faculty rigorously on how to develop their course on Canvas that can help them design their courses for a blended/hybrid modality that involves combination of teaching online and traditional face-to-face. It can also prepare faculty to design their courses for a combination of asynchronous and synchronous teaching modalities. 

See Explanation of TPACK Model fitting for faculty/teacher development

During this presentation, I plan to engage my audience by doing a question & answer session, providing a link to the training program, and share the qualitative and quantitative data that shows faculty experiences. They will also be provided templates for faculty development approach and timelines for effective LMS training using the TPACK model. They will also be asked to share their own faculty development plans/implementations and how they intend to apply this training at their own institutions. This presentation is unique and valuable since it employs a novel and innovative approach using the TPACK model for a faculty development program on the usage of LMS effectively, a strategy that has not yet been tried. It is valuable to faculty and training designers in the field of education. With the help of this presentation participants will be able to think of an LMS from a pedagogical point of view and be more creative on how to use it when teaching their subject matter. Participants will be able to use this approach for faculty development at their own institutions. Personally, I seek to help Higher Education Institutions with faculty development efforts.

 

Learning Outcomes:

By the end of this educational session, participants will be able to:

  • Apply the TPACK model for LMS training at their own institutions
  • Use data on usage and effectiveness from faculty to design and develop faculty development programs and LMS training models at their own institutions
  • Design and Develop faculty development programs for effective LMS implementation at their own institutions
  • Connect and network with interested colleagues to collaborate on faculty development plans that integrate the TPACK model

Outline of the session:

Question & Answer Session/Discussion- Are faculty at your institutions making effective use of LMS? How do you train your faculty on how to use LMS? Is your training effective? (5 minutes)

Introduction/Learning Outcomes/TPACK Model/Past experiences with this training technique that worked and from where the idea was originated and developed (5 minutes)

Present samples of training material- Link to a repository with demos, slides, workshop models, faculty professional development timelines, and Canvas LMS course shell that present the training approach using the TPACK model. All the details related to the Faculty Development Program will be presented

See a brief sample here: https://tinyurl.com/tpacklms 

Note the tiny url link above presents/explains the TPACK model approach to train on LMS for this submission. The repository link on the day of the presentation will include the entire LMS training on the Canvas LMS course shell. Dummy accounts will be created on the school Canvas website and participants will be able to walk over and browse the training modules on Canvas implemented for this faculty development program. They will also get access to workshop slides and recordings. 

(5 minutes)

Share Data- Results of faculty participation, usage, experience, and the increase in the use of LMS will be shared. All data that demonstrated the success of the program will be shared. Problems that were anticipated and areas that could be improved upon if the same program was to be implemented again will also be shared. (10 minutes)

Application Activities- A Faculty Development Template (with a timeline) will be shared that will have an outline of the key aspects that need to be involved for effective LMS training (using the TPACK model) to increase its effective usage. Participants will be asked to brainstorm plans for their own institutions for such a training using this template. This activity will be done individually or in groups of two.

(15 minutes)

Audience Reflection Discussion on how this approach can be implemented in their institutions. (5 minutes)

 

*Sources (Also See List of all References): 

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge:  A new framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record 108 (6), 1017-1054.

TPACK.ORG. (2020). TPACK Explained Retrieved June 1, 2020, from http://tpack.org/

Mar 16, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Next Generation Curriculum Design: Agile, Technology Enabled, and Data Driven | Education Session

You’ve heard of agile development. But what about agile course design? In this interactive session, you’ll learn how Salem University and LearningMate partnered to reduce development time and costs, create sustainable online learning experiences, leverage key course components for reuse, and establish an effective process for sustaining ongoing revisions.

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Extended Abstract

Now, more than ever, faculty and academic leaders need a seamless and sustainable approach to online and blended course design. The Post-COVID landscape may improve and universities may see students back in traditional classrooms, but the student experience has changed forever. Flipped classrooms, HyFlex, and technology-enhanced learning programs are here to stay.

The development of online courses, though, can take a lot of time, money, and know-how. And not all institutions have the resources to support faculty with an instructional designer or multimedia expert. How can we provide courses with a high level of student engagement and mastery without reliance on a hefty instructional design infrastructure? One solution to this challenge is the agile course development model.

In this session, we will tell the story of the collaboration between Salem University and LearningMate. We focused on designing an ecosystem in support of the development of flexible, modular, reusable content. Through interactive discussion and demonstration, you will have an opportunity to explore a new process for course and program design and truly see how you can:

  • Ensure consistent online course components
  • Cut development time in half
  • Plan a more strategic evaluation of learning resources
  • Assess the quality of course content
  • Increase engagement in the design and development process
  • Enable flexible deployment of courses and credentials

You will leave with practical strategies to improve instruction at your institution, both through centralized planning and faculty engagement. Information will also be shared about LearningMate’s new tool for customizable course frameworks, learning outcomes management, and flexible support.

Mar 16, 2021
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Capturing Open Educational Practices with ePortfolios | Workshop

Open Educational Resources (OER) without Open Educational Practices (OEP) will not produce the educational transformations at the speed and scale that is possible.   This session will provide models of how to institutionalize open educational practices with ePortfolios and help participants develop their own local strategies for supporting OEP with ePortfolios.

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Extended Abstract

MERLOT (www.merlot.org)  has recently created a portal showcasing open educational practices for redesigning courses with technology, adopting OER, innovating career and technical education programs, using virtual labs, and moving online at http://oep.merlot.org.   The collection of over 1,000 eportfolios captured faculty's "know how" to adopt and adapt a wide range of technologies in transforming their teaching and their students' learning.   The ePortfolios are OERs that can be reused, revised, remix, retained and redistributed within the process of scaling the innovative practices.   The workshop will briefly review the IDEATE virtual event strategy designed by MERLOT and the Online Learning Consortium to openly share practices for teaching STEM Labs online.  

The workshop will guide participants through the extensive collection that covers many academic and CTE disciplines as well as explain and discuss strategies for leveraging the portal for their local use.  The workshop will include the presentation and discussion of institutional implementation strategies which have been successful in engaging faculty in open educational practices and adopted in multiple institutions.  The workshop will also demonstrate the use MERLOT's Content Builder application to create OER ePortfolios for capturing open educational practices at their own institution.   MERLOT provides templates for ePortfolios with scaffolding questions that guide users through the comprehensive reflection and documentation of their educational practices as they create OER that are hosted for free within MERLOT.

After a few introductory PPT slides providing the context for Open Educational Practices and MERLOT,   the workshop will involve a number of screen sharing  activities, directed tasks, and use of chat to share reflections on their learning.  After each of the major sections.  discussion via chat and video conference will be used to engage participants in the learning activities.   The workshop will end with people sharing their learning outcomes in the chat and verbally as well.

OER without Open Educational Practices will not produce the educational transformations at the speed and scale that is possible.   This session will provide models of how to institutionalize open educational practices with ePortfolio and should help participants develop their own local strategies for supporting OEP.

MERLOT's OER/Affordable Learning Solutions strategy and OEP services have been implemented as part of the HBCU Affordable Learning Solutions initiative.   See http://hbcuals.org to explore the HBCU AL$ Community Portal.   The workshop will showcase how a number of HBCUs have adapted the Affordable Learning Solutions "practice" into their own institutions.   The California State University System is composed of 20 HSIs and 16 ANAPIs and has been implementing the Affordable Learning Solutions Initiative  successfully for the past 10 years with over $40 million in  student savings for course materials in 2019-20 due to campus activities focused on  the adoption of OER and library resources.

Participants will acquire the knowledge and skills to:

1. Explore MERLOT's portal showcasing over 1,000 eportfolios capturing open educational practices for redesigning courses with technology, adopting OER, innovating career and technical education programs, using virtual labs, and moving online,

2. Use the open educational practices captured in OERs to support their own initiatives and  professional development programs

3. Use MERLOT's Content Builder to create their own OEP templates

Mar 16, 2021
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live: Let's Talk About Compassion Fatigue | Other

Join OLC Live hosts Chris Stubbs & Katrina Wehr for a discussion about compassion fatigue. Hear from the OLC community about how they've dealt with burnout and are supporting their institutions throughout the pandemic, and discuss strategies you can implement to make space for this real phenomenon.

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Community College Summit: Part 3 | Summit

Join us for this last session of three sessions at OLC’s Community College Summit, where we bring together educators and advocates of community colleges. This session will focus on promoting and supporting both student and faculty engagement in the time of COVID-19.  As a result of the pandemic, student enrollment in community colleges across the country has taken a dramatic dip, with a significant decrease in students of color.  There has never been a more critical time to focus on engagement as student engagement helps students persist and complete college programs.  This session will explore the continued need to remove cultural barriers that impede successful engagement, and we’ll see how one college does this by leveraging the library, and how another college engages faculty.  

 

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Extended Abstract

Last summer racial unrest permeated the air and COVID-19 held the nation in a vice grip.  As we kick off a new year,  enrollment at community colleges across the country continue to decline.  Engagement strategies can help students succeed and complete programs, but today, engagement looks different.  TaChalla Ferris is the librarian at Shoreline Community College and she works to create an open, engaging and socially relevant experience for the students.  Ms. Ferris will share her philosophy and initiatives implemented at Shoreline to engage students is culturally relevant learning.  Dr. Townes is the director of the Teaching Academy at Southwest Tennessee Community College where she focuses on faculty engagement and excellence.  She will share insights on keeping faculty motivated and inspired.  The teaching academy promotes faculty development, and since COVID-19 has shifted focus to help faculty identify and  include culturally relevant teaching strategies. 

Just when we thought we had things under control, COVID-19 interrupted our lives.  Community college faculty, like many other industries, jumped into action. At times it may have felt like we were on the proverbial treadmill that kept speeding up and all we could do was to hang on.

Well, we not only survived, we added awesomely to our innovation toolbox.

This summit celebrates all of that energy, through discussion, sharing and brainstorming about what was and what comes next. Learn more about the Community College Summit on our website.

 

Community College Summit sponsored by:

Mar 16, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Women in Learning | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Supporting awareness of gender equality and creating environments committed to a more diverse future is essential to the future of Higher Ed – join us to learn why. 

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Extended Abstract

COVID-19 has disrupted the workplace in ways we’ve never seen before – including Higher Ed. Many are struggling to do their jobs effectively and the boundaries between work and home have blurred. These disruptions have disproportionately impacted women, further intensifying issues they already face in the workplace. Now we risk losing women at all levels of the hierarchy. Recent studies have indicated that working mothers are three times more likely than men to discontinue work due to childcare demands. How can the Higher Ed and L&D industries combat the coming “she-cession”?

During this open dialogue, we will discuss strategies to support women in leadership roles, including:

  • Leveraging remote work as an opportunity to expand our female senior talent pool

  • Strategies on accelerating your career – even during a pandemic!

  • Creating the building blocks of a more empathetic workplace (“future skills”)

  • Overcoming gender stereotypes

  • Creating an allyship with men

  • Supporting women from ethnic minorities in learning

Mar 16, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Interactivity: The Vaccine for your Boring Syllabus | Education Session

Are you tired of receiving email after email asking you questions about material covered in the syllabus?  Are you looking for a better way to direct students to the important information they need to be successful in your course?  If so, then an interactive syllabus is the vaccine your syllabus needs to thrive in our new normal. 

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Extended Abstract

In online classes the syllabus is key for delivering important information to students.  Faculty often spend hours creating a comprehensive, well-organized syllabus.  Getting students to read the syllabus is another story entirely.  Faced with a generation who is used to Instagram, Tik Tok, and Twitter, it is evident that we need a new approach to reach students and meet them where they are.  The interactive syllabus is an approach that could accomplish just that.  Research shows quiz-based educational videos are most successful at fostering student success and engagement (Rice, et al., 2019). Furthermore, students have positive perceptions of interactive video and it has been shown to increase engagement in courses (Gedera and Zalipour, 2018). The interactive syllabus will help:

  • Focus student attention on the most important aspects of a course.

  • Draw attention to where students can find relevant information in your course.

  • Allow students to get to know your personality as their instructor.

  • Provide you with feedback you can use to gain a clearer understanding of what your students know about your syllabus.

In this session we will showcase an example of an interactive syllabus using PlayPosit, as well as best practices for integrating one into your already existing courses.  We will also discuss different free and paid options for incorporating the interactive features into your syllabus delivery.  

We will use PlayPosit’s synchronous interactive video presentation option, Broadcast, to create our interactivity. PlayPosit is an interactive video tool that allows learners to engage with what is being presented through interactions built over streamed videos. The Broadcast modality allows learners to use their own devices to interact with the presentation and answer questions that are displayed by the presenter. 

Using PlayPosit Broadcast in our remote learning environment, we will share our screen to display portions of our presentation including our co-designed interactive syllabus. Then, attendees will be asked to participate using their own devices by answering multiple choice, free response, check all, and fill-in-the-blank questions, etc. Attendees will only be required to go to a Bitly short URL to participate as no login is required. We will recommend attendees use a second device (phone, tablet, Chromebook, or computer) where possible to avoid having to switch between our shared presentation screen and the browser they will use to answer questions. More about using PlayPosit Broadcast in a remote environment can be found here: https://knowledge.playposit.com/article/267-how-to-use-broadcast-remotely

After seeing an example of an interactive syllabus, presenters will share their plan and process for creating an interactive syllabus.  We will then engage participants in a discussion surrounding best practices for integrating an interactive syllabus into a course and highlight different methods for doing so.  With a variety of tools available to produce interactive content, we will explore different options to meet the needs of designers and faculty in different institutions. 

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Inject your syllabus with interactivity

  • Identify potential interactive strains (technologies) to infuse life into your syllabus

  • Examine your institution for the proper antibodies (tech tools for interactivity)

  • Diagnose aspects of your course that are crucial for student survival

    • Prescribe an approach for incorporating those into an interactive syllabus

Participants will leave the session with an outlined plan of how to design their own interactive syllabus using tools that are readily available to them.

 

References

 

Gedera, D. & Zalipour, A. (2018). Use of interactive video for teaching and learning. ASCILITE Open Oceans: Learning Without borders, Geelong, 2018. Geelong, Victoria, Australia, ASCILITE.

 

Rice, P., Beeson, P. & Blackmore-Wright, J. (2019). Evaluating the Impact of a Quiz Question within an Educational Video. TechTrends 63, 522–532. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11528-019-00374-6

 

Mar 16, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Fanning the Flames: Online Faculty Burnout | Conversation, Not Presentation

This conversation explores how faculty burnout impacts faculty and organizations, by basing a discussion on key research findings and sharing ideas on how different institutions are, and can, prevent burnout. This space provides an opportunity to start a conversation on an important topic which is often neglected in the academy.

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Extended Abstract

With the dramatic pivot to online learning in Spring 2020, and the realities of shifting from on ground to online modalities for the foreseeable future, compounded with personal and professional  pressures, faculty burnout is anticipated to increase dramatically. Currently burnout in faculty members occurs both in the United States and throughout the world. It has been proven that 20% of United States university faculty have burnout, while a study conducted in Brazil shows that over 33% of one public university’s faculty indicate burnout symptoms (Alves et al., 2019; Lackritz, 2004; Padilla & Thompson, 2016).

This conversation explores how university faculty burnout impacts faculty and organizations, by basing the conversation on key research findings and sharing ideas on how different institutions are, and can, support faculty to prevent burnout. The definition of burnout that provides the foundation for our conversation is, “a persistent and negative mental state that is characterized by emotional exhaustion related to distress” (McCann & Holt, 2009, p. 99). 

During the conversation we  will discuss the signs and stages of burnout; and how variables such as gender, academic discipline, and institutional type impact perceived burnout. By having an understanding of the warning signs, attendees can begin a proactive, and most likely a reactive, approach to identify faculty in need of support. Participants will engage in self-reflective and pair-share exercises during our time together. By the end of the session, attendees will be able to identify burnout in their faculty, and have at least one faculty support idea that can be implemented in their own institution. 

Burnout is a pervasive problem in academia, exacerbated by our current circumstances. This conversation provides an opportunity for faculty, administrators, and faculty development professionals to start a conversation on an important topic which is often neglected in the academy. 

 

Mar 16, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Unlocking The Unconference: The Ideate Formula | Education Session

Even in the world of online, digital, and blended learning, not every organization, institution, or unit has figured out how to translate what they know about effective teaching and learning into the context of large community-wide professional development or convenings (like a conference). In this panel-style session, we will discuss a salon based discussion model called OLC Ideate that the organization has created to bring educators together in active collaboration. 


    

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Extended Abstract

Even in the world of online, digital, and blended learning, not every organization, institution, or unit has figured out how to translate what they know about effective teaching and learning into the context of large community-wide professional development or convenings (like a conference). In this panel-style session, we will discuss a salon based discussion model called OLC Ideate that the organization has created to bring educators together in active collaboration.

OLC Ideate makes its goal to both surface and model effective online engagement to educators, designers, practitioners and leaders of all levels and arenas.  Moving past the notion of a passive, “sit-and-get” online experience, each session (or “salon” within the Ideat model”) focuses on inspiring participants to leverage the power of online and digital learning with the goal of extending impact and access to education. Thus far, we have held three OLC Ideates, each with a different focus. Last Spring we gathered for the inaugural OLC Ideate around effective practices for online teaching (with the particular recognition of increased conversations around emergency preparedness and instructional continuity). Fall 2020 saw two OLC Ideates. In August, STEM educators came together to discuss how to deliver STEM laboratory experiences in online settings. In December, the community convened to discuss and operationalize our efforts to ensure equitable and inclusive access to digital learning environments.

Having brought over 3000 educators together over the course of these three OLC Ideates, we invite you to reflect with us on what we have learned along the way.. Those who attend this session will leave with a number of resources, including strategies for online collaboration. You will learn how to incorporate storytelling and dialogue into an event, as well as how to design with community-driven change in mind. 

  

Mar 16, 2021
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Storytelling with Dice & Dungeons | Evening Event

Join us for an evening of improvised, collaborative storytelling! We'll use the Dungeon World roleplaying game as a guide to drive our storytelling. What will you do as wizard in a strange land? Who will you save as a devoted cleric? What will you prize as a roguish thief? Come for adventure, stay for our awesome community! No prior experience required!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Enhancing instructor-student relationships through online journaling using Carl Rogers’ person-centered approach | Education Session

This presentation will explore ways to use online journaling within a learning management system and instructor feedback based on Carl Rogers’ model of person-centered learning to enhance teaching presence and the relationship between instructors and students.

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Extended Abstract

Central to the concepts of both learning and computer mediation is the notion of interaction. No matter what learning theories we hold - - behaviorist or constructivist, cognitivist or social -- reciprocal events and mutual response in some form must be integral to our notions of how we learn. Similarly, interaction has been widely cited as the defining characteristic of computing media (Murray, 2017, Turkle, 1997). Digital telecommunications connect people beyond the limitations of space and time to promote interactions among people who might not otherwise interact. Because interaction seems to be central to multiple conceptualizations of both learning and learning online, it highlights what is unique in online learning.

Michael G. Moore (1989) identified three kinds of interactivity that affect learning in any environment and that so must be developed online: interaction with content, interaction with instructors, and interaction among peers. Interaction with content refers both to learners' interactions with the course materials and to their interaction with the concepts and ideas they present. Interaction among peers refers to interactions among learners which also can take many forms -- debate, collaboration, discussion, peer review, as well as informal and incidental learning among classmates. Interaction with instructors includes the myriad ways in which instructors teach, guide, correct, and support their students. Each of these modes of interaction support learning and each can be uniquely enacted in online learning environments.

In Garrison, Anderson, and Archer’s (1999) Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework, interaction with students becomes teaching presence. A growing body of research has found that teaching presence is a major, if not the major factor, in developing robust learning communities online (Kozan, 2016; Shea & Bidjerano, 2009; Zhu et al., 2019). It stands to reason, then, that finding ways to enhance teaching presence, to enhance interactions between instructors and students, might lead to improved teaching and learning online.

This presentation grew out of the initiation of research into the use of Carl Rogers’ conditions for developing the relationship between therapist and client to minimize disengagement between the teacher and the student. This research began with finding a relationship between empathy and high regard and engagement and evolved to finding a relationship between empathy and high regard and teaching presence. The beauty of using Roger’s conditions is that these constructs can be taught to online instructors and easily broken down into doable techniques that instructors can use in any classroom be it online or face-to-face. In this presentation, we examine the medium of feedback on reflective journal entries to convey empathy, genuineness, level of regard, and  unconditionality.

Our previous research (Swan, Chen, & Bockmier-Sommers, 2020) explored student perceptions of links between Carl Rogers’ person-centered education and the Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework. We found significant links between the Rogerian constructs of level of regard and empathy and the CoI concept of teaching presence. The finding suggests potential avenues for investigating practical ways to enhance teaching presence, and thereby learning, in online courses.

In this presentation, we will report the ongoing research exploring exactly those connections. In particular, we are using content analysis to identify indicators of the Rogerian constructs of empathy, level of regard, genuineness, and unconditionality, and then qualitatively reviewing instructor feedback to explore their effects on the instructor-student relationship. Our focus is on student journaling with instructors, which creates a private space for students and instructors to interact. We believe that the journal is an ideal space in which to use Rogerian strategies to enrich the relationship between instructors and students and perhaps improve student engagement and outcomes.

We are investigating the following questions:

  • Can indicators of instructor expressions of empathy, regard, genuineness, and unconditionality be identified in instructor feedback, in particular in instructor responses to students’ journals?
  • Is the number of such indicators found in instructor feedback related to student perceptions of instructor empathy, regard, genuineness, and unconditionality?
  • Is the number of such indicators found in instructor feedback related to student engagement and/or student outcomes?
  • Can instructors be taught to use a Rogerian approach to responding to student journals to enhance the instructor-student relationship and improve student engagement and outcomes?

Methodology

We explore the use of Rogerian indicators in journals employed in undergraduate and graduate courses in education, human services, and public health at a small Midwestern university. Instructor responses in the journals were transcribed and associated with anonymized student identifiers, and then coded for instances of indicators of empathy, regard, genuineness, and unconditionality. The relative density of Rogerian indicators in the feedback given to students will be compared with students’ perceived engagement in the courses and with their achievement within them.

Participating students in all classes will be given the Barrett-Lennard Relationship Inventory (BLRI). The BLRI (Barrett-Lennard, 2015) is a survey instrument developed by Godfrey Barrett-Lennard as a means for assessing Rogers’ conditions for successful therapy. The education version is a 40-item measure that assesses the strength and quality of the student-instructor relationship. Barrett-Lennard’s (2015) research has confirmed its reliability and validity. The BLRI will be used to determine student perceptions of empathy, regard, genuineness and unconditionality. These will be compared with the content analyses of instructor feedback.

Presentation Outcomes

After attending the presentation, participants will have a better understanding of Carl Rogers’ person-centered education and a notion of how to use journals in online courses. They will also be familiar with indicators of Rogerian conditions that they might employ in journal responses to enhance their relationships with students in online classes.  Attendees will engage in a small sample of the BLRI survey at the onset of the presentation and will participate in a Q&A and discussion period as well. We will provide slides describing essential aspects of our research, links to related articles, and prospective formats for responding to student journals.

 

References

Barrett-Lennard, G. T. (2015). The relationship inventory: A complete resource and guide. John

Wiley & Sons.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (1999). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2–3), 87-105.

Kozan, K. (2016). A comparative structural equation modeling investigation of the relationships among teaching, cognitive and social presence. Online Learning, 20(3), 210-227.

Moore, M. G. (1989). Three types of interaction. American Journal of Distance Education, 3(2), 1-6.

Murray, J. H. (2017). Hamlet on the Holodeck: The future of narrative in cyberspace (updated ed.). MIT Press.

Shea, P. & Bidjerano, T. (2009). Community of Inquiry as a theoretical framework to foster ‘epistemic engagement’ and ‘cognitive presence’ in online education. Computers and Education, 52(3), 543-553.

Swan, K., Chen, C. C., & Bockmeir-Sommers, D. (2020). Relationships between Carl Rogers’ person-centered education and the Community of Inquiry framework: A preliminary exploration. Online Learning, 24(3), 4-18.

Turkle, S. (1997). Life on the screen: Identity in the age of the Internet. Simon & Schuster.

Zhu, M., Herring, S. C., & Bonk, C. (2019). Exploring presence in online learning through three forms of mediated discourse analysis. Distance Education, 40(2), 205-225.

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Lessons Learned: OLC's Ideate On Diversity, Equity, And Inclusion | Education Session

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is central to the work we all do within online, blended, and digital learning. DEI is core to community building. In this panel-style session, we will discuss what we learned from OLC Ideate: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Digital Learning Environments, a discussion based convening that brought together over 1000 educators to craft a charter for more equitable digital learning environments. 


  

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Extended Abstract

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) is central to the work we all do within online, blended, and digital learning. DEI is core to community building. It is core to conversations around sustainable and accessible programming. It should necessarily be core to any conversation around impact or student success and even extends into the space of technological innovations and our relationships with industry partners. That said, though DEI is a foundational thread to the breadth of work we all do, it nevertheless remains an area of focus that many feel under-prepared to talk about or lead programming around. Beyond individual skills and knowledge base, there is also the question of what it means to engage as a community around the systematic changes necessary to truly move towards diversity, equity, and inclusion in our field and the learning contexts we work in. 

In this panel-style session, we will discuss what we learned from OLC Ideate: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Digital Learning Environments, a discussion based convening that brought together over 1000 educators to craft a charter for more equitable digital learning environments. During this 5-day event, educators came together in dialogue around their challenges and our collective opportunities. Learn what we discovered from engaging community in a DEI-centered collaborative charter. Hear about ways to continue to get involved with the amazing and generative community we began to form during the event. And leave with a better understanding of how you might meaningfully engage others around diversity, equity, and inclusion.

 

     

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Improving Student Outcomes Through a Community-Based Approach to Learning and Support

First-year math classes are often the gateway to an undergraduate degree. Success instills confidence, and opens the door to degrees in any field, including STEM. And yet, failure rates for first-year math at many institutions can be above 50%, having significant, long-term impacts on a student’s educational trajectory. In this session, Juliet Greenwood, Vice Dean for Educational Initiatives at Arizona State University will share her experience using digital communities to scale personalized support and dramatically increase successful completion rates among ASU Online’s first-year math students. She'll also share how ASU plans to extend the community-based approach across the institution.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Sparty Matters: A Remix of Quality Matters for Internal Peer-to-Peer Course Reviews | Education Session

This session will highlight a course review process initiated by our Provost in the Spring of 2020 when the novel coronavirus necessitated a rapid shift to remote learning at MSU. A background will be shared along with what worked, what did not work, and planned revisions for the future.

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Extended Abstract

Background 

This session will highlight a course review process initiated by the Michigan State University Provost in the Spring of 2020 when the novel coronavirus necessitated a rapid shift to remote learning at MSU. A background will be shared along with what worked, what did not work, and planned revisions for the future. Since most of the faculty thrust into some form of online teaching did their best to adapt courses rapidly to Zoom and/or D2L and other online learning technologies, faculty were concerned that finishing the Spring might be mostly survival. The institution knew summer study for undergraduates would need to be delivered online. A robust faculty development program was prepared to help faculty prepare to teach online. This resulted in synchronous and asynchronous formats for professional-led workshops covering online teaching and learning best practices. It was decided that we should encourage faculty developing online courses for Summer and Fall 2020 to follow up with a structured peer-review format utilizing the Sparty Matters rubric, which had been voluntarily developed and used by some academic units at MSU in preceding years. An incentive for faculty to complete the full program was offered by the Provost’s office and the Associate Provosts worked with Assistant Deans in each college to prioritize and enroll instructors in training cohorts and review cohorts. 

Sparty Matters is based on the widely researched rubric maintained by the Quality Matters organization, of which MSU is a subscribing member, as well as previous simplification efforts of quality measurements at MSU in collaboration with MSU IT and the MSU College of Arts and Letters. This initiative drew from previously developed MSU rubrics and formative review processes in the colleges, as well as literature associated with online course quality. These materials were synthesized by Nick Noel and his collaborators to compile previous efforts into the summer 2020 rubric. 

The structure for the course review process involved assigning instructors, and two facilitators, to a review group and session. Whenever possible we organized instructors by their college. Each review session lasted two weeks. The first week instructors were asked to review two courses, with the facilitators providing guidance and answering questions. In the second week, instructors went over the reviews of their courses and formulated a revision plan for their course based on the feedback they received. These revision plans were due two weeks after the end of the session. At all phases we emphasized that the reviews were formative feedback, not mandates, and that they should be approached with kindness and understanding. In that vein, we put a low threshold of one course review being the minimum for being counted as having completed the process. All told, 327 instructors went through the process. 

What worked

The general approach of asking instructors to review each other’s courses seems to be, on the whole, a positive experience. Several instructors indicated that they found it useful to get feedback on their course, and see how other instructors had organized their courses. Many also appreciated the QM rubric sheet as a method of providing guidance to instructors on what they were looking for. Overall, there is indication that instructors would like to engage with their peers on the practice of teaching, and on how to best organize and deliver their courses.  

Facilitators reported on many aspects of the course review process that worked well related to collaboration and course alignment of learning objectives with learning activities, instructional materials, and evaluation. The rubric and corresponding feedback also heightened awareness about accessibility guidelines and assisted educators in understand some essential things they could do to better meet these guidelines. Most importantly, it helped them approach their course design from a learner's perspective. One facilitator said, “Our faculty members are actively embracing the challenges of teaching online. They are excited to learn from each other and are enthusiastic about making changes to improve their courses. Building a course is in effect, a lonely process, and I think it was wonderful that they now have a new shared experience joined with others, across disciplines, who are also working diligently to improve the learning experience. As a facilitator, it was a privilege to watch their excitement.” Working across disciplines was a common sentiment of what worked. Still, some suggested that working within the same discipline would have been more beneficial. Many simply stated how advantageous it was generally for faculty to be able to see how other courses are set up in D2L.   

It was important to recognize and iterate that faculty in the working groups may have been at all different levels of experience and comfort with online education. Even facilitators had varying degrees of experience. For some, Sparty Matters and the Quality Matters rubric itself upon which it was built was something they had never known of or used before. One facilitator mentioned that it would be something they would continue to be using from now on. Similarly, going through the QM training and review process also provided facilitators with the information they could apply toward modifying their own courses.  

These peer-reviews were timely and helpful because of COVID-19 when a lot of instructors were in the process of moving their courses online for the first time. The process aided instructors in giving them a sense of community, new perspectives on designing for active learning, sharing of resources, and space to reflect on their own courses and ask questions of their peers. Some teams reported having important discussions during the meetings on topics that are not always reflected in department meetings and trainings. It was a safe environment to ask questions about why and how one goes about teaching and there aren’t always many places for these types of conversations.   

What didn't work

There are several areas were found that could be improved in future iterations. Some instructors did not find the reviews to be meaningful due to the fact that Quality Matters, and thus Sparty Matters focuses only on the design elements of the course, rather than the teaching and learning elements. One participant noted that the frame “has nothing to do with the teaching or the learning process.” This was the strongest criticism, but one that may come from a misunderstanding of the intent of the reviews which intentionally focus on design only.  

Another simply just didn’t find the quality review work all that helpful, noting “One thing that I learned during this process is that I don't actually need or want the kind of help that was being offered. It just wasn't useful for me. However, there are other folks that I am certain found it very useful...this should not be seen as a poor reflection on the facilitators. I don't know what circumstances they were working under, and I feel it is important to be generous and grateful for the work they put into making this experience as valuable as possible while meeting university expectations.” 

Recommended revisions for future course reviews 

Facilitators recommended that they be paired with others who have done it before so that they have an opportunity to observe a previous session to get an idea of the duties and what they look like. There was a stated need for more clarity for what the facilitator role entails at the beginning of the process. They also suggested providing more documents, email templates and timelines. Some facilitators who facilitated multiple different sessions suggested a more standardized way of doing the reviews with faculty so that there wouldn’t be big changes from session to session.  

Specifics on what to communicate at the beginning of the process were discussed such as the timeline for compensation and what must be met to qualify. Instructors should be reminded how important the deadlines are because of how it holds up the process for many others in the group. There was a need for a tutorial for instructors on how to add reviewers to their courses in D2L. One facilitator suggested that it would be insightful to see faculty comments on the reviews they received and to follow up with a survey to see if student performance improved, if complaints went down, if they found the feedback useful and if they were able to implement the suggestions. Lastly, it was recommended that more faculty be encouraged to do these peer-reviews as they were extremely beneficial and that they be done every 3 years to ensure quality curriculum and alignment.

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Building Student Trust with Consistent Course Design | Education Session

How can you communicate care, compassion, and empathy to your online students? In the transactional culture of our day which seems only interested in "what can you do for me," how can we powerfully demonstrate our commitment to our students? It is actually easier than you would suppose. It starts with trust.

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Extended Abstract

 “Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.” – Stephen R. Covey

“Trust is earned when actions meet words.” – Chris Butler

“Without communication, there is no relationship. Without respect, there is no love. Without trust, there’s no reason to continue.” – Anonymous

How can you communicate care, compassion, and empathy to online students? In this transactional culture of our day, which is only interested in "what can you do for me," how can we demonstrate commitment and empathy to our students? It is easier than you would suppose. It starts with trust.

Building student trust is vital to online learning. It contributes to student engagement, completion rates, and deep learning.  But how can trust and student agency be built in a digital environment? A 2014 research study found that consistent, high-quality course design is the top factor for building student trust in online courses (Wang, Ye., 2014). This session will examine the four levels of trust needed for student engagement and three strategies to build trust with students using a consistent, high-quality course design.

Participation:

This session will begin with a short competitive game to introduce the concepts of trust, design, and consistency (5 minutes). After the presentation (25 minutes), attendees will collaborate to construct strategies for building student trust using consistent course design models (10 minutes). The session will wrap with a Q&A (5 minutes). Attendees will be provided with examples and a facts sheet on how to implement a consistent course design in their own courses. The presentation slide-deck along with all presentation documents will be made available via QR code.

Goals:

This session will inform faculty, instructional designers, and administrators on how to develop courses that build engagement, deep learning, and contributes to higher completion rates. At the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify and implement trust building course design strategies.

Mar 17, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
The COVID-19 Pivot: Comparing and Contrasting Three Institutions in Approach to Faculty Development and Digital Ecosystems | Education Session

This session will compare how three institutions responded to the COVID-19 crisis in terms of faculty development, partnerships, and digital infrastructure (edtech, LMS, etc).  Attendees will walk away with an understanding of what faculty development, partnerships and digital infrastructure projects were implemented with data on cost, impact, and recommendations.

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Extended Abstract

This session will compare and contrast how three institutions responded to the COVID-19 crisis in terms of faculty development and digital infrastructure.  Each institution will present on how they trained faculty with links to best practices and resources including data on cost of delivery and impact.  Each institution will talk to working with new partners across the institution and in the community.  Each institution will discuss their technical infrastructure including the learning management systems (LMS), edtech tools and support for students and faculty with these systems and tools.  This educational session will lean towards the conversation side as the presenters interact with the audience to understand what the audience learned in regards to faculty development, working with partners, and digital infrastructure.  Readings and slides will be provided before the session.  

Attendees will walk away from this session with an understanding of: 

  • What faculty development and digital infrastructure projects happened at each institution with recommendations on best practices, cost, and impact.

  • How different institutions across the country formalized new processes/programs in response to Spring 2020 pivot

  • How each institution is adapting faculty development support moving from Spring 2020 to Spring 2021

  • How these institutions are capitalizing on new opportunities for partnerships across the institution and into their communities 

Mar 17, 2021
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
OLC Live: Sponsor Chat with MindEdge Learning | Other

From designing innovative technologies to helping to establish sustainable infrastructure for professional and skills development, our industry partners play an important role in the field of Online, Digital, and Blended Learning.

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Build Better Canvas Courses In Less Time | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Join us to learn how DesignPLUS from Cidi Labs has helped over 300 educational institutions design better Canvas courses in less time. We'll demonstrate the DesignPLUS tools and show how they make it possible to design more engaging and accessible Canvas courses -- all without requiring html or css skills!

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Extended Abstract

Designing great looking Canvas courses that engage students often requires advanced knowledge of html and css, as well as lots of time and effort. DesignPLUS from Cidi Labs changes all that! The DesignPLUS toolset, which integrates seamlessly with Canvas, makes it possible to create expertly designed courses with ease and in much less time. Join us to see a demonstration by the inventor of DesignPLUS, who originally developed the tools at Utah State University's Center for Innovative Design & Instruction. The demonstration will highlight the various ways that DesignPLUS can help improve the quality, consistency and accessibility of your Canvas courses, without requiring any knowledge of html or css. We'll also highlight some examples of the amazing things other institutions have done with DesignPLUS, which is provided and supported as a SaaS offering by Cidi Labs.

Mar 17, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
OLC Leadership Network Event - Part 1: Learning Analytics As A Tool For Equity: Guiding Principles And Practices To Apply | Summit

Learning analytics has been heralded as a tool that can powerfully be used to support student success. Administrators and faculty recognize not only the latent value in student data to promote student academic performance, but also the opportunity it provides to assist institutions with implementing changes to close achievement gaps and eliminate race and income as predictors of student success. During this session, we will share the results of two national research initiatives, by APLU and EDUCAUSE and Tyton Partners, on the state of learning analytics, key barriers and challenges that we need to address as a field, and share institutional strategies for implementation.

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Extended Abstract

 

Learning analytics has been heralded as a tool that can powerfully be used to support student success. Administrators and faculty recognize not only the latent value in student data to promote student academic performance, but also the opportunity it provides to assist institutions with implementing changes to close achievement gaps and eliminate race and income as predictors of student success. However, do higher education administrators and faculty have the tools to interpret the data and make informed decisions that deliver the desired outcomes?

During this session, we will share the results of two national research initiatives, by APLU and EDUCAUSE and Tyton Partners, on the state of learning analytics, key barriers and challenges that we need to address as a field, and share institutional strategies for implementation.

Join us for this first session of three sessions at OLC’s spring leadership network event, where we bring together digital leaders from academics, non-profits, and the private sector to discuss digital education strategy in times of great change.  This session will focus on maintaining vision through times of crisis, and is open to both established and emerging leaders attending the conference.

Digital leaders are guiding initiatives at traditional academic institutions and non-profits, attempting to maintain vision through crises, developing new partnerships and approaches within the private sector, and working to establish policies and regulations within government. We see ever increasing demand for cross-sector collaborations led by digital leaders across an increasingly diverse educational landscape. Join us at this half-day event for featured presentations and small group discussions on opportunities for digital leaders, both established and emerging, to create new pathways to student success amidst the rapidly-changing higher education landscape.

The Leadership Network Event option is included in your OLC Innovate Virtual Conference 2021 registration fee. There is no additional registration fee to participate in the event.  Learn more about this session and all of the sessions at the Leadership Network Event page.

 

OLC Leadership Network Event sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Build It Better: Tackling the User Experience in Higher Ed Technology | Industry Showcase - Presentation

The educational technology terrain is changing quickly. Planning for and focusing on the needs of students and instructors as a core driver of product design is critical to ensure that they are not lost. Evan Travers, Lead User Experience Architect at ProctorU, has over thirteen years of experience working with customer-facing development projects. He will talk briefly about the practice of User Experience Design, discuss some of the challenges of product design in the world of online learning, and showcase some of ProctorU’s past roadblocks and greatest successes.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 17, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Defining quality learning in self-paced eLearning: Practices and challenges | Education Session

This session will engage participants in a discussion on defining quality design practices for self-paced eLearning. We will discuss how self-paced fits into the eLearning landscape, examine theoretical assumptions to determine impactful design choices, and discuss the design challenges.

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Extended Abstract

The focus of this session is to discuss and establish learning design practices and principles for self-paced eLearning (SPeL) materials – learning tutorials that are delivered without the aid of a facilitator. The central question being asked is: what defines quality instruction when materials are presented without the aid of a facilitator?

SPeL is typically used in professional training contexts, delivered through a human resource office’s training department, or as part of client or product training packages. However, there has been a growing use of self-paced learning for credit-based higher education course support. A SPeL learning course or module contains the learning content, the instructional process, and assessment system typically packaged together and plugged into a learning management system. Software packages such as Articulate 360 or Adobe Captivate are popular tools used to create SPeL materials.

This session will focus on helping instructional designers and developers make better decisions in the production of SPeL materials. This will be accomplished by highlighting aspects of distance education theory, showing examples of design practices, discussing what design choices might enhance the development of SPeL, and present the challenges in developing self-paced materials – particularly related to meeting accessibility standards.

The session will begin with an opening activity, where the presenter will ask groups of participants to list distance education examples between a continuum of formal and informal learning. This information will be recorded on a shared digital workspace used throughout the session. Groups will be then asked to share their ideas while the facilitator asks pre-arranged questions related to the effectiveness, efficiency, and appeal of the examples. Within the spectrum between formal and informal eLearning, the facilitator will establish a threshold that distinguishes self-paced eLearning (SPeL) from other types of eLearning. This will be connected to common theories and practices that influence learning design and in turn, SPeL design. The facilitator will then show examples SPeL courses, while asking participants to provide feedback. The session will conclude with the presentation of design tensions instructional designers and developers face when creating self-paced eLearning. Participants will be asked to reflect on how these tensions impact their design choices.

The premise of this presentation is to acknowledge the use and ubiquity of self-paced eLearning materials within the broader range of eLearning, particularly as it relates to formal and informal learning. Researchers and thought leaders such as Michael Allen (Michael Allen’s Guide to eLearning) and Ruth Clark and Richard Mayer’s (eLearning and the Science of Instruction) have dominated the field of eLearning design and provide design guidance related to SPeL. However, eLearning in higher education means something very different. Michael Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance (TTD) may provide a bridge between formal distance education and SPeL used in professional training design and bridge this gap. Through a session such as this, it may help disentangle conflating definitions of eLearning, and perhaps helps focus on the problems instructional design is meant to solve – impacting behavioral change or improving performance.

Mar 17, 2021
10:15am - 12:15pm (Central)
1-Minute Gardener: Plant Mindful Teaching Strategies in Digital Learning Terrains | Workshop

It takes less than a minute to empower students, regardless of ability, in a digital learning terrain. Explore how a meditation bell in weekly announcements increases focus or how a gratitude list on a whiteboard can improve groupwork. Craft these mindful experiences to plant into any LMS or live session.

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Extended Abstract

How can changing the color of the background on the screen for 60 seconds during a recorded or a live lecture create ease when transitioning into a difficult or complex topic? How can having students trace a labyrinth pattern on their phone or screen with their finger allow them to see answers more clearly before a test? 1-minute mindful pause points are strategic teaching strategies. When simple embedded behaviors are paired with engaging students in overt mindful activities, we confront some of the realities of a COVID paradigm shift. Integrating mindfulness in teaching empowers and eases students’ bodies and minds back into the classrooms to improve learning.

The Planting Mindfulness series was originally facilitated with members of the LGBTQ community to support an initiative embracing neurodiversity. In this condensed version, the interactions and models will resonate with instructional designers and instructors in K-12 and Higher Education. Asynchronous examples are showcased in Canvas but also use features that span different LMS, such as simple formatting and integrating multimedia.

The objectives of this participatory workshop are to:

  • Design a mindful activity or plan to integrate into their LMS and / or live class
  • Engage in diverse individual and collective mindful experiences during an online educational session
  • Explore the benefits and potential dangers of purposeful mindful activities in classrooms
  • Contribute to a repository of mindful activities from participants’ experiences.

Our playfulness achieves practical solutions: products and experiences can be integrated into the digital fabric of the LMS environment asynchronously, such as embedding an open educational resource from archive.org as a meditation bell,  and in synchronous facilitated sessions, such as learner-driven, anonymous intention lists on the whiteboard. Attendees will be able to use these creations immediately. While we are using backwards design principles, the activities themselves are based on cognitive embodiment, democratic pedagogy, trauma theory, and care pedagogies. We build for autonomy. For agency. For inclusion. For equity. And we build to suspend judgment.

Our format thrives on attendees' willingness to participate at their level of comfort. Examples and interactive elements cater to a range of different physical, cognitive, learning, and other abilities. After we center ourselves with a 60-second demonstration, we'll play in a demo course and explore different common and new technologies to build the experiences. A sprinkling of the theory behind the methods demonstrates practical applications in teaching and learning environments.

During our time, attendees explore and choose among categories, such as affirmations, abilities, and activities, to create their 1-minute mindful moments. In both large and small-group interactions we will frame the purpose; play with possibility; find a model; deconstruct the strengths and challenges; and pause.

When available, and relative to the number of attendees, breakout rooms allow 3-4 participants to practice creating a mindful moment, which might include a quick experience with a free tool from a list of resources. Individuals are invited to pursue their own interests and offer their own examples for feedback and development.

The session resolves with a plan for learning extension. Following an invitation to place ideas and activities into a repository and share this library with others, this time isn’t just a Q & A. It’s also a chance to make a statement of intention to take only what they need to succeed back with them.

Attendees are asked to have a device that allows them to join and tour a demo course in Canvas during the session. A microphone is encouraged.

Mar 17, 2021
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
Choose Your Own Speed Networking Adventure: Breakout Bonanza | Other

Join us in the Speed Networking Lounge for a “whatcha wanna talk about?” experiment where we leverage the power of Zoom breakout rooms to create casual, “mini speed networking lounges” based on common interests. We’ll determine interests and themes in the first 10 minutes, but hop in whenever you can and we’ll help you make some quick friendships before the 30 minutes are up!

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Virtual Speed Networking sponsored by:

 

Mar 17, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
“Not another speech?” Tips and tricks to infuse conversations, presentations, podcasts and stories throughout our online spaces. | Education Session

As we reimagine online education, let’s also reimagine speeches and reframe presentations as conversations.  Speeches are stressful, whether in F2F, hybrid or Zoom environments and sometimes the format can increase the anxiety. Let’s collaborate and reimagine speeches as intentional opportunities to share stories and connect in meaningful and empowering ways. 

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Extended Abstract

As we reimagine online education, let’s also reimagine speeches and reframe presentations as conversations.  Speeches are stressful, whether in F2F, hybrid or Zoom environments and sometimes the format can increase the anxiety. In many cases, we follow the same format and speech design that was used generations ago.  True, the fundamentals of good communication, speaking with conviction and clarity in a tone and volume welcoming to a target audience that we connect with, have not changed yet how we deliver speeches and how we can deliver speeches should have changed significantly over the years. As we move to online education, virtual interviewing, and working from home as the normal rather than the unusual, let’s also reimagine and innovate how we teach our students to communicate and share their gifts, stories, and voices. Let’s seize this opportunity for innovation, to craft speeches more as presentations and conversations rather than performances, empower all students to share their knowledge and stories, and reduce speech anxiety by creating warm and welcoming spaces where all students can succeed.  We will explore a variety of presentation opportunities, including virtual, team, research, and traditional, and examine ways to reduce the anxiety and increase the value of each. We will also uncover different formats, purposes and challenges.

 

We are going to co-create this experience together and rely on one another to actively engage and contribute. We will tell stories, share ideas, ask and answer questions, and explore some tools to help us empower our students.  I will share some data I have gathered over the years about speech anxiety via a PowerPoint slidedeck and we can explore how that may shape how we conceptualize about our students’ experiences moving forward. We can share some Best Practices to reach oral communication outcomes that do not necessarily have to involve a student standing in front of a classroom or a Zoom camera by themselves and reading from their notes.  We can do better than that and we can empower our students to do much better than that.  I will share an open access website about speech anxiety that we can explore, and we can brainstorm other great sites and resources on our campuses and in our shared virtual spaces. We will engage in conversations about the power of words, reframing, and empathy. We will brainstorm ways to remove roadblocks. We will also discuss ways we can share our new insight with our students, colleagues, and campuses. We are going to reimagine speeches and in doing so we can redesign student empowerment and engagement. Please join us!

Mar 17, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
OLC Leadership Network Event - Part 2: Post-COVID Online Futures: Clues From CHLOE 6 | Summit

Managing the COVID emergency is the mightiest distraction higher education leaders have ever faced. Short-term tactical needs are so novel and pressing that long-term strategic planning- always hard to focus on but vital for institutional health- seems impossibly abstract and low priority. Early data from the sixth CHLOE (Changing Landscape of Online Education) survey, an annual study from Quality Matters and Eduventures, delves into the messy realities online learning leaders face in 2021. In this panel, educational leaders will reflect on the design of the CHLOE 6 survey, seeking to both follow trends from prior surveys and illuminate pandemic-specific developments, and distill what early analysis of the results reveals about directions of travel for online learning in the 2020s.

 

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Extended Abstract

Managing the COVID emergency is the mightiest distraction higher education leaders have ever faced. Short-term tactical needs are so novel and pressing that long-term strategic planning- always hard to focus on but vital for institutional health- seems impossibly abstract and low priority.

Institutional leaders are caught between holding their breath until normality returns, if it does, and anticipating (or inventing) new student experience-business model equations that can thrive in what may be a post-COVID future that looks very different from the 2010s.

Early data from the sixth CHLOE (Changing Landscape of Online Education) survey, an annual study from Quality Matters and Eduventures, delves into the messy realities online learning leaders face in 2021. The survey covers questions such as:

  • On which technology types are online leaders placing bets?
  • Did fully online degree program, established pre-pandemic, see enrollment rise or fall in 2020?
  • To what extent are institutions rolling out enterprise online course development and student support arrangements?
  • Did 2020 convince more schools to lower online program prices?
  • Did more schools turn to online program management (OPM) companies for help?
  • How has the pandemic affected the internal standing of the Chief Online Officer?

Richard Garrett, Chief Research Officer at Eduventures will be joined by Dr. Sasha Thackaberry, VP Online & Continuing Education, Louisiana State University and Dr. Eric Fredericksen, Associate VP for Online Learning, University of Rochester, both members of the CHLOE Advisory Panel, who will contribute their current strategic thinking, adding local depth to CHLOE's breadth.

The panelists will reflect on the design of the CHLOE 6 survey, seeking to both follow trends from prior surveys and illuminate pandemic-specific developments, and distill what early analysis of the results reveals about directions of travel for online learning in the 2020s.

This panel serves as the second session of three sessions at OLC’s spring leadership network event, where we bring together digital leaders from academics, non-profits, and the private sector to discuss digital education strategy in times of great change.  This session will focus on futurecasting the positioning and role of online education in supporting access to education, and is open to both established and emerging leaders attending the conference.

Digital leaders are guiding initiatives at traditional academic institutions and non-profits, attempting to maintain vision through crises, developing new partnerships and approaches within the private sector, and working to establish policies and regulations within government. We see ever increasing demand for cross-sector collaborations led by digital leaders across an increasingly diverse educational landscape. 

Join us at this half-day event for featured presentations and small group discussions on opportunities for digital leaders, both established and emerging, to create new pathways to student success amidst the rapidly-changing higher education landscape.

The Leadership Network Event option is included in your OLC Innovate Virtual Conference 2021 registration fee. There is no additional registration fee to participate in the event.  Learn more about this session and all of the sessions at the Leadership Network Event page.

 

OLC Leadership Network Event sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
The Best Case Scenario: Scenarios for Serious Learning | Education Session

This interactive session explores how we drew upon foundational teaching and learning practices--scenario-based learning, backwards design, curriculum mapping, and the latest neuroeducation research--to redesign an MBA program to meet new challenges and opportunities identified by our students, faculty, and the employers who hire our graduates.

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Extended Abstract

Topic Relevance

The world is changing rapidly and our graduates need to be able to solve wicked problems. We approached the redesign of our MBA program with this challenge in mind. In this session, we focus on foundational teaching and learning practices: scenario-based learning, backwards design, curriculum mapping, and neuro-education research related to design and teaching. We will share how we applied these approaches to create new teaching and learning experiences designed to meet the demands of the fourth industrial revolution (4IR).

Interactivity

The inspiration to redesign the program stemmed from many factors including the competitive marketplace, student feedback, faculty feedback, and the need for curricula to adapt to industry standards. As with any university, we had some non-negotiable constraints to work within. Each speaker will present a scenario that drove our decision making. After we set the stage with a scenario, we’ll provide a range of options that we faced, and invite participants to consider which option they would have pursued.

Takeaways

We will share key inflection points: How do we learn more about our learners? How do we balance the theoretical with the practical to create a student-centered program? How are business practices -- teamwork, leadership, self-directed learning, strategic and operational thinking, corporate social responsibility -- best integrated into the curriculum? How can scenario-based learning be designed to give students a safe space to practice, fail, and practice more the skills their current and future employers seek? How do we map the curriculum for increased flexibility and with future program efficacy data in mind? Attendees will come away with reference tools and concrete ideas that address these and other questions.

 

Mar 17, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
A Team Approach to the Institutional Adoption of Digital Learning | Industry Showcase - Presentation

This session is focused on a story of collaborative leadership innovation. Community college leaders work hard to support their students and provide access to affordable, quality programs. In the midst of a global pandemic, this work becomes even more challenging, forcing leaders to quickly problem-solve under high stakes circumstances. At Northcentral Technical College, leaders rose to the challenge.

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Extended Abstract

This session is focused on a story of collaborative leadership innovation. Community college leaders work hard to support their students and provide access to affordable, quality programs. In the midst of a global pandemic, this work becomes even more challenging, forcing leaders to quickly problem-solve under high stakes circumstances. At Northcentral Technical College, leaders rose to the challenge.

Northcentral Technical College is located in Wasau, WI and enrolls 12K students across NTC’s 120 programs. A member of the Wisconsin Technical College System, NTC is a comprehensive community and technical college serving suburban and rural counties. In describing her role as Executive Dean of Academic Excellence, Emily Stuckenbruck says she “speaks both academics and IT”. This was extremely helpful in establishing NTC’s online programs but also in weathering the challenges of COVID-19. Prior to the pandemic, NTC adopted an institution-wide subscription to a complete catalog of digital course materials from Cengage. This was done to lower student costs and provide a digital learning infrastructure across the institution. Having this resource in place made the COVID-driven transition to remote learning an easier one with 80% of learning uninterrupted. Dean of Academic Technology Jon DeGroot was Emily’s partner in implementing the rollout of this catalog across programs and courses at NTC. The Cengage team played a vital role in this accelerated migration to new, digital course materials. Services and professional development as well as student support were all provided during the rollout and throughout the spring and fall of 2020. Andrea Iorio, NTC’s account manager, will share the partner’s perspective in this inspiring story.

Learning Outcomes:

  • Discover how collaborative leadership innovation can drive positive change at your institution.
  • Learn how digital learning strategies support both your students and your institution.
  • Hear how a system-wide subscription to a complete catalog of digital course materials provides affordability and quality learning.
Mar 17, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Delivering Virtual Labs in Rehabilitative Sciences During COVID-19: Strategies and Instructional Cases | Education Session

While hands-on training for students came to a halt during the pandemic, the University of Saint Augustine for Health Sciences leveraged its technology, simulation expertise, digital resources, and innovation culture to deliver active learning. We provide our framework and share cases of how faculty creatively used resources such as video, 3D printing, and simulation to “keep teaching” now and into the future.  

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Extended Abstract

Due to federal and local regulations related to social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, programs in the medical and rehabilitative sciences have been faced with the unique challenge of converting hands-on laboratory activities to an online format. This conversion has been complicated by rapidly evolving standards regarding activities acceptable to meet accrediting body guidelines for fieldwork and/or clinical education. However, most accrediting bodies have sanctioned the use of virtual labs to maintain continuity of instruction by preparing and in some cases substituting virtual for hands-on learning activities.

This presentation will provide an overview of the strategic learning framework that is being employed by the University in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and share practical case examples of how faculty have used university resources and support to not only maintain academic continuity, but to deliver excellence during virtual instruction.

We will also examine how the new approaches and changes we have supported are impacting the future of how we define quality in online and blended education. Many of the new approaches and technologies will become permanent parts of our teaching model, and we will offer strategic lessons learned to guide planning and budgeting for a complex and uncertain future. These strategic pillars include:

Strategy 1: Invest in Instructional Design and Resources for Media Development

A quality digital video approach, particularly in the health sciences where visual cognition is important for learning, incorporates and integrates rich, relevant, and outcomes-linked instructional video. Skills demonstrations and clinical scenarios using standardized patients and simulated environments provide students with the important visual models and processes to prepare them to perform competently in authentic clinical settings.

During the rapid pivot to virtual instruction, two additional pedagogical considerations emerged – 1) the need to quickly produce new video and multimedia content to supplement minimized or lost physical lab demonstration time, and 2) the need to adopt a “two-way” video approach to replace the physical lab feedback model. We will share our strategies and lessons learned as we met these challenges.

Strategy 2: Implement Simple Yet Powerful Active Learning Techniques

Although there are many ways to do make online learning “active,” our focus is on supporting faculty to adopt a few essential technologies to accomplish a) synchronous and asynchronous interactions with personalized feedback, b) critical thinking activities that promote authentic learning, creativity, higher-level thinking, and application, and c) knowledge and skill competency using hands-on learning activities.

To support a lab learning environment, we implemented a variety of strategies that include synchronous and asynchronous interaction, at-home lab kits, as well as a video demonstration and multiple modes of feedback. We also adapted simulation to be “virtual,” and constructed unique interprofessional simulated learning experiences to engage students and support the development of their clinical skills virtually.

Strategy 3: Amplify Development, Support, and Digital Resources

As the University leaned into the virtual environment, we made a decision to not just provide support to faculty, but to overwhelm them with support opportunities using a just-in-time, active, and multi-modal approach. We will share the numerous resources, ideas, approaches, and strategies that guided our faculty support model, which also includes the University’s Technology, Innovation, and Peer Support (TIPS) team of faculty on each campus who offer virtual sessions for faculty peers and provide one-on-one consultation on a variety of topics to support instruction and overall teaching effectiveness.  

Strategy 4: Adopt the Mindset of an Innovation Culture

At the heart of the University’s mission is “innovation.” We know we are being “innovative” when we as educators and institutional leaders thoughtfully apply and experiment with different tools, technologies, and approaches in order to optimize student learning. At USAHS, a culture of innovation manifests in many ways. For example, grant support is competitively awarded to faculty and staff (including financial, professional development funding, and technical resources) through the Innovation Steering Committee, which is dedicated to supporting new ways to strengthen student outcomes. Our cultural mindset fosters and encourages a passionate curiosity and a measured risk-taking approach. The University is committed to scanning the internal environment for problems that need to be solved, and also scanning the external environment for best practices, tools, and technologies to foster continuous improvement in healthcare education outcomes.

During COVID-19, as we were faced with the need to quickly innovate to solve problems, teams from across the five campuses came together quickly to examine data, discuss solutions, and identify potential solutions. Internal collaboration allowed us to work together, but agility allowed us to innovate solutions quickly but responsibly. As solutions were identified, we moved quickly to implementation with a healthy tolerance for risk-taking. For example, as noted, faculty required solutions for formative and summative feedback in the virtual environment. Faculty were invited to submit solutions and suggestions, and it was from within the faculty that GoReact was suggested. Within just a few days, the Information Technology, Finance and Contracts, and the Teaching, Learning and Innovation teams had collaborated to license, install, and integrate the platform into the learning management system. A similar process was executed with Respondus, which was needed to replace campus-based proctored testing.

Instructional Cases

During the session, we will present examples of faculty innovation that embody the strategic framework that has guided our approach to COVID-19. These cases show how the university leveraged its culture of innovation, agility, and problem-solving to meet student needs. Faculty across the University designed and implemented hundreds of such cases and continue to do so as we approach a future shifting toward a greater reliance on virtual teaching due to COVID-19.  

The cases we will highlight with video, images, and practical perspective as to “how-to” are:

Case 1: Virtual Lab Kits for Home Fabrication of Orthoses

Case 2: 3-D Printing of Anatomic Models

Case 3: Using GoReact for Formative Assessment of Psychomotor Skills

Case 4: Using GoReact for Summative Assessments

Case 5: Telehealth Focused Virtual Simulation

Case 6: Virtual COVID-19 Patient Case Simulation Using the Double Robot

A Look at the Future

USAHS has been able to quickly apply a strategic learning framework with innovative solutions to preserve the integrity of the University’s active learning model during a rapid shift to fully virtual learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Undeniably, the pandemic has changed higher education, in some ways potentially permanently. If there is a silver lining in such a tragic episode, it is that the pandemic has forced all higher education stakeholders to solve instructional problems creatively and be resilient. Technology has also afforded us the opportunity to stay connected virtually, and rather than merely replicating our campus environments, we have had to innovate new ways to teach.

At the University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences, we remain committed to innovating new and enhanced teaching and learning strategies, as well as assessing our progress using data-driven approaches. The University has established data points and ongoing measurements for learning outcomes and student satisfaction throughout the alternative teaching period.

During the presentation, we will share our perspectives on the future and invite participants to share theirs as well.

Mar 17, 2021
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
OLC Design Sprints (Part 1): A Lunch Networking Event | Other

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the first of a series of OLC Innovate Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of three days. This session in particular will center community building. Participants will be divided into teams and together you will generate solutions to a unique design challenge. Along the way, you'll have a chance to make meaningful connections with other conference participants (including our industry partners), will leave with innovative ideas, and even have an opportunity to win a prize!

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Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Flexibility With Online Proctoring: LockDown Browser And Respondus Monitor | Industry Showcase - Presentation

See how LockDown Browser and Respondus Monitor help over 1,500 colleges and universities deter cheating across a variety of online testing scenarios. You'll see how they work, hear keys to success, and discover new features and integrations that make this the most powerful and flexible proctoring solution available.

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Extended Abstract

This session begins with an overview of LockDown Browser (a custom browser that locks down a computer during online exams) and Respondus Monitor (a fully-automated proctoring system).

We’ll discuss new integrations and settings that allow for test integrity in a variety of testing scenarios. Keys to success will be covered, including training resources for instructors, and 24/7 live chat support for students. We'll also discuss security, privacy concerns, scalability, and licensing/pricing options.

These applications integrate with leading LMS including Canvas, Blackboard Learn (original and Ultra), Brightspace, and Moodle, as well as leading publisher platforms including MyLab and ALEKS. You can learn more before the session at https://web.respondus.com/he/monitor/. There will be time available at the end of the session for Q&A.

Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Go Online on Your Timeline: Pick Your Pace Pedagogy | Education Session

Our faculty training program was developed by the Center for Teaching and Learning at Shepherd University in West Virginia.  Geared toward instructors at all experience levels (and all motivation levels), and designed to be highly flexible and adaptable, this six-module, no-cost training greatly fosters learner satisfaction, as well as wide-reaching access and scale.  Assessment data gathered throughout the training help us reinforce a culture that values best practices in teaching and learning, as well as continuous improvement.

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Extended Abstract

The “Go Online on Your Timeline:  Pick Your Pace Pedagogy” (PPP) training program is the first of its kind at Shepherd University in Shepherdstown, West Virginia.  While this free and comprehensive training program has been evolving over the past five years, it wasn’t until Covid-19 and the months following, that the Center for Teaching and Learning team decided to “package” the experience in different ways in order to best suit the learning styles and schedules of our institution’s professors and working professionals.

Incorporating best practices from entities such as the Online Learning Consortium (OLC), Quality Matters (QM), and the SUNY Online Course Quality Review Rubric (OSCQR), Shepherd’s PPP utilizes six learning modules that encompass learners’ most immediate needs at our institution including: Learning Management System (LMS) Immersion Training, Quality Course Design Training, Web 2.0 Tool Overviews, Community Building Exercises, Accessibility and Usability Training, and Exposure to the Latest Research in Online Learning.

As we moved from a “remote triage” implementation process in March and April, to quality practice development in May, we wanted to make sure all faculty at Shepherd University who chose to teach online in the fall 2020 semester had access to an effective training opportunity.  Thus, we re-scaled our in-house training program to make it free of cost to learners, minimal in terms of time commitment, and high impact, even for those faculty who were very resistant to learning to teach online.

In order to best engage our learners, we developed three very different tracks of PPP.  Our first track, “Beginner Rise and Shine” was scaled for faculty who felt uncomfortable with technology and online teaching as a whole.  This course still contained six learning modules, but these modules were “stretched” over three weeks.  This way, learners had more time to complete the exercises and plenty of opportunities to meet one-on-one with the dean or the information technology consultant via Zoom to work toward meeting the learning outcomes.  Extra time was spent on tool mastery within the learning management system and key asynchronous skill-building activities such as screencasting, video recording, and effective and engaging discussion forum techniques.  

Our second track was scaled for faculty members who felt comfortable with technology, but had never taught fully online and needed help molding their face-to-face course to that modality.  We called this PPP track “Intermediate Intensive.”  The same six modules were utilized, but condensed into one week’s time.  Because these faculty members were comfortable with our learning management system and technology in general, we were able to share more in terms of web 2.0 tools and take deeper dives into the literature surrounding best practices with online teaching.  We were also able to do more than skim the surface in terms of accessibility issues and 508 compliance- all very new to our campus. 

Finally, for faculty who had already earned their online teaching certifications, we set up free 1.5 hour “Zoominars” throughout the month of July.  These refresher courses were intended to help teachers enhance skills for online teaching and introduce them to new tools.  Our “Zoominars” were led by the Shepherd University Library and Center for Teaching and Learning team and included sessions on “How to Host an Effective Zoom Meeting,” “Using Microsoft OneDrive,” “Using Microsoft Teams as an Alternative to Zoom,” “Using Google Forms,” “How to Use Test Proctoring Software,” “How to Set Up a Sakai-Savvy Test,” and “How to Make Your Online Course More Accessible and Usable.”  

By allowing faculty to “pick their pace” and go online on their own timeline, we were able to improve and expand access for training to the point that nearly 100% of our full-time faculty members currently teaching online are now officially "certified" to do so.  Furthermore, by “picking their pace,” faculty found the educational value of the experience to be very high impact.

Shepherd University is a small, public liberal arts university with roughly 3700 students and 150 full-time faculty members.  Because we are located in a very financially depressed state with higher education budgets ever on the decline, we wanted to provide our teachers with an online training experience that was not only valuable and time efficient, but one that came at no cost to learners.  Therefore, our training was provided absolutely free in order to ensure the greatest access and engagement with the opportunity.  The only equipment needed by learners was working internet and a computer or tablet.  A phone worked just as well since the program was delivered on our LMS, Sakai, which is mobile-friendly.

Our two main goals, in addition to achieving the learning objectives within each of the six modules was to make sure that 100% of learners in our training sessions, 1) set up courses that achieved all of the Specific Review Standards (SRS) on the Quality Matters Remote Checklist (QM), thereby receiving an online teaching certification through our Center for Teaching and Learning and, 2) found the course educationally valuable and satisfying.

This presentation will provide a detailed overview of the various modules and provide feedback from various participants.  This training program can be replicated on any learning management system and the process is valuable for any institution looking to develop a no-cost training program, especially if you are short-staffed and are experiencing faculty resistance to or anxiety about online teaching.

Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Connecting With Purpose: Proven Techniques For Strengthening Inclusivity | Education Session

This interactive session will apply and illustrate how 5 principles for inclusive teaching and learning (adapted from Columbia University’s Teaching and Learning Center) using a Purposeful Learning Framework.   Using examples for adopting OER to applying UDL principles, the outcome of the session is to provide participants a better understanding of inclusivity and to become familiar with tools, technologies, and design strategies that can be immediately adopted to strengthen inclusivity in their own programs

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
OLC Leadership Network Event - Part 3: Innovation And Visionary Leadership | Summit

Join us for this last session of three sessions at OLC’s spring leadership network event, where we bring together digital leaders from academics, non-profits, and the private sector to discuss digital education strategy in times of great change. This session will focus on the evolving nature of student services in present times and the future, and is open to both established and emerging leaders attending the conference.

 

 

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Extended Abstract

Join us for this last session of three sessions at OLC’s spring leadership network event, where we bring together digital leaders from academics, non-profits, and the private sector to discuss digital education strategy in times of great change.  This session will focus on the evolving nature of student services in present times and the future, and is open to both established and emerging leaders attending the conference.

Digital leaders are guiding initiatives at traditional academic institutions and non-profits, attempting to maintain vision through crises, developing new partnerships and approaches within the private sector, and working to establish policies and regulations within government. We see ever increasing demand for cross-sector collaborations led by digital leaders across an increasingly diverse educational landscape. Join us at this half-day event for featured presentations and small group discussions on opportunities for digital leaders, both established and emerging, to create new pathways to student success amidst the rapidly-changing higher education landscape.

The Leadership Network Event option is included in your OLC Innovate Virtual Conference 2021 registration fee. There is no additional registration fee to participate in the event.  Learn more about this session and all of the sessions at the Leadership Network Event page.

     

OLC Leadership Network Event sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Online in Half the Time: Tips for Successfully Accelerating Your Course | Education Session

Accelerated online courses (8-week courses, for example) are being offered at an increasing rate due to non-traditional students’ desire to complete courses more quickly and utilize the flexibility and convenience that online learning affords. With this condensed format, it is natural for faculty to focus on how to get all of their content across in a limited amount of time. Rather than focus on the limitations of this structure, let’s consider the strategies necessary for student success and satisfaction in this ever-growing format.

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Extended Abstract

Condensed or accelerated courses are becoming more popular due to the convenience for non-traditional students, and the benefit of focusing on a single course (or two) at a time. Literature has already shown that student performance is similar across regular-length and condensed formats. However, barriers persist for both faculty and students in accelerated formats, and many times the challenges of online learning are exacerbated by the condensed time frame. Thus, it is important to consider the strategies necessary for student and faculty success and satisfaction in this ever-growing format.

When condensing a semester-length course into an accelerated time frame, faculty often worry about the amount of content they need to squeeze into a limited number of weeks. While this is certainly a valid concern, additional considerations for student success and appropriate course design must also be taken into account. For example, presence and self-regulation strategies are not only crucial for online student success, but are additionally important in an accelerated format. Issues such as workload and cognitive overload are also important to address, for both student and faculty experience and satisfaction. Clear expectations and understanding the context of course content, and context and previous experience and knowledge of students are additional components to consider. In using evidence-based strategies to address these concerns through careful course design, accelerated courses can not only be just as effective as traditional-length courses, but can increase satisfaction and success for students and faculty alike.

During this session, participants will engage with the topic and content through a reflection activity on why accelerated courses are increasingly popular for students, and what challenges are present for both students and faculty in a condensed format. Additionally, five evidence-based tips with practical examples will be shared with session participants in an interactive format.

Mar 17, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Cut The Thread: Reconceiving Online Discussions Beyond the Post-and-Reply Model | Education Session

This session introduces a visual approach to online discussions and combines social and educational elements to help faculty and students easily create and share knowledge and reimagine the possibilities of online collaboration and learning.

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Extended Abstract

Online discussions play a critical role in connecting students with the content and one another. However, the linear and threaded nature of traditional models of online discussions often result in shallow, disconnected exchanges that fail to engage students meaningfully. Discussions are most often characterized by the compulsory posting of discrete ideas, which seldom add new knowledge to the discussion or create meaningful connections amongst students or ideas. Three aspects of traditional online learning environments—the linear nature of discussions, the lack of visuals, and limited ownership of ideas and knowledge—challenge authentic engagement and deep learning.

To foster meaningful collaborative learning, online environments should allow learners opportunities for natural and organic engagement with their peers, the kinds of opportunities where they can “build shared meaning, explore topics in-depth, and develop insight into the nature of the communication and learning process, which supports the emergence of new creative and conceptual thinking” (Champion & Gunnlaugson, 2017). This calls for “reconceiving online discussions more as symphonies with each participant serving a distinctive instrumental role to encourage departure from the solo approach of each student making posts with minimal engagement of cohorts” (Schwartzman & Morrissey, 2010, p. 59). 

This session will introduce participants to a cloud-based discussion platform, Pretzl, that reimagines the possibilities of online collaboration and learning by introducing a visual approach to online discussions and combining social and educational elements to help faculty and students easily create and share knowledge. Through visual representation, instructors and students engage in an interactive exploration of emerging themes and patterns, leading to more spontaneous and organic discourse.

Learning in Pretzl begins when instructors shape their discussion. The Pretzl platform offers a growing library of discussion modes to choose from—including debates, video-based discussions, and microchats. Instructors and students can share more than just words in their posts, capturing, uploading, or embedding videos and images, and creating interactive polls. As the discussion grows, Pretzl's Burst Viewer creates a graphical representation of the conversation, each post adding a new layer and a potentially new starting point for the discussion—allowing instructors and students to see how discussions are growing. Users' ideas are automatically saved to their own multi-media portfolio, which allows users to showcase their best work; as well as store, share, and create images, videos, blogs, and podcasts. Each individual's growing portfolio of ideas then becomes part of the Pretzl community's inspiration ecosystem—empowering users to search for new ideas and create and share new knowledge throughout the platform.

Common themes addressed during the session will include: a) the effects of visualization on the learning process, b) the fidelity of discussions, specifically as compared to discussions in traditional learning management systems and online discussion alternatives, and, c) overall engagement and satisfaction. The session will give participants the opportunity to interact with the platform to gain insight into the new technology and uncover its effectiveness to the possibilities of collaborative learning.

Mar 17, 2021
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
The New Normal: How COVID-19 Has Driven Schools To Adopt Online Proctoring | Networking Coffee Talk

Take a break from the rich idea sharing in this virtual coffee talk with PSI experts. Grab a hot beverage and join us for an informal discussion and light networking as an interlude between sessions.

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Extended Abstract

Mark Musacchio, representing our sponsor PSI, will kick things off with a chat about how COVID-19 has necessitated the adoption of Online Proctoring at scale by schools around the world. We look forward to your contributions to the chat to see where it takes us!

Mar 17, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Creative Strategies for Equitable Engagement in Online Classes | Featured Session

In this interactive synchronous session, participants will explore principles and practices for cultivating an equitable and engaging virtual learning environment. Through a series of activities and reflections, they will explore common challenges around student engagement and develop strategies to build community and design high impact virtual experiences for individual and team-based learning.

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Extended Abstract

In this interactive synchronous session, participants will explore principles and practices for cultivating an equitable and engaging virtual learning environment. Through a series of activities and reflections, they will explore common challenges around student engagement and develop strategies to build community and design high impact virtual experiences for individual and team-based learning.

By the end of this session participants will be able to:

  1. Identify solutions to common problems with learner engagement in online classes.
  2. Incorporate principles for building community and cultivating inclusion in online classes.
  3. Implement tools for facilitating equitable engagement in online classes at various scales

 

Featured Sessions Series sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Enabling Machine Learning Education In The Time Of Pandemic | Exposition Foundry Live

For a cutting-edge course such as Machine Learning, where high performance computing infrastructure is key to learning, no access to on-campus labs is a challenge. Join Barbra Sobhani as she shares how the RRCC ML course continued to thrive during this pandemic with the help of HP solutions.

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Extended Abstract

Data literacy and data sciences skills consistently rank in the top 1 or 2 of job skills in demand across industries. Community colleges are uniquely positioned to develop such skills for traditional students and lifelong learners to compete in the AI-powered workforce. In order to be successful, the college must be equipped with the proper computing infrastructure and be committed to evolving your curriculum in this fast-moving field. Through careful design of the infrastructure, machine learning is curriculum that has successfully made the adaptation to remote learning during the pandemic. By collaborating and building a community of experts among colleagues across campuses and industry partners we can increase student success and align skills with job demand in this data and AI-driven economy. Developing an introductory course that is adaptable to multiple modes of instruction is just the first step in the infusion of AI/ML across disciplines, critical for the community college mission of workforce development and accelerating the economic recovery.

Red Rocks Community College has over the past two years developed a combination of curriculum and an advanced computing infrastructure which has enabled AI/ML to be infused into a range of courses. The creation of a pilot Mathematics of Machine Learning course was key to testing the computing infrastructure for adaptation to curriculum. The course has been taught multiple semesters, working out the best methods for introducing machine learning to students. The course has not pre-requisites, so it has wide accessibility for students. As an introductory course, the students start with developing an understanding of what machine learning is and how it can be used. The curse reviews the basic of mathematical techniques that are critical for developing machine learning algorithms. Building on this foundation, students dive into to some basic coding using a scaffolded approach. The course incorporates data selection and preparation, and culminates with a group project and presentation. This course has been submitted for adoption by the State of Colorado Community College System as an exemplar to be adapted broadly. The structure of the course and the architecture of the enabling compute infrastructure is critical for student success. as well as examine. RRCC has partnered with HP to develop a standalone computing infrastructure to support the development of a data science program. Faculty at RRCC initially tested the efficacy by engaging students in machine learning projects. The Mathematics of Machine Learning course will form the core of a data science certificate, based on input from industry partners, and eventually an AS degree in Data Science.

Community colleges are well poised to provide the workforce training in the burgeoning AI/ML field. By the end of the presentation, attendees should understand the necessity of addressing computing infrastructure from the outset of program development. They will also understand the how to begin integrating ML projects into courses.

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Designing, Implementing, & Scaling An Online Course Quality Review & Refresh Process With OSCQR | Workshop

Develop an implementation plan for your online course quality review and refresh initiative using OSCQR, OLC’s online course quality scorecard. Gain access to free openly licensed tools and resources to support your larger-scale online course review initiative to systematically review and refresh the instructional design and accessibility of online courses and programs.

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Extended Abstract

In this workshop participants will be provided with all the information and tools necessary to create an implementation plan for their larger-scale online course quality initiative. Participants will be guided in the creation of an implementation plan to systematically review and refresh the instructional design and accessibility of online courses and programs. Participants will leave with an implementation plan template and all the information, and resources and understanding necessary to tailor it to their individual context, and the scope and scale of their online quality initiative. Access to the tools and resources needed to implement their project are provided, and best practices in implementing a larger scale online course quality review and refresh initiative will be reviewed and discussed.

This workshop is designed to address 3 key objectives:

  • Provide an overview and orientation to an implementation planning framework that they can customize and use to develop a comprehensive online quality assurance implementation plan. 
  • Provide an opportunity to think about and discuss individual institutional contexts. Key questions will include: What model of course review will work best for the scope, scale, and context of your initiative? What is your timeline? Who are your stakeholders? What policies and institutional organizational structures or procedures have to be taken into account for any aspect of your initiative?
  • Provide access to and overview of the OSCQR tools and resources that can be used to implement and track larger-scale online course quality initiatives. These include the OSCQR dashboard, the OSCQR rubric, and the OSCQR resource site.

Participants will:

  • Receive an implementation plan template that you will use to create your own individualized plan.
  • Gain access to OSCQR self-assessment rubric for use in team reviews.
  • Gain access to OSCQR online dashboard to manage larger scale online course quality review initiatives.
  • Receive an overview and orientation to the tools, resources, process, and best practices for conducting a larger scale online course quality review and refresh initiative.

Participants will earn the Designing an OSCQR Implementation Plan badge. This workshop assumes a familiarity and some experience with online course reviews, and/or OSCQR, and is not intended to dive deeply into OSCQR standards, how to use OSCQR, or how conduct an online course quality review. 

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
What is Research? Who am I? | Conversation, Not Presentation

Instructional designers and academic support staff serve a critical role in the design of learning experiences, and are uniquely positioned to perform human-centered research and identify processes and trends that can inform and guide faculty, students, and administrators alike. This session explores the learning designer as researcher, shares methods and frameworks that can guide this work, and facilitates a conversation about what research is and can be within the context of academic support staff.

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Extended Abstract

Instructional designers, I have something to say. If research interests you? You should do it. And furthermore? You probably already are. You belong, and this session will provide you with the toolkit you need to help you see it if you don't already. 

Academic support staff deserves a seat at the research table for digital learning, despite reporting they are frequently left feeling that they do not belong (Kumar & Ritzhaupt, 2017). When conversation is seen through the lens of inquiry as reflected by Campbell, Schwier & Kenny (2004), Pangaro (2008) and others, instructional designers and academic support staff are perfectly positioned as data collection agents in that they find themselves in regular collaborative contact with faculty, staff, students, administrators and more on a near daily basis. Further, instructional designers and academic support staff experience the learning design process across a number of continuums ranging from deploying quality assurance frameworks to designing blueprints, to building courses to troubleshooting technology, to advising on pedagogy, theoretical lenses, and other duties as assigned.

In this session, we will have a facilitated conversation about:

  • The role learning designers and academic support staff can play in research initiatives, as well as roadblocks that keep them from engaging in that work
  • How the data collected every day as a part of standard, practice-driven instructional design activities can inform a measurable, research-based instructional design process 
  • Perceptions of identity and who belongs at the research table
  • Brainstorming solutions for instructional designers who struggle to tell their research stories, either to their institutions or to their faculty partners as a means of increasing collaboration

By the end of this session, participants will have:

  • Gained general knowledge of the instructional design research landscape
  • Have discussed roles, challenges, and shared experiences in using research practices (or wishing to) to inform instructional design work
  • Assessed the challenges and shared experiences of their colleagues and shared potential solutions to these challenges
  • Selected some methods and paths that will take them into their next adventures in inquiry

Research is fun, useful, and critical to our understanding of the world around us. It is also inherent in what we do. Come learn, share, and build together!

References

Campbell, K., Schwier, R. A., & Kenny, R. (2006). Conversation as inquiry: A conversation with instructional designers. Journal of Learning Design1(3), 1-18.

Jaschik, S., & Lederman, D. (2017). 2017 survey of faculty attitudes on technology: A study by Gallup and Inside Higher Ed. Washington, DC: Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/booklet/2017-survey-faculty-attitudes-technology

Jaschik, S., & Lederman, D. (2019). 2019 survey of faculty attitudes on technology: A study by Gallup and Inside Higher Ed. Washington, DC: Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/system/files/media/IHE_2019_Faculty_Tech_...

Kumar, S., & Ritzhaupt, A. (2017). What do instructional designers in higher education really do? International Journal on E-Learning, 16(4), 371–393.

Pangaro, P. (2008). Instructions for design and designs for conversation. In Handbook of conversation design for instructional applications (pp. 35-48). IGI Global.

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
K-12 Summit - Part 1: Instructional Design For Blended Learning: Essential Skills for K-12 Settings | Summit

K-12 educators across-the-board have turned to digital resources to enhance instruction and address student needs. But not all content is created equal, and educators have been challenged to learn and scale online learning platforms when sifting through options to find high-quality material with little time for basic considerations of instructional design. This session will focus on creating and implementing online, blended and digital learning innovations within the K-12 sector that can be sustained over time. Considering that blended learning or some aspect of digital learning is likely to persist in K-12 education, we must revisit the design considerations most important for ease, adaptability, and assurance of student success in our K-12 classrooms. Blended learning calls for us to use a more systematic methodology (rooted in instructional theory) to design and develop content, experiences, and other solutions to support our students’ acquisition of new knowledge or skills. 

 

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Extended Abstract

K-12 educators had little time at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic to employ systematic methodology and consider instructional theories and models when designing and developing content, experiences, and other solutions to support their students in the acquisition of new knowledge or skills in a virtual format. Sheer grit and resilience have gotten us through to the present. However, as we look to a future of increased virtual learning experiences, hybrid course and school structures, and the potential for blended learning to be the norm for most schools and classrooms, we can start to refine the instructional design work we undertake as more intentional and planned virtual learning experiences which complement face-to-face classroom instruction. 

Instructional Designers create instructional experiences that make the acquisition of knowledge and skill more efficient, effective, and appealing. K-12 teachers are likely now and in the near future to be their own instructional designers. So how exactly do we go about this workload in the context of all other classroom responsibilities? Extending the regular planning process to include digital considerations may actually ease workload when considering its potential for differentiation and explicit mapping to learning outcomes. 

Instructional designers begin by conducting a needs assessment to determine the desired learning outcomes of a digital learning event, including: what the learner should know and be able to do as a result of the online experience and what the learners already know and can do. Instructional design is rooted in cognitive and behavioral psychology, though instructors most certainly choose the best mixt of behaviorist and constructivist learning experiences to match their sense of student individual needs and how learning design can support the achievement of those goals. Determining the current state and needs of learners, defining the end goal of instruction, and creating a digital opportunity to assist in the transition becomes more manageable when we consider fundamental tasks of instructional design. Let’s lean in on our collective experience to go from the quick transition of instructional materials needed to make compulsory virtual operation in a pandemic work to the more exciting, strategic, and student-supportive opportunity of blended learning instructional design opportunities in the world after COVID. 

          

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
The Free College Program at Eastern Gateway Community College: Partnerships and OER at Work. | Education Session

Eastern Gateway Community College in Ohio has been delivering free college education to more than 60,000 students over the last 5 years and saved over $12M in course materials through the adoption of free and open educational resources with MERLOT and SkillsCommons. How did we do it? Stop by.

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Extended Abstract

Through its national partnerships with AFL-CIO and other community-based organizations, Eastern Gateway Community College offers the Free College Program to more than fifteen million working-class families in the United States.  Launched in 2016, Eastern Gateway Community College works nationally with organized labor and other organizations to determine what academic programs and career training certificates will facilitate the best educational experience for working adults, helping to train and skill the workforce of the future.  In this program, Eastern Gateway Community College has delivered 100% online instruction to more than 60,000 students since 2016—students from all ages, backgrounds, and levels of socioeconomic status, as well from all fifty states. 

The success of the Free College Program at Eastern Gateway Community College, measured since the program’s inception in 2015, provides the evidence to support the projected success of the proposed project.  Several measurements stand out as clear indicators of such success, including graduations by program, student retention, student persistence, student course success, and student credit transfers. Additionally, students from the Free College Program have transferred credits from Eastern Gateway Community College to nearly 700 institutions of higher education to further their studies.  Student retention within the Free College Program has exceeded the national averages for student retention as reported by the National Student Clearinghouse since 2015.  Likewise, student persistence rates within the Free College Program have exceeded the national averages for student retention as reported by the National Student Clearinghouse since 2015 as well.

As a result of these efforts, Eastern Gateway Community College is in a unique position to deliver education and career training programs at significant scale to populations impacted and otherwise displaced by the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, as outlined by the grant notice.  More than thirty-five (35) programs are currently delivered entirely online and at no out-of-pocket cost to the student.  Eastern Gateway Community College established the Free College Program to reduce a variety of barriers to college access for working adults—not just the high cost of education. Through the management and operation of a variety of student-focused services and supports, Eastern Gateway Community College (EGCC) helps students navigate the enrollment process.  Students have the flexibility to do schoolwork on their schedule, allowing them to work full time, care for their children, and provide for their families. While attaining the education or career training they need to cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Though the Free College Program was no cost to the students, there are many costs that are covered by the institution, including the cost of course materials.   In 2018, EGCC began a partnership with MERLOT to transition all their course materials to free and open educational resources.  In 2020, EGCC reported that they saved $12M in course materials by use free and open educational resources for a majority of their courses.

MERLOT provided EGCC a customized and branded portal for their faculty and instructional designers to find quality substitutions for the higher cost course materials and textbooks, the Eastern Gateway Community College Open Library for Education http://egccol4ed.org/ that provided a wealth of quality options for faculty and instructional designers to choose free and open educational resources for their courses.   The portal provides a wide range for online teaching/learning resources, from animations, presentations, drill & practice, tutorials, simulations, collections, and more across all different disciplines.   MERLOT’s SmartSearch also searches over 75 other libraries, which provides even greater access to alternative resources.    MERLOT also connected the EGCC to expert members of its community to support EGCC in redesigning their courses with free and open educational resources.

With the COVID pandemic, EGCC also leveraged the MERLOT OER resources to support moving more of its courses online.   The customized EGCC-MERLOT portal provides easy access to guidance for teachers and students in moving online.

The panel will consist of the EGCC administration program officer (Dan Jones), the EGCC instructional technology lead (Vanessa Birney), and MERLOT’s executive director (Gerry Hanley) with each person presenting the key plans and actions that enable this success to occur at the scale and speed.  Identifying the factors that determine the organization’s readiness for change, the professional development with faculty, and the instructional design for repurposing and reusing free and open educational resources will be the topics of conversation with the session’s participants.   The panel will engage the session participants by asking them to “think-pair-share” about their institution’s readiness for migrating to free and open educational resources.

We expect session participants to “take-away” draft plans on how some of the policies, practices, tools, and strategies implemented by EGCC could be adopted by their own institution.

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Reimagining The Shift From Emergency Remote Teaching To High Quality Blended Learning | Industry Showcase - Presentation

This session will present a framework for reimagining the transition from Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) to the conceptualization, development, and delivery of high-quality blended learning experiences

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Extended Abstract

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, traditional forms of instructional delivery (e.g., face-to-face teaching, on-site laboratory activities) were either significantly reduced in scope or altogether eliminated as educational institutions of all types were forced to turn to various forms of digital teaching and learning to ensure at least some form of educational continuity. This shift to “Emergency Remote Teaching” was sudden, unexpected, and rife with challenges. 

One of the clearest outcomes that our recent experience with Emergency Remote Teaching has yielded is the increased recognition among educators that digital, remote forms of instruction offer a viable, effective, and efficient way of supporting students’ mastery of knowledge, application of learning, and preparation for career success. Although accurately predicting the long-term future of education as a result of the pandemic may be challenging, thoughtful and proactive consideration of likely future states can help educational institutions consciously prepare for the “new reality” that is likely to emerge.  

There is little doubt that the new reality in educational delivery promises the benefits of blending face-to-face interactions with the implementation of high-quality, effective digital teaching and learning. Ensuring the most meaningful blended educational experiences for students requires us to capitalize on recent advances in learning science and technology, which are all too often ignored. Maximizing student learning and ensuring graduates are adequately prepared to succeed in the constantly evolving world of work necessitates a recognition that future modes of instructional delivery are likely to blend the very best that face-to-face teaching has to offer with high quality, contemporary digital teaching and learning. 

In this session, we will review and discuss a three-phase process that outlines the transition from primarily face-to-face instruction to more of a blended learning approach. We believe that conceptualizing the transition across three major phases of activity offers a useful model for educational institutions to consider as they prepare for the “new normal” that is already beginning to emerge. 

 

Phase I: Emergency Remote Teaching 

The realities of COVID-19 necessitated the implementation of online instruction as a means of ensuring at least some degree of instructional delivery continuity as physical campuses were closed and students isolated to curb the transmission of the new coronavirus. What quickly became known as “Emergency Remote Teaching” required institutions to quickly and efficiently ensure that several basic, foundational elements of delivering learning in an online modality were implemented in as timely a manner as possible. Although many educational institutions had previously engaged in a limited amount of digital teaching and learning activities (e.g., offering online courses, enrolling students in degree programs delivered fully online), few institutions were adequately prepared to accelerate the delivery of online learning to all students that COVID-19 required. 

Phase I of the transition process, Emergency Remote Teaching, required educational institutions to: 

  • Identify and implement a synchronous learning technology. 
  • Evaluate student and faculty access to hardware, software, and internet connectivity. 
  • Communicate with all stakeholders to explain the shift to online synchronous instruction. 
  • Deliver virtual training to ensure faculty members’ ability to deliver online synchronous instruction. 

 

Phase II: Stabilized Faculty and Student Support 

After making the transition to Emergency Remote Teaching, educational institutions quickly encountered the many challenges associated with relying on digital, remote teaching as the sole means of instructional delivery. Faced with issues such as limited faculty experience in online teaching, a lack of virtual student support services, and the absence of robust data analytic tools, many institutions began realizing that sustaining an effective and efficient digital teaching and learning practice requires investments in several key areas, including the following: 

  • Additional faculty training in online teaching 
  • Implementation of virtual student support services 
  • Robust data analytics to evaluate student learning 
  • Analysis and evaluation of academic policies and procedures  
  • Expanded digital teaching and learning capabilities  

 

Phase III: Blended Learning Integration 

The final phase of the transition from face-to-face instructional delivery to high-quality blended learning requires investing in and mobilizing resources to support the full integration of a blended learning practice. The activities required to master this phase of the transition include: 

  • Implementing a robust LMS solution 
  • Delivering comprehensive faculty training  
  • Increasing instructional design capabilities  
  • Maximizing efficiencies in student services  
  • Identifying the optimal blended learning mix  

During the session, we will discuss the three phases of the transition from face-to-face learning to high-quality blended learning in detail, sharing examples of how various institutions have begun preparing for and executing the transition. The session will conclude with a brief overview of Walden University’s commitment to providing in-kind consultative and advisory support to select educational institutions, as we share with others our experiences and expertise in online and blended learning experiences, bringing our Education for Good™ mission to life. 

     

Mar 17, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Data intelligence in a multi-stakeholder world | Education Session

 

This session will cover the variables and considerations necessary to develop a data vision and strategy that assures near- and far-term success. It will include an analysis of the various components, contributors, and barriers to that strategy, including stakeholders, systems, institutional momentum, and implicit and explicit drivers that must be considered, all from the perspective of a variety of institutions reflecting varying levels of maturity regarding institutional data and approaches. It will also offer some of the key barriers that are often encountered, as well as common strategies to address or elude those barriers.

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Extended Abstract

 

This session will cover the variables and considerations necessary to develop a data vision and strategy that assures near- and far-term success. It will include an analysis of the various components, contributors, and barriers to that strategy, including stakeholders, systems, institutional momentum, and implicit and explicit drivers that must be considered, all from the perspective of a variety of institutions reflecting varying levels of maturity regarding institutional data and approaches. It will also offer some of the key barriers that are often encountered, as well as common strategies to address or elude those barriers.

Mar 17, 2021
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live: The Innovate Experience | Other

Dive deeper into the conference experience with OLC Live! Hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr as they lead focused conversations with presenters and participants focused on this year’s conference themes:

  • Blended Teaching and Learning
  • Career and Technical Education
  • Instructional Technologies and Tools
  • Leadership and Advocacy
  • Open Learning
  • Process, Problems, and Practices
  • Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
  • Teaching and Learning Practice

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 17, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Opportunities for Increasing Online Student Success and Enrollment | Education Session

Join us to learn how online programs can grow and prosper, even in this pandemic era, by employing recent research and online best practices.  We will also share our institution’s return to in person (with live online elements) and online courses including the planning, successes and opportunities for improvement. 

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Extended Abstract

With over 25 years experience in online higher education, the presenters will share some of their success tips for online programs and online students. Due to Covid-19, many colleges quickly rolled out “online” courses this past Spring, Summer and Fall.  We will share statistics on the number of institutions who had no courses available online in 2019 and then the amount that shifted to in 2020.  Many online course design and instructional best practices are still being used in institutions as they return to in person learning due to those learners who are at risk, ill, isolating or quarantining and must participate in class in a “live online” format.  

 

As more higher education institutions offer more courses fully online, it’s important that instructional designers, faculty and others in academic leadership understand some of the recent data regarding online learning students.  The presenters will share information on the number of students enrolled in fully online programs and institutions with fully online programs using the data points from Public, Private and For-Profit institutions. We also plan to share recent demographic data on today’s online student (average 60% female, 64% white, 59% employed full time, 55% single, etc.) as well as data on the current age groupings of online students.  We want to engage our audience to further explore the recent research which shows one in three online students have been out of school five or more years.  

 

The presenters will share success tips for online students such as virtual course orientation experiences (credit and non-credit) as well as some of the key pieces online students need to know such as: how to access the written record of their degree plan (advisor or degree planning system) and self-regulation and more specifically planning is crucial to the success of online students (Inan, Yukselturk, Kurucay & Flores 2017). 

 

A key to a successful online program would be to employ an early alert system (i.e. learning analytics-quickly determine student needs and provide needed service, prioritize students who are most “at risk” and auto send personalized emails or text messages to students-(Lawson, Beer, Rossi, Moore & Fleming, 2016)). A second key to a successful online program would be to employ Instant Notifications.  These can be a powerful method to instantly communicate with students (directly to their mobile device).  Institutions should use notifications built into their LMS (i.e. when quiz will close, when papers are due, when grades are posted).  Institutions may also employ instant notifications tool such as blackboard connect and activate notifications in the college/university’s mobile app.

 

Successful online colleges ensure their students work towards taking ownership of their college academics and experiences.  Students may do this in a variety of ways:

  • research additional financial aid options, scholarships and questions
  • learn how to use the college system to register for classes 
  • students need to make the connection between their coursework, program, major and career (Levy & Polnarie, 2016)

 

Research shows that successful online programs employ a variety of academic engagement strategies which may will lesson student isolation and increase reflection and metacognition such as:

  • chat (virtual office hours, weekly test review, peer feedback on writing assignments) (Melkun, 2012)
  • personalized information based on student performance-conditional release & intelligent agents-controlled release of news item, content, quiz, etc. based on performance on previous tasks or other actions, for instance, create two news items (passing and not passing). not passing may receive additional remediation content

 

For online courses and programs to be successful, student success must be at the heart of the entire college/university.  This will be evident via:

  • institutional effectiveness and college planning is critical to online learning success of students and programs
  • student/faculty interaction-research shows that increased faculty contact/student engagement is a key factor in student success online-avid and creating engaging courses
  • curricula infusion and systems approaches-students get a big picture of main topics in their course and major how those fit well together (and perhaps how they fit with other course main topics)-align with “real world” topics and careers
  • shared student affairs and academic affairs collaboration and mutual goals (Levy & Polnarie, 2016)

 

Finally, our presenters will explore ways to increase online student enrollment.  They will share recent reflections and research on:

  • overall online enrollment continues to grow (Burns and McCormack, 2020), (Clinefelter and Aslanian, 2018)
  • ensure course quality is comparable to f2f courses and publicize that along with the flexibility of online learning
  • determine why the need/interest in online course/program growth
  • online learning students will follow other successful online learning students (Allen, Seaman, Poulin & Straut, 2016)
  • find grant money (Manchin, 2013)
  • use data to determine which courses are growing (wait list data)
  • reach out to those former online students and see what else they may be interested in taking in the future (amazon approach)  
  • allow students no limit on registration of preferred courses (experienced online students get first choice of online courses/sections) (Christensen, Howell & Christensen, 2015)
  • determine what are the faculty inhibitors to online learning (i.e. need more financial compensation for tenured faculty to develop online learning so there are increased offerings in course sections and in a variety of course offerings/programs (Ortagus & Stedrak, 2013))
  • engage community advisement groups to aid in development of curricula and program offerings, especially valuable in allied health, public safety and applied science disciplines
  • develop marketing plan 

 

In addition, our presenters will share how they are using “safety” technology systems to aid in institutional communication and processes (i.e. daily health alerts, security notifications, severe weather alerts and contact tracing).  Finally, we will discuss current educational trends and issues such as virtual office hours, cross listing courses, workload calculations, attendance policies (considering Covid),  and how technology can assist faculty and educational support team members. The presentation will include information on several free and low-cost instructional technology tools to aid in teaching and learning (i.e. use https://youcanbook.me for scheduling faculty in person or virtual office hours).  

 

The information in this educational session will be shared via PowerPoint slides and web links from our institution (slides will be posted online with the URL given at the presentation start) as well as posted on the conference web site.

 

While our research on these topics have provided many answers to questions we seek, we believe we can learn much from others.  So we may engage the participants, the presenters will employ the following Engagement Strategies for our Audience:  Carousel Brainstorming (creating a poster on key topics) combined with Jigsaw. This activity will be followed by the Gallery Walk so the groups can rotate around the room and all participants may take notes from the tools/strategies they need to learn more about. After all groups have rotated through all the posters, participants can ask each poster’s creators questions if they feel they need even more information or clarification for a point of confusion.  We also plan to employ a few Stand Up Survey’s in the beginning of the presentation.  Depending on room set up, time  and Covid safety considerations we may alternatively employ other participant engagement methods such as Turn and Talk, Kahotz and a Wordle.net exercise. Throughout the presentation we also plan to offer several interactive question and answer sessions.

 

Works Cited

  • Allen, I., Seaman, J., Poulin, R. & Straut T. (2016). Online Report Card: Tracking Online Education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group. Retrieved From http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED572777.pdf.
  • Burns, Sean and Mark McCormack. Fall Planning for the New Normal: Moving Higher Ed Online. Research report. Louisville, CO: EDUCAUSE Research, September 2020. Retrieved October 1, 2020 from 
  • Christensen, S., Howell, S. & Christensen, J. (2015). Six Ways to Increase Enrollments at an Extended Campus. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 18 (4).

·      Clinefelter, Dr. David and Carol Aslanian (2018), “Online College Students 2018 Report: Comprehensive Data on Demands and Preferences”, May 23, 2018,  Retrieved January 2, 2020 from  www.learninghouse.com/OCS2018

  • Inan, F., Yukselturk, E., Kurucay, M. & Flores, R. (2017). The Impact of Self-Regulation Strategies on Student Success and Satisfaction in an Online Course. International Journal on E-Learning, 16(1), 23-32. Waynesville, NC USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved From https://www.learntechlib.org/p/147296/.
  • Lawson, C., Beer, C., Rossi, D. Moore, T. & Fleming J. (2016) Identification of 'at risk' students using learning analytics: the ethical dilemmas of intervention strategies in a higher education institution. Educational Technology Research & Development. Oct2016, 64(5), 957-968.
  • Levy, M. & Polnarie, B. (2016) Academic and Student Affairs in Collaboration: Creating a Culture of Student Success. Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, New York and London. 
  • Manchin, J. (2013) Manchin And Rockefeller Announce Nearly $535,000 For Online Science Courses At West Virginia State University Training, Research And Development Project Will Bring Best Online Education Practices To University. States News Service, Sept 20, 2013.
  • Melkun, C. (2012). Nontraditional Students Online: Composition, Collaboration, and Community. Journal of Continuing Higher Education, 60(1), p.33-39.
  • Ortagus , J.& Stedrak, L. (2013) Online Education and Contingent Faculty: An Exploratory Analysis of Issues and Challenges for Higher Education Administrators. Educational Considerations, 40(3), 30-33.
Mar 17, 2021
4:30pm - 6:30pm (Central)
5 Steps For Building A Sustainable Faculty Development Program | Workshop

In this workshop, we will discuss a 5-step approach for developing a comprehensive and sustainable faculty development program for online and blended teaching. Participants will discuss how they plan to complete each step at their institutions, and the facilitator will provide specific and effective examples to supplement the conversation.

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Extended Abstract

Faculty development and engagement continues to be an important topic of conversation, especially as institutions work to meet the needs of their students by increasing online and blended learning opportunities. However, building a comprehensive online and blended faculty development to support the development of rich online and blended learning experiences can be difficult for higher education teaching and learning professionals. How do you meet the needs of your stakeholders (e.g., instructors, students, institution)? How do you plan for things your stakeholders may not even see as a need yet? How do you include the right components in your approach to online and blended faculty development? How has the pandemic informed the way we provide faculty development?

In this workshop, we will discuss a 5-step approach for developing an effective, comprehensive faculty development program for online and blended teaching. This highly interactive workshop will begin with introductions and an overview of the session, and then we will dive into each individual step. For each step, the facilitator will pose specific questions and ask participants to reflect upon how they can answer them within the context of their own institutions. This reflection will take place using collaborative documents and breakout rooms, with each group having a chance to share out via chat to the larger group. After discussing each step as a large group, the facilitator will share the approaches that he’s taken at his institution.

Therefore, by the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Identify ways to gather needs from their campus stakeholders
  • Identify the role of trends in higher ed that affect programming
  • Determine the areas of focus they need to take at their institution
  • Articulate a plan for components of a faculty development program
  • Develop a plan for evaluating an effective faculty development program

In this workshop, we will focus on the five steps listed below:

Step 1: Explore your Institution

Knowing your institution’s needs, resources, and direction is vital to a successful online and blended faculty development program because it is necessary to contextualize the work of teaching in these modes. In particular, you will need to know what priorities lie at the heart of the institution and where these priorities are coming from. In addition, you must know your audience — in this case, instructors who teach online and blended courses.

Key questions for discussing Step 1 include:

  • How do you gather information about your institution?
  • What kinds of questions do you need to ask?
  • How do these needs translate into a faculty development program?
  • What are your institution’s priorities, and how do you determine them?
  • How do you determine the needs of the instructors?
  • How do you determine the needs of the students?

Step 2: Investigate Emerging Trends

Although institutions have their own cultures, needs, and priorities, they do not exist in a vacuum. Colleges and universities are heavily influenced by a number of factors, including a declining college-aged population, increased enrollments by working individuals, increasingly engaging technologies, and effective pedagogical innovations. Keeping in mind these trends is critical to developing a sustainable faculty development program for online and blended teaching, as such trends will inevitably affect institutional, instructor, and student needs. It is important to stay informed about these trends through a variety of avenues, including professional conferences and key publications, such as the ELI Key Issues in Teaching and Learning and the Horizon Report. The ongoing impact of COVID-19 is an additional consideration for developing effective programming.

Key questions for discussing Step 2 include:

  • What do you think will be the biggest trends of the next 5 years?
  • How will these trends impact your institution?
  • How can you keep informed about ongoing trends?
  • How do you incorporate current research in your faculty development program?
  • How can you contribute to research in online learning?

Step 3: Identify your Focus Areas

After gathering data about your instructors, your institutions, and emerging trends, you’ll need to prioritize your goals and identify your focus areas.

Key questions for discussing Step 3 include:

  • What are the objectives of your faculty development program? How will you know if participants are meeting those objectives?
  • What are the main priorities for developing your faculty development based upon what you know about your instructors, their students, and the institution?
  • How will you make your faculty development flexible enough to meet the changing needs of your instructors, their students, and the institution?
  • How will projected future trends impact your areas of focus?

Step 4: Develop your Offerings Once you have laid the groundwork and done the necessary investigation, the challenging part begins: developing your offerings. Although this is typically a multi-year process, being strategic about priorities is key, especially when needing to meet a wide variety of campus needs. It is important that instructors get both the technological (e.g., how to upload content and facilitate interaction in the learning management system) and pedagogical (e.g., how to support collaborative and active learning online) support that they need. Many institutions offer a formalized Online and Blended Teaching Program, supplemental workshops, informal communities of practice, and certification programs to ensure quality.

Key questions for discussing Step 4 include:

  • What do instructors need to teach their first online course?
  • What will they need to help others as they progress in their teaching?
  • What technical skills do instructors need? • What are common components that institutions can include in their approaches to supporting online and blended instructors?
  • How can institutions support instructors throughout the lifecycle of their teaching?
  • What challenges arise when building a comprehensive vision?

Step 5: Evaluate your Program Evaluating a faculty development program for online and blended teaching is important to ensure that you are meeting the needs of your instructors, their students, and the institution. It is also vital for demonstrating the value of your center and your work. The evaluation process should be baked into the development process so that you are aware of how and when you will be gathering the necessary data to understand the impact of your program.

Key questions for discussing Step 5 include:

  • How do you plan to evaluate your program?
  • Who will be providing feedback about the program?
  • How often will you evaluate the effectiveness of the program and make the necessary changes?
  • How will you communicate the effectiveness of your program to campus stakeholders?
     
Mar 17, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
K-12 Summit - Part 2: Quality Characteristics Of K-12 Online Learning | Summit

Even prior to COVID-19’s introduction of nearly every student and school to some degree of online teaching and learning, the world of online learning has exploded with roughly 6 million of the country’s 56 million K–12 students having taken at least one online or virtual class over the last 20 years. Most K–12 teachers start with a learning management system (LMS) to manage their online classroom space (for example, Canvas, Blackboard, Google Classroom, or Schoology) and have also integrated technology into their coursework. Even more of us have added remote synchronous instruction using a host of web-conferencing tools during the pandemic. This session will focus on taking our unique knowledge base of what has worked and what we need additional support and training to reimagine in the digital sphere when asking key questions about online quality in the new normal. It is certainly very possible for K-12 educators to capitalize on the distance learning revolution and extend what works in the post-Pandemic world. 

 


    

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Extended Abstract

Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 6 million students in the United States took at least one distance education course annually, a number that will continue to rise now that nearly every student and family has experienced distance learning--some positively and some less-than-positively. Taking the time to migrate courses and grade-levels from a traditional classroom format to an online or blended format ideally takes more time than teachers have been afforded. However, fundamental considerations of course quality are universal to digital learning and areas we can reflect upon with our new and recent experience. 

Course quality includes considerations such as how students and faculty actively engage in online instruction, faculty response to student inquiries in a timely manner, establishing a timely process for giving students feedback and grades, and use of a Learning Management System (LMS) and web conferencing tools for synchronous or asynchronous instruction and instructor communication. To maximize the success of online learning, teachers must practice proactive course management strategies and establish patterns of course activities This session considers some of the most fundamental considerations of course quality and where K-12 teachers may wish to invest time in order to feel greater satisfaction and confidence in their virtual teaching experience. The future is likely to include greater levels of hybrid or blended learning environments for K-12 students. Thus, even if remote instruction is minimized for your grade-level or subject, we must prepare for potential course interruptions and use of virtual learning as a bridge between weather-related closures and related breaks in normal school operation. Matters of course quality can help educators to capitalize on the extensive experience in distance learning we have gained since 2020 and determine how to best extend what we see working at individual schools and classrooms for the post-Pandemic world.

 

           

Mar 17, 2021
4:30pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Connect with Your Online Students through Intentional Instructor Presence! | Workshop

Feeling lost or confused is the fastest way for students to lose interest and trust in an online course. Your presence is essential! Veterans and newbies alike can expect to walk away with at least one new technique to engage students and improve their next online course!

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Extended Abstract

Importance of Developing Instructor Presence

 

 One of the biggest challenges in moving from a traditional classroom to an online format is fostering and maintaining an environment in which the students are engaged not only with the static learning materials for that course but also with the living, breathing person teaching the class. The little day-to-day interactions that help us create these environments in a face-to-face setting is difficult to replicate when moved online; moreover, this is typically overlooked when designing a course or teaching it for the first time as we tend to focus on the meat and potatoes of the course: the syllabus, instructional materials, assessments, etc. While no self-respecting teacher would walk in on the first day of a traditional classroom and simply drop-off these materials to their students and expect them to navigate it all for themselves, for many students in online classes this is what an online class can feel like to them if we don’t try to actively engage them. Your presence is essential even though you aren’t in the room with them. 

 

We have found that personal connections are particularly important at our Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) to help improve retention among students as they feel engaged in their online classes.  Retention of students at HSIs is a frequent topic of study, and other researchers have suggested methods for improving graduation rates and student performance at Hispanic-serving institutions (DiSanto and Guevara, 2019; Espinosa and Espinosa, 2012; Garcia and Ramirez, 2018; Martin and Meyer, 2010; Meling, 2012; Wolf, Lyons and Guevara, 2019).  These methods typically involve increased engagement and personal relationships.  It is particularly important to focus on course personalization and developing community as an effort to improve retention (Martin and Meyer, 2010; Meling, 2012).  Collaborative relationships and collective course projects also contribute to student success (DiSanto and Guevara, 2019; Garcia and Ramirez, 2018).  Human relationships and instructor presence are required in both face-to-face and online classes to help students succeed.

To this end, our Faculty Learning Community members have been exploring ways to improve instructor presence in online courses over the last two years, and we would like to share some of our findings with the OLC community. Specifically, we have developed a self-assessment tool to help instructors improve instructor presence in existing online courses and/or provide useful tips for instructors who are new to the field. This type of engagement is critical to student success at an HSI.

Our tool is not a traditional rubric in the sense that it does not score individual categories and look to check a bunch of boxes. Rather it poses four specific questions related to instructor presence, asks the instructor to meaningfully reflect on these aspects in their own course, and then provides specific examples to help improve this area of a course.  The intent of this tool is that you will use it for self-reflection or for thoughtful and intentional conversations with colleagues around improving instructor presence in your online classes.

 Plan for interactivity 

This workshop will introduce this tool to participants and ask you to evaluate one of your own existing (or planned) online courses. The workshop leaders will introduce the tool, pose each of the four questions, and provide a few examples (15 minutes).  Next, leaders will facilitate as participants work on assessing your own instructor presence in small groups using the self-reflection tool. These conversations will draw on group expertise, and  leaders will share research- and practice-based insights relevant to each individual discussion (60 minutes).  We foresee that many of the groups will generate useful tips and examples based on the participants’ collective experience, and we will provide time for you to share and discuss these ideas with the entire audience (15 minutes). As a means of facilitating idea development and sharing new perspectives, we have developed an idea-catcher to allow workshop participants to contribute directly to the ideas already shared in the self-assessment tool- we want this workshop to be a place where we can learn from each other!  This workshop is hands-on, and you will have time to work on your own classes in your own discipline.  Each participant will leave with at least one personalized technique you can employ to improve your next online course. 

Takeaways

As a participant, you will share questions and insights, and develop the ability to identify the high value strategies that make a difference to student learning.  You will exchange ideas about how to evaluate student engagement, and consider learning needs in light of accessibility, diversity of experience with higher education, and online learning. We will explore the idea of assessing and leveraging student expertise in virtual spaces, even as we invite you to share your own expertise with our group. As a participant, you will explore the concept of instructor presence and the relevance to student learning and success. You will see the tool our group developed to evaluate presence, and explore applying it to your practice.  While there are many options  and ideas about online learning, streamlining and focusing our instructional efforts is key for sustainable work for us, and for student learning. This tool will help you make decisions about which approaches yield the highest benefit, and will help you make sense of and choose among the many tools and strategies that currently litter our online landscape. A few specific strategies, intentionally chosen and consistently implemented can make the difference in your next online class, and this workshop will help you take the next steps in improving your instructor presence.

References

DiSanto, J. M., Guevara, C. (2019). The online learning initiative: Training the early adopters.  In Wolfe, K., Lyons, K., Guevara, C. (Eds.) Developing educational technology at an urban community college (pp. 79-93). SpringerLink.

Espinoza, Penelope P., & Espinoza, Crystal C. (2012). Supporting the 7th-Year Undergraduate: Responsive Leadership at a Hispanic-Serving Institution. Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership, 15(1), 32-50.

Garcia, G. A., & Ramirez, J. J. (2018). Institutional Agents at a Hispanic Serving Institution: Using Social Capital to Empower Students. Urban Education, 53(3), 355–381. https://doi.org/10.1177/0042085915623341

Martin, N. K., & Meyer, K. (2010). Efforts to improve undergraduate student retention rates at a Hispanic serving institution: Building collaborative relationships for the common good. College and University, 85(3), 40-49.

Meling, V. (2012). The Role of Supplemental Instruction in Academic Success and Retention at a Hispanic-serving Institution, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses.

Wolf, P. D. (2006). Best practices in the training of faculty to teach online Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 17(2), 47–48.

 

Mar 17, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Combine Creativity and Open Pedagogy for an Engaging Student Experience | Education Session

Build a creative final assignment for students to demonstrate their learning, add an opportunity to share and publish their work and you create an engaging student experience. Our university has provided everyone with access to the Adobe Creative Cloud. The opportunity for students to utilize this level of professional software in an assignment not only enables them to demonstrate their learning in a creative way but introduces them to tools to increase their digital literacy. The assignment is then peer reviewed and eligible to be part of an Open Educational Resource that will be published each semester.

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Extended Abstract

Three to five critical take-aways from this session will be for the audience to describe a creative assignment that uses open pedagogy, discuss the opportunities to integrate digital literacy into an assignment and identify ways to use OERs for an assignment.The audience will be engaged your audience virtually through other examples of creative assignments, open pedagogy and the use of OERS within the curriculum. Google Doc will be used to record the information shared along with personal information to connect at a later date and continue the conversation.

Mar 17, 2021
5:15pm - 5:45pm (Central)
Protect Exam Integrity with Proctorio, A Leader In Remote Proctoring | Exposition Foundry Live

Protecting integrity of assessments is crucial in remote learning environments. Proctorio has established itself as an industry leader in remote proctoring by maintaining the highest data security and privacy standards and providing a secure and scalable platform to thousands of institutions worldwide.

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Extended Abstract

Proctorio is a learning integrity platform that offers remote proctoring software with a robust suite of scalable and secure exam features designed to protect the integrity of every assessment, every time. Proctorio’s suite of integrity protection tools includes Identity Verification, Automated and Live Proctoring, Content Protection, and Plagiarism Detection. Proctorio has been recognized as a leader in prioritizing privacy and data security for test takers due to our use of Zero-Knowledge Encryption.

Since 2020, Proctorio has expanded rapidly and now partners with over 1,200 higher education, K-12, corporate, and federal institutions across the globe. To date, Proctorio has proctored over 32.5 million exams, all while maintaining a 99.991% uptime, a record the company has maintained since inception in 2013. Proctorio offers 24/7/365 proactive support to all users via email, live chat, and social media. From March to June 2020, Proctorio’s support team responded to 391,104 support chats, more than twice as many support requests as seen from March to June 2019. Despite this increase, Proctorio’s support team was able to maintain an average support response time of 11 seconds.

Proctorio is the first and only remote proctoring solution to utilize Zero-Knowledge Encryption, a level of security that reserves access to unencrypted exam recordings to approved individuals with the appropriate credentials at the test taker’s institution. This unique design ensures that no exam recordings leave the test taker’s computer until they have been encrypted, and the recordings are only decrypted when unlocked by an authorized official.

Proctorio has and continues to be dedicated to the sustainability of the organization and contributing to the overall health of the planet. We are designed to reduce paper waste and emissions associated with testing centers and paper exams. The carbon footprint of a test taker taking an exam with Proctorio is nearly non-existent at 0.31 pounds of CO2, just a fraction of the CO2 emitted by taking a test of a testing center. Proctorio is a certified customer of ClimatePartner and actively engages with the calculation of a corporate carbon footprint, the determination of reduction potentials, and offsetting the CO2 emissions of the company, making Proctorio 100% carbon neutral.

Join Connor Koper from Proctorio as he discusses the importance of protecting integrity in remote learning environments, Proctorio’s Learning Integrity Platform, and the platform’s unique features and customizable settings.
Screen reader support enabled.
 

Mar 17, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
COVID-19 Response: Free Tools For Successful Teaching And Learning From MERLOT AND Skillscommons | Education Session

Looking for FREE teaching materials and exemplary online teaching practices using Open Educational Resources? Join us for a guided tour in exploring free resources to help teachers and their students prepare for successful online and hybrid learning. Walk away with FREE teaching tools you can put right to work!

 

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Extended Abstract

Looking for FREE teaching materials and exemplary online and blended teaching practices for teaching during the COVID pandemic and beyond? Need FREE resources to help better prepare your students to learn online? Explore the abundance of free resources designed to help teachers and their students prepare for successful learning. Through interactive conversations and demonstrations, participants will walk away with a new collection of ready-to-use, FREE resources and tools available from SkillsCommons/MERLOT designed to help instructors and students stay safe while supporting improved learner engagement. This face-to-face presentation will be an interactive, live demonstration (internet allowing), and guided tour that will actively elicit audience participation and feedback. An electronic copy of the slide deck and handouts will be provided. The presentation back-up plan includes screenshots of the site from the user’s lens with links embedded in the slide deck for easy later-date access. This is the right time-and-place sharing discussion for CTE and college-level instructors, Deans, Chairs, instructional designers, and others in the academic setting who have a vested interest in student success methodologies and for industry trainers and HR training professionals seeking affordable learning and training solutions.

Mar 17, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Transfer of Knowledge: From Virtual to Physical Labs | Education Session

This session will share feedback gathered from students regarding their online learning experience in a virtual chemistry lab. Specific examples will get shared regarding the perceived transferability of the skills mastered online with those required in a physical lab.

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Extended Abstract

As research emerges on the impact of transitioning to an online learning environment for activities that were typically taught in person, an essential element of the student perspective cannot get overlooked. Through the adoption of a virtual lab software, students were still able to participate in lab activities that aligned with the curriculum without having to visit a physical location on campus. As the large number of students began participating in the activities, the importance of a well designed curriculum surrounding the activities, which included clear guidelines and expectations remained a key component.

Course Background

The course is an introductory chemistry course, which has around 400 students enrolled each semester. The students are from a variety of majors (mostly non-STEM), and it is often the first chemistry course enrolled in. The course transitioned all labs that were taught in-person to an online environment. The focus is on the experience of students enrolled during fall 2020.

Project Description

A survey will get administered to students during the fall 2020 semester. The emphasis of the survey is to capture the student experience and skill development as it pertains to transferring knowledge beyond a virtual lab. In addition, levels of confidence and comfort will get measured as it relates to achieving the course learning objectives.

Interactivity

As the presenters share the project results, they will have built-in questions within the slides at key points. This will provide opportunities for participants to answer poll questions and share common experiences in the chat as the different topics of the presentation get discussed.

Takeaways

The information gathered through this project is relevant to the community as it can impact the curricular design for both the virtual lab activities as well as the pre and post lab activities. Although attendees may be from a variety of disciplines, the student perspectives can have instructional design practice recommendations that are interdisciplinary.

Mar 17, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
K-12 Summit - Part 3: Designing Learning Futures: Navigating Toward The Next Normal | Summit

Given the rapid disruption and changes brought on by COVID-19, we know that there will be no returning “back to normal.” In this session, we want to explore ways in which educators and leaders can begin to design and give shape to a new normal, even through all the uncertainty of now. Using the mindsets and tools of design and strategic foresight, we will explore how we might reimagine our teaching and learning environments - particularly online and digital learning environments - by addressing and harnessing the plausible outcomes and impacts of our collective uncertainty. We will also explore and practice with emerging tools and strategies for leading change in a rapidly-changing world.

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Extended Abstract

We are certainly living through a volatile, complex, uncertain, and ambiguous (VUCA) world at the present moment, and its impacts have been felt perhaps more deeply and tangibly in K12 education than anywhere else - both at global level and within our local schools and communities. Given the rapid disruption and changes brought on by COVID-19, we know that there will be no returning “back to normal.” While schools, educators, students and families have all navigated the past year in different ways and with different degrees of hardship, challenge, and even success - we still look forward to establishing a future sense of normalcy, however the new normal takes shape.

In this session, we want to explore some of the ways in which educators and leaders can begin to design and give shape to this new normal, despite all the uncertainty of now. Given all that educators and communities are facing, it’s worth exploring how we might reimagine our teaching and learning environments - particularly online and digital learning environments - by addressing and harnessing the plausible outcomes and impacts of our collective uncertainty.

We will invite participants to learn about and  experiment with emergent design and strategic foresight tools that can reveal risks and opportunities, helping us prioritize the work needed to build the next normal. The goal of this session is not to predict what will happen in the future, but to stretch the imagination (and ourselves!) to think about what we would like to have happen, using a framework and tools for how it might happen. The maxim “we cannot predict the future, but we can invent it “ is often cited as a call to design and use strategic forecasting tools and methodologies. Join us as we create a studio space to explore a set of tools and reflective prompts that we’re describing as Learning Futures.


           

Mar 17, 2021
5:45pm - 6:30pm (Central)
Learning Starts at the Application: Community & Belonging in Student Onboarding | Education Session

Learn how Western Governors University is leveraging an AI-based community-building platform to create a deeper sense of belonging among prospective students.  Preliminary research findings concerning the impact that belonging has on enrollment will be shared.  Attendees will discuss the research implications, especially as applied to their own institution.

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Extended Abstract

Attendee learning objectives:

  • Understand the psychology of student belonging and the related consequences when that need for belonging is frustrated.

  • Explore community-building tools as applied to the student enrollment experience

  • Discover of practical measurements tools for prospective students (measuring sense of belonging and community along the enrollment funnel)

  • Explore quantitative and qualitative research methodologies used to evaluate impact

Western Governor University’s (WGU) sizeable student population is unique, with a broad demographic distribution and rich permutations of education and experience. Our large network of current and former students, combined with a 100%-online teaching model, provides us unmatched research access and insights into student outcomes.

As with other institutions, we also experience challenges converting prospective students from the application phase to matriculation. In analyzing our enrollment process, we found an opportunity to focus on the early stages of the enrollment process--often one of the first touch-points between the prospective student and the academic institution--where student engagement can be crucial. It is at this critical juncture when many feel uncertain about whether a postsecondary education is the right choice for them, their minds filled with doubts about whether they have the requisite competence to succeed, whether they will be valued, and whether they feel like they belong in this new environment. If a student experiences difficulty, lack of support, or confusion during these early stages, they are likely to conclude that the academic pursuit is not for them, and thus abandon their efforts to enroll. If, however, they are kept feeling engaged and supported--through responsive and efficient guidance--they will experience less frustration as they successfully complete their enrollment process and, in turn, begin to build the confidence that they can succeed in college and that they do belong at WGU. This early, and consistent, effort to promote a sense of belonging and community is one of the key psychological experiences that allows students to feel connected with their institution and more confident about their nascent academic journey. 

Nonetheless, building a sense of community remains challenging at the best of times for any institution. Oftentimes, many students must also contend with both internal challenges in their daily lives, such dealing with negative stereotypes, belonging uncertainty, and psychological scarcity; as well as external pressures of financial struggles, family demands, and absent or negative social support from their communities. These pressures are now further compounded as a result of the current COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in factors that create a sense of detachment from education for many potential students. 

To amend some of these pressures and foster a greater sense of community and belonging, WGU is using an advanced technology platform built around student interactions, moderator actions, and machine learning, in order to spark engagement early in the enrollment process. The platform provides prospective students with a support community to access pertinent information; share excitement and motivation; calm anxiety and uncertainty. With this timely, responsive, and supportive interaction platform in place during the enrollment phase, we explore the impact on enrollment to matriculation retention rates as well as student experiences throughout their academic experience. 

Table breakout discussion will be structured through questions from a recognized social psychologist with expertise in student sense of belonging, mindset, and equity.

 

Mar 17, 2021
6:45pm - 7:30pm (Central)
Happy Hour: Treats & Trivia | Evening Event

Join us for a relaxing night of treats and trivia! Bring your own drinks, cookies, and any other delectables. Be ready to share recipes and join in the fun and laughter of an evening of trivia among new friends. This is a family friendly event. The more the merrier!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 18, 2021
8:15am - 8:45am (Central)
Get To Know Wiley Education Services | Networking Coffee Talk

Join our Coffee Talk to meet members of our business development team, chat about our range of online learning solutions, and learn about our free Market Assessment opportunity.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 18, 2021
8:15am - 8:45am (Central)
Meditation and Mindfulness - A Guided Meditation Session | Other

Join us for some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Innovate Virtual Conference in a healthy and present way together.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Establishing an Online Tutoring Platform | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Institutions across the United States are quickly shifting gears to offer the delivery of student support services in a virtual environment. This session will explore a real-world example of how an institution of higher education selected and established an online tutoring platform to enhance academic success.

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Extended Abstract

As a result of Covid19 and changing students demographics, educational institutions have had to quickly pivot student support services to a remote environment. One such service, academic based tutoring, continues to be high need area for students as classes continue to be held virtually in both synchronous and asynchronous methods. While educators have always been quick to respond to changing student needs, it can be difficult to know where to begin with expanding/shifting services to an online platform.

This session will offer a broad view of how Saint Mary's College of California leadership team examined and analyzed various third party tutoring platforms. Additionally, they will cover campus implementation techniques (including how to integrate an online platform into existing services). Assessment data, including lessons learned, will also be showcased.

Participants will:

  • Learn what to consider when selecting a third party tutoring platform as well as a sampling of potential questions to ask institutional leadership and third party platform vendors
  • Determine who to collaborate with while gaining institutional support how to integrate an online tutoring program with existing campus tutoring structures how to assess their newly integrated program
  • Learn how to integrate an online tutoring program with existing campus tutoring structures
  • Learn how to assess their newly integrated program
Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Designing, Developing, and Delivering MOOCs to further Institutional Goals | Education Session

Instructional designers discuss the design, development, and delivery process for launching a series of MOOCs to address institutional needs arising in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The MOOCs are open to all, completely free, asynchronous, and provide pathways for college credit should students wish to enroll at our institution.

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Extended Abstract

Like many institutions of higher education (IHE), our large southeastern research university found itself needing creative solutions to stave off enrollment declines due to moving fully online as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. One novel solution to the problem was implemented by a collaboration between one of the institutions’ colleges and  the institution’s instructional designers. Together, both groups created a series of MOOCs that leveraged the quality instruction of faculty and the latest innovation in instructional design and technology to offer quality asynchronous online courses at no cost to students around the world. 

Three broad themes will be discussed in detail. First, we will discuss the administrative challenges. This will include a discussion of institutional needs in light of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as how departments collaborated to create MOOCs. This section will discuss how faculty, staff, and university administration worked together to make MOOCs possible at our institution as well as the steps taken to ensure a high quality course was the output of all this collaboration. Through collaboration, we were able to offer a quality educational experience that could be redeemed for college credit should the student wish to enroll at our institution. 

Second we will discuss the design, development, and delivery of the course. It was important that students new to online learning be able to successfully interact with these MOOCs and meet their learning objectives. Furthermore, MOOCs needed to be designed from the ground-up as a completely asynchronous experience, and we will share how they were designed and delivered completely asynchronously. Here, we will discuss how instructional designers leveraged Open Educational Resources (OER) to provide no-cost instructional content for students since it was important for us to keep the entire experience free for our students. Additionally, we will discuss how the courses were developed to be fully accessible for all learners ensuring an engaging yet equitable learning environment. Accessibility will be discussed from both a technological and disability perspective.

Third, we will discuss how we leveraged MOOCs to build stronger relationships with both the state as well as our corporate partners. First, we partnered with our state’s college reengagement program for potential adult students. Our state government has placed an importance on getting adults with some college to go back into an IHE to complete their degree. We will then discuss how we used our MOOCs in our corporate partnerships to provide credit bearing educational experiences that are not bound to rigid start and end dates. This is essential for successful corporate partnerships since they serve as an open pipeline funneling students into our institutions, and MOOCs ensure we have options for them no matter when they want to start. 

Given the amount of information presenters will need to cover to fully discuss the design, development, and delivery as well as the institutional challenges and course outcomes, the interactivity of this presentation will be limited to a Q&A. We will begin the Q&A with a live survey to best tailor the discussion to the audience in attendance. Launching a MOOC, especially at an IHE that does not have a history of offering them, possesses an immense institutional challenge as administrators attempt to implement them. 

    As a result of attending our presentation, participants will come away with the following takeaways:

  • the organizational challenges in launching a fully asynchronous MOOC at absolutely no cost to anyone

  • a better understanding of how best to leverage the open access of MOOCs to drive interest in a college’s credit bearing courses as well as market the quality of a college’s or institution’s online education.

  • How best-practices from the design and delivery of online courses can be leveraged for student success in a MOOC.

  • How instructional designers can work effectively with subject matter experts and OER resources to create high-quality yet open educational experiences.

Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
New VoiceThread Assignments Are Here! | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Our new assignments feature, which has been in the works for several years, was released in full. Many courses and institutions have already adopted it, and we encourage you to check it out, too!

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Extended Abstract

October 19 was a massive day of celebration at VoiceThread. Our new assignments feature, which has been in the works for several years, was released in full. Many courses and institutions have already adopted it, and we encourage you to check it out, too!

This update offers a huge number of new features and streamlined workflows, including:

  • A streamlined interface
  • More control for instructors
  • Editable assignments
  • A “student gallery” so students can easily see classmates’ VoiceThreads
  • Better feedback for students
  • Much more!

If time permits, we will provide a sneak peak at what's coming in 2021

Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
360 Degrees of Learning: Using Immersive Virtual Learning Technologies and Approaches | Education Session

This presentation will showcase how we merged 360° technology and an interactive "choose your own pathway" platform to create personalized experiences for our students. Participants will have the opportunity to interact with these virtual learning experiences to better understand the capabilities of 360 technologies and personalized learning pathways.  

 

 

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Extended Abstract

The global pandemic has prompted many higher education institutions to embrace new technologies and approaches to virtual teaching. The USAHS Center for Innovative Clinical Practice (CICP) has shifted from facilitating campus-based learning to becoming invaluable in transferring immersive and interactive activities leveraging both existing and new technologies. 

We used 360° technology, interactive "choose your own pathway" platforms, and our learning management system to create personalized experiences that immerse our students into authentic learning environments such as hospitals, educational settings, homes, and workspaces. This presentation will demonstrate the multiple ways we have implemented 360 technology to successfully engage students and achieve learning outcomes. We will demonstrate how we have overcome the obstacles presented in the areas of home safety evaluations, skills practice and demonstration, workplace ergonomics, and inpatient safety considerations using immersive learning approaches. Participants will be able to explore environments, select learning pathways, and experience the personalized learning media and feedback that is given to students.

Participants will see examples of how 360 technology has been utilized to immerse our students into diverse environments despite the challenges presented by social distancing precautions. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in a virtual 360 experience to discover "hotspots", clues, and embedded media that guide their learning expereince. Participants will "choose their own destiny" within a virtual simulation to better understand the personalized student experience. We will discuss the future of 360 technology, simulation gaming, and personalized learning pathways in hybrid and online programs as a method to enhance the learning experience.

Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 11:00am (Central)
Diversity and Inclusion in the Online Classroom: Scenario Based Training | Workshop

Join us as we examine diversity and inclusion considerations for the online learning environment, specifically the online classroom. Workshop participants will engage in hands-on diversity and inclusion scenario-based training and discussions, mirroring what one might do to increase awareness through scenarios embedded in faculty development.

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Extended Abstract

Won't you join us for this workshop? We will examine diversity and inclusion considerations for the online learning environment, specifically the online classroom. You will engage in hands-on diversity and inclusion scenario-based training and discussions, mirroring what one might do to increase awareness and positive action through scenarios embedded in faculty development. 

Workshop Outcomes

Upon completion of this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Identify potential diversity or inclusion concerns with current course materials or interactions in an online learning environment
  2. Be proactive with considerations for diversity and inclusion during online course development and delivery
  3. Create action plans in response to diversity and inclusion situations which could arise or already exist in the online classroom
  4. Discuss how diversity and inclusion scenario-based training may be embedded in online faculty and staff development

Background

Through a collaborative effort between the area which provides online faculty development and the Division of Diversity and Inclusion, a list of scenarios has been developed to increase awareness of situations which might arise in the online learning environment and online classroom. These scenarios have been embedded in courses and lessons within the Online Faculty Academy (OFA) program. The aim of the scenarios created is to increase awareness of faculty and other staff engaging with individuals at a distance or through technology mediated communications about how campus climate topics may present. Increasing the meaningfulness and relevance of the professional development activity, discussion and reflection on how one might address or improve upon the situation as described in the scenario is expected. Reference materials and electronic sources are provided as resources to faculty and staff as they work their scenarios and determine appropriate plans of action.

Notably regulations and policies have attention focused on accessibility for students with special needs or disabilities. With that accessibility topics such as captioning and the availability of typed transcripts have been at the forefront or atop the inclusivity list for many. We have gone beyond that alone looking at 15 areas to bring to the attention of faculty and staff through realistic scenarios. The scenarios created to date focused on the online classroom. These exercises have been the subject of positive feedback received through our end of course assessment and reflection activity. The presenters believe these concepts could be applied across all modalities supported with electronic media and interactions; instructors have noted the inherent value for on-going consideration as well.

  1. Ability
  2. Accessibility
  3. Age
  4. Citizenship
  5. Ethnicity
  6. Gender
  7. Linguistic Background
  8. Mental Health
  9. Misrepresentation
  10. Nationality
  11. Political Affiliation
  12. Pronoun Usage
  13. Race
  14. Sexuality
  15. Socio-economic Status

Workshop Agenda

  • Welcome and expectations (5 minutes)
  • Divide into groups and do introductions (10 minutes)
  • Review the 15 areas and scenarios provided (15 minutes)
  • Each group to choose three scenarios; discuss and determine action plan for each one selected. (30 minutes)
  • Group Report Outs (25 minutes)
    • Which Scenarios did your group choose?
    • Provide the action plan for one of them.
    • Highlight any 'aha' moments or points of differing perspective
  • Wrap-up (5 minutes)

References and handouts will be provided at session, in addition to a listing of electronic resources. Handouts will include area definitions, scenarios, worksheet for the group discussion and reporting out. A listing of electronic resources will be made available for a deeper dive into the topics covered.

Mar 18, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
International Summit - Part 1: A Case Study For Re-imaging And Responding To Education Globally | Summit

Join us for this first session of three sessions at OLC’s International Summit, an online convening spanning time zones and continents bringing together thought leaders and practitioners around the concept of digital transformation. This session will present case studies from The Texas International Education Consortium and their work responding to the disruption of the pandemic by harnessing expertise and networks across Texas in online programming, to collaboratively build capacity at institutions in Ghana, Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Tunisia, Libya, Morocco, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman, Lebanon, United Arab Emirates. 

 

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Extended Abstract

This session is part of the OLC Innovate 2021 International Summit, a gathering for educators from across the globe to engage in answering the following questions:

  • How do we within our various contexts and environments work to promote equity and access to learning through digital transformation?  
  • What are the practices, processes and connections that must be created to better meet the needs of our learners in local and global contexts? 

 Learn more about the International Summit on our website.

 

International Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
The Future of Learning & Upskilling | Networking Coffee Talk

 Join Walden University to discuss innovative pathways for learning and skills development designed to address skills gaps in the workforce.

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Extended Abstract

Walden University’s School of Lifelong Learning has an innovative approach to upskilling. We create engaging, job-relevant, self-paced “micro courses” which stack to learning paths culminating in a variety of micro credentials for the learner.

Mar 18, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
International Summit - Part 2: Open Educational Pathways To Digital Transformation | Summit

As the world looks to address ubiquitous challenges to access to education in both global and local contexts, open education continues to serve as a powerful pedagogy and practice for creating sustainable and impactful change. This session will focus on creating and implementing a culture of digital transformation in online, blended and flexible learning across the globe through critical open educational practices. The presenters will revisit the findings from the 2019 OLC Accelerate Online International Summit on Openness, sharing what was learned, where we’ve gone since, and what new opportunities emerge ahead.

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Extended Abstract

Join us for this second session of three sessions at OLC’s International Summit, an online convening spanning time zones and continents bringing together thought leaders and practitioners around the concept of digital transformation. This session will focus on creating and implementing a culture of digital transformation in online, blended and flexible learning across the globe. 

This session is part of the OLC Innovate 2021 International Summit, a gathering for educators from across the globe to engage in answering the following questions:

  • How do we within our various contexts and environments work to promote equity and access to learning through digital transformation?  
  • What are the practices, processes and connections that must be created to better meet the needs of our learners in local and global contexts? 

 Learn more about the International Summit on our website.

      

International Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Evolution in Design: Innovation and Expansion of Design Teams | Conversation, Not Presentation

As the pandemic accelerated changes to education, the scope of responsibilities for Design teams are expanding to support more faculty, adjust education delivery, and reach learners in new ways. We will ideate around innovation to meet these evolving needs.

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Extended Abstract

The abrupt launch into widespread remote teaching and learning due to the pandemic brought with it an evolution in the role of Design teams, including instructional designers, program managers, production specialists, and technologists. In this “Conversation, Not Presentation” session, the facilitators will explore key questions about these topics: (a) the scope of expansion and innovation to meet new needs, (b) challenges and opportunities this has created, (c) ideation for continuing to evolve and expand into the future, and (d) making the case for stakeholder support of expanded innovation and roles.

 

Many Design teams went from providing wraparound support services to a select group of faculty members, to being responsible for technology, faculty development, and instructional consultation support across entire colleges and the wider university community. As learner and faculty needs changed, so did the roles of the design teams. Faculty, staff, and administration sought information, expanded support, and direct skill development in online teaching and learning, something often offered but underutilized. For many institutions, the benefits of remote learning were noticed through hands-on experience with it, decreasing the apprehension for online and remote learning.

 

Rapid development of digital resources and assets allowed for impact at scale, as many institutions created compilations of tutorials and resources for faculty. Program managers provided remote technology support, tutorials, and just-in-time how-tos. Designers met with faculty for consultations to support online course planning and offer personalized feedback. 

 

The needs of industry partners in the areas of executive and professional education changed as well, which expanded audiences and the types of services designers and program managers stepped in to develop and support. Once apprehensive about online learning, many companies saw the benefits of remote professional development after experiencing it, saving their organizations time and money. 

 

In this “Conversation, Not Presentation” session, join us for key questions about Evolution of Roles, Challenges and Opportunities, Ideas for the Future, and Garnering Stakeholder Support.

 

Evolution of Roles

  1. How roles for you and/or your team evolved or expanded due to the pandemic?

  2. Describe the extent to which the expectations for your responsibility have expanded, the areas of impact have entered new areas, and let’s discuss how this impacts us, our teams, and our professional identities.

 

Challenges and Opportunities

  1. Describe the challenges and opportunities that have emerged from the acceleration and disruption due to the pandemic.

  2. What new partnerships were forged as a result?

 

Ideas for the Future

  1. How might you continue to tap into the opportunities and mitigate challenges?

  2. How are we using this experience to prepare for the next disruption?

 

Garnering Stakeholder Support

  1. Considering the current shifts and possible future horizons, how might we make the case for stakeholder support of design teams?

  2. How might you tell the story of your changing role?

Mar 18, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Building 21st Century Skills for all Learners | Education Session

Employers continue to complain that college graduates do not have the 21st-century-skills they need.

Through this presentation, participants will be able:

1. Utilize a competency framework to evaluate students’ 21st-century-skills

2. Identify the value of digital micro-credentials

3. Explore how their institution can begin addressing these high need skills

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Extended Abstract

Soft-skills.

Everyone wants them. No one has them.

The 2019 Chronicle of Higher Education report Responding to Work-force Needs: Views on how colleges can partner with employers to teach student 21st-century skills identifies soft-skills “as the power skills of human interaction—interpersonal and communication skills, adaptability, collaboration, creativity, and emotional intelligence” (p. 2).

The basis of the report is the “massive skills gap” (p. 21) between the skills employers expect their new hires—especially college graduates—to possess and the skills these new hires actually possess.

In turn, institutes of higher education are increasingly attempting to address the recognized gap between the soft-skills employers demand and the soft-skills college graduates demonstrate by embedding development of such skills within existing curriculum (Chronicle of Higher Education, 2019).

However, institutes of higher education continue to struggle to effectively adjust learning experiences to accommodate the inculcation of non-content-related objectives into their curricula (Murugiah, 2020).

In turn, soft-skills add-on training programs are frequently used to compliment  standard content-based education. These programs are frequently self-paced, individualized learning experiences meant to help that learner develop that skill. While add-on programs often utilize simulations for the purposes of helping learners apply their knowledge, the experience is still largely between the individual learning the skill and the computer program teaching the skill

There are at least two major problems with these approaches:

      1. Soft-skills are best developed within specific content domains (Hirsh, 2016).

      2. Soft-skills are best developed in the context of experiential learning (Stalp & Hill, 2019).

For example, there is a great difference between a learning experience that teaches students something about collaboration and creativity and a learning experience that is itself based on collaboration and creativity. 

Recognizing these challenges, Education Design Lab partners with a variety of colleges, universities, and training programs to create a compelling learning experience to develop 21st century skills within the context of their institution and their individual fields of study.

Education Design Lab’s 21st Century Skills Digital Micro-credentials, delivery platform called vsbl is an active, asynchronous, flexible, experiential learning experience that includes modules for the 8 broad competencies of collaboration, critical thinking, oral communication, creative problem solving, initiative, resilience, empathy, and intercultural fluency, which are comprised of 23 sub-competencies.  Pretzl has been integrated to cultivate community within the online environment, in a way that is dynamic, visually appealing, and learner-focused.  

Specifically, the learning experiences are designed to identify discrete skills such as “Identify Patterns” for Critical Thinking. Leveraging their partnership with Pretzl--an online discussion platform aimed at helping learners develop 21st skills through discussion--these programs combine learning, practice, contribution and unique assessments called proving grounds to make the learning process transparent, explicit, and portable to the learner. Through the use of the performanced-based proving grounds, which include detailed skill rubrics, learners demonstrate the required skills that can then be used as a signal of candidate abilities to employers. The award of digital credentials makes the learner digitally discoverable and serves as a means of expressing and validating the gained skills and sharing of accomplishment. 

To date, 415 students from one badge issuing platform (Credly) have successfully earned digital badges across 14 institutions. Other programs and partnerships have provided hundreds of additional digital badges by using Education Design Lab content and framework.

This presentation will provide examples and showcase the individual and combined successes of fostering the 21st century skills through the unique partnership between education providers Education Design Lab and Pretzl.  

Through this presentation, participants will be able:

1. Generate ideas for creating strategic partnerships to solve diverse challenges

2. Familiarize themselves with a competency framework for evaluating 21st century skills in their learners

3. Identify the value of digital micro-credentials

4. Explore the way their institution might begin to address these high need skills

 

Mar 18, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Exploring the tools, strategies, and processes for making exceptional educational videos | Education Session

This session will benefit professors seeking to create engaging video content in their courses.  We will discuss tools and approaches for creating videos, including types of educational videos (i.e., webcams, screencasts, animations, editing, etc.), options for software and platforms, logistics (e.g., presentation, scripts, lighting, etc.), and general tips and techniques. 

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Extended Abstract

There are many methods available to professors to create engaging videos for their students.  For faculty who are new to creating videos for students, the task may be overwhelming or downright intimidating.  However, creating videos for your classes does not have to be a precipitous endeavor – there are small and simple things that you can do to begin your multimedia journey or refine your skills and production value. 

In this session, we will elaborate on the differences between webcam and screencast videos, and discuss which approaches would be most appropriate based on the content and intent of the video.  We will also review a video planning checklist to guide the production of videos and ensure that videos are impactful and created in such a way that students will view and benefit from them.  This checklist will ensure that storyboarded videos encapsulate single, big ideas that are supported by key points.  We will explore various tools and platforms for both creating and hosting video content. 

Finally, in this session we will cover the many do’s and don’ts of creating effective videos for your students.  What are the novice mistakes, and how can I distinguish my video to that it is effective?  With some practice and effort, your videos will help to humanize the course content and increase your instructor presence in your learning environment. 

Mar 18, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Online Program Growth During The Pandemic Supported By Unbundled OPM Partnership Model | Industry Showcase - Presentation

The pandemic has accelerated the need for innovative, online programs – and a new flexible model for online program enablement can provide a flexible, revenue-growth focused partnership that truly moves the needle on enrollment growth.

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic has accelerated the need for innovative, online programs – and a new flexible model for online program enablement can provide a flexible, revenue-growth focused partnership that truly moves the needle on enrollment growth. Over the course of a two-year partnership, Saint Louis University and Collegis Education built a sustainable operational model that has weathered the challenges of the current environment – allowing the SLU School for Professional Studies to not only maintain enrollments, but exceed its growth goals. While the higher education landscape is saturated with OPM vendors, SLU looked to an unbundled OPM partnership that provided flexibility, collaboration and transparency. In this session, Saint Louis University will share why they chose a partnership model with Collegis Education, and how the foundation built together has allowed the University to thrive during the pandemic and maintain operational success.

Learning Outcomes:

  • How SLU approached their search for a collaborative partner outside of OPM vendors
  • Steps to build an internal enrollment foundation through program strategy and differentiation, admissions augmentation, process optimization and digital marketing.
  • Breeding a culture of continued innovation and constant improvement.
  • The measurable impact over the course of two years
Mar 18, 2021
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
OLC Live: The Innovate Experience | Other

Dive deeper into the conference experience with OLC Live! Hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr as they lead focused conversations with presenters and participants focused on this year’s conference themes:

  • Blended Teaching and Learning
  • Career and Technical Education
  • Instructional Technologies and Tools
  • Leadership and Advocacy
  • Open Learning
  • Process, Problems, and Practices
  • Research: Designs, Methods, and Findings
  • Teaching and Learning Practice

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Fight: Personalize the Protest with Antiracism and Universal Design for Learning | Featured Session

Controversy is born the moment dreamers begin taking actions to invite the marginalized ones into the secret society of success. It takes bravery to dream beyond the locked gates of educational access for all. When we say “all” we need to be brave enough to identify the students who the system has not traditionally served. It’s more important than ever that we recognize that our systems are not socially just or equitable for our Black and Brown students. The time is now to FIGHT!

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Extended Abstract

Participants in this session will:

  • Evaluate the fighting skills of educators to enact antiracist strategy.
  • Begin building techniques to fight against racism and oppression with instructional and professional decision making.
  • Personalize the protest to stand for marginalized and oppressed learners with antiracist UDL implementation one fight at a time.

 

Featured Sessions Series sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
OLC Design Sprints (Part 2): A Lunch Networking Event | Other

Don't miss the opportunity to join others during lunch for the second part of the OLC Innovate Design Sprints series! The first Design Sprint centered community building. In this session you will be asked to dive into the world of collaborative meaning-making. Participants will be divided into teams and together you will generate solutions to a unique design challenge. Along the way, you'll have a chance to make meaningful connections with other conference participants (including our industry partners), will leave with innovative ideas, and even have an opportunity to win a prize! So grab a snack or a meal and hop into a team for some quick designing and lots of fun!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Understanding the Power of Toxic Leadership on Followers and Organizations | Education Session

Leaders influence their organizations and followers. Overall, we accept this; however, we rarely consider what happens if leaders are toxic. This session explores the true influences of toxic leadership on both organizations and followers. Additionally, this session equips attendees with an understanding of toxic leadership, behaviors associated with toxic leadership, and strategies to mitigate toxic leaders' influences. 

 

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Extended Abstract

Overview

Toxic leaders are leaders who harm organizations and followers. Unfortunately, toxic leaders are common. Specifically, a Society of Human Resource Management (SHRM) 2019 survey showed over two-thirds of Americans reported working in or having worked in a toxic work environment. Furthermore, more than 50% of these respondents stated their leader was the cause of this toxicity. Thus, toxic leadership is common and, unfortunately, rarely discussed. This session strives to change this by exploring the negative/toxic side of leadership to create awareness. 

In addition to being common, toxic leadership is harmful. The current research shows toxic leaders inflict harm on both their organizations and followers. From an organizational perspective, toxic leaders are linked to decreases in organizational performance, organizational learning, innovation, organizational citizenship behavior, and an increase in organizational cynicism.  On an individual level, the followers of toxic leaders report having lower job satisfaction, higher turnover intentions, increased stress levels, decreased affective well-being, and using coping strategies to "deal" with their leaders.

These harms are directly related to innovation and innovation, as we all know, is needed in online education. So, being able to identify toxic leaders, understand the reasons for toxic leadership, and address toxic leadership behaviors is important to the future of innovation (and our organizations). This session invites participants to learn about what toxic leadership is, the characteristics and behaviors of toxic leaders, their harms on organizations and followers, and strategies to minimize toxic leaders' influence.  After learning the basics in these areas, attendees reflect on their personal experiences with a toxic leader(s) and think about how that experience has influenced them and their organizations. Special attention will be paid to the influences on innovation directly.  Attendees will share these reflections with the group and talk about ways to mitigate toxic leaders in their organizations.  

Session Interactivity

As an education session, this session will focus on learning about toxic leadership and allowing individuals to reflect and discuss their revelations. The session will begin with a 5-minute interactive, digital survey to gather information about attendees’ experiences with toxic leadership and their perceptions of what toxic leadership is.  The session will then progress to the presentation part. The 25-minute presentation will center on the following information: definitions of toxic leadership, characteristics and behaviors of toxic leaders, influences of toxic leaders on organizations and followers, and strategies to minimize toxic leader impact.  The presentation will encourage attendees to engage throughout the presentation and through offering examples and thoughts if they are comfortable.  

After the presentation ends, participants will spend 5 minutes reflecting on any experiences they may have had with a toxic leader(s) and think about how this leader influenced them or their organization (related to innovation if possible). Participants will also think about any strategies that could have mitigated the impact of this leader.  The session will then conclude with 10 minutes of sharing and discussion.  Participants will share the experiences and strategies they identified during the reflection portion. I will record the trends and themes of these reflections for participants to see in Padlet (or similar tool) The goal of this section of the presentation is to allow participants to learn from others' experiences. 

Session Goals:

Session participants can expect to accomplish the following:

1) Discuss how toxic leadership can impact innovation; 

2) Learn definitions of toxic leadership; 

3) Discover the common behaviors and characteristics of toxic leaders; 

4) Explore how toxic leaders harm organizations and followers; 

5) Learn about strategies to mitigate the influences of toxic leaders; 

6) Reflect on personal experiences with toxic leaders; 

7) Share experiences with others to learn through real-life examples of toxic leaders. ​

Materials

This session will include a digital/interactive survey, a PowerPoint Presentation (available for download), a handout that will outline common characteristics and behaviors of toxic leaders, a handout/padlet to guide the reflection portion (for attendees to write their thoughts).

Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Delivering Effective Hybrid Classes | Industry Showcase - Presentation

How to deliver effective hybrid classes during Covid-19.

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Extended Abstract

Having over 10 years experience of teaching online, Steven Muegge will share his techniques for engaging remote students. He will cover his strategies and best practices in response to the unique challenges facing teachers (and students) during the pandemic.

Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Advancing Quality Research in Online Learning: A Panel Discussion with Editors of the Online Learning Journal | Education Session

Join us in celebrating the Online Learning Journal’s (OLJ’s) 25th anniversary! To celebrate we’ll spend time reflecting on what makes high quality research, suitable for publication in OLJ or other peer-reviewed journals. We will also discuss how you can become involved in our efforts to continuously improve the quality of research on online learning.

 

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Extended Abstract

As we celebrate the Online Learning Journal’s (OLJ’s) 25th anniversary, it is the perfect time to reflect on the need for high quality research on online learning.  This includes taking a hard look at weaknesses in the literature and how we might address these. Weaknesses include fragmented and disjointed approaches to researching online pedagogy, tools, and participants.  Other issues are the application of methods that lack rigor or are unsuited to the research questions, and poorly written reports that impede subsequent attempts at replication and follow-up. The field faces a significant challenge. We must design and carry out research that will both address past concerns about methods and findings and illuminate the directions we should take in the future.  

This panel session will bring together some of the most influential leaders from the online learning research community to answer questions like:

  • What makes a good research question?
  • What are the most common problems with literature reviews?
  • What methods are complementary to my research question?
  • What topics are likely to stimulate additional productive research and generate citations?
  • How can I help OLC and OLJ to advance the quality of research in the field?
Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
International Summit - Part 3: Designing For Global Collaborations And Change: Lessons And Takeaways From The Inaugural IELOL Global Cohort | Summit

In this session, join OLC’s Madeline Shellgren and SARUA’s Rassie Louw as they detail what they learned from the inaugural Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (IELOL) Global community, a group of educators from around the world who gathered over a four month period in 2020 to help answer challenges around digital learning leadership in international contexts, particularly strategy and operations for ensuring equitable and inclusive access to education.

 

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Extended Abstract

The last year and a half has visibilized for the world a number of things related to online, blended, and digital learning. Among them is the fact that there are ubiquitous challenges in digital learning across the globe that we have yet to address in equitable and sustainable ways. These challenges include everything from stark inequities in access to education to a lack of infrastructure to support systemic change (particular change that moves institutions from Digitization through Digitalization, and towards Digital Transformation). These challenges also highlight, however, the need and opportunity for leadership in cross-institutional collaborations which seeks to intentionally build global coalitions. In this session, join OLC’s Madeline Shellgren and SARUA’s Rassie Louw as they detail what they learned from the inaugural Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (IELOL) Global community, a group of educators from around the world who gathered over a four month period in 2020 to help answer these challenges.

Through immersive and project-based professional development and collaboration, the 2020 IELOL Global cohort not only deepened our understanding of how these challenges manifest in unique global contexts (through storytelling, collaborative note-taking, and reflection), but also collectively generated a series of change-oriented assets to support others in their digital transformation efforts. Be among the first to gain access to these amazing resources and stories by engaging with us in this session, and learn more about how you can get involved in the future.

This session is part of the OLC Innovate 2021 International Summit, a gathering for educators from across the globe to engage in answering the following questions:

  • How do we within our various contexts and environments work to promote equity and access to learning through digital transformation?  
  • What are the practices, processes and connections that must be created to better meet the needs of our learners in local and global contexts? 

 Learn more about the International Summit on our website.

      

International Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Now what do I do?! Addressing Student Concerns in a Digital Classroom | Conversation, Not Presentation

Student issues confronted in the face-to-face classroom don’t disappear with the move to synchronous and asynchronous online learning.  The issues just get a bit more challenging to address. Join this conversation to share best strategies for effectively dealing with student issues. 

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Extended Abstract

While many things have changed in the world of education, some issues never change.  Understanding why students do the things they do to set themselves up for a less than successful experience, is an ever present challenge for instructors.  In the online learning environment, these problematic student behaviors can be magnified and complicated by relying on technology for communication.  

 

The presenters and participants will share scenarios to stimulate thought and discussion around student behaviors that impact student success in online courses, such as: 

 

Student doesn’t turn on camera in live online class

Student engages in inappropriate on camera behaviors

Student doesn’t understand material

Student isn’t turning in work

Student asks for extra credit

Student is negative in the discussion board

Student dislikes online classes

Student has violated academic integrity

Student continues to have technical difficulties

Student doesn’t want to engage with you . . . or others

Student misses a major assignment

 

The presentation will include the following elements:

  • Brief presentation with PowerPoint slides to examine how remote communication complicates student participation issues.

  • PowerPoint slides to present the scenarios and Mentimeter slides to present alternatives to course of action.

  • Breakout group activities to discuss and present alternatives to solving scenarios.

  • Full group activities requiring participation via discussion.

Mar 18, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Online Student Support in a Post-COVID World | Education Session

How did pivoting to remote student services due to COVID-19 provide equity of access between online and campus-based students? Presenters address unexpected findings from a study exploring the nature of online units at 31 HEIs. Results and questions of equity and continuation of expanded online services will be discussed.

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Extended Abstract

In 2019, a cross-university research collaborative initiated a year-long qualitative inquiry into the evolving nature of online units at a cross-section of higher education institutions across the United States.  The sample consisted of 31 colleges and universities representing 17 public non-profit and six private non-profit four-year institutions, six two-year nonprofit, and two private for-profit institutions.  The team sought to understand the precedents and implications of the current and future states of online units within the participating institutions to identify common structures and themes, as well as benefits and consequences that peer institutions can learn from as their online operations evolve.  The research team conducted a series of three semi-structured interviews, and coincidentally, scheduled Student Support as the final set of interviews to be completed in the Spring of 2020 (during the COVID-19 crisis).  What resulted were highly nuanced and informative data suggesting that student support for online students in areas previously not addressed were suddenly not only at the center of administrators’ discussions but also growing in capacity.  The findings contribute to a growing body of knowledge that highlights gaps between student support services offered to campus-based students versus those offered to online students.  Ironically, many chief online officers may posit that online students may need more support than their campus-based peers who benefit from affordances of a physical community.  

A lingering question is whether the support for online (and remote) students gained during the pivot to emergency remote teaching and learning during COVID-19  is here to stay, or merely a temporary fix for campus-based students--prompting our research team to question the true lines of demarcation of student support for students, modality aside.  Further, it prompts important inquiry into equity between campus-based and online student support, and highlights the need for more emphasis on equitable service for all.  

Key takeaways from the session include: 

  1. Study findings related to the support of students, regardless of modality.
  2. Study findings related to leadership opportunities for chief online learning officers.

  3. Reflections on the implications for future changes on our campuses related to the study findings, as well as the experiences of attendee’s campuses.  

In a breakout room, small attendee groups will participate in a 3-2-1 exercise where they will write down 3 things they learned, 2 things they found most interesting, and 1 thing they still have questions about.  Session presenters will then take a sample of the questions and open it up to the larger group for dialog and problem-solving.  

 

Mar 18, 2021
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
What Online Proctoring Approach Is Right For Your Program? | Networking Coffee Talk

In order to make sure that you select the best proctoring solution for your needs, many factors need to be considered. Join us for a review of available modalities, and hear from universities who have used different modalities successfully.

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Extended Abstract

When choosing to integrate online proctoring into your course, it is crucial to select an approach that works best for your institution. Online proctoring should never be considered “one size fits all.” In order to make sure that you select the best type for your needs, many factors need to be considered. What kind of exam are you administering? How important is test security? Do you have any financial constraints that need to be considered? Join us for an engaging conversation around this important topic, including real-life examples from universities who have used different modalities successfully. Our experts will help guide you through the decision making process and demonstrate how selecting the right approach can make all the difference.

Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Facilitating Inclusive, Equitable, And Welcoming Online Learning | Education Session

The rapid shift to online learning caused by COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequalities for underrepresented learners. Research shows that inclusive, equitable, and welcoming learning environments can close educational gaps and promote the learning of all students. Our CARE framework provides practical design principles that can make online learning welcoming for all learners.

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Extended Abstract

Many have feared that the the rapid shift to fully online instruction at universities caused by COVID-19 -- and the concomitant transition for most students to home-based learning -- would deepen existing inequalities and achievement gaps for disadvantaged and minority students. Unfortunately, a survey of nearly 6000 students at our institution indicates that first-generation and/or low income (FLI) and underrepresented minority (URM) students have been disproportionately negatively impacted by the shift to online learning (Stanford Spring Survey, 2020). Recent national surveys of college students have found similar results. While some of these discrepancies can be attributed to lack of access to basic resources (e.g., internet connectivity, adequate location for quiet study), research suggests that the design of online learning environments can ameliorate participation and achievement gaps for FLI and URM students (Kizilcec, Saltarelli, et al. 2017; Kizilcec & Saltarelli, 2019).

Whether students feel welcome and like they belong in learning environments has a direct affect on educational processes and outcomes (e.g., memory, persistence, motivation). Further, feelings of non-belonging have been shown to contribute to educational gaps for underrepresented students (Harackiewicz et al., 2014; Taylor & Walton, 2011). Even subtle cues in the learning environment can affect whether students feel welcome, and this is particularly true in online learning environments where contextual cues and social interaction may be less than in face-to-face environments. Thus, we have developed the CARE framework that outlines five approaches for designing online learning environments that are more welcoming to traditionally marginalized students: community, agency, representation, equal access, and pedagogies of care.     

In this educational session, attendees will:

  • review recent theory and research on inclusive, equitable, and welcoming online learning;
  • explore the CARE framework and consider practical examples of how to implement each aspect in online learning environments;
  • join breakout groups in the second half of the session and work together to design at least one learning activity based on the CARE framework;
  • leave with openly licensed materials they can used to promote inclusive, equitable, and welcoming online learning at their respective institutions.  

References:

Harackiewicz, J. M., Canning, E. A., Tibbetts, Y., Giffen, C. J., Blair, S. S., Rouse, D. I., & Hyde, J. S. (2014). Closing the social class achievement gap for first-generation students in undergraduate biology. Journal of Educational Psychology, 106(2), 375–389. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0034679

Kizilcec, R. F. & Saltarelli, A. J. (2019). Psychologically Inclusive Design: Cues impact women’s participation in STEM education. In Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (CHI).

Kizilcec, R. F., Saltarelli, A. J., Reich, J., & Cohen, G. L. (2017). Closing global achievement gaps in MOOCs. Science, 355(6322), 251–252. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aag2063

Stanford (2020). Stanford Spring Student Survey: COVID-19.

Taylor and Walton (2011). Stereotype Threat Undermines Academic Learning. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. 37(8): 1055-1067.

Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Student Outcomes in Online Courses: Does Class Size Matter? | Education Session

This session will summarize an analysis of over 300 undergraduate online courses. Course level data were analyzed to investigate the relationship between class size and student performance (average GPAs and DFW rates). A discussion will be led about how results can be applied to class size in online education.

 

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Extended Abstract

Context/Summary:

Research in higher education suggests that smaller class sizes correlate with positive outcomes for both students and instructors. In addition, national rankings for quality in higher education include online class sizes in their algorithms. However, there is limited research investigating how class size correlates with student outcomes such as grades, DFW rates, and withdrawals in online college courses. In this session, I will summarize a study of over 300 undergraduate online courses that were taught in years 2017 and 2018 at a large university in the United States.

For this study, we used course level data, including average GPAs (grade point averages) per course, as well as DFW rates. First, I will include an overview of the current literature on class size and student outcomes, followed by a description of the methodology we used for the study. Then, I will share results of the study, including student outcomes for class size ranging from 8 students to 226 students. Last, I will lead an interactive discussion about how the study results connect to the current understanding of class size in online higher education courses, and ask participants to think of ways to apply the results to practice. To do this, I will ask participants how they might use the information presented to make decisions from the perspective of different stakeholder groups, such as from the administrator perspective, or the instructor perspective. In addition to using slides during the presentation, a handout that summarizes the study results will be posted on the conference website for participant use. 

 

Research Questions:

  1. Do student outcomes (average course grades and DFW rates) differ in online courses of different sizes?
    1. When considering class size in online courses, are there differences in student outcomes for upper and lower division courses?
    2. When considering class size in online courses, do students experience different outcomes in in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) courses?

 

Methods: The analyses contained 391 undergraduate online courses that were taught in years 2017 and 2018 at a large university in the United States. All data were collected at the course level. For example, the average student GPAs (grade point average) for each course were collected using archival university data. Similarly, the DFW rate for each course (the percentage of students in the course who received the final grade of a D, F, or Withdrew), was also used as a dependent variable. The independent variable in the study was class size, or the number of students enrolled in a section of a course, taught by a single instructor.

To analyze the data, a series of one-way ANOVAs were used to test differences in GPA and DFW rates between courses of different sizes. To address Research Question 1, analyses were conducted using the full sample of courses. To address Research Question 1a, analyses were run separately for lower division courses (courses at the 100 and 200 levels) and upper division courses (courses at the 300 and 400 levels). To address Research Question 1b, analyses were run separately for STEM and non-STEM courses. Each course was defined as being STEM or non-STEM based on which college the course was offered in. For example, courses taken in the college of Engineering were labeled as STEM courses, while courses taken in the college of Liberal Arts were labeled as non-STEM courses.

Key Results: In general, we found few significant differences in student outcomes by class size. For example, DFW rates did not significantly differ based on class size. However, we did find some significant differences in regard to average student GPA. For example, students in STEM courses earned higher average GPAs in courses with 30 or fewer students (70 courses; M = 3.27) compared to courses with 31 or more students (100 courses; M = 3.09). Similarly, students in upper division courses also earned higher average GPAs in courses with 30 or fewer students (194 courses; M = 3.22) compared to courses with 31 or more students (134 courses; M = 3.10). Other results will be discussed.

Conclusions: For the online courses in this sample, slightly higher average GPAs seemed to occur in a) STEM courses, and b) upper division courses when classes had 30 or fewer students. However, DFW rates did not differ by class size.

Discussion/Interpretation: In general, results suggest student grades may be better in STEM and upper division courses if there are 30 or fewer students per online course. However, I look forward to discussing this topic further during the presentation. After presenting the results, I will lead an interactive discussion about how the study results connect to the current understanding of class size in online higher education courses, and ask participants to think of ways to apply the results to practice. To do this, I will ask participants how they might use the information presented to make decisions from the perspective of different stakeholder groups, such as from the administrator perspective, or the instructor perspective. I will also ask participants to think about other research questions they may have pertaining to class size in online courses.

 

The following are key objectives of the presentation:

After attending this session, participants will:

  1. Understand the current literature on class size and student outcomes in online higher education courses
  2. Gain awareness of how course level data can be used to investigate an educational research question
  3. Learn how online class size correlated with students’ grades and DFW rates in this study
  4. Discuss how the research on class size and student outcomes in online courses can impact practice
Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Instructional Design Summit - Part 1: The Four Corners Of An ID's Life | Summit

Session 1 of the ID Summit will begin with a panel discussion on a range of topics that will address the key components of the instructional designer role: designing learning experiences, collaborating with faculty, leveraging educational technology, and integrating new approaches and theories into our work. Join us for this dynamic conversation with our expert panelists!

 

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Instructional Design Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Designing Active Learning for Health and Medical Education | Education Session

This education session is an effort to provide quick strategies and techniques for active learning to Academic Faculty and Instructional Designers in Health and Medical Education for their synchronous/asynchronous/blended sessions and course designs that can be applied to teaching all didactic lecture, clinical, and laboratory sessions.

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Extended Abstract

Health and Medical Education faculty who are involved in preparing and educating future physicians face pressures for clinical and research productivity. These faculty who teach future physicians need to work on and develop competencies necessary to train and promote the professional development of medical students and residents. Educating, assessing, and guiding the next generation of physicians represent the central component of the academic contributions of such faculty. This presentation is an effort to help such faculty and the Instructional Designers who help in this field to implement Active Learning in their sessions and course designs to improve the effectiveness of their teaching and help prepare future physicians for their profession effectively. 

Active Learning (AL) can be defined as any instructional method that engages students in the learning process, where students do meaningful activities and think about what they are doing. The goal is to help our students be engaged constantly in relation to the learning outcomes of the course session/overall course. The 3 key dimensions identified through reviewing the literature that should be accommodating/integrating into a course/session design are (Bradford, 2018):

  1. Engagement

  2. Meaningfulness

  3. Reflection

HERE IS ONE SAMPLE ACTIVITY OUTLINE THAT FITS AN 85-MINUTE CLASS SESSION THAT WE DELIVER ONLINE USING SYNCHRONOUS TECHNOLOGY.

Outline 1: (for brevity, additional outlines are not included)

Preparatory Assessment (10 minutes)

This activity will test students on their preparation provided for this particular class. It could include a short essay (e.g., the 1 min essay) or multiple-choice questions covering homework or other activities designed to prepare students for the class. These questions should make students think critically, creatively, and apply knowledge. This can also be used as a formative assessment by the teacher.

Use of Polls (can use 1 or more; the point of the polls are to initiate the session with activity relevant to the session objectives and to identify the poor understanding of key concepts)

Poll A

Poll B

Introduction (5 minutes)

Unit/Topic/Learning Outcomes (of this particular session): The instructor gives an overview of what will be covered in this session, which includes specific learning objectives.

Common Confusions / Misunderstandings / Explanations (10 minutes)

The instructor will have a class discussion and ask students to explain or defend their answers to the poll questions submitted by the students. The point is to uncover common misconceptions and ensure everyone is on the same page. The instructor can involve other students to comment on each other’s answers as well for this class discussion and can scaffold an explanation overall to help students understand the course unit or topic to achieve the related learning outcome.

Activity #1: (Simple focus on new topic concepts) (20 minutes)

This activity can include a short presentation of new conceptual material or build off the common confusions activity. Activity #1 should be a general treatment of new concepts, facts, and/or procedures (etc.). The activity can also introduce instructions to break out group activities. Activities could leverage any of the following samples, or other collaborative, cooperative activities:

  • analyzing case studies

  • playing a game or simulation that facilitates learning

  • modeling a skill

  • analyzing visuals, graphs, audios or videos

  • solving a problem

  • inquiring about a problem

  • working on an aspect of project based-learning

  • working on an aspect integrated into problem-based learning

Conduct an activity debrief (for instances when breakout groups are used, a group spokesperson presents the results of their efforts and is prepared to explain and defend results. The instructor and students summarize the activity.

Activity #2: (Deeper focus where new topics are worked in context) (30 minutes)

This activity differs from Activity #1 because the instructor introduces opportunities for students to leverage what was covered and to apply that into contextually relevant ways. For example, in a finance course, students could be asked to apply a mathematical formula to derive a business’s financial stability by exploring a different organization than was previously explored.

If breakout groups are used in this activity, then each group could have different organizations to explore or different aspects of one organization’s financial profile to examine.

Structurally, this activity could be organized this way:

  • Give an introduction or breakout group instructions

  • Conduct a poll

  • Start and finish the activity or breakout group

  • Hold a debrief

  • Give an activity summary

Wrap-up (10 minutes)

This activity closes the class session. It is important to leave sufficient time to properly end what was covered and allow for students to reflect and share aspects of what they learned. It is also important to summarize what the session covered and then provide what students need to complete prior to the next session.

The activity can be organized in this way:

  • Conduct a reflection poll

  • Summarize the session

To summarize this outline design, the building blocks in this outline can be reduced in this way:

  1. A preparatory assessment (10 min)

  2. A session introduction (5 min)

  3. Common confusions, misunderstandings, and explanations (10 min)

  4. Activity #1 – new topic general treatment (20 min)

  5. Activity #2 – deeper topic treatment, contextually relevant (30 min)

  6. Wrap-up (10 min)

Each of these building blocks can be innovated upon or used to break up a traditional presentation to promote active participation and contribution by students. The latter makes it a more easily integrated design for those situations when an instructor refuses to change the entire session plan.

RELEVANCE & IMPORTANCE

The materials provided in this workshop will help health and medical education faculty with resources to facilitate design work for their synchronous, asynchronous, and blended sessions/courses to make them engaging and in a constant flow. The activities in this workshop can help both current remote/online and for the traditional on-ground/blended courses when we get back to our normal routine. The goal is to help our students be in a constant flow and be engaged throughout the course/session. The proposed session is timely and relevant: using learner-centered designs in health and medical education teaching remains an important target as it is not common practice and is an immediate need. 

SESSION OUTCOMES

This OLC Innovate Education session will give the audience an active learning experience by using the approach described in this proposal. Participants will be able to describe active learning and recognize when a course session (live/synchronous/Zoom) design is not fully leveraging the approach. They will see how we are using this approach in fully synchronous/asynchronous/blended session designs. Participants will also receive a link to a project repository with several different block outlines set into a list of educational technologies, academic disciplines in health and medical education, and levels (e.g., undergraduate, graduate, etc.) to improve their own course session designs. Participants will then be divided into breakout groups and will be provided with sample Zoom Session outlines to analyze and critique about their approach. A breakout group debrief will take place to brainstorm and check for answers. After this, participants will submit a reflection poll for which they will think about one question they still have on AL and also think about how they will use this approach for their own course session designs. A reflection discussion will take place at the end to share their plans for implementation with the rest of the participants. 

Learning Outcomes for this session:

  1. Clarify an operational definition of Active Learning

  2. Recognize when a course/session design is not fully leveraging an active learning approach

  3. Apply active learning strategies in your own course/sessions for health and medical sciences majors

OUTLINE OF THIS OLC EDUCATION SESSION (45 MINUTES)

Poll Questions (5-minutes)

Participants will be polled with 5 questions on their knowledge of AL.

Introduction/Learning Objectives/Common Confusions (10-minutes)

Operational-definition of AL

Present evidence from the literature regarding why AL should be implemented.

Present three key dimensions integrated into the course design to ensure AL is well implemented

Demo Outline/Access Repository/Present Examples (5-minutes)

Demo a general outline of the AL Approach. Sample: https://tinyurl.com/olcal2020

Provide access to a repository of AL Activity Blocks for synchronous/asynchronous/blended session designs made to fit different academic disciplines related to Health and Medical Majors, and levels (undergraduate or graduate).

Breakout Group Activity (10 minutes)

Participants will be divided into groups of 4 and will be provided with sample session outlines to analyze and critique whether they implement an active learning approach or not. 

Breakout Group Activity Debrief (5 minutes)

They will then share and discuss their approach, thinking, and solutions with all the workshop participants. Each session outline will be reviewed based on the 3 dimensions of Active Learning talked in this education session. All confusion will be clarified.

Reflection (10 minutes)

Participants will then submit a reflection poll (using Google Form) for which they will think about one question they still have on AL. They will also think about how they will use the same approach for their own course session designs for health and medical education. 

After the participants finish submitting the reflection poll individually they will be asked to share their plans with the rest of the workshop participants as a discussion.

REFERENCES-

For a list of all the references click here 

Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
The Digital Class Syllabus: How Software Is Improving Distance Learning & Student Engagement | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Simple Syllabus is a centralized, template-driven platform that creates a collaborative environment between instructors, instructional designers, and other institutional staff for building online class syllabi—directly within the LMS. Join our session to learn how your peers are using the Simple Syllabus platform to easily create interactive and digital class syllabi for their students all while ensuring compliance with regulatory and accreditation standards.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 18, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
What's Next for Instructional Designers? A Mid-Career Instructional Designer Roundtable | Career Forum Roundtable

Are you an instructional designer who has been working in higher education for close to 10 years or even longer? Then this session is for you. Let’s bring together like-minded professionals to remind ourselves of the passion for this work and provide a place to discuss emerging opportunities and the future of the field.

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Extended Abstract

Professionals who identify themselves as instructional designers, learning designers, learning engineers, or whatever nomenclature they use to describe the design and support of learning experiences at higher education institutions, will inevitably face a plateau in their career. Maybe this is 5, 10, or 15 years engaging in this work. In any case, an experienced instructional design professional brings a wealth of knowledge to their institution and guides the new generation through their expertise.

The plan of this session is to bring a like-minded group of mid-career instructional designers together to discuss opportunities and options for the next phase in their career. The main consideration is: Does the profession plateau and if so, what strategies can instructional designers adopt to keep their careers engaging?

The session will be facilitated with a set of pre-arranged discussion questions to prompt discussions around topics such as the profession’s future, professional development strategies, and how to mentor new instructional designers. The discussion will be informal, while giving the participants a chance to share their thoughts within a dynamic conversational environment. If needed, think-pair-share topics will be provided to accommodate a larger group. Through the session, participants will be encouraged to create a support network of like-minded professionals to continue the conversation past the conference.

The ideas in this discussion topic are an extension of research the facilitator conducted with University of Wisconsin instructional designers employed throughout the state. A conclution of this research indicated and supported the need for instructional designers to be a part of strategic teaching and learning initiatives on their campuses. It also continues a presentation area the facilitator has been involved with, that resulted in facilitating a prior panel discussion at OLC Accelerate in 2017, “Instructional Design in Higher Education: The University of Wisconsin Perspective”, as well as at other conferences over the years.

Mar 18, 2021
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Follow Me: Buddy Up Your Conference Sessions | Other

Have you ever had that magical moment where you just “clicked” with a fellow conference attendee and ended up attending some conference sessions together just to keep the conversation going? This session is all about how we can make that happen in the virtual world! Join us for strategies, inspiration, and of course, the casual socialization you’ve come to expect (and love) from the Speed Networking Lounge.

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Virtual Speed Networking sponsored by:

 

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Drive Engagement With Richer Online Discussions With Harmonize | Industry Showcase - Demonstration

Learning happens when people engage with each other. Harmonize delivers new ways to engage and support students, transforming online discussions into spaces where every student can fully participate in a shared learning experience. With Harmonize, instructors have the tools they need to challenge students to think more deeply and support students with ongoing and consistent engagement—in a way that makes sense for your institution. Join our session to learn more about how Harmonize can transform your online discussions.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Using Assessment to Improve Peer Review Feedback | Education Session

As teachers, we rely on peer review to help students improve their writing. But how do we ensure peer comments are actually helpful? This study provides detailed guidelines for how to make shorter comments (21-40 words) more productive.

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Extended Abstract

Students need high-quality feedback to improve their writing (e.g. Reid, 2014; Vardi 2008). Peer feedback is a scalable solution (Nicol et al., 2014). 

To coach multiple peer feedback activities in accelerated online writing courses, instructors need a clear framework. First, instructors, and students, benefit from guidelines to assess if students are contributing too little to help their peers or themselves. Instructors, and students, also require a more robust set of models for recognizing when reviewers’ comments discuss criteria that lead to improved writing. Online technologies promise to capture all the texts generated during students’ peer review, but the peril lies in making sense of that data. 

In this study, we relied on research data analytics from Eli Review (elireview.com), a peer learning and revision app developed by writing professors at Michigan State University. Seven sections of ENGL101 and 24 sections of ENGL102 used Eli’s online platform to complete three projects each during 2019-2021 at a large, research intensive, state university in the southwest.  During the 7.5 week, fully online terms, students completed four formative feedback and revision activities per course. 

We used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze the 13,717 comments exchanged during peer learning. Our quantitative analysis describes peer norms in comments based on word count. Word count is a blunt measure that indicates how likely a comment is to describe a problem, evaluate it, and offer a suggestion (Hart-Davidson and Meeks, 2020). Prior research establishes that comments shorter than 20 words tend to be praise or corrections, and comments longer than 41 words tend to have enough information to persuade writers to make global revisions. Comments between 21-40 words fall in the “messy middle.” This program-wide corpus of peer feedback has the following distribution by comment length: 

  • 27% of comments were shorter than 20 words (likely praise or correction)
  • 39% of comments had 21-40 words 
  • 24% of comments had 41+ words (likely long enough to persuade a writer to revise).

To better understand this “messy middle,” we conducted additional qualitative analyses to describe comment length norms across assignments and a qualitative analysis of over 4,000 student peer comments having 21-40 words. Our aim was four-fold: 

  1. gain more confidence in the quality of comments of this length
  2. curate comment models that reflect student language
  3. reflect on effects on review task design in influencing comment length and modify assignments accordingly
  4. establish word count indicators for each assignment based on program norms that can guide instructors' interventions in future terms

Shorter peer review comments (21-40 words) may be useful for the reviewee; this study provides more detailed guidelines for making them more productive.  

Interactivity 

Besides providing a classic IMRAD style presentation (Introduction, Methods, Results and Discussion), we will also prompt attendees to interact with our information and data; specifically we will prompt attendees to:

  1. Provide feedback on a document;
  2. Code their feedback using some of our coding schemas; and
  3. Outline peer review assignment prompts they might use in future assignments.

Takeaways 

By the end of the session, attendees will have access to:

  • Reference list about peer review;
  • Peer review assignment prompt guidelines; and
  • Outlines towards peer review prompts for future classes. 

References

Hart-Davidson, B. & Meeks M.G. (2020, forthcoming). Feedback analytics for peer learning: Indicators of writing improvement in digital environments. In Improving Outcomes: Disciplinary Writing, Local Assessment, and the Aim of Fairness, edited by Norbert Elliot and Diane Kelly-Riley, MLA.

Nicol, D. et al. (2014). Rethinking feedback practices in higher education: A peer review perspective” Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39(1) pp. 102–22. CrossRef, http://doi.org/10.1080/02602938.2013.795518 

Reid, E. S.  (2014). Peer review for peer review’s sake: Resituating peer review pedagogy. In Peer Pressure, Peer Power: Theory and Practice in Peer Review and Response for the Writing Classroom. Eds. Steven J. Corbett, Michelle LaFrance, and Teagan E. Decker. Texas: Fountainhead Press,, pp. 217-231.

Vardi, I. (2008). The Relationship between Feedback and Change in Tertiary Student Writing in the Disciplines. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 20(3): pp. 350-361.

 

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Instructional Design Summit - Part 2: Breakout Topic Discussions | Summit

In Session 2 of the ID Summit you’ll choose one breakout topic to explore. You’ll have a chance to brainstorm ideas and share resources about your chosen topic/prompt.  There will be a collaborative notes document where you’ll work together to create recommendations for addressing challenges associated with the topic. We have created an engagement key which describes the level of interaction that will take place in these breakout sessions.   

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Extended Abstract

Here is the list of breakout topics to choose from:

Breakout Group Topic #1: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
Moderated by German Vargas Ramos, Amy Archambault

Instructional designers are in a unique position to review an instructor’s course and ask meaningful, targeted questions about purpose and content. In this breakout, we’ll explore how we get at those sensitive topics, as well as, think about what it means to think functionally and ethically about course design within our roles as instructional designers. 

During this session, we’ll take the first 10 minutes individually to explore the “10 Principles” from Designjustice.org.  We’ll then spend some time reflecting and discussion how these principles might impact our work in 4 different areas: Learning Experience, Collaboration, Technology, and New Approaches.  By the end of our session, we’ll have a collaborative handout to share on the ways these principles might impact our work and how we might plan on using them at our institutions.

Engagement Expectations

  • Interaction icon for ID SummitInteraction Level – Medium
  • Participation icon for ID SummitParticipation Level – Medium
  • Structure icon for ID SummitStructure Level – Medium

Recommended Reading

 

Breakout Group Topic #2: Improvisation Skills for Instructional Designers
Moderated by Penny Ralston-Berg 

The subject matter expert (SME) / ID relationship can be complicated. Subject matter experts may not understand what designers do or push back on proposed solutions. Designers may not have the experience or confidence to react to a SME’s questioning and rejection in the moment. It can be difficult to establish trust and build collaborative relationships with SMEs. However, by adopting an improvisational mindset, IDs can learn to think quickly, react positively, and keep conversations moving forward in the moment. 

Whether you choose to share your improvisational skills with the group or just observe as a spectator, you will have the opportunity to play games, have fun, and gain insights into building better SME relationships. By practicing the improvisational techniques of noticing more, letting go of preconceived expectations, and using everything that is presented to us, we can build more productive and collaborative relationships with SMEs.

Submit an idea for a scene or volunteer to perform in a game.

Engagement Expectations 

  • Interaction icon for ID SummitInteraction Level – Medium
  • Participation icon for ID SummitParticipation Level – Medium
  • Structure icon for ID SummitStructure Level – High

Additional Resources:

 

Breakout Group Topic #3: The Good, the Bad, the Technology You Love and Hate
Moderated by Cindy Schanke 

How has the pandemic changed the tech you recommend to faculty? In 2020, Zoom became ubiquitous overnight and other technologies became more popular or fell out of favor. Considering all of the changes in teaching expectations and needs within the last year, think about tech you have grown to love this year and those that you no longer recommend. For the first half of the session, we will work independently in a collaborative form where you will list one piece of technology you love to recommend and one you don’t. For the second half of the session, add your comments, debate the pros and cons, add additional resources, discuss, and share ideas. Leave the meeting with a list of technology recommendations for 2021.

Engagement Expectations 

  • Interaction icon for ID SummitInteraction Level – Low
  • Participation icon for ID SummitParticipation Level – High
  • Structure icon for ID SummitStructure Level – Low

 

Breakout group topic #4: The Future of Design Work:  How will our work change as a result of the pandemic?
Moderated by Olysha Magruder

Think back to January 2020. How did you work? What was your main focus? Fast forward to today. How are you working now? How has work changed on your team, if at all? How will work be different going forward? As 2020 taught us, we can’t predict the future. We can, however, use the past year to inform it. In the first part of this session, we will review recent survey data on the state of work in design shops pre- and post-pandemic. We will explore the differences we have found in our own contexts and discuss how we think things will change in the long-term. We will document these ideas and thoughts in a collaborative space to look for overarching themes and ideas. 

Engagement Expectations 

  • Interaction icon for ID SummitInteraction Level – Medium
  • Participation icon for ID SummitParticipation Level – Medium
  • Structure icon for ID SummitStructure Level – Medium

Recommended Reading:

 

Instructional Design Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Troublesome Knowledge: Identifying Barriers to Innovate for Breakthroughs in Learning to Teach Online | Education Session

Embedded within ‘simple’ practices for teaching online are ways of thinking and doing that can be ‘invisible’ to practitioners and troublesome for faculty who are learning how to teach online. This interactive session presents early research findings and invites participants to strategize constructivist approaches to preparing others for online teaching.

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Extended Abstract

Introduction

Educational Developers, Learning Designers, and Instructional Technologists have long been studying and seeking the most effective ways to teach University Faculty how to teach in online, blended, and web-enhanced modalities. In many, well-documented cases (e.g., Nilson & Goodson, 2018; Wiggins & McTighe, 2012; Online Learning Consortium, 2020), one common practice involves working from a set of research-based evaluation criteria, such as those found on OLC’s OSCQR Course Design Review Scorecard, the Quality Matters Rubric, and several others. For most faculty-learners, programming designed in this way—coupled with individual consultations and support, as well as ongoing professional development—is enough to help them navigate, and sometimes thrive with, online teaching and learning. 

However, we also know that many faculty continue to struggle with learning how to teach online, even though they may have decades of teaching experience or relative comfort with learning new technologies. Depending on several factors, including size and capacity of Institutional Centers for Teaching and Learning or Academic Technology, the much-needed support for these faculty learners can be time-consuming and complicated (see Intentional Futures, 2016, p.15). For learning/instructional designers, technologists, and faculty developers, this work can be frustrating because it feels like a lack of buy-in, trust, or understanding on the part of the faculty learner about how online learning is different from face-to-face—and now, how remote learning is even different from online learning (see Hodges, Moore, Lockee, Trust, and Bond, 2020).

Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic propelled more faculty than ever to learn how to teach in some form of ‘virtual’ modality, whether or not they wanted to, with rosters of students that were also propelled into the online learning, whether or not they wanted to. The Online Teaching and Learning Community of Practice was tasked with preparing and supporting all faculty with this effort (see, for example, Koenig, 2020; Decherney & Levander, 2020; Online Learning Consortium, 2020). While much of the advice for those new to online teaching and learning involves ‘keeping it simple’ (Cavanagh & Thompson, 2019), we (members of the Online Teaching and Learning Community of Practice) recognize that, embedded in those simple principles, are practices that can still be difficult. For example, embedded within the principle of a clear, organized, navigable course can be the concept of chunking content into modules, the skills associated with screencasting and posting a course tour, and the practice of socializing students to the course organization through demonstration, explanation, and reinforcement. While these attributes can become fluid with practice, they may not necessarily be intuitive to new learners. Not only are these more than ‘simple’ tasks that can be checked off of a course design list, they are potential technological and pedagogical barriers (Mishra & Koehler, 2006) for some faculty new to teaching this way. 

In August 2020, Learning Design Researchers launched an empirical-qualitative study (IRB#IO5519) to investigate sources and stories of Troublesome Knowledge (Perkins, 2006) associated with learning how to teach online. Perkins suggests that certain types of knowledge inherent in communities of practice can function as barriers to newcomers who are trying to participate. We see this in online teaching and learning: for example, when faculty have a ritualized practice for communicating with students, that ritual can break down when there is an unexpected change. Perkins’ theory of troublesome knowledge reframes conversations about problems of practice, like these, from being a ‘deficit’ in the faculty-learner to a natural opportunity for constructivist sense-making that an instructional designer is uniquely equipped to facilitate. This session will share the methodology and early results from our study. Forty-four higher education professionals—faculty developers, learning designers, and instructional technologists—whose duties include teaching and supporting faculty with online teaching and learning, participated in an online survey distributed through a variety of higher education and instructional design listservs and social media outlets. Through open-ended questions about their experiences working with faculty, participants shared nearly eighty stories about some of the barriers and bottlenecks they regularly encountered specific to faculty learning about online teaching. Some initial themes that emerged from these stories included a limited or misunderstanding of the ways a learning management system can function as a vessel of learning experiences, rather than a repository of information, as well as the difficulties some faculty have transitioning established rituals (e.g., recording grades) to a new medium, for example.  

Session Overview

In this interactive session, the co-PIs will share the methodology (replicable, aggregable) and initial, unpublished findings from this phase of a multi-part study, as well as draw from the collective expertise of OLC attendees to brainstorm strategies for addressing ‘troublesome’ knowledge in online teaching and learning.

OLC Innovate is a conference for the Online Teaching and Learning Community of Practice to convene over common interests, ideas, and innovation goals. Conference attendees will have interest in this session because they may share similar challenges and experiences in their own work, or they may share an interest in learning design research. This conference is an opportunity to collectively examine these processes, problems, and practices, and then innovate for positive change. This session also contributes to conversations in the field of Learning Innovation (Kim & Maloney, 2020) about how to prepare and support faculty who teach online, blended, and web-enhanced modalities. Many who might otherwise prefer face-to-face instruction are compelled to learn other modalities during periods of disruption, as we are facing now, so this conversation is timely, as well.

Session Goals

By participating in this session, attendees will:

  1. Explore Perkins’ (2006) theory of troublesome knowledge—including tacit, ritual, conceptually difficult, foreign/alien, and inert—and consider where those types of obstacles occur in learning design and innovation.
  2. Review initial research findings from a study of barriers to learning how to teach online.
  3. Brainstorm constructivist approaches to barriers to learning how to teach online. These ideas can be used immediately to inform programming and professional development opportunities related to online/virtual teaching preparation.

Session Plan

  1. Introduction & Engagement Activity (5-10 minutes) 
    • Self-introductions
    • Illustrative story of common examples of Troublesome Knowledge that audience members have likely experienced in their own work.
  2. Troublesome Knowledge Concepts (10 minutes)
    • Using a companion website, we will present the 5 types of Troublesome Knowledge as defined by Perkins
  3. Sorting Activity (10 minutes)
    • Participants will be broken up into small groups within the session (depending on session size) and each group will be given a sorting activity in Jamboard. The Jamboard will have spaces for the 5 types of Troublesome Knowledge as well as a selection of the examples obtained from our survey. Groups will be tasked with sorting each example into the category they think it most belongs to. The companion site will be available throughout this activity.
  4. Group Debrief (10 minutes)
    • After the sorting activity, we will discuss as a whole group. We will compare results of the groups along with our own sort of the samples. We will ask the participants for feedback on the sorting experience.
  5. Q&A and Resource Tour (5-10 minutes)
    • We will open the floor up for questions and also offer additional resources on our companion website for how thinking of faculty interactions within this framework can help develop online learning skills.

Level of Participation

This session will offer the chance for participants to make sense of the concepts being presented through an interactive sorting activity. This will allow for active participation in the session, as well as serve as a model for how a new skill or concept can be taught in an online setting. Additionally, we believe this session also offers the unique opportunity for participants to be part of an active research study and this session will inform the second phase of our research.

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Moving Hands-On Learning to Online learning in career and technical education with SkillsCommons: COVID Strategies | Workshop

The COVID pandemic has required hands-on career and technical education programs to move online.  The workshop will demonstrate how to use SkillsCommons, an OER repository of workforce development training resources, to design hybrid and online courses that align with hands-on learning in the workplace.

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Extended Abstract

Moving Hands-On Learning to Online learning in career and technical education with SkillsCommons: COVID Strategies

From aviation manufacturing in urban Seattle to health care in rural Montana, many community colleges have used their U.S. Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grants to develop work-based learning (WBL) opportunities and build the capacity of their institution to prepare their students for 21st century employment. These WBL activities provides alternative learning environments, subject matter experts, and assignments as compared to classroom learning that can accelerate the students’ readiness for successful employment is high skilled jobs.  With the COVID pandemic, how will Career and Technical Education programs prepare the workforce with the significant restrictions on hands-on, work-based learning?   Blending online learning with Open Educational Resources and Practices with work-based experiences will help balance the learning needs and the social distancing restriction during COVID.  With the current recession we still need to place thousands of adults into well-paying jobs and ensure American firms’ competitiveness in the global marketplace.

This workshop will review and demonstrate a variety of WBL programs of study that are freely available SkillsCommons, an OER repository developed for TAACCCT grantees across multiple sectors to store all their instructional and program support materials.  The workshop will have participants explore these resources on their own devices and select materials that could be applicable to their own institutions.  The review/demonstration will cover a wealth of teaching and learning OER that can be used to scale and sustain apprenticeship programs, strategies for designing apprenticeship programs, and detailed tactics for implementing apprenticeship programs. 

The workshop will also showcase how SkillsCommons can design, deliver, and sustain a customized portal of OPEN Educational Resources (OER) to provide higher education, industry partners, and 3rd party intermediaries with the following:

  • Learning content for apprentices in Work-Based Learning Training Programs for On-the-Job Training and Related Technical Instruction (classroom delivery), including content focused on workplace safety that can be delivered online.
  • Online teaching content for mentors in Work-Based Learning Training Programs for On-the-Job Training and Related Technical Instruction (classroom delivery), including an online/hybrid training program to help mentors become better teachers (Jumpstart to Successful Instruction) developed by SkillsCommons that can be delivered online.
  • Exemplary innovations in apprenticeship and support services for program design, management, and evaluation resources produced by TAACCCT grantees and curated by SkillsCommons. Program evaluations of TAACCCT projects provided evidence of effective apprentice programs improving retention and employment.
  • A customized repository (modeled after SkillsCommons) for your project to store, curate, distribute, rebrand, and revise the resources created by your grant, along with reliable and effective support services.

Finally, the workshop will end with a group discussion (via chat in Zoom)  on the institutional and industry sector barriers for implementing successful and sustainable apprenticeship programs and how the resources reviewed during the workshop can be used to overcome these barriers.

  • ​What are the explicit participant learning outcomes for the workshop?

Participants will identified the key elements and the available resources for them to design a blended work-based learning -online learning program for workforce development at their institution 

  • What types of collaboration or interactivity will occur during the workshop with the instructor-participants and within the participant-to-participant group themselves?​ Please outline time allotments for any presentation vs. interactivity (i.e., 15 minute presentation; 65 minute interactive workshop; 10 minute Q & A).

Participants will interact with the online resources so they become familar with their value.   Participants will interact with each other in small groups assigned In Zoom in discussing the application of the presented materials to their own institutional plans.  Participants will discuss the barriers they face at their institutions for successful work-based learning during the COVID pandemic.

  • How will workshop participants be able to apply the effective practices shared in the workshop at their home institution?

Participants will be identifying opportunities for them to apply lessons learned from workshops during discussions.

  • Who do you envision as the primary audience types who would get the most out of this session and why do you believe they will benefit?

Community college faculty teaching in CTE programs  as well as Program managers and directors responsible for  designing WBL at their instittuions.

  • What activities, take-aways, and/or activities will your workshop participants engage in that make your workshop unique, innovative, and relevant to the OLC Innovate 2020 themes and track you have selected?

Free access to online program support materials and instructional materials that have been evaluated by SMEs and industry partners which they can customize for their own needs will be the unique value to the workshop.  Taking away strategies to help them move some of their hands-on learning to online learning will be an important outcome.

  • What materials are required for the presenters, and what materials are required of those in attendance? This must be clearly outlined within the proposal submission.

Participants need to bring their own devises and pen.

Presenters need computer, projector, access to the WWW, screen, and will be providing handouts to participants.

Mar 18, 2021
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Magic of Feedback | Education Session

One of the best ways to combat feelings of isolation online is through providing meaningful feedback to students. Join us as we conjure some magic and cover best practices of feedback in the online classroom.

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Extended Abstract

In education, the word "feedback" has many strong connotations. Most believe giving feedback to students is important, but students report a lot of dissatisfaction with the feedback they receive due to a lack of helpful or timely comments. Faculty also often report finding it extremely time-consuming and burdensome. Faculty may even doubt whether students actually read or engage with the feedback they are given. We want to help our audience combat all of that, by showing participants how to improve their feedback to students and to weave it into their course in more meaningful ways!

First, we'll talk about why we're here and define feedback a bit, in addition to giving examples of effective versus less effective feedback, and soliciting examples from the audience. We'll also talk about the concept of feedback versus feedforward, discuss ways to leverage automated feedback, give some practical examples for involving students in the feedback processes, and end with a discussion about scaling feedback to large format online courses.

The goal of our presentation is to provide faculty with tangible takeaways for improving students' performance and sense of connection in online courses through the usage of feedback. Feedback, when applied effectively, can positively impact the social, teaching and cognitive presence in an online course. It can also help promote wisdom over knowledge for both the faculty and their students and inspire students to have a growth mindset and confidence in the skills they are learning and how the apply to the real world. This may not be a spells and potions kind of magic, but to anyone with a love for educating, it's still pretty magical!

Mar 18, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Alignment of Technology with Pedagogical Purposes During Online and Blended Course Design | Education Session

This paper explores the decision-making process during the construction of an online teacher professional development course. The analysis revealed repeated attention to the underlying pedagogy and the process of aligning pedagogical structures with technological affordances. Such alignment is essential for harnessing the potential of online and blended learning designs.

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Extended Abstract

The Topic of the Session

In response to pressures for providing more flexible and cost-effective solutions, teacher educators across the world are bringing about a variety of innovative technology-mediated online and blended approaches where teachers can actively engage in learning on demand and at their pace. Collaborative online technologies make involvement in participatory rather than content-driven teacher professional development (TPD) experiences increasingly possible. These new technologies have a potential to offer pedagogically intriguing electronic apprenticeship tools that allow for a variety of learning interaction and supports as well as opportunities for virtual instructional conversations where new meanings and insights can be co-constructed (Dede et al., 2009; Harasim, 2017; Hrastinski, 2009). However, inconsistent attention to underlying pedagogy during design, development, and implementation may be at the center of online and blended designs falling short of their full instructional potential. The surface features of presentation and delivery are typically the main focus of the design and development process. Only limited attention is paid to the underlying pedagogical structures and strategies that enable the achievement of learning outcomes (Graham et al., 2014). Instructional designers typically identify learning outcomes, connect them with performance-based assessments, and develop learning activities using available technology tools. But they may underestimate the need for overall strategic orchestration of desired results, assessment evidence, and instructional methods with intentional use of technology to bring about a deeper understanding of the content and support transfer of knowledge and practices. 

Attention to pedagogy is increasingly becoming relevant in the field of online and blended instructional design. Researchers are articulating instructional models for online and blended learning that are based in our understanding of how people learn with technology attending to pedagogical principles in a variety of ways based on their philosophical and theoretical stance (e.g., Anderson, 2011; Garrison & Vaughan, 2008; Harasim, 2017; Kirschner & Merrienboer, 2008; Picciano, 2017). For online and blended designs to reach their potential, designers need to identify and attend to the core attributes within the pedagogical layer leading to the learning outcomes of interest (Graham et al., 2014). Purposefully aligning pedagogical structures and strategies with presentation and delivery features and related affordances of the design should be considered (Bowers, 2008; Graham, Henrie, & Gibbons, 2014). It is no longer viable to select technology tools merely based on popularity or the latest trends. Diverse technology tools can be effectively employed in a variety of ways, but only when technology is aligned with underlying pedagogy and used for clear pedagogical purposes. 

This paper presents a self-study of practice that closely examined the process of designing and developing a fully-online instructor-facilitated TPD course grounded in sociocultural practices. The purpose of the study was to reflectively explore the process of creating a course template and uncover the dynamics of aligning technology with pedagogy within the course design with the goal to better understand and improve those practices. Inquiry into the design process was guided by the S-STTEP (self-study of teaching and teacher education practices) methodology (LaBoskey, 2004; Pinnegar & Hamilton, 2009) within a larger design-based research project (McKenney & Reeves, 2012). The interrogation was self-initiated, self-focused, improvement-aimed, and collaborative. Data consisted of nineteen approximately one-hour-long collaborative conversation recordings analyzed in detail. Data was analyzed using constant comparative qualitative analysis techniques (Corbin & Strauss, 2008; Ryan & Bernard, 2003). Closely examining decisions made during the design and development process, and identifying patterns within the data led us to reflectively evaluate assumptions and knowledge underlying those decisions and recognize that the emerging design, as well as the structures and processes we see in the data, manifest our collective knowledge, assumptions, and overall theoretical orientation. Our collaborative conversations pushed our individual understanding beyond what we would ordinarily see in isolation and enabled us to examine a variety of multiple perspectives and theories outside our typical comfort range in a safe circle of critical friends. It was the cross-disciplinary expertise of each individual within the unique coming-to-know process of self-study that allowed us to negotiate robust solutions and a gain deeper understanding of the processes involved in aligning pedagogy with technology during designing online TPD course grounded in sociocultural theory.

Main Findings

The analysis of collaborative conversations revealed relevant interrelationships of main themes and uncovered a consistent pattern of alignment of pedagogy with technology within the context of this study. Attention to tasks was identified as a central theme of the alignment process. The context of the phenomenon was represented through two dimensions, pedagogy and technology. Tasks, methods, and strategies were always discussed either with attention to identify underlying pedagogical intents (pedagogy) or with a goal to enact these pedagogical intents related to a task in an online setting taking advantages of affordances of available technological tools (technology). This finding is clearly related to the attempt to align pedagogical and physical design layers, as suggested by Graham and colleagues (2014). It is also related to the iterative process of a systematic alignment between learning task affordances requirements and the affordances of available tools proposed by Bowers (2008) and a similar process for aligning the learners/educator needs and the affordances of selected technological tools proposed by Antonenko, Dawson, and Sahay (2017).

Themes related to how the alignment is carried out highlighted the importance of pedagogical thinking as part of the design process under study. When reviewed, the core components elements paralleled Schwab’s four commonplaces of curriculum making (1971) of the subject matter/curriculum/task, students, teachers, and the milieu or setting. This indicates that it is essential to consider all four core components not just when designing an extended curriculum but also as part of designing individual tasks for online courses. Identifying core methods and core strategies as key themes related to how the alignment occurs point to the importance of identifying core attributes as an essential step in aligning physical and pedagogical layers (Graham et al., 2014). Although the physical layer features related to presentation and delivery of instruction (i.e. available technological tools and related affordances) are important, it seems that it was attending to the core attributes of the pedagogical layer and related structures (core methods and strategies) that enabled the alignment and take advantage of available technologies in a purposeful way.

As part of the analysis, we identified a conceptual pattern of pedagogical intent as the driving element guiding the process of alignment of pedagogical and physical design layers. The concept of pedagogical intent elaborates on Graham and colleagues’ (2014) idea of core attributes and is defined by attention to its key elements as a careful and repeated consideration of the intended learning experience for a specific learner in a specific context. A conceptual tool to guide the alignment process and is defined as careful consideration of how the intended learning experience should emerge for the learners in a specific context. Identifying core methods and strategies that facilitate these intended learning experiences is also an essential part of the process enabling purposeful alignment of content, activities, and tools with available technological affordances.

These findings recognize the importance of attending to underlying pedagogy, which seems to support design and development of online and blended instruction. Identifying the pattern of pedagogical intent allowed us to more purposefully attend to its individual elements and attend to underlying pedagogy when we were deciding on how we want certain learning experiences and task to turn out in a technology-mediated environment. Attending to pedagogical intent, rather than just focusing on learning objectives and outcomes, provided a means for developing a more pedagogically-driven and learner-oriented design and allowed us to purposefully utilize available technology tools to meet the identified pedagogical needs. It is yet to be determined whether this process of identifying core attributes and aligning physical and pedagogical layer during design actually supports the achievement of learning outcomes as the course design is implemented.

Description of the Presentation

This paper session will present findings with specific examples of the alignment process. The audience and presenters will work together to unpack the ways in which pedagogy and technology can be aligned in a variety of learning designs across different contexts. Participants will walk away with an understanding of a step-by-step process of aligning technology with underlying pedagogical purposes useful in designing effective online and blended learning experiences.

Mar 18, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Paradigm Shift: Reconsidering Best Practices for Online Discussion | Industry Showcase - Presentation

Online discussions form the basis for student interactions in many courses but they are labor-intensive and quite frankly underwhelming. This session questions many aspects of the dominant paradigm and will dive deep into data suggesting other best practices to consider.

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Extended Abstract

Many degree programs and courses include online discussion boards to engage students, promote critical thinking, increase topic relevance, help students network, etc. In these instructors and course designers expend considerable effort doing administrative tasks, creating weekly assignments, enforcing posting rules to ensure they meet requirements, and meticulously grading the resulting “discussion” to motivate participation. In reality, these assignments rarely spur anything even remotely resembling real conversations. Moreover, the grades that are given may accurately reflect post quality according to an instructor’s rubric, but rarely capture whether a post actually created or sustained meaningful discussion. Consequently, though traditional discussion grading compels content generation, it does not propel content consumption or conversation. Existing discussion frameworks lead to assignments with prescribed rules like “post once and comment twice this week.” The discussion forum, then, just becomes a way to collect an assignment that is peppered with a couple of forced and awkward student interactions. These assignments typically also fail to launch real discussions because students post just before the weekly deadline, after which the “discussion” moves to a new topic for the next week. These forums are not engaging, dynamic, or thought-provoking places and, therefore, do not actually produce most of the promised benefits of discussion (e.g., social learning, peer interaction, etc.). This model for incorporating discussion spaces simply doesn’t work and most of the existing technologies reinforce rather than solve for the bad habits that produce these poor outcomes. This session is focused on creating a different model by rethinking the common approach to discussion assignments. The suggestions made are supported by data gleaned from Yellowdig, a community-building technology that amplifies student engagement and interaction, and from studies on different implementations in Canvas, Blackboard, and Yellowdig.

Mar 18, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Organizational Models For Leading And Administering Blended Or Online Programs | Education Session

As leaders are re-examining their programming post-inoculation, including incorporate new course modes and programming modes, including expanding blended and online programs, they are seeking answers to key strategic questions.  Leaders are determining how they can build capacity and better support processes and procedures to ensure quality programming.  This capacity building and quality depend greatly on the organizational structure (units, reporting lines, staffing, cross-functional teams) and activities (e.g., faculty development, instructional design support, learning technology administration) that take place on campuses.  This session reviews the research on organizational models to support quality blended and online learning and brings in leaders in our field to discuss their own experiences in creating a capacity to support quality.


  

 

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Extended Abstract

Even before the COVID-19 Pandemic forced quick pivots to remote teaching and learning, one-third of all undergraduate students were enrolled in online classes and thirteen percent were learning exclusively online.  Perhaps even more striking, online course enrollments in 2019 increased for the fourteenth straight year, even as overall enrollments have declined. This growth has been concentrated in public institutions since 2012, with online enrollment growth in public institutions surpassing both private non-profit and private for-profit sectors for the first time in 2015-16. Despite this marked growth in online learning, research on how institutions can and did  build capacity and administratively support processes and procedures to ensure quality online programming was shockingly limited. The Online Learning Consortium (OLC) and its partners at the National Research Center for Distance Education and Technological Advancements (DETA) at the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee have been examining factors driving decisions about organizational models for leadership in online learning, to better articulate strategic decisions necessary in the field and communicate best practices out as part for OLC’s engagement in the Every Learner Everywhere (ELE) network 

Clear examples of how organizational structures influence leadership over online learning initiatives in higher education emerge from the literature. Capacity building and quality depend greatly on the organizational structure (units, reporting lines, staffing, cross-functional teams) and activities (e.g., faculty development, instructional design support, learning technology administration) that take place on campuses.  This session reviews the research on organizational models to support quality blended and online learning and brings in leaders in our field to discuss their own experiences in creating a capacity to support quality. Specific variances and organizational leadership structures will be highlighted from research and practitioners at two-year institutions, four-year institutions, online higher education systems, and minority-serving institutions with the goal of weighing those differences to reflect more deeply on how institutions can effectively design, develop, and deliver high-quality instruction online. 

         

Mar 18, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
After the MOOC comes the GAIN - Global Adaptive Instructional Network | Education Session

The static MOOC model has not evolved since its widespread adoption in 2012.  This session will explore the development of a dynamic Global Adaptive Instructional Network (GAIN) to create the means to personalize the learning experience for every learner everywhere.

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Extended Abstract

In this session, we will explore the idea of developing a Global Adaptive Instructional Network (GAIN).  This network will create a marketplace for faculty to share instructional resources, profit from their intellectual property, and configure their own courses in the platform.  Using those instructional resources, the GAIN will employ adaptive techiques to recommend the right lesson to the right student at the right time in order to enable student success in a course.  This will result in the personalization of the instructional process in contrast to the existing static MOOC model where all students have the same learning experience.

Mar 18, 2021
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Instructional Design Summit - Part 3: Bringing It All Together | Summit

Don’t miss the third and final session of the Instructional Design Summit where raffle prizes will be awarded to participating attendees and breakout group facilitators will have the opportunity to provide report outs from the previous session.  Join us for a final reflection on the four corners of an ID’s life!

 

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Instructional Design Summit sponsored by:

Mar 18, 2021
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Happy Hour: Letters of Appreciation | Evening Event

Need a break and wish to spread some joy? Join us for an evening of writing letters of thanks and encouragement! Use this time to show appreciation for OLC Volunteers, colleagues, students, or anyone else who needs a joyful letter. This is a family friendly event. The more the merrier!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Experiential Learning Forum | Featured Session

In August of 2020, a group of STEM educators gathered virtually to discuss and collaborate around the realities and possibilities for online STEM labs. Central to the design of the event (“OLC Ideate Labs for Online STEM: Innovating STEM Education”) was the acknowledgement that while educators around the world were shifting with the move remote, some — namely those engaged in experiential learning — were unsure if / how they could proceed at all in the online context. In this featured session, educators and partners from that event reconvene to showcase the ways in which they’ve leveraged the unique affordances of digital, virtual, and distance learning to innovate in the lab context. They’ll be joined by other experiential learning educators (across the arts and even athletics/sports) to dialogue around their experiences and practices. We invite you to collaborate with us as we engage in stories of successes and failures, but also as we discuss strategies for intentionally incorporating online experiential learning into our educational spaces into the future. Additionally, come reflect with us as we explore the types of things we can do together in convenings such as this to drive support around experiential learning. Finally, if you are an experiential educator, we welcome you to bring your own examples and practices to share with others and add to our digital experiential learning community showcase.

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Featured Sessions Series sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
Recharge Your Batteries With The Slow Networking Lounge | Other

It’s been a wonderful week of conference sessions, and our brains are buzzing with new knowledge, inspiration, and hopefully, new friendships. Remember, though: your brain needs downtime, too! Join us in our final Speed...er, Slow Networking Lounge session for an open invitation to take a breath, take a walk, take a stretch, and take what you need to recharge your batteries.

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Virtual Speed Networking sponsored by:

 

Mar 19, 2021
10:15am - 12:15pm (Central)
The TikTok Professor: How to Use TikTok to Build Community and Connect with Students | Workshop

A university professor with over 50,000 followers on TikTok will provide a crash course on how to use TikTok to connect with students and build community. The first part of the workshop will cover basic information on the benefits of TikTok, how the app itself works, and how participants can use TikTok to create meaningful asynchronous engagement with students. The second half is experiential and will guide participants through brainstorming and designing their own TikToks.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Strengthening Interpersonal Communication Skills in the Virtual Space | Education Session

The movement to the online educational space has been challenging for many of us. During this virtual event, attendees will be guided through specific communication techniques and skill sets that ensure you are presenting yourself in an effective way virtually, and getting the most out of future online events.

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Extended Abstract

“Strengthening Interpersonal Communication Skills in the Virtual Space” 

Whether you’re a teacher, professor, speaker, or attendee, the movement to the online space has been challenging for many of us. No small part of that is the loss of most non-verbal communication cues. During this virtual event, attendees will be guided through specific communication techniques and skill sets that ensure they are not only presenting themselves in an effective way virtually, but that they know how to get the most out of future online lectures, classes, or presentations.

Non-verbal communication makes up 70% of how we understand one another. It’s important to not only acknowledge how to best compensate for that loss in our online communication, but to also know the toll that energy can take and how to manage boundaries around our virtual time to allow for rest and prep. Attendees will leave this session with strategies for maximizing their time, virtual communication skills, and the effort involved in maintaining efficacy in this new and continuously developing landscape. 

During this three-part talk, attendees will accomplish three primary goals:

1) Develop an assured understanding of the difference in verbal and non-verbal communication sets, and correlating cues. Importantly, they will learn the overwhelmingly disproportionate role of non-verbal communication in our understanding of one another.

2) With this foundation set, we will move forward to clarifying what happens when these non-verbal cues are not available us in the virtual space – and the effect on our bodies (fatigue!). Do we have any left? Yes! But they are few and far between. We will discuss how to maximize their effectiveness to our advantage.

3) Finally, we will discuss targeted strategies for Listeners, Speakers, and General Users, as we continue to move forward in this primarily digital learning environment for the time being. These tips also serve those taking primarily online courses in general as well, no matter what age or subject.

Special Notes:

• Resources for research referenced as well as Closed Caption resources will be available in the slides, a copy of which will be available to all attendees for future uses.

• The presentation itself has engaging and active slides, as well as several specific moments dedicated for thoughtful, open discussions and trouble-shooting strategy sessions. Every one of us has experienced this level of online exhaustion, and discussion sessions are designed to allow our mutual experiences and questions to help one another.

 

Mar 19, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Virtual Delight: Increasing Student Satisfaction and Engagement in Virtual/Live/Recorded Synthesized Teaching Environments During the Coronavirus Pandemic and Beyond | Education Session

Faculty have had to pivot to new methods with short notice, so, reasonably, teachers and students are weary and wary. This session will examine classroom-tested tools and methods, and breakdown the design of new engaging virtual/live/recorded synthesized teaching environments including the free but licensed use of music, sounds, and graphics.

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Extended Abstract

Faculty across the nation have had to pivot to virtual delivery with very short notice, so, reasonably, teachers and students are weary and wary. Many of us are simply unfamiliar with ways to connect this virtual space with our time-tested insight which knows that teaching and learning is, first and foremost, about relationships.  This session will examine classroom-tested tools and methods, and breakdown the design of engaging virtual environments including the use of public domain and free but licensed music, sounds, and graphics. This session will not provide legal advice but will contemplate fair use in the instructional setting.

Attending this session will allow participates to increase their understating of and utilize best practices in: 1. Knowing how faculty can be aligned with three aspects of good teaching: Preparation, Connection, and Engagement. 2. Understanding some tools and approaches toward creating an engaging virtual learning space. 3. Analyzing our own student engagement practices alongside best practices. 4. Recognizing a best practice foundation from which individual practice can be created.

The presentation will be structured to foster engaging exchanges while providing strategies toward making sense of individual faculty responsibilities for successfully connecting with students. Best practices will be emphasized while reshaping the perceptions of faculty responsibility. The session aims to be distinctively engaging by use of presentation style with the careful use of custom images, sounds, and public domain and licensed music. 

The approach to virtual instruction being presented was: awarded a  Ivy Tech Community College StatewideFostering Creativity and Innovation Strategy Team Summer 2020 Recognition", shared with the Great Lakes community a part of Chautauqua in the Dunes at our Indiana Dunes State Park, and nominated for the 2020 Society of Innovators at Purdue Northwest Innovation Awards which will be streamed in November of this year.

Mar 19, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Based on Bandersnatch: Designing a “Choose Your Own Adventure” eLearning Module | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

Emmy award winning Black Mirror: Bandersnatch was Netflix’s first interactive movie that allowed the viewer to choose the movie’s storyline.  Designed in Articulate Storyline and similar to Bandersnatch, this case-based eLearning module allows the student to choose their own learning path.  In this session we will review the eLearning module and discuss the design process while providing technology tips and tricks for developing multifaceted branching scenarios, triggers and layers.

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Extended Abstract

Emmy award winning Black Mirror: Bandersnatch was Netflix’s first interactive movie that allowed the viewer to choose the movie’s storyline.  Like the popular Choose Your Own Adventure books from the 1970’s, Bandersnatch created multiple paths within the storyline based on the choices selected by the viewer.  The question became, can we create an eLearning module based on the framework of Bandersnatch?

 

It was a question posed by our Subject Matter Expert (SME), a respected pharmacist and professor at the university. The SME wanted to reimagine his lecture on therapeutic medication for schizophrenia diagnosis.  Bandersnatch’s creative layout and extensive branching scenarios provided the ideal format for a schizophrenia patient case study, and Articulate Storyline was the only authoring tool powerful enough to make this idea come to life.

 

The simulated case study follows the patient, PJ, through multiple medication timelines.  Similar to Bandersnatch, the student chooses which medication to prescribe PJ, and therefore chooses their own individual learning path.  Much of the module branching originates from the virtual pharmacy in which the student has six medications to prescribe to the patient.  Once a selection is made, the student travels down the education path. 

 

Throughout the education path the student learns about the prescribed medication, answers questions, participates in interactions, and discovers common medication side-effects.  The side-effects ultimately overwhelm PJ, and the learner is forced to return to the virtual pharmacy slide to choose another medication for the patient.  Intricate triggers are integrated within the module forcing the student to learn about, and exhaust, all medication options until the correct medication appears on the pharmacy shelf thereby proving the ending path of the case simulation.

 

The complicated branching scenario in the eLearning module includes over 80 slides, 40 layers, 35 interactions, 20 variables, over 100 triggers, and a result slide that captures the student’s choices along the way.  Additionally, all the representative artwork integrated within the design was created by individuals living with schizophrenia.

 

In this session we will review the creative and design process that begun with generic PowerPoint themed slides supplied by the SME and discuss how the content was reimagined and retooled to be an engaging eLearning module student experience.  During the session the audience will gain access to the e-module and experience the case via their tablet, mobile device, or wi-fi enabled laptop.  Technology tips and tricks for developing multifaceted branching scenarios, triggers and layers will be shared.  After the conference participants can continue to develop their cases and will have access to an online repository of cases that will be developed by the larger group. 

 

Innovation Studio sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Blended Learning Summit - Part 1: Blended Learning Is Our Future, Now More Than Ever | Summit

The strategic combination of f2f and online experiences in individual courses is likely to rise in prominence as the pandemic wanes. As a desirable middle-ground between the pandemic ubiquity of online tool use and the desire for safe, value-add f2f experiences, blended has the opportunity to fulfil the promise of being the “best of both worlds.” Drawing from decades of experience with effective institutional blended experience and influenced by emerging trends in faculty and student expectations, this session will offer clarifying perspectives on effective blended course design and institutional implementation post-pandemic.

 

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Blended Learning Summit sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
OLC Live: Beyond Innovate | Other

Join OLC Live hosts Chris Stubbs and Katrina Wehr to discover ways to make the most of all the ideas and resources from the conference and beyond with the OLC community. Discuss upcoming opportunities to engage with the community after the conference ends.

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Extended Abstract

     

This session is sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
11:30am - 1:30pm (Central)
Extreme Makeover—OER Edition: Using SoftChalk and SkillsCommons to Redesign OER to Optimize Learning

Equipped with SkillsCommons' vast repository of open educational resources (OER) and SoftChalk's innovative lesson design tools, you can renovate your course materials to align with the unique educational goals of your institution and students. Though we teach common courses across institutions, each institution and each classroom educates a unique combination of students, programs, and pedagogies. This interactive presentation will demonstrate how OER from a program like SkillsCommons and a course authoring tool like SoftChalk enable faculty and staff to make over OER to redesign curriculums.

In this two hour workshop participants will review the importance of Affordable Learning Solutions initiatives and their relationship to OER, review the benefits of using a lesson authoring tool like SoftChalk, and focus on workforce development. Participants will have the opportunity to see SkillsCommons and SoftChalk in action in redesigning OER content for lesson design.

This workshop is designed for institutional administrators as well as instructores and educators of all levels. Gerry, Sue, and Rick look forward to working with you to renovate and remodel your course materials to meet your specific and unique needs.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Blended Learning Summit - Part 2: Planning For A Blended Future | Summit

Wondering how you can leverage blended programming to meet your teaching and learning needs as we leave the pandemic? We have a Playbook that can help with that!

 

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Blended Learning Summit sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Ramping Up Skills to Meet the COVID Challenge: Lessons from an Online Teaching Training Program | Education Session

Responding to the spring COVID-19 shift to an all-virtual campus, our institution focused on quickly ramping up online teaching skills. This session shares design principles and lessons learned from a rapidly created summer online teaching training program.  Partnership between the academic technology team and faculty created enhanced readiness.

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Extended Abstract

In response to COVID-19 our institution announced a shift to virtual campus one week prior to our scheduled spring break, asking students not to return to campus and faculty to pivot all course teaching to fully online.  As we considered the implications ahead, we quickly realized the need for enhanced online teaching training.  While a level of expertise existed among some of our nearly 200 full time faculty, stop-gap training happened in order to facilitate the spring pivot.  At the same time, we planned to survey both students and faculty on their “spring pivot” experience in order to learn what else would need to be addressed to prepare for fall 2020.  The result was the OTTP program: a two-week online teaching training program, in a cohorted model by learning level, accompanied by a faculty and academic technology mentor team.  This program ran three times, training 276 individuals, including 90% of the full time faculty, a large proportion of the adjunct faculty, and staff with teaching or training roles. 

This session will share design principles and lessons learned.  Key design principles included: putting the participant in the role of a student; cohorting by learning level while creating opportunities for conversation across cohorts; a blended learning model that mixed synchronous and asynchronous learning activities; providing choices to allow customization to the participant’s needs; optional opportunities for peer learning conversations.  Key lessons learned included: the value of having a dedicated academic technology team; the benefit of teaching technology tools in connection with pedagogy; the power of peer-to-peer sharing; the ways in which training can create shared connection; the ways in which training can strengthen faculty-technologist relationships; and how to incentivize faculty participation without making training mandatory.  

The OTTP was sponsored by the Dean of the College who also participated in the program. The initiative enabled the acceleration of faculty development around online teaching skills, facilitating the institution’s ability to be responsive to the context of the global pandemic. 

This session will be presented by the program designers who also served as cohort mentors for the program.  In addition, we will hear the perspective of participants who are early and later career teachers.  Our goal for this session is to offer one model of how to create high-impact online teaching training and then open the discussion for consideration of other strategies. Attendees will be encouraged to consider how this model might be adapted for their own context and institutional needs.We plan to reserve plenty of time for questions and answers so that attendees can probe any details of interest and the presenters can offer suggestions for how others might implement future training of this kind. 

 

Mar 19, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Building Quality Into Your Online Program | Education Session

How do you know if you have a quality online learning program? What steps do you need to take to create an effective environment? If you don’t know the answers to these questions, do you know where you can go for help? In 2018, OLC released the latest update to the Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs. In this session, you will learn how this scorecard can help you understand what steps you need to take to build quality into your program through the use of current best practices.

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Extended Abstract

      

Mar 19, 2021
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Project Management for Continuous Improvement and Career Resilience | Education Session

This session will highlight how project management tools such as planning, status reporting, and stakeholder management can improve the operations of online learning programs.  Opportunities for professional development (OLC class Project Management for Instructional Designers), certification (PMI PMP), and the value of these skills for career resilience will be presented. 

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Extended Abstract

This session will highlight how project management tools such as planning, status reporting, communication plans, RACI charts, risk mitigation, and stakeholder identification can improve the operations of online learning and instructional design programs.  Opportunities for professional development (OLC  workshop - Project Management for Instructional Designers), certification (Project Management Institute Project Management Professional - PMI PMP), and the value of these skills for career resilience will be presented.  

 

The first part of the session will look at specific project management tools and provide templates for attendees to leverage in their organization.  The second part of the presentation will look at how gaining skills and certification in project management can lead to more career options and build career resilience.  The final part of the presentation will be an overview of the PMI PMP certification and a look at the OLC Project Management for Instructional Designers professional development workshop.

Attendees will walk away from this session with: 

  • An understanding of how leveraging project management tools can improve business processes

  • A variety of project management templates: communication plan, status report, RACI diagram, risk mitigation plan, stakeholder chart

  • Insight for how (OLC workshop, PMI PMP) and why (continuous improvement, improved leadership, career resilience) to develop project management expertise 

Mar 19, 2021
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
OLC Design Sprints (Part 3): A Lunch Networking Event | Other

Join us for the final session of the OLC Innovate Design Sprints series! The Design Sprints consist of three related sessions - each designed and structured in the same way but featuring different challenges. Thus far, designers have delved into considerations of community building and collaborative meaning-making. In the final installment of the series, you'll be asked to design with asynchronous engagement in mind. Participants will be divided into teams and together you will generate solutions to a unique design challenge. Along the way, you'll have a chance to make meaningful connections with other conference participants (including our industry partners), will leave with innovative ideas, and even have an opportunity to win a prize! Snacks or lunch welcome for this third and final lunch networking session!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Changing the Conversation: How New Approaches to Online Discussion Can Improve Student Success | Education Session

How can online discussion foster intrinsic student motivation—by supporting peer-to-peer interaction, helping students formulate inquiries, and encouraging them to assume a teaching role?  This panel will explore a forthcoming study from 10 institutions finding that inquiry-based discussion can drive greater student engagement, increase faculty satisfaction, and, ultimately, improve academic outcomes. 

 

 

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Extended Abstract

A robust body of research indicates that quality online discussion can lead to better discussion quality and interaction, greater faculty satisfaction, and improved course outcomes. And getting discussion right is especially critical—both during and well beyond the Covid-19 crisis—as online education continues to grow, along with the use of online discussion to support blended and fully in-person courses.

 

But strong outcomes are far from guaranteed, and the model for discussion has a major impact. Pedagogy that supports intrinsic student motivation—by supporting robust peer-to-peer interaction, asking students to formulate and pose inquiries, and encouraging them to assume a kind of teaching role with peers—can be especially powerful. Last fall, researchers at the University of North Texas conducted an initial pilot study that examined the role of technology in facilitating such an inquiry-based, motivation-focused approach to pedagogy. That pilot found that AI-enabled platforms, which include “features that mimic a social networking site as opposed to the traditional discussion forums in a learning managements system,” led to measurable improvements in metrics like citation of sources that correlate strongly with the quality of discussion. 

 

While this pilot and other existing studies on such approaches are promising, the research is far from complete. A forthcoming research study, which will be published in spring 2021 in the Online Learning Consortium’s special-edition COVID-19 issue, aims to add to our understanding of online discussion and how to maximize it to improve outcomes along with the faculty and student experience. To do so, 10 institutions participated in a research study with Packback, an inquiry-based discussion platform powered by AI, in fall 2019 and spring 2020. The study, which involved 5,000 students, 100 instructors, and analyzed more than 100,000 student discussion posts, compared the inquiry-based platform to LMS discussion boards the institutions were already using. 

 

Results from the study’s fall cohort show that AI-enabled discussion can drive greater student engagement than traditional online discussion tools—and that, in turn, increases faculty satisfaction and engagement and, ultimately, student grade attainment. Similar findings have been replicated in independent studies. This speaks to the power of this particular tool and package of faculty support services, but also more broadly to the efficacy of inquiry-based discussion and the use of AI. In particular, it extends our understanding of the role of online discussion in driving outcomes in face-to-face courses. The need for effective online discussion is well established for online courses, and this study has shown that asynchronous inquiry-based student discussion has similar value within face-to-face courses.

This panel will feature Dr. Adam Fein, who led the initial pilot study at the University of North Texas, in conversation with institutional leaders who participated in the full research study, as well as faculty who have themselves implemented AI-enabled discussion in online and face-to-face classes. Participants will learn more about not only the research itself, but also how to effectively implement inquiry-based discussion pedagogy in their own online classes -- an issue that has taken on ever greater importance in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Mar 19, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Integrating digital fluency skills to engage and empower graduate-level nursing students in a hybrid course | Education Session

Health care professionals participate in online graduate programs to advance their practice. Connecting and learning with peers is an integral part of this journey. However, this often conflicts with work and family responsibilities. How can we engage learners and empower them with digital fluency in an online learning experience?

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Extended Abstract

Health care professionals participate in online graduate programs to advance their practice. They opt for online programs, primarily for flexibility with course work and to be able to juggle work and family responsibilities. However, online learning can also be an isolating experience because students have less opportunities to connect with peers and faculty, as compared to conventional (residential) graduate programs. Yet, evidence suggests that students learn better when they form important communities of practice with peers. These connections positively contribute to the learning experience. How might instructors balance these compelling constraints to craft an active learning experience in a hybrid, graduate-level course? It is vital to offer structured flexibility in academic programs, while integrating technology that facilitates communication and co-creation of knowledge. This offers meaningful learning and sustainable, scalable programs.

We will share our rich experience from one course where we strategically chose technology readily available to students, but that also allowed them to gain skills that were transferable to their work environment. We also provided scaffolded (i.e., gradually increasing level of difficulty in the applications to be used, one application at a time) and structured (i.e., a conscious selection of tools to meet specific learning and engagement objectives) support for faculty, that noticeably complemented their technical skill development for online teaching. This support included frequent one-on-one sessions with the instructional designer and ongoing support with best practice use of technology tools. In this conference session, we will use participant polling and a think-pair-share activity using a virtual whiteboard to discuss our course design and learner feedback. 

Attendees will be able to identify at least two evidence-based strategies to engage learners, determine how to strategically select multimedia tools to enhance digital fluency among learners, and discuss the advantages and constraints of specific digital fluency tools. We believe that participants will be able to take away some ideas for how to integrate elements of this workflow in their own teaching environment, based on their individual course needs and institutional resources.

Improving Quality, Safety and Outcomes in Healthcare Systems is a graduate-level nursing course.

 Students take this course as part of their master’s and doctoral training in the Healthcare Systems track. The course was designed to meet synchronously, on site, five times over the course of the fall semester (16 weeks), the remainder of the content was presented through self-paced, asynchronous modules. Course content focused on collaborative group work and synthesis of concepts.

As a team of one instructional designer and two faculty members, we identified a need to focus on building social presence and facilitating meaningful peer-to-peer interaction throughout the course with the goal of positive learning outcomes. Prior studies link these concepts to student retention and learning satisfaction. We also believe that both faculty and graduate students needed to become digitally fluent, or comfortable with the idea of using multiple multimedia tools in their course work. In a digital learning context, fluency involves using technologies “readily and strategically to learn, to work, and to play, and the infusion of technology in teaching and learning to improve outcomes for all students.” Digital fluency is a relevant and imperative skill in any work environment.

We consciously organized students into small discussion groups from different practice settings to ensure professional diversity. Each person was assigned a reading role: Discussion Leader, Connector, Devil’s Advocate, and Reporter. Each role has specific responsibilities. For example, the Connector role linked current discussion to past readings, course topics, or life or work experiences. Thus, each person in the group had a specific role for the reading assignments and they each contributed to their discussion with a specific task in mind. Students remained in the same group throughout the semester. For group discussions, we felt that the use of video conferencing technology (Zoom) would facilitate more robust peer discussions, rather than asynchronous text-based discussions in the learning management system, which tend to be dry and resemble a string of comments. Students received structured, scaffolded support by way of a demonstration and instructions on how to use the video conferencing tool. Our work occurred prior to the current COVID-19 Zoom environment.

To foster instructor presence in the course, especially for the weeks when the course was not meeting synchronously, course faculty prepared short videos that were embedded in the weekly lesson content within the learning management system. Faculty also received a demonstration and support on how to use the video creation tool, WarpWire. Both faculty and students had ready access to IT support as needed.

At the end of the semester, we tabulated our purposeful engagement of technology and students. The course instructor created 15 short videos in addition to ten text announcements and ten email messages to the class. The students participated in four video-based discussions with their group, in addition to two text-based discussions.

At mid-semester, we examined student perceptions of video-based group discussions compared to face-to-face discussions, and asynchronous written discussion forums using a three-item survey administered through Qualtrics. To make this seamless for students, a link to the survey was embedded in the learning management system. Of 34 students in the class, 22 responded. Of those, 68% preferred the video-based discussion. Students felt more engaged. They also felt that this method was more natural, human, and enjoyable. “The zoom session allows to talk through the reading material which helps me better understand the material”. It also helped students develop strong professional contacts in their practice areas, especially since these are graduate students. However, students also reported difficulty scheduling due to work responsibilities. We therefore adapted the course design and modified the number of required video discussions. We consciously selected quality over quantity of discussions and followed up by adjusting the scoring of the assignments accordingly.  When asked what was going well, one student said, “Professor being "present" every week. Weekly reminders are really nice.” Another student said, “I like how you post a short video of the overview of each week, so it's easy to understand the plan for the week.”

At the end of the course, 65% of the class participated in the anonymous course evaluation sent out by the department. Of those who responded, approximately 95% the students felt the course was designed to keep them engaged in learning. Approximately 86% felt the instructional techniques engaged them with the subject matter. One student said, “I got to develop better relationships with my classmates, and it felt meaningful.” Another student said, “Zoom discussions were [a] more efficient use of time and compared to asynchronous discussion boards and a creative way to engage in the subject matter.”

During one of the five face-to-face class days one group noted a member was absent. This group was able to include them using video conferencing to participate in the discussion. This made the absent student feel included and they were all able to contribute effectively in their reading roles as scheduled. On that day, students were also easily able to substitute one technology for another (Zoom for Facetime), thus demonstrating digital fluency in their use of technology, once they had understood the approach.

Future implications: Based on the feedback students praised the interactive element of virtual discussions but they did not like the scheduling primarily due to difficulties negotiating work schedules. Much has changed since Fall 2019! We have all advanced in our digital fluency, use Zoom with great frequency, and we have explored Zoom breakout rooms. For similar learning needs, we propose having the instructor schedule time and assign breakout rooms ahead of time. This will allow students to focus on the discussion rather than the scheduling. This approach would mean students would have relatively less flexibility but that may be off-set by polling students at the start of the course to identify times that work for most people.

While we always work with the tools that we have now, we need to cultivate a mindset of agility and creativity with technology. Therein lies the need to achieve sufficient digital fluency that will allow our nursing graduates to effectively fulfill their roles as nurse managers and quality improvement resources within their institutions. We expect our graduates to support their teams and patients by using the right technology for the right purpose, based on their actual experience with the technology.

In a post-COVID environment, where time and attention are scarce, we are all now a little savvier with technology and increasingly aware of multiple tools at our disposal. It is even more important to be strategic in planning how students will engage with one another, and how the instructor will engage with the students, professionally. It is beneficial to map out which tools will be used and for which specific interactions they will be used. The importance of integrating instructions and having reliable IT support cannot be overstated. Such a scaffolded, structured approach can lead to meaningful learning and sustainable, scalable program development.

(Abstract: 1474 words)

 

References:

  1. Bigatel, P. M., & Edel-Malizia, S. (2017). Using the “Indicators of Engaged Learning Online” Framework to Evaluate Online Course Quality. TechTrends, 62(1), 58-70. doi:10.1007/s11528-017-0239-4
  2. Borup, Jered & West, Richard & Graham, Charles. (2012). Improving online social presence through asynchronous video. The Internet and Higher Education. 15. 195–203. 10.1016/j.iheduc.2011.11.001.
  3. Serembus, J. F., & Riccio, P. A. (2019). Relationship Between Student Engagement and Outcomes for Online Master of Science in Nursing Students. Journal of Nursing Education, 58(4), 207-213. doi:10.3928/01484834-20190321-04
  4. Sparrow, J. (2018, March 12). Digital Fluency: Preparing Students to Create Big, Bold Problems. Retrieved October 07, 2020, from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/3/digital-fluency-preparing-students-to-create-big-bold-problems
  5. Spencer, K. (2020, March 16). What is digital fluency? Retrieved October 07, 2020, from https://www.digitallearningcollab.com/blog/what-is-digital-fluency

 

 

Mar 19, 2021
12:45pm - 2:45pm (Central)
The Work of Wellness for Higher Education: Strategies to Implement for Yourself and Students | Workshop

With educators facing ongoing stress and uncertainty the need to focus on wellness is vital.  This training will help educators and leaders learn the importance of caring for themselves in order to continue to support the needs of their staff and students through best-practice self-care strategies designed for busy lifestyles. 

 

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Extended Abstract

With educators facing ongoing stress and uncertainty due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the changing landscape of higher education and the impacts of cultural and societal traumas, the need to focus on wellness is even more vital.  This training is intended to help educators and leaders learn the importance of caring for themselves in order to continue to support the needs of their staff and students through best-practice self-care strategies designed for busy lifestyles. The goal is for educators and leaders to adopt and then implement some of these strategies with their staff and students as part of ongoing student success strategies. 

Mar 19, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Tips for Designing an Inclusive Online Course | Education Session

In the rush to offer courses online during the pandemic, ensuring that online technology and pedagogy are fully accessible and otherwise inclusive of students with disabilities is often overlooked. The presenter will provide 20 evidence-based tips on how to deliver an online course that is inclusive of all students.

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Extended Abstract

I taught the first online learning course at the University of Washington in 1995. My co‑instructor was Dr. Norm Coombs, who was, at the time, a professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. We designed the course to be accessible to anyone, including students who were blind, deaf, or had physical disabilities. Norm himself is blind. He uses a screen reader and speech synthesizer to read text presented on the screen. We employed the latest technology of the time—email, discussion list, Gopher, file transfer protocol, and telnet (no World Wide Web yet!). All online materials were in a text-based format, and videos, which were mailed to the students, were presented in VHS format with captions and audio description. When asked if any of our students in this course had disabilities, we were proud to say that we did not know why. No one needed to disclose a disability because all of the course materials and teaching methods were designed to be accessible to everyone.

Today the technology is more advanced and there are more options to choose from for teaching an online course, but the basic issues are the same when it comes to accessibility. We need to make sure that the screen readers of students who are blind or have a reading-related disability can access content in a text-based  and structured format; that content is accessible by using the keyboard alone since assistive technology can be used to emulate keyboard commands, but not necessarily movement of a mouse; that videos are captioned and audio described; and that content is presented in a clear, consistent format.

As they choose content, document formats, and teaching methods, it is important for instructors to remember that potential students have a wide variety of characteristics that may relate to gender, race, ethnicity, culture, marital status, age, communication skills, learning abilities, interests, physical abilities, social skills, sensory abilities, values, learning preferences, socioeconomic status, religious beliefs, etc.

But what does “accessible” mean with respect to an online course? According to the Office of Civil Rights, “accessible” means that “a person with a disability is afforded the opportunity to acquire the same information, engage in the same interactions, and enjoy the same services as a person without a disability in an equally effective and integrated manner, with substantially equivalent ease of use. The person with a disability must be able to obtain the information as fully, equally, and independently as a person without a disability.”

It would be difficult to find online learning instructors who would say that they do not plan to effectively teach all of their students. Even with these good intentions, many are excluding students with specific characteristics, including disabilities that impact sight, hearing, mobility, learning, attention levels, social interactions, and attendance. The topic of this presentation is particularly relevant because of the conversion of thousands of on-site courses to an online format in response to the pandemic, legal mandates for colleges and universities to make their courses accessible to students with disabilities, and heightened interest nationwide in addressing diversity and equity issues on postsecondary campuses and beyond.

The good news is that there are established principles and evidence-based practices that, when applied proactively, lead to a course that is accessible to, usable by, and inclusive of students with a wide variety of characteristics that include disabilities.  Principles include those that underpin universal design in general (Center for Universal Design. (n.d.)), Universal Design of Learning (UDL), and the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) principles is particularly suitable for addressing both technological and pedagogical aspects of online course curriculum and activities in order to ensure that students are offered multiple, accessible ways to gain knowledge, demonstrate understanding, and interact and minimize the need for additional disability-related accommodations for specific students. For example, a student with a learning disability engaging in a universally-designed online course may require extra time on an examination as determined by a campus disability services office.

Many instructors who consider it important to address diversity and equity issues in their materials and instructional methods, lack the knowledge and skills to design a fully accessible and inclusive course. They also report little understanding of their obligations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and its 2008 Amendments when it comes to making their online learning courses accessible to students with disabilities. Procurement officers also struggle to encourage IT companies to make their products accessible to individuals with disabilities. 

In this conference session I will reveal how UD’s proactive design practices can be integrated with best practices in the field of online learning design to create an inclusive course. I will share evidence-based practices for operationalizing UD principles into practices that are often easy to implement. I will bring in perspectives and evidence-based practices from the field as I share 20 evidence-based tips on how to deliver an online course that is accessible to all students, including those with disabilities (Burgstahler, 2020). They provide a good place to start when designing an accessible course. 

For course web pages, documents, images, and videos, follow these guidelines:

  1. Use clear, consistent layouts and organization schemes for presenting content.
  2. Structure headings and lists—using style features built into the Learning Management System (LMS), Microsoft Word and PowerPoint (PPt), PDF, etc.— and use built-in designs/layouts (e.g., for PPt slides).
  3. Use descriptive wording for hyperlink text (e.g., “DO-IT Knowledge Base” rather than “click here”).
  4. Avoid creating PDF documents. Post instructor-created course content within LMS content pages (i.e., in HTML) and, if a PDF is desired, link to it only as a secondary source of information. 
  5. Provide concise text descriptions of content presented within images.
  6. Use large, bold fonts on uncluttered pages with plain backgrounds.
  7. Use color combinations that are high contrast and can be read by those who are colorblind.
  8. Caption videos and transcribe audio content. 
  9. Use a small number of IT tools and make sure they present content and navigation that require use of the keyboard alone and otherwise employ accessible practices​.

 

With respect to instructional methods,​follow these guidelines:

  1. Assume students have a wide range of technology skills and provide options for gaining the skills needed for course participation.
  2. Provide options for learning by presenting content in multiple ways (e.g., in a combination of text, video, audio, and/or image format).
  3. Provide options for communicating and collaborating that are accessible to individuals with a variety of disabilities. 
  4. Provide options for demonstrating learning (e.g., different types of test items, portfolios, presentations, single-topic discussions).
  5. Address a wide range of language skills as you write content (e.g., spell acronyms, define terms, avoid or define jargon).
  6. Make instructions and expectations clear for activities, projects, discussion questions, and assigned reading. 
  7. Make examples and assignments relevant to learners with a wide variety of interests and backgrounds. 
  8. Offer outlines and other scaffolding tools to help students learn. 
  9. Provide adequate opportunities to practice. 
  10. Allow adequate time for activities, projects, and tests (e.g., give details of project assignments in the syllabus so that students can start working on them early). 
  11. Provide feedback on project parts and offer corrective opportunities. 

 

In this conference session I will share resources that provide explanations of why these guidelines are important, how to implement them, and other resources, consult ​AccessCyberlearningAccessDL,​ Accessible Technologythe Center for Universal Design in EducationUDL on Campus and the book Creating inclusive learning opportunities in higher education: A Universal Design toolkit.

 

References

AccessCyberlearning. (n.d.). Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from uw.edu/doit/programs/accesscyberlearning/overview

Accessible Technology. (n.d.). Seattle: University of Washington.

Burgstahler, S. (2020). 20 Tips for Teaching an Accessible Online Course. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from uw.edu/doit/20-tips-teaching-accessible-online-course

Burgstahler, S. (2020). Creating inclusive learning opportunities in higher education: A Universal Design toolkit. Harvard Education Press. Retrieved from www.amazon.com/Creating-Inclusive-Learning-Opportunities-Education/dp/16...

Burgstahler, S., & Thompson, T. (Eds). (2019). Designing accessible cyberlearning: Current state and pathway forward. Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from https://www.washington.edu/doit/accessible-cyberlearning-community-report

Center for Accessible Distance Learning (AccessDL). Seattle: University of Washington. 

Center for Universal Design. (n.d.). History of universal design. Retrieved from https://projects.ncsu.edu/design/cud/about_ud/udhistory.htm

Center for Universal Design in Education. (n.d.). Seattle: University of Washington. Retrieved from http:/uw.edu/doit/cude

UDL on Campus. (n.d.). CAST. Retrieved from udloncampus.cast.org/home

Mar 19, 2021
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Blended Learning Summit - Part 3: Supporting Quality In A Blended Learning Program | Summit

As we move past the pandemic, more institutions are looking at how to better use technology in the classroom and be prepared for future distasters. Learn how to implement a quality blended learning program in this session. OLC’s Blended Learning Scorecard will be shared along with best practices for an effective blended program.

 

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Blended Learning Summit sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Ideas to Support Students during COVID | Networking Coffee Talk

During and eventually after the pandemic, providing services to students virtually is integral to an education institution’s success. Services such as advising, orientation, emergency aid, clubs and activities, academic/learning supports, and health and well-being programs must be transitioned online. Join SmarterServices as they explore and share best practices with how to support students.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Academic Advising For Online Students During Times Of Uncertainty | Industry Showcase - Presentation

In this presentation, we outline data-driven tools that can be utilized to anticipate student challenges and deploy hands-on support to foster student success in times of crisis.

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Extended Abstract

Now more than ever, having human-to-human interaction matters. When faculty are unable to connect with students in traditional ways, there is plenty they can do to provide virtual support. In this presentation, we outline data-driven tools that can be utilized to anticipate student challenges and deploy hands-on support to foster student success in times of crisis and uncertainty.

Mar 19, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
The Impact of Student Recognition of Excellence to Student Outcome in a Competency-Based Educational Model | Education Session

Persistence lift is significantly impacted by student recognition; evidenced by the findings of our study and corresponding to findings of extant studies. Students struggling and on the verge of disenrolling exhibited greater motivation to perform well in a competency-based education model following student recognition of excellence (11-20% persistence lift, n=30,440). 

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Extended Abstract

Student enrollment and retention are paramount to the ongoing operation of a college/university. Recognition of achievement is found to be a motivational factor for college students to remain enrolled in their courses and persist in their coursework to graduate, as indicated in past research. This presentation will provide a detailed review on a recently completed study on the impact of student recognition of excellence on student persistence in an online higher ed program. The study includes a retrospective longitudinal study of all excellence award recipients from August 2016 to August 2019, involving the correlation of student’s course progression after receiving the award and its impact on three key student success indicators: On Time Progress (OTP), Student Academic Progress (SAP), and Course Completion Rate (CCR).  

 

The participants will be provided an in-depth look at the student success analytics foundational to this student, particularly regarding the exciting findings related to persistence lift. Persistence lift is significantly impacted by student recognition; evidenced by the findings of our study and corresponding to findings of extant studies.  Details will include the findings that students struggling and on the verge of disenrolling exhibited greater motivation to perform well in a competency-based education model following student recognition of excellence (11-20% persistence lift, n=30,440).  Participants will be provided the opportunity to explore the relevance of the study methodology and results to the fostering of student success with an interactive discussion on how they may apply study findings to the intentional student recognition at their educational institution.  

 

Presentation Overview  

A detailed literature review will be provided, which indicated student recognition affects a student’s self-efficacy, motivation, and level of effort put forth. Students with low academic performance, have higher academic performance after recognition. Students react to receiving recognition with the greater effort expended toward higher academic achievement. However, these findings were not from studies conducted in a competency-based education model.   

 

Research Premise  

The study is based on an online university operating in a competency-based education model. The students demonstrate competency (demonstrating what they know and can do) in their courses in order to pass their performance and objective assessments. There is a considerable amount of self-regulated learning on the part of the students in this education model; while the learning is being facilitated and mentored by faculty. Therefore, in this type of learning environment, the students must have a higher level of motivation that fosters persistence than in any other educational model.   

 

Research Questions  

Based on the findings of extant research in the area of college student motivation and persistence, the following research questions emerge: (1) What effect is the online competency-based university awards program having on their students? (2) How does student recognition of excellence support and enhance indicators of student success: On-Time Progress (OTP), Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP), and Course Completion Record (CCR)?  

 

Research Methodology 

 This research was conducted as a retrospective longitudinal study over a period of three years with a mixed-method investigation in a competency-based education model. The qualitative method was a content analysis using MAXQDA. This is a software program designed for computer-assisted qualitative data, text, and multi-media analysis of content. The quantitative investigation was conducted using a quasi-experimental analysis tool: Civitas Learning Impact™. 

 

The qualitative analysis measured the frequency of trending words and phrases contained within a student's comment written in response to being selected to receive an excellence award. Using MAXQDA, analyzing 11,644 student grateful responses content trends with words and phrases expressing gratitude such as: “thank you,” thanks for the award,” and other similar grateful responses were identified. Another type of trending phrase emerged such as “I was on the verge of quitting,” “was about to give up,” was about to quit school.” In fact, 19% of the phrases written were from students about to give up, quit, and leave school.  

 

The quantitative method measured student’s persistence lift using Civitas Learning Impact™ (hereto referred to as “Civitas”) statistical analysis tool, matching nearest neighbors with one group of students receiving an award and the other group of students not receiving an award. Civitas uses what is known as prediction-based propensity score matching (PPSM), a two-dimensional method that matches students.  The similar students are matched to similar persistence probabilities that the two students show, these persistence probabilities are matched to several categories including OTP, SAP, CCR, and demography with behavioral indicators. The action of matching one student to another helps control the amount of bias in any analyzed initiative.  

 

Review of Civitas Analytics 

The presentation will provide an in-depth review of the Civitas statistical tool, which uses a quasi-experimental statistical method to determine the Persistence lift for the specified student group. The definition of Persistence lift is defined to be the ability for a student to meet On-Time Progression (8/12 CU’s) and be retained to the next term for a minimum of 45 days. Persistence lift is measured by comparing the Propensity Score and the students’ predicted outcomes to the students who participated in the initiative to those who did not. This methodology was patented by Civitas and is an extension of the Propensity Score Matching methodology that was developed over 30 years ago to calculate propensity. Using this patented methodology provided a way to analyze several initiatives by removing bias and effectively limiting the effects of other confounding factors that might differ participant students to those in the comparison group. 

 

Civitas Data Processing Steps 

Participants will be offered in inside look at the key data process steps that are integral to establishing a high level of confidence in this cutting-edge student success analytics tool.  In this initiative, the participant group was classified as students who received an Excellence Award, and the comparison group was every student who did not receive the award. There are five high-level process steps to use the Civitas, the first being identifying the eligible students (known as the participant group). This includes nine steps to explore and interpret the results; making sure the research team understands the initiative and context details by asking if they truly answered the research question and making sure that the overall persistence lift is intuitive and not too good to be true. The research team also ensures that the results are statistically significant or that the match rate is greater than 85%.  

The presentation will include this level of detail describing the use of our quantitative analysis tool so the audience will not only have a greater understanding of the validity in using Civitas but also gain a level of confidence in the findings. The research team will invite discussion regarding the use of this analysis tool and its applicability in future studies of this nature. 

 

Research Findings 

The qualitative analysis showed a significant effect taking place by the student’s comments indicating 19% of the comments were regarding the intention of leaving school and giving up. Another trend identified 20% of the comments expressing the boost of confidence. To the extent, this boost of confidence affected the level of motivation was shown with a measurement of persistence lift.  

Using Civitas and after comparing students in the same three year time period terms, the statistical analysis (n=30,340) shows a significant overall lift of 10.9% in persistence (p<0.01), with students in the lower quartile being the ones with the most lift in persistence (20.23%, p<0.01). The content analysis (n= 11,644) shows 19% of the student receiving the excellence award was on the verge of dropping their enrollment, deciding to continue their studies after receiving their award.   

Another significant finding in this study was students in their first term who received an award had a greater persistence lift than students who did not receive an award (14.96%, p<0.01). Compared to the persistence lift of students who received an award and were in term 1 - 3 (8.44%, p<0.01) and who were in term 4+ (7.36%, p<0.01), these findings indicate that “early cheering” versus “early warning” had a positive effect on the student’s outcome measures: OTP, SAP, and CCR.  Additional findings will be shared with the participants including the measurable impact receiving an excellence award has on a diverse student population at the online university and those attending college for the first time. 

 

Closing Discussion  

The presentation includes a closing discussion, noting that the results from this research investigation confirmed the findings of past research as it applied to other education models. The recognition of students’ effort as being deemed excellent has been quantifiably shown to impact their student outcomes and achievement measured by course completion, on-time-performance, and satisfactory academic progress. This is the first study of its nature in a competency-based education model (as known at this time).  

Future research in this domain is advised including the use of a student survey measuring motivation, self-efficacy, and self-regulated learning levels to triangulate more of the evidence brought forth in this study investigation. Future studies investigating the effect student recognition has on student success factors will be encouraged as a final takeaway for those attending this presentation. 

Mar 19, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$): Scaling OER adoption within HBCUs | Education Session

Reducing the cost of higher education by providing free to low cost course materials has proven to be an important institutional strategy. The session will review strategies to improve the institutional readiness for AL$, customized technologies to implement AL$, and the research agenda to evaluate the impact of AL$.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 19, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
From Facilitation to Instruction: Supplementing Online "Master Courses" through Multimodal Communication and Technology | Education Session

The pre-designed nature of an online “master course” can make faculty unsure of how to rise beyond the role of Facilitator to that of Instructor; however, master courses can be taught creatively. This session will empower faculty to actively teach and supplement a master course through technology and engagement.

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Extended Abstract

One of the challenges of teaching a pre-designed master course, particularly in an asynchronous format, is the common misconception that instructors are powerless to engage or build meaningful relationships with their students. When presented with fully written lectures and assignments, some faculty may feel displaced, wondering what role they can play beyond grading written work and responding to students’ emails. Particularly in departments where changes to master courses are not permitted, it can be easy for instructors to feel less accountability for learning outcomes in courses they did not develop. This session, though, will explain how online faculty can find their voice, offer expertise, and enhance learning without breaking from protocol. Covering a range of emerging instructional technologies, the presenters will bring their experience from multiple perspectives: those of a Professor, Instructional Designer, Educational Technologist, and Assistant Dean in a department where faculty are evaluated on their ability to supplement an online master course.

First, the presenters will model available uses for screen-capture recordings, elucidating their potential for deciphering difficult passages, interpreting still images, and explaining a process. Then they will transition to the creation of individualized recorded messages for students, which are useful in student-support efforts and personalized grading feedback.

Moving from pre-recordings to live sessions, the presenters will illustrate uses for web conferencing, ranging from holding office hours to hosting optional synchronous lectures while remaining mindful of ADA requirements. Illustrating uses for breakout groups and live polling, the presenters will invite the audience to complete a live survey. This segment of the presentation will conclude with an explanation of how free polling software can even work asynchronously through practice quizzes, surveys, or discussion posts.

The presenters will then offer tips for where to find ready-made resources, offer self-authored materials, and elaborate on rubrics. Session attendees will learn how to maximize their course announcements page, email messaging, grading feedback, and discussion boards, using each as an opportunity for supplementation and active teaching.

Finally, the presenters will highlight the components of a successful faculty-training program based on their department’s model of establishing clear expectations for permissible course supplement, and maintaining an active evaluation and professional development program.

While the presentation will focus on the Canvas LMS and humanities disciplines, ideas will be transferable to other LMS platforms and disciplines. Moreover, while the session will focus on asynchronous courses, most tools will be useful in synchronous environments.

Mar 19, 2021
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Unleashing the Power of Open: Adopting and Adapting LibreTexts for Use in Your Classroom | Education Session

You are convinced that now is the time to adopt OER. Where do you begin? Learn how to use LibreTexts to find OER your colleagues have authored and "remix" customized OER texts with state-of-the-art annotation, computation and homework system capabilities that will best serve you and your students. 

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Extended Abstract

Open Educational Resources (OER) are more than free to your students, they give instructors the freedom to customize the learning experience for them. Have you always hated the way most texts cover a topic? Been frustrated by the lack of diversity exhibited in images, examples, and research? Or simply wished your text was more human – and engaging? Join this session to learn what LibreTexts has to offer – whether you are looking for existing high-quality OER with readily available print options and easy import into Learning Management Systems or ready to create your own.

The LibreTexts community focuses on creating and curating online libraries that are easy to reuse, revise, remix and redistribute, fulfilling the 5R dream of OER. Since inception 13 years ago as the ChemWiki, the LibreTexts project has grown exponentially and currently reaches more than 120 million students per year with 14 libraries that extend across the curriculum, horizontally from business to physics and vertically from secondary to graduate school. LibreTexts meets the UNESCO condition for OER of no-cost access under open, mostly CC, licenses. Instructors can use the OER in the repository without registering and expense or they can request free UserIDs and build custom LibreTexts in individual or team sandboxes. Student teams assist with importing other open materials into the system for use. After completion these can be moved to campus hubs in one of the libraries. Beyond ten texts a small ($500) institutional fee is required to join the LibreNet consortium. 

The site is globally available online and all texts can be printed-just-in-time through a low cost online bookstore. Acrobat files are available for all pages and complete books. An ebook app will soon allow downloading in that format. A nice feature of the books are QR codes attached to videos and applets which can be linked by readers over their cell phones. Work started in August 2020 on a smartphone app which is vital in this COVID age as more students have cell phones than computers and more have phone connectivity than internet.  A group is developing LibreTexts-in-a-Box, a Raspberry Pi based system for use in remote locations, the only limitation of which is that certain functions such as a Jupyter notebook that requires internet connectivity to the server will not work.

Attendees will be able to access and test drive most of the features described here and those intrigued can register as instructors, gaining access to them for their classes and institutions. Office hours are available for further discussion and special times will be made available for the three time zones of the conference.

LibreTexts’ technology enables faculty members to easily and rapidly create OER textbooks and more, optimized for their courses and students. The structure of LibreTexts solves two of the central problems limiting OER adoption: the time and expertise that faculty need to find appropriate OER from which to assemble OER materials for their classes and dissemination to others. Libretexts platform is augmented by incorporating content from an extensive (largest on the net and growing) network of over 1000 textbooks extending across higher education that faculty can edit, enhance and add to to meet their needs. Teams of students help with transferring open materials to the site. A simple to use drag-and-drop “remixer” application allows rapid textbook creation using materials from any library. Automatic renumbering of figures, tables, equations and page labels greatly reduces the soul numbing necessity of doing this by hand. 

Uniform formatting allows automation of key functions such as import into LMSs using the Common Cartridge, accessibility optimization in collaboration with the Student Disability Center at the University of California Davis, inclusion of extensions including annotation (hypothes.is), computation (Jupyter notebooks) and other features. Because of the uniform formatting all  services extend to every book in the library. For example every LibreTexts is available for just in time low cost printing through the online bookstore and the files are updated weekly to reflect any edits or corrections made by authors. The bookstore itself functions as a petting zoo similar to online bookstores such as Amazon, but linking directly to the table of contents, sections of the text or the entire book. Books in the bookstore are searchable by subject, institution or autor at this time but this will be upgraded to allow searching by meta-information. 

Accessibility is a major issue for OER. For LibreTexts accessibility includes students and other users being able to reach content as well as getting it in forms that they can understand. This is driving LibreTexts’ thrust to provide all materials in multiple formats in ways that they are automatically current as discussed above. Among other features that make LibreTexts available, a sidebar app allows enlarging text and the size of margins using sliders. Other services include the BeeLine Reader which improves readability and focus by adding color gradients to text as well as providing an inverted view. Testing shows that this improves performance by those with reading difficulties such as attention deficits, vision impairments and dyslexia. LibreTexts is developing bots to scan pages and improve accessibility by editing the underlying HTML5.0 code. Identification of problems is currently done with other bots as well as other software. Testing with SiteImprove for JAWS and  NVDA screen reader optimization has increased scores from 40 to 70% and more and other software used by LibreTexts’ Accessibility Team include Claro Read and Dragon for speech recognition.

In addition to creation of original material a principle feature of LibreTexts is to act as an abstraction layer between the various formats that OER comes in, such as pdf, eprint, Pressbooks, etc, and users, both students and instructors, by providing a uniform format for the OER with a rich set of features LibreTexts improves the ability of students and other users to access materials and for instructors to create them. Nowhere is this more important than for homework systems, which are known to drive adoption of texts. At this time LibreTexts provides access to libraries of questions from WebWork, H5P, and IMathAS, the latter being the system that MyOpenMath and Lumen’s Ohm are built on. By storing these in the system format LibreTexts has made them available for inclusion in any text by reference for formative assessment and into quizzes and other summative assessments. While the general approach is to build question libraries so large that they cannot be memorized there is secured storage for questions that any instructor wishes, (at least for a short time until they get out) to keep private. By design other question libraries can be added to the Query system. LibreTexts is working with WeBWorK, and Rederly to build a standalone WeBWorK problem renderer that will improve access to WeBWorK problems across the OER ecosystem. This will free WebWork problems from the need for dedicated servers, using Rederly’s standalone renderer WeBWorK problems are available as a  micro-service for integration with OER including LibreTexts.  

A complementary approach is the Adapt system built on the Query database and the Libretexts content. The hierarchy of organization within the Adapt system starts with bit sized building blocks that are classified as either assessments nodes (using Query assessments) or remediation nodes (text, video or simulations in Libretexts or available to it). Trees are then a series of nodes for a specific area connected with a specific topology which can be created by instructors or accepted or modified by them and modules are a series of trees which comprise a problem set. Adapt is currently being used in a pilot course and release is anticipated in January 2021.

OLC Innovate is an exciting opportunity to showcase LibreTexts technology to the community

Mar 19, 2021
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Conventional Wisdom About Leading Change In Education: What Still Holds True And What’s Old News? | Networking Coffee Talk

We all challenge conventional wisdom about education to shift pedagogy at our institutions. It’s time to challenge our conventional wisdom about leading change. Join us as we try to make sense of all the change in the past year – what conventional wisdom still holds true, and what’s old news?

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Extended Abstract

Education change leaders are experts at questioning conventional wisdom in a way that sparks interest, shifts mindsets and creates a better path forward. Whether you’re the lone maverick who seeks to do things the best way simply because they’re the best way, or whether you’re a consensus-building leader working to create momentum to get to a certain tipping point on your campus, you’ve probably got a reputation for challenging conventional wisdom around education models, teaching approaches and pedagogical tactics.

With the acceleration of change we’ve seen in the last year, particularly in education, much of what we thought was always going to be true about leading change has turned out to not be useful at all while some emerging patterns are helping educators be more effective change agents. We have the advantage of working with hundreds of clients through many kinds of changes from micro to macro, and a new conventional wisdom around leading change is emerging.

In preparation for this session, consider your old standby phrases, pieces of advice you’ve either given or received, and concepts you hold dear as a change leader. For us, those are ideas like:

  • Work with the ones who want to work with you, the others will come along in their own time.
  • When you come into an organization as a top-level leader, don’t change anything for the first year.
  • Old ways won’t open new doors.
  • Leaders should carefully craft a compelling vision with detailed strategies and tactics before rolling out a change.
  • Rely upon your lone maverick innovators to influence their colleagues to change.
  • Change comes slowly in higher ed, so be sure you’re in it for the long game.
  • Don’t worry about your laggards/luddites – they’ll come along eventually, or when there is a mandate to adopt.
  • Trusting relationships are the bread and butter of successful change.

In the session, we will share our own conventional wisdom, when we’ve seen conventional wisdom fail in the past year, and what we see as the emerging conventional wisdom for the future. We’ll discuss, debunk, demystify, and ask you to chime in on whether you think our conventional wisdom will hold true, or whether we’re acting on old news. Questions to engage the audience:

  • What is your go-to phrase, cliché or advice about leading change in higher ed?
  • Considering those nuggets of conventional wisdom, which of those nuggets still apply, and which ones do we need to rethink because they won’t work to effectively lead change in our institutions today?
  • What moment or moments in the last year caused you to rethink your conventional wisdom?
  • Which phrases or sayings are you using now that will shape your approach tomorrow, next week and next month?
     
Mar 19, 2021
3:15pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Centering Inclusion, Trust And Care: A Connected Plenary And Closing Event | Plenary Address

Moving beyond the mere transactional sit-and-get conference experience, OLC Innovate brings together educators from across the globe to engage in critical change work in supporting the modern learner, anywhere and anytime. Part fireside chat, part active design sprint, this highly-engaging plenary will weave together the threads of the salient themes and discussions covered across the various tracks, sessions and engagement opportunities. Using a curated set of notes collected by numerous conference attendees, session participants will first hear reflections on how the discussions and themes from the conference presentation connect to our collective role in reimagining educational innovation. Then, we will hear reflections from the leaders of the OLC Innovate 2021 summits, each aligned to different tracks of the conference. We’ll close with a call to action in support of our future discussions, collaborations, and advocacy.

Join us for a transformative session that will not only weave together the threads of OLC Innovate 2021 as a closing activity, but will provide you with a road map and continued momentum for the shared path ahead of ensuring access and impact of our online, blended and digital teaching and learning practices.

 

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This session is sponsored by:

Mar 19, 2021
4:30pm - 5:00pm (Central)
OLC Innovate 2021 After Party | Other

The sessions may be over, but the fun doesn't stop there! Live music, fun games, virtual celebrations, organically unpredictable Zoom antics...what's not to love? The OLC Innovate 2021 After Party will be an experience you don't want to miss, and we hope to see you there!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Student Perceptions of Instructor Feedback | Discovery Session

Feedback in online modalities continues to be an important area of discussion. As a result, there is need to examine the most valuable way to provide feedback to benefit student learning. In this session, research on student perceptions of feedback will be presented. Research findings will provide faculty and administrators with greater understanding of the most valuable ways to provide discussion forum feedback that is most beneficial to student learning in the online classroom.

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Extended Abstract

Our purpose as faculty is to prepare our students for the next phase of their lives. Among our various responsibilities, we engage, teach, develop, inspire, question, challenge, and…we provide feedback. Feedback in the online modality takes on many forms; but what is most effective?

 

Key areas related to feedback in the online modality identified in the literature include level and detail of feedback (Barabczyk & Best, 2019; Kyrilov & Noelle, 2014; Planar & Moya, 2016), student preferences related to feedback (Nixon, Brooman, Murphy, & Fearon, 2017; Percell, 2017; Smith, Ralph, MacLeod, & Smilek, 2019), personalized feedback (Baleni, 2015; Percell, 2017; Plana-Erta, Moya, & Simo, 2016), student learning (Baleni, 2015; Dlaska & Krekeler, 2017; Mu & Hatch, 2019;  Planar & Moya, 2016), and student perceptions and use(Diefes-Dux, 2018; Ekahitanond , 2013; Luaces, Diez & Bahamonde 2018; Suzan, Gorban, Levesley, & Mirkes, 2019; Martínez-Argüelles, Plana, Hintzmann, Batalla-Busquets, & Badia, 2015). As faculty and administrators, it is important to understand what feedback student use, what they like, and what is most useful. Understanding the influence that characteristics such as level of detail, focus, target, and grade reference can assist faculty in providing feedback that is most beneficial to students.

In this session, research on student perceptions of feedback will be presented. Research findings will provide faculty and administrators with greater understanding of the most valuable ways to provide discussion forum feedback that is most beneficial to student learning in the online classroom. In addition to presentation of research findings, faculty and administrators attending this session will have the opportunity to collaborate, brainstorm, and explore best practices for feedback in the online modality.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Plug In or Power Down: Educational Technology Usage by K-12 ELL Teachers during COVID-19 | Discovery Session

This presentation will highlight results of the authors’ quantitative study that investigated how K-12 teachers of English Language Learners (ELLs) incorporated educational technology tools in their remote classrooms, and the access issues they encountered, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings can inform instructional decisions to better leverage modern technologies and improve learning outcomes in the ELL classroom.

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Extended Abstract

Background and Overview

The global COVID-19 pandemic has changed the way people around the world live their lives; in fact, every facet of everyday life has been disrupted, including education. Administrators, teachers, and students have all had to adjust to a “brave new world” of remote learning, almost overnight. While remote learning options were already prolific, the abrupt shift into this method of instruction and the instant closures of the traditional classroom models across the world was unprecedented. Expectations for students and teachers shifted as they attempt to match traditional learning experiences more closely with the digital life outside the classroom. The fact that there is little consistency in the integration of technology in public schools has probably deepened the crisis of converting traditional schools to online schools in response to the COVID-19 crisis.

This study explored how teachers faced and overcame these unique challenges by using educational technology, as they struggled to meet their expectations when their delivery mode is switched to remote teaching. We sought to identify what proportion of ELL educators used educational technologies, outside of learning management systems, to assist their students in meeting their learning goals during remote teaching brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. For our purposes, educational technologies include software, apps and programs created for use in the realm of education. There are hundreds of options available for teachers, and our study asked teachers which they used and whether they found these learning tools effective in improving outcomes for ELLs when teaching remotely.

We also explored the prominent issue of the “digital divide,” or inequitable technology access for students, which has been exacerbated with mandatory remote learning. Did teachers report technology access issues with English language learners? Did students or teachers struggle to learn to use technology in order to adapt to remote instruction? We asked teachers what barriers they encountered when educating English language learners remotely during the pandemic’s school closures. From integrating certain educational technologies into widely used learning management systems, to improving teacher training, we hope the results of this study can assist ELL teachers as they learn how to best incorporate educational technology into the curriculum of their ELL classrooms, during the current COVID-19 crisis and beyond.

Who Will Benefit

This session should appeal to anyone involved in the creation, promotion, or implementation of ELL curriculum in remote and/or online learning environments. The authors will share the steps they took to investigate the issue, provide data analysis and lessons learned, and promote a discussion of issues surrounding what educational technology tools work best for ELL remote and/or online classrooms. With these session outcomes in mind, the presentation should appeal to a broad audience and be of particular interest to K-12 teachers and administrators, education researchers, education

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Professional Development Reimagined: Become a MERLOT Peer Reviewer | Discovery Session

We all have had professional development sessions through our institutions; it isn't always geared to our particular discipline area.  MERLOT gives you the opportunity to review materials in your discipline, and work with colleagues across the world.  You can grow, learn, and contribute to the community.  Find out more!

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Extended Abstract

We all have had professional development sessions through our institutions; it isn't always geared to our particular discipline area.  MERLOT (Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching) provides an orientation to reviewing online materials (GRAPE Camp) and then multiple opportunities to review materials in our discipline.  We have over 20 editorial boards--you'll find one that you fit in.  Reviewers find that the materials they assess allow them to grow in both knowledge and pedagogy.  Think about joining our team.  Find out more in this session!

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Providing Effective Dissertation Mentorship Experiences for Online Students | Discovery Session

Dissertation completion is a vital yet complex process for doctoral students. Online students encounter unique challenges of dissertation completion resulting in faculty needing to provide diverse mentorship approaches. This presentation explores online doctoral students’ experiences and effective mentorship strategies that faculty can implement to overcome challenges associated with student research.

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Extended Abstract

Introduction

               Online education has increased in popularity over the last several decades. The advent of the internet and communication technologies have afforded students the opportunity to complete their entire programs of study in a completely virtual format. Allen et al. (2016) reported that approximately 5.8 million students completed their degrees completely online in fall 2014. The National Center for Education Statistics further reported that in fall 2018 there were close to 7 million students enrolled in distance education programs. Although online student growth has continued in an upward trend, faculty are not always adequately trained to mentor doctoral students in this learning modality. Indeed, Kumar and Johnson (2019) shared that faculty who teach and mentor online students typically have limited experience in these learning environments. Kumar and Coe (2017) also expressed the importance of identifying the unique challenges experienced by online learners and the strategies that are implemented to overcome them. Because doctoral students’ attrition rates for many programs of study is 50% (Young et al., 2019), understanding how to best support students in their dissertation research is vital for program completion.

Online Doctoral Mentorship

               Doctoral faculty are referred to as advisors, supervisors, and mentors as they guide students through the research process. Researchers have found that the faculty to dissertation student relationship is vital to degree completion and that it encompasses professional and psychosocial development and academic growth (Creighton et al., 2010; Hayes & Koro-Ljungberg, 2011). However, dissertation mentoring for on-ground students often looks very different than how faculty guide online students through the dissertation process. Particularly, online mentoring differs from face-to-face approaches due to factors of time and distance (Kumar & Coe, 2017). For example, Kumar and Johnson (2019) postulated that on-ground faculty provided learners research instruction and opportunities to observe how their mentor conducts studies. Although online learners could receive similar experiences, faculty need to be intentional in how they offer students additional research experiences and flexible in their approach to integrating students into their research activities. Further, faculty need to implement scaffolding to guide students through the research process and consider how to structure learning into practical chucks of information through online mentorship approaches. By implementing effective mentorship approaches, students are able to feel supported in their research and confident in their abilities to complete their studies. Students who receive positive mentorship experiences may also be more likely to persevere when faced with challenges in degree completion. However, Ensher et al., (2003) indicated that online mentoring can result in miscommunications, technical issues, and difficulties in relationship building. To promote student satisfaction in online settings, faculty need to determine how to utilize technology to promote research skills and develop relationships that are conducive to academic success.  

Educational Technologies

               Online mentors are able to employ a diverse range of technological resources to better support students as they progress through their programs of studies. Kumar et al. (2013) found that “successful online mentoring includes the flexible and effective use of multiple technologies” in order to “structure a dissertation experience that facilitates doctoral students’ learning, growth, and autonomy” (p. 9). Emerging technologies help to leverage student learning and enhance instructional practices. By incorporating diverse technologies into dissertation mentorship approaches, faculty are able to better support students via real-time through platforms that provide options for time management and to track goal task completion. For example, mentors can provide students online feedback opportunities in which they provide students edits and suggestions on their dissertations through cloud-based platforms. These types of technologies can allow for faculty to have immediate access to revised documents and for students to easily identify the most recent feedback provided by their mentor. Additional technologies that can be powerful in promoting dissertation progress and program satisfaction include screen sharing platforms, task management programs, personalized learning experiences. Technologies can also offer faculty to student interactions that are more personable and promote continual dissertation progress. Platforms such as Zoom and GoToMeeting allow for faculty to share their screens in order to guide students in their document revisions and record directed feedback on how to modify dissertation components. However, faculty should offer multiple communication options that include videoconferencing, email, and telephone and provide flexibility in meeting times that range from day to evening hours and weekends.

Support Systems

               Students who are completing the dissertation process need to feel that their mentors are dedicated to their success in their research endeavors and program completion. Researchers have found that relationship building components for faculty mentors include an organic environment and personal transformation (Rasheem et al., 2018); trust that results from feedback, consistency, and the development of personal connections (Rademaker et al., 2016); an understanding of social, academic, and emotional life balances and provide reassurance (McConnell et al., 2019); and availability of support services (e.g., institutional) (Rockinson-Szapkiw et al., 2016). Breitenbach et al. (2019) also shared that family, friends, and coworkers levels of support to dissertation students can significantly impact retention in their doctoral studies. Peer support from classmates can further impact dissertation student progress and program satisfaction (Tompkins et al., 2016). Because support systems are identified as a crucial aspect of doctoral student retention, faculty need to encourage their students to identify external (e.g., family members, friends, colleagues) and internal (e.g., program faculty, classmates) support systems that they can contact for further guidance as they progress through their students. These support systems can be particularly important as students complete their content coursework and embark on their dissertation research, which may be perceived as being a lonely and isolating process. 

Concluding Thoughts

Online enrollment will most likely continue to increase due to current events (e.g., COVID) and the accessibility and benefits these programs offer working professionals. However, approximately half of doctoral students do not earn their degrees (Gardner & Gopaul, 2012). To better support online learners, particularly dissertation students, faculty must place emphasis on how to promote effective and positive virtual mentorship experiences. Faculty need to be cognizant of the purpose of their communications with students and which tools may be most effective in supporting their academic and research endeavors. As a result of these interactions, students and faculty are able to develop shared goals and a continued commitment to degree completion. Emerging and innovative technologies provide faculty the unique opportunity to develop learning environments that are conducive to effective mentorship, scaffolding, and relationship building that are essential components that positively impact doctoral students’ program satisfaction and completion. Particularly, there are a plethora of online tools and technological resources that promote collaborative opportunities and facilitate online relationship building experiences. Providing students opportunities to connect with their mentor is essential in the development of relationships that promote scaffolding and guidance. As a result, this presentation will provide an overview of online doctoral programs, mentorship approaches for dissertation students, suggestions for overcoming challenges experienced with virtual doctoral learning, reflections from faculty who supervisor doctor students, and student feedback on their experiences in conducting dissertations in an online program.

Learning outcomes of the workshop include:

  1. Session participants will be introduced to approaches to dissertation research conducted in online programs.
  2. Session participants will discover the possibility of new mentorship strategies to use with their online learners.
  3. Session participants will receive recommendations on technological tools that can promote successful mentorship experiences and promote research skill development.   
  4. Session participants will discuss potential opportunities for overcoming challenges found in mentoring online students.

References

Allen, I. E., Seaman, J., Poulin, R. & Straut, T. T. (2016). Online report card: Tracking online education in the United States. Babson Survey Research Group. https://onlinelearningconsortium.org/read/online-report-card-trackingonline-education-united-states-2015/

Creighton, L., Creighton, T., & Parks, D. (2010). Mentoring to degree completion: Expanding the horizons of doctoral protégés. Mentoring and Tutoring: Partnership in Learning 18, (1), 39–52. https://doi.org/10.1080/13611260903448342

Ensher, E. A., Heun, C. & Blanchard, A. (2003). Online mentoring and computer-mediated communication: New directions in research. Journal of Vocational Behavior 63, 264–88. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0001-8791(03)00044-7

Gardner, S. K. (2009). The development of doctoral students: Phases of challenge and support. ASHE Higher Education Report, 34(6), 1-127. Jossey-Bass. https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ835648

Kumar, S. & Coe, C. (2017). Mentoring and student support in online doctoral programs. American Journal of Distance Education, 31(2), 128-142. https://doi-org.tcsedsystem.idm.oclc.org/10.1080/08923647.2017.1300464

Kumar, S. & Johnson, M. (2019). Online mentoring of dissertations: The role of structure and support. Studies in Higher Education, 44(1), 59-71. https://doi.org/10.1080/03075079.2017.1337736

Kumar, S., Johnson, M., & Hardemon, T. Dissertations at a distance: Students’ perceptions of online mentoring in a doctoral program. International Journal of E-Learning & Distance Education, 27(1), 1-10. http://www.ijede.ca/index.php/jde/article/view/835/1481

McConnell, K., Geesa, R. L., & Lowery, K. (2019). Self-reflective mentoring: Perspectives of peer mentors in an education doctoral program. International Journal of Mentoring and Coaching in Education, 8(2), 86-101. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJMCE-07-2018-0043

National Center for Education Statistics (n.d.). Distance learning. https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=80

Rademaker, L. L., O’Connor, J., Wetzler, E., & Zaikina-Montgomery, H. (2016). Chair perceptions of trust between mentor and mentee in online doctoral dissertation mentoring. Online Learning, 20(1), 57-69.

Rasheem, S., Alleman, A., Mushonga, D., Anderson, D., & Vakalahi, H. F. (2018). Mentor-shape: Exploring the mentorship relationships of Black women in doctoral programs. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership in Learning, 26(1), 50-69. https://doi.org/10.1080/13611267.2018.1445443

Rockinson-Szapkiw, A. J., Spaulding, L. C., & Spaulding, M. T. (2016). Identifying significant integration and institutional factors that predict online doctoral persistence. The Internet and Higher Education, 31, 101-112. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2016.07.003

Tompkins, K. A., Brecht, K., Tucker, B., Neander, L. L., & Swift, J. K. (2016). Who matters most? The contribution of faculty, student peers, and outside support in predicting graduate student satisfaction. Training and Education in Professional Psychology, 10(2), 102-108. https://psycnet.apa.org/doi/10.1037/tep0000115

Young, S. N., Vanwye, W. R., Schafer, M. A., Robertson, T. A. & Poore, A. V. (2019). Factors affecting PhD student success. International Journal of Exercise Science, 12(1), 34-45.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
PSPP - A Basic Tutorial | Discovery Session

PSPP is a free alternative to SPSS, created by the Free Software Foundation. It includes many, but not all, of the features found in SPSS. This tutorial includes a subset of the 2018 General Social Survey (GSS) for use in conjunction with the software.

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Extended Abstract

PSPP is a statistical analysis program made available at no charge to users by the Free Software Foundation. There are two versions: the “syntax” version and the less comprehensive but more user-friendly GUI (Graphic User Interface) version. This tutorial, written primarily for beginning students, describes the GUI version.

PSPP is similar to SPSS. SPSS (officially IBM SPSS Statistics) has, through many iterations and over many years, served as a widely used standard for analyzing quantitative data. The name “SPSS” originally stood for “Statistical Package for the Social Sciences.” So successful was it, that it was widely adopted in business and other fields outside social science. Eventually it became known simply by its initials (just as many people refer to “IBM” without knowing, or caring, that these initials originally referred to “International Business Machines.”)

The authors of this tutorial have used SPSS in their teaching and research, and continue to consider it extremely useful. It has become increasingly so for undergraduate instruction as, over time, it has become much more user-friendly, so that even students with no background in statistical analysis can master it as part of a single introductory research methods or statistics course. It has also added more and more features, notably including the ability to produce a wide range of graphs.

Despite its many advantages, one thing that SPSS is not is free. As of this writing, the cost of a base subscription to SPSS starts at $99 per month! This need not trouble you if you are a student at a college or university that has purchased a site license. Even if this is not the case, you can obtain a special version available only to faculty and students at a deep discount. But still not free. (Check Amazon.com or other vendors for details.)

In this tutorial, we’ll be using a subset of the 2018 General Social Survey (GSS) for use in conjunction with the software. The GSS is a biannual national survey conducted by the National Opinion Research Center, and used for teaching and research in a variety of disciplines since 1972. We’ve created a subset of the 2018 survey. A version that can be read by PSPP can be downloaded here.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Serious Process Management Issues in the OPM-University Business Model | Discovery Session

This session will cover the results of a Case Study on a business partnership between an Online Program Management Provider and a Research University. It will discuss and present the problems in process management during this partnership that caused a negative impact on faculty motivation to participate in the instructional design process and to teach online. This session will suggest the best practices for this partnership.

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Extended Abstract

Online instructors face new pedagogical issues surrounding student interactions, course design and delivery, multiple levels of communication, new assignment types, performance expectations, assessments, and evaluation techniques that necessitate adaptations in their teaching practices (Bonwell & Eison, 1991; Boling et al., 2012). Additionally, a persona change occurs when a faculty member transitions from face-to-face instruction to online classrooms (Phillips, 2008). Online course development contexts can, therefore, offer powerful opportunities for faculty development and pedagogy improvement.

Universities launching online programs often train faculty via Faculty Development staff, in-house Instructional Design and Technology staff, or by outsourcing to third-party vendors known as Online Program Management providers (OPM’s) that specialize in developing and implementing online programs. Institutions also use Instructional Designers (ID's), or learning design experts who can significantly support faculty in developing online courses through training and consultations (You, 2010). Faculty teaching an online program must work closely with the OPM provider and their ID staff (Riter, 2017; InsideHigherEd.com, 2019). Using ID’s for creating online courses or converting courses into online format may cause faculty to rethink their roles as teachers and maximize student learning. ID’s, therefore, play a critical role in facilitating faculty change and motivation to implement good teaching (Holsombach-Ebner, 2013). 

OPM providers are generally for-profit companies that partner with educational institutions to offer academic programs. The OPM provider invests some or all of the necessary capital upfront to create infrastructure for an online program and also provides various related services in exchange for a percentage of the program’s revenue (Springer, 2018). OPM providers offer help in four core service areas: market/lead generation, enrollment management, student services, and course development and delivery (Springer, 2018). For universities, the most important aspects of the partnership are the promise of building high-quality courses and receiving thoughtful instructional design support for their faculty (InsideHigherEd.com, 2019; Riter, 2017). 

A review of the literature indicates that most OPM providers do not have economic sources or expertise to tailor instructional design services for a particular institution, program, or course, and therefore maintain only a small number of instructional design staff because tailoring their approach to a particular institution does not benefit the underlying economic arrangement (InsideHigherEd.com, 2019). From the OPM perspective, student enrollment in online programs takes higher priority to instructional design; hence most of their resources go into marketing rather than into designing highly effective online programs. 

However, low effectiveness in the course design process can be reflected in lower completion rates and reduced student satisfaction (Bawa, 2016; Hone & Said, 2016; Educause.edu, 2010). No studies have shown how OPM provided instructional designers work with faculty to design and develop online courses and whether these collaborations have an effect (positive or negative) on faculty motivation and attitudes regarding what it takes to effectively teach online. No studies yet have shown the best practices for handling this business partnership.

This research study analyzes the OPM-University Business model and how the two institutions meet and manage this entire process to designing and developing online courses and help in faculty development. The findings can provide insights for college administrators (including strategic planners, provosts, directors for online learning programs, etc), faculty, OPM provider managers, and instructional designers on building this relationship in ways that optimize faculty development of pedagogical and technological knowledge. 

In addressing research quality, I conducted an analysis of my literature review sources to determine citation quality and thoroughness. See Analysis of the “Scholarliness” value of the Literature Review.

This research uses an interpretive case study methodology to examine a private research university’s partnership with an OPM provider to develop online master’s degree programs, with the outsourcing of instructional design services to an Instructional Design Firm (IDF). The primary data sources come from interviews, participant observations, and documents from the OPM, the IDF, and the institution. For anonymity purposes, the names of the organizations participating in this study have not been disclosed. 

The study uses the Activity Theory (AT) as a framework to describe and analyze the complex work/activity system involved in developing online courses. AT is an umbrella term for a range of social science theories and research originating from Soviet psychological activity theory pioneered by Lev Vygotsky, Alexei Leont'ev, and Sergei Rubinstein (Cole & Engeström, 1993). It is widely used in theoretical and applied psychology, education, professional training, ergonomics, social psychology, and work psychology. AT is specifically useful in qualitative research methodologies (e.g., ethnography, case study) in providing a method of analyzing and understanding a phenomenon; finding patterns and making inferences across interactions; and describing and presenting phenomena through a built-in language and rhetoric. AT offers an external perspective on human practices. It is a descriptive meta-theory or framework rather than a predictive theory (Engeström, 1999). An activity cannot be understood or analyzed outside the context of which it occurs. The components of any activity are organized into activity systems. See Figure 1 below.

Figure 1. Engeström’s (1999) model of an activity system. Source: (Engeström, 1999)

 

AT is well suited to the discovery and sense-making nature of this study (See Figure 2). According to Bradford et al. (2011), AT is a good framework for an organizational self-evaluation of its “technology-enhanced learning” (TEL) or online learning practices. In adjusting the model to the case of faculty and their teaching practices when launching online programs via a business relationship, the faculty becomes the subject with teaching as an object of active learning with an outcome target of new competencies. The resulting model incorporates key actors’ roles in making an impact on faculty approaches to teaching design (See Figure 2 below). 

Figure 2. Activity System context for the RU (Research University--->R University) and OPM (Online Program Management Provider) business partnership with outsourced Instructional Design Firm (IDF)

 

Using AT, I looked at a complex system that integrates and captures the dynamics of the interactions between multiple levels – from the leadership of both the OPM and institution, to project management and the staff involved in that, to the ID faculty interactions, as well as multiple processes including the selection of the IDF, the dynamics of communication and collaboration between IDs and faculty, and between faculty and department and institutional leadership, etc. The literature does not include a study that uses AT to analyze this kind of system.

 

Session Outcomes

The presenter/researcher will share all the important themes that emerged from this study that will be helpful for all faculty, instructional designers, academic administrators, OPM managers, and design thinkers. These themes will also be shared on the screen via voicethread. The format of this session is an asynchronous conversation rather than a formal presentation. The presenter will be putting results and ideas out that would invite questions and commentary. The following steps will be followed

Think Assertion

Evidence

Commentary 

 

Learning Outcomes for the audience

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

Identify the complexities of an OPM-University Institutional process 

Analyze implications for implementing and managing work with an OPM

Use implications/best practices learned from this study when involved in this business model

 

References:

List of References for this proposal

 

List of Figures (in case if you cannot view the above figures correctly)

List of Figures

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. CC BY

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The Modern Age of Professional Development: Virtual PD in K-12 and Higher Education | Discovery Session

Virtual professional development has become a common practice in K-12 and higher education to continue the advancement of employee learning while also maintaining teacher health and safety through social distancing. This presentation seeks to explore how the innovations in virtual meeting spaces can provide increased engagement, professional growth, and efficiency.

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Extended Abstract

Introduction

               Life-long learning is a required component of the teaching profession (Sharma & Singh Pandher, 2018). However, as our way of life continues to be impacted from the global COVID-19 pandemic, so too does the world of education. Simultaneously, as the methods that students are now learning and engaging with their peers are changing, so too are the approaches that school leadership must take to provide professional development to their teachers. Virtual professional development has become a common practice in schools and organizations in order to continue the advancement of employee learning while also maintaining staff health and safety through social distancing. While educators and leaders might initially express concerns with professional development held remotely, innovations in virtual meeting spaces have actually provided the opportunity for increased engagement, professional growth, and efficiency. Whether it be consistent professional learning community meetings or semester or yearly training from an outside expert, virtual professional development is most effective through the use of an appropriate online platform, timely planning, engaged participants, and prepared presenters.

Long-Term School or District Plans

               Under the current pandemic, Joseph (2020) stressed the need for school districts to create long-term virtual professional development plans in order to benefit educators during this time of uncertainty, anxiety, and upheaval. School leadership is tasked with providing their staff a sense of confidence in their skills and abilities to manage these changes, oftentimes including the ability to teach in a completely new environment. Consequently, the original goals and needs of professional development may have shifted. Joseph (2020) recommended that in order to develop a long-range professional development (PD) schedule, educational leaders ask themselves:

  1. What are the session goals?
  2. Are the topics aligned with the district’s vision and goals?
  3. Who is the target audience for each session?
  4. How does this training align with existing PD opportunities?
  5. Who can I invite to facilitate or co-present?
  6. How often, and by whom, will follow-up be provided?

In addition to Joseph’s (2020) questions, funding may be an additional concern when evaluating potential virtual PD experiences for staff. Therefore, school leadership may need to be more creative in terms of the type of PD that is offered in the 2020-2021 academic year. For example, instead of outside sources being funded, teachers may need to collaborate to provide training to one another on topics that they are more experienced or skilled in. Primarily, teachers who are skilled in technology may need to take more leadership roles this year in providing PD training to their peers in times of budget cuts and increased pressure on teachers to provide more technology and accessibility to all students in the virtual classroom.

Prepare a Professional Presentation Environment

At this point, we have probably all been on a virtual meeting with an unprepared or struggling presenter. And with the almost overnight shift from in person to Zoom meetings, we might have even been that unprepared speaker! After one specific training presentation where Aubrey felt the web camera built into her laptop was no longer sufficient, it took an additional purchase of an attachable camera for her to feel more comfortable presenting in a virtual meeting space. One primary component of virtual PD is the creation of a professional presentation environment.

In addition to having the necessary tools in place, including a capable webcammer, this environment actually relies on the role of an engaging speaker who is prepared to deliver content in the virtual environment. It is important to note, that presenting in a virtual meeting space is not the equivalent to presenting in person. The speaker must be prepared to look at a camera generally the size of a pinpoint, while also running their slides, viewing their notes if needed, and often checking the meeting space chat feature for questions from participants. Therefore, it is important that if an outside source is hired for PD, they are well prepared and experienced with presenting in the virtual environment. If the PD speaker is going to be an in-house facilitator, the teacher should be willing to spend additional time preparing for the training and should be aware that facilitating a virtual PD experience will probably feel very different than teaching in a face-to-face classroom. For example, the Zoom blog recommends avoiding robotic monologues by practicing the material that is going to be delivered, even including the speaking rate. Interestingly, Zoom noted that the conventional science behind public speaking indicates that presenters should speak at roughly 120 words per minute (Zoom, 2020).

Joseph (2020) also noted the importance of having a moderator, notetaker, small group facilitators, and timekeepers prepared for each PD meeting. Further, technical support should also be available to troubleshoot for participants who are unable to connect to a meeting or utilize all features of a virtual meeting space. In a recent PD training we were a part of, all participants were provided the same Zoom log-in link yet only about 15 of the 50 participants were able to initially log-in to the meeting. Therefore, immediate troubleshooting needed to take in place in order to manually enter students into the training.

Lastly, in order to establish a professional learning environment, participants should be reminded at the beginning of a meeting, as well as throughout the call if necessary, to put themselves on mute when not speaking in order to avoid distracting background noises or unintended commentary. Further, features in meeting spaces such as Zoom can be utilized to provide background noise suppression. In fact, according to Zoom at the highest suppression feature, the sounds of barking dogs and kids playing in the background nearly disappear during important presentations and meetings (Hill, 2020). Also, participants should be reminded of the importance of turning their cameras on in order to demonstrate interest in the presentation as well as professional dress and behavior during the PD experience.

Creating Engagement

               The most significant potential drawback of virtual PD is a lack of engagement from the participants. Audience members may be more tempted to multi-task by checking e-mail, grading papers, or scrolling through social media. Hence, to hold the attention and interest of PD participants, session presenters and organizers should make the most of virtual meeting space features in order to create engagement. For example, filters, reactions, video overlays, and virtual backgrounds all allow presenters and speakers to engage with one another through fun, creative, and meaningful ways (Hill, 2020). Additionally, at a recent three-day PD training held via Zoom, we utilized the chat function during various presentations. This feature not only allowed the speaker to continue to present without interruptions, but also enabled and engaged the audience to provide feedback to the topics being discussed, to interact with one another, and to ask questions. We found that having one or two facilitators monitor the chat feature was beneficial in assisting the speaker to be able to still focus on the content of their presentation while continuing to create engagement through chat with our participants. In addition to chat, in our experiences of PD for adult learners, many of them teachers, we have found that quick ice breakers as well as team games were effective in creating engagement. These tools allow meeting participants to get to know one another and also explore the material of a professional development training.

Concluding Thoughts

Research specific to PD indicates that educators should regularly conduct self-assessment and self-reflection in order to determine their commitment to the profession (Sharma & Singh Pandher, 2018). Further, Sharma and Singh Pandher (2018) posited in their study that in performing these times of self-reflection, teachers should also use these professional exercises to develop creative problem-solving approaches with their students by providing challenging learning activities for their learners to address and grow through. In the same manner, educational leaders currently have the opportunity to demonstrate innovative problem-solving for the unprecedented challenges being faced during COVID-19 and the era of social distancing, including how to create life-long learning and necessary, yet engaging PD training for educators during a global pandemic. Therefore, through planning, creativity, and an assessment of long-term goals, school leaders can effectively provide PD to their teachers and staff through the innovative means of virtual meeting spaces.

Learning outcomes of the workshop include:

  1. Session participants will be introduced to strategies to streamline virtual functionality and interaction with audience.
  2. Session participants will discover the possibility of tools and platforms to enhance virtual interaction and audience engagement
  3. Session participants will receive recommendations on virtual activities best suited to audience age and setting: K-12, Higher Education, or Professional Workplace.  
  4. Session participants will discuss potential opportunities for expanding upon current virtual meeting practices and reworking processes to optimize desired outcomes.

References

Hill, J. (2020, August 4). Filters, reactions, lighting & more! New features to liven up your meetings.

Zoom Blog. Retrieved from https://blog.zoom.us/filters-reactions-lighting-features-zoom-meetings/.

Joseph, M. X. (2020, April 29). Strategies for virtual professional development. Tech&Learning. Retrieved

from https://www.techlearning.com/news/strategies-for-virtual-professional-development.

Sharma, P. & Singh Pandher, J. S. (2018). Teachers’ professional development through teachers’

professional activities. Journal of Workplace Learning, 30(8), 613-625.

Zoom. (2014, August 19). 6 Keys to delivering information in Zoom video webinars. Zoom Blog.

Retrieved from https://blog.zoom.us/5-keys-deliver-info-zoom-webinar/.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Teams-work Makes the Discussion Dream Work: Microsoft Teams as an Online Learning Communication Solution | Discovery Session

Online education and learning environments struggle with students feeling isolated from their instructors. The discrepancy between student engagements with online materials and the achievement of learning outcomes has also been problematic. The authors will be attempting to apply the use of a novel communication tool and building an Online Community.

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Extended Abstract

Online education and learning environments historically struggle with students feeling isolated or distant from their instructors, colleagues, and the material. Various mitigations have been considered and applied to varying degrees of success like:

1.    Text-based discussions forums

2.    Voice-based discussion forums

3.    Synchronous video conferencing

4.    SMS group chats, and others

The discrepancy between student engagement with online materials and learning outcomes has also been problematic, with some research demonstrating an improvement in assessments, but no impact on achieving learning outcomes. Discussion forums, likely the most ubiquitous form of online student-student interaction, do not entirely mitigate struggles with class engagement. However, highly structured and guided discussion forum prompts and posts from students appear to lead to better demonstrations of content mastery and critical thinking. Research has also shown that more organic, conversational interactions can lead to higher levels of reinforcement of previously acquired knowledge and improve social presence. This leads to a stronger sense of community, agency, and a more personalized sense of learning. Current research on the application of social networks strongly points to the high value of social interaction as an indicator of academic performance.

In the current study, the authors will apply the use of a novel communication tool (Microsoft Teams) to create a fully online learning environment in an attempt to address concerns and pitfalls pointed out in the literature. We plan to shorten the transactional distance by providing an online space that is social, building a Community of Inquiry Framework that allows for a space to improve teacher-student, student-student, and student-content interactions, and serves as a “home” outside a learning management system.

   
Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Template for Online Collaborative Professional Development | Graduate Student Discovery Session

This discovery session will demonstrate theory-guided online teacher professional development course template. We will engage participants in exploring affordances of online and blended instructional modalities for pedagogical purposes. Participants will walk away with a template and several practical examples for implementing sociocultural practices within an online environment.

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Extended Abstract

Background

Across the world, educators argue for a need to accelerate learning through the use of effective online practices enabled by quality technology-mediated instruction, where students can actively engage in learning on demand and at their pace. While online approaches proliferate and the quality of the content may be strong, the quality of the pedagogy is variable. A fundamental issue is that there is no comprehensive theory guiding the pedagogy of online instruction that attends to learner-centered collaborative practices.

Educators understand the importance of developing virtual communities of practice in supporting deep and meaningful learning (Garrison, 2017) and the critical role different types of interaction play in this process (Anderson, 2004). Researchers have identified critical types of knowledge needed by a teacher for effective technology integration (Koehler, Mishra, Kereluik, Shin, & Graham, 2014) and others recognize the importance of using best practices for online learning (Keengwe, Onchwari, & Agamba, 2014). As designers explore online learning from these perspectives, they utilize tools and activities that enact these practices. However, careful consideration of the experience of the learner in a specific context is often neglected. When tools and instructional strategies are utilized in an eclectic manner, they are often abstracted from their underlying theory and are void of pedagogy, potentially resulting in being stripped of their original meaning and utility. For example, a designer may use a discussion board to increase interaction but may fail to theoretically and pedagogically attend to orchestrating students’ strengths and needs, the content being taught and the particular context. Based on this information, they could have selected other appropriate technological tools and strategies to increase the efficiency of the learning experience, such as synchronous video discussion or guided instructional conversation. This intentional and strategic selection of tools and activities to optimize the learning potential of every student is referred to as pedagogy. While in this paper we use the term pedagogy, we recognize that the term andragogy may be more appropriate in situations where adult learners are involved. Although Vygotsky’s sociocultural theory of learning (1978, 1986) is the main theory framing our ideas, since adult educators are involved we also rely on principles of Mezirow’s theory of transformative learning (1991).

Indeed, much remains to be uncovered about effective pedagogy and the successful deployment of affordances in online and blended learning environments. As Ertmer & Ottenbreit-Leftwich (2013) (2013) states: “Technology integration is no longer an isolated goal to be achieved separately from pedagogical goals, but simply the means by which students engage in relevant and meaningful …work. The call for pedagogical rather than a technological goal is not new” (p. 175). This argues for designing technological integration with at least as much attention to the pedagogical interactions as there is to the technological tools being used. Learner-centered collaborative practices grounded in the sociocultural theory of learning empower educators in a traditional classroom and provide powerful tools for differentiated instruction that are both supportive and engaging (Reusser & Pauli, 2015). Frequent interaction, guided collaboration and active facilitation in support of reflective practice and deeper understanding create successful learning conditions in many teacher education and professional development courses (Desimone, 2009).  As designers work to bring these practices into online and blended instructional environments, they must attend to the strengths of online/blended instructional modalities, affordances of online collaborative tools and the pedagogical orchestration that will promote the kind of powerful learning that sociocultural education can provide. To do this instructional designers and educators must attend to the technological modification and supports that will provide optimum learning environments leading to more meaningful exchanges that embed learning in authentic tasks and support participation in communities of practice (Bonk & Cunningham, 1998).

Constructing online teaching environments may require somewhat different pedagogy from that of a face-to-face classroom in order to provide similar opportunities for learning and engagement. Even though a similar design and instructional principles apply regardless of whether the learning modality is face-to-face, blended or online, it is critical to design instruction with the end in mind, carefully considering learning objectives, determine acceptable evidence of learning and identify purposes of learning activities. Based on this knowledge, we can apply principles of effective pedagogy grounded in current understanding of learning and purposefully utilize affordances of the online medium and related collaborative tools.

The purpose of the presentation

Within this presentation, we will demonstrate ways in which theoretical and pedagogical considerations and technological analysis guided our construction of an online teacher professional development course. Based on the analysis of these three concerns, we intentionally selected and modified online pedagogical tools and practices to engage students more effectively in an online learning environment that more fundamentally represented sociocultural learning experiences. Our design attempted to create affordances for experiential learning that was both dialogic and reflective. In our design process, we utilized the principles of backward design (Wiggins & McTighe, 2005), Anderson’s theory of online learning (2004) and the sociocultural instructional strategies of modelling, coaching, scaffolding and fading, questioning, articulation, exploration and reflection as informed by merging Tharp and Gallimore’s Assisted Learning model (1988) with the Cognitive Apprenticeship model (Dennen, 2004). In designing specific learning activities, we were especially cognizant of engaging students in joint productive activities, focusing on language and literacy development, contextualizing, providing cognitive challenge and using instructional conversation (Dalton, 1998).

Description of the presentation

This interactive discovery session will present a template that was used to develop online learning events. Participants will analyze the learning events using a provided rubric, which was used by course designers to attend to the complex integration of theory, pedagogy and technology in designing online learning events. The session will focus on how sociocultural practices combined with the strengths of online/blended modalities provide support for both educators and learners in creating more individualized and meaningful learning. Initially, we will explain the template we developed from simultaneous consideration of theory, pedagogy and technology. We will then engage the audience by having them analyze a learning event. The audience and presenters will work together to unpack the ways in which the template and learning event attend to the integration of theory, pedagogy and technology. Participants will consider how the design and practices enable students to engage in deep and meaningful learning experiences. Participants will walk away with a template and several practical examples for implementing sociocultural practices within an online environment.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The Impact of Laboratory Exercises in Achieving ULOs in Online Astronomy Classes | Discovery Session

Fully online classes use simulated labs in an attempt to provide a traditional learning component in the online classroom and help students actively engage in the learning process. This session will discuss the impact of online lab exercises in enhancing student understanding of core concepts taught in Introductory Astronomy courses. 

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Extended Abstract

Even before the COVID-19 global pandemic emerged as a potential watershed moment in higher education, debate has raged over the effectiveness of online versus face to face learning experiences. The literature largely supports similar learning outcome achievements between virtual and traditional classrooms, although student perception of instructors and course quality is often higher for traditional face-to-face classrooms (Johnson, 2000). Similarly, comparisons have shown no statistical difference in achievement of learning outcomes regardless of face-to-face, hybrid, or fully online delivery (Lovern, 2010). Specific studies have further focused on the learning impacts of virtual versus hands-on laboratory experiences (see (Darrah, 2014), (Corter, 2011), and (Brinson, 2015)); studies have shown that virtual is as effective as hands-on learning experiences, if not more effective in some situations. However, previous studies often examined virtual laboratories conducted in a university laboratory setting, not in a truly remote, fully online learning experience.

Our study seeks to add to the body of STEM education knowledge by expanding on previous work in two key areas. First, we wish to examine in more detail the contribution of a laboratory to mastery of theoretical concepts in online learning. Secondly, we are comparing essentially the same course: the only difference is whether the course contains additional content for a laboratory experience. With this foundation in mind, we are interested in determining the impact the presence or absence of a virtual laboratory experience has on achievement of student mastery of course concepts. In other words, rather than studying the impact of lab format, we wish to see the contribution of a laboratory in general. As the literature indicated no direct correlation to this question, we designed our own study focused on this research premise:

Hypothesis: Including simulated laboratory exercises in online Introductory Astronomy classes increases student mastery of core concepts taught in the class, thus enhancing the learning experience.

Question 1: Does the inclusion of online laboratory exercises significantly increase student mastery of core concepts?

Question 2: Do online laboratory exercises increase perceived student mastery of core concepts, as reported by the students?

Question 3: Do online laboratory exercises increase student enjoyment of a class?

This study evaluated student mastery of core concepts in the Introductory Astronomy classes which include online laboratory exercises compared with classes which do not include a laboratory experience. The study focuses on student outcomes from two courses, completely identical in scope and sequence; the only difference between them is the inclusion of online laboratory exercises in one course. Students in both classes completed a 15 question anonymous online quiz during the first and last weeks of class. The results were analyzed statistically in order to determine if there is a demonstrable increase in mastery of the concepts tested in the courses that include the laboratory exercises. Students in the course with simulated laboratory exercises also completed an online Likert-style exit survey for the course to evaluate student enjoyment and perceived benefits of doing the labs.

We will present results from 9 months of study, representing multiple independent course offerings. Preliminary results indicate both qualitative and quantitative support for simulated labs facilitating better student mastery of course outcomes when compared to the absence of a laboratory experience. We believe the results of our study contribute to a better understanding of the role and effectiveness of virtual laboratories in STEM education in terms of both achievement of learning outcomes as well as student satisfaction. During this session we hope to facilitate a discussion focused on the role and impact of simulated laboratory exercises in online STEM education as well as share lessons learned from using various simulation tools. The focus will be on student attainment of learning outcomes as well as course satisfaction rather than a comparison of simulations or vendors.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Outsourcing Instructional Design loses its effectiveness in the OPM-University Business Model | Discovery Session

This session will cover the results of a Case Study on a business partnership between an Online Program Management Provider and a Research University. It will discuss and present the problems and concerns arising when the instructional design services are outsourced in the OPM-University model and will suggest best practices for such a partnership.

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Extended Abstract

Online instructors face new pedagogical issues surrounding student interactions, course design and delivery, multiple levels of communication, new assignment types, performance expectations, assessments, and evaluation techniques that necessitate adaptations in their teaching practices (Bonwell & Eison, 1991; Boling et al., 2012). Additionally, a persona change occurs when a faculty member transitions from face-to-face instruction to online classrooms (Phillips, 2008). Online course development contexts can, therefore, offer powerful opportunities for faculty development and pedagogy improvement.

Universities launching online programs often train faculty via Faculty Development staff, in-house Instructional Design and Technology staff, or by outsourcing to third-party vendors known as Online Program Management providers (OPM’s) that specialize in developing and implementing online programs. Institutions also use Instructional Designers (ID's), or learning design experts who can significantly support faculty in developing online courses through training and consultations (You, 2010). Faculty teaching an online program must work closely with the OPM provider and their ID staff (Riter, 2017; InsideHigherEd.com, 2019). Using ID’s for creating online courses or converting courses into online format may cause faculty to rethink their roles as teachers and maximize student learning. ID’s, therefore, play a critical role in facilitating faculty change and motivation to implement good teaching (Holsombach-Ebner, 2013). 

OPM providers are generally for-profit companies that partner with educational institutions to offer academic programs. The OPM provider invests some or all of the necessary capital upfront to create infrastructure for an online program and also provides various related services in exchange for a percentage of the program’s revenue (Springer, 2018). OPM providers offer help in four core service areas: market/lead generation, enrollment management, student services, and course development and delivery (Springer, 2018). For universities, the most important aspects of the partnership are the promise of building high-quality courses and receiving thoughtful instructional design support for their faculty (InsideHigherEd.com, 2019; Riter, 2017). 

A review of the literature indicates that most OPM providers do not have economic sources or expertise to tailor instructional design services for a particular institution, program, or course, and therefore maintain only a small number of instructional design staff because tailoring their approach to a particular institution does not benefit the underlying economic arrangement (InsideHigherEd.com, 2019). From the OPM perspective, student enrollment in online programs takes higher priority to instructional design; hence most of their resources go into marketing rather than into designing highly effective online programs. However, low effectiveness in the course design process can be reflected in lower completion rates and reduced student satisfaction (Bawa, 2016; Hone & Said, 2016; Educause.edu, 2010). No studies have shown how OPM provided instructional designers work with faculty to design and develop online courses and whether these collaborations have an effect (positive or negative) on faculty motivation and attitudes regarding what it takes to effectively teach online. No studies yet have shown the best practices for handling this business partnership.

This research study analyzes the OPM-University Business model and how the two institutions meet and manage this entire process of designing and developing online courses and help in faculty development keeping the Instructional Design services outsourced to a third-party vendor. This third-party vendor for Instructional Design services is brought/provided by the OPM. The findings can provide insights for college administrators (including strategic planners, provosts, directors for online learning programs, etc), faculty, OPM provider managers, and instructional designers on building this relationship in ways that optimize faculty development of pedagogical and technological knowledge. 

In addressing research quality, I conducted an analysis of my literature review sources to determine citation quality and thoroughness. See Analysis of the “Scholarliness” value of the Literature Review.

This research uses an interpretive case study methodology to examine a private research university’s partnership with an OPM provider to develop online master’s degree programs, with the outsourcing of instructional design services to an Instructional Design Firm (IDF). The primary data sources come from interviews, participant observations, and documents from the OPM, the IDF, and the institution. For anonymity purposes, the names of the organizations participating in this study have not been disclosed. 

The study uses the Activity Theory (AT) as a framework to describe and analyze the complex work/activity system involved in developing online courses. AT is an umbrella term for a range of social science theories and research originating from Soviet psychological activity theory pioneered by Lev Vygotsky, Alexei Leont'ev, and Sergei Rubinstein (Cole & Engeström, 1993). It is widely used in theoretical and applied psychology, education, professional training, ergonomics, social psychology, and work psychology. AT is specifically useful in qualitative research methodologies (e.g., ethnography, case study) in providing a method of analyzing and understanding a phenomenon; finding patterns and making inferences across interactions; and describing and presenting phenomena through a built-in language and rhetoric. AT offers an external perspective on human practices. It is a descriptive meta-theory or framework rather than a predictive theory (Engeström, 1999). An activity cannot be understood or analyzed outside the context of which it occurs. The components of any activity are organized into activity systems. See Figure 1 below.

 

Figure 1. Engeström’s (1999) model of an activity system. Source: (Engeström, 1999)

AT is well suited to the discovery and sense-making nature of this study (See Figure 2). According to Bradford et al. (2011), AT is a good framework for an organizational self-evaluation of its “technology-enhanced learning” (TEL) or online learning practices. In adjusting the model to the case of faculty and their teaching practices when launching online programs via a business relationship, the faculty becomes the subject with teaching as an object of active learning with an outcome target of new competencies. The resulting model incorporates key actors’ roles in making an impact on faculty approaches to teaching design (See Figure 2 below). 

Figure 2. Activity System context for the RU (Research University--->R University) and OPM (Online Program Management Provider) business partnership with outsourced Instructional Design Firm (IDF)

 

Using AT, I looked at a complex system that integrates and captures the dynamics of the interactions between multiple levels – from the leadership of both the OPM and institution, to project management and the staff involved in that, to the ID faculty interactions, as well as multiple processes including the selection of the IDF, the dynamics of communication and collaboration between IDs and faculty, and between faculty and department and institutional leadership, etc. The literature does not include a study that uses AT to analyze this kind of system.

Session Outcomes

The presenter/researcher will share all the important themes that emerged from this study that will be helpful for all faculty, instructional designers, academic administrators, OPM managers, and design thinkers. These themes will also be shared on the screen via voicethread. The format of this session is an asynchronous conversation rather than a formal presentation. The presenter will be putting results and ideas out that would invite questions and commentary. The following steps will be followed

Think Assertion

Evidence

Commentary 

Learning Outcomes for the audience

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

Identify the complexities of outsourcing Instructional Design services in an OPM-University business model

Analyze implications for implementing and managing work with an OPM when the Instructional Design services are outsourced. 

Use implications/best practices learned from this study when involved in this business model

 

References:

List of References for this proposal

 

List of Figures (in case if you cannot view the above figures correctly)

List of Figures

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. CC BY

 

 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The Rapid Transition and Growth of Poll Everywhere at Stanford: Onboarding Faculty with Live Polling and Active Learning Pedagogies | Discovery Session

Drawing upon his broad experience, administering Poll Everywhere accounts at Stanford University and consulting with individual faculty in Human Biology—Carlos Seligo will share a case study and best practices for faculty to promote active learning among students and collaboration among colleagues, during our rapid transition to online teaching.

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Extended Abstract

Carlos Seligo is the Admin for Poll Everywhere at Stanford University’s Center for Teaching and Learning and the Academic Technology Specialist for the Program in Human Biology.  During the rapid transition to teaching online he has offered workshops and one-on-one consultations on active learning with Poll Everywhere and Zoom.  Because of his dual role, he has both the 10,000 foot view of the challenges facing higher education and the boots-on-the-ground point-of-view from working closely with individual faculty, some of which have never taught online before nor even experimented in the classroom with technology or new active learning pedagogies.  

Carlos will begin his presentation with a case study from the Human Biology program, where three faculty team-taught the end-of-quarter Fall review, by asking students to problem solve what they would need—everything from the genetic toolkit to the Pleistocene ecosystem—in order to de-extinguish the wooly mammoth. Using Poll Everywhere to crowd-source solutions to each problem, the faculty asked a lecture hall full of ~150 students: what challenges would researchers face adapting CRISPR or cloning to create a viable embryo? If Asiatic elephants were the best surrogate mother, how would they find them in the numbers necessary to achieve a successful birth? How many mammoths would we need for a viable herd? What institutions could protect this herd and the arctic taiga, long enough for the mammoths to survive and reproduce? All students responded to the polls but some students also volunteered and were called upon to explain the details out loud in the lecture hall, so they were both collectively and individually engaged with the subject matter. More importantly, they were more engaged than they would be in an abstract review of the scientific methodologies and subject matter, because of the concrete ethical and environmental issues at stake.  

Though this Fall review was technically-mediated it was still in-person learning—but what a different challenge faculty face now that they must do all of this entirely online!  Fortunately, Poll Everywhere can be embedded in slide decks and screen shared with Zoom and live polling can break up the monotony of long lectures.  Students can still be engaged in crowd-sourced problem solving, where answers to problems are shown anonymously on screen, but individual student responses can also be automatically scored, with multiple choice and clickable image polls, to provide the kind of low-stakes, iterative testing faculty are being encourage to use now instead of the traditional timed and graded mid-term and final exams.  Once integrated with an LMS like Canvas, these scores can also be uploaded to the gradebook through a spreadsheet or automatically recorded. 

As more than 1000 new Poll Everywhere accounts were added since March, Carlos will share some of the challenges he faced as the admin of the campus-wide site license.  He has broad experience with onboarding new faculty and graduate students and will offer tips to take advantage of their PollEv Presenter account.  Even those with little to no experience with new technology and pedagogy can be persuaded to innovate, now that they must teach online, but they need to learn the easy and more rewarding methods first.  For faculty who have more experience, how can they be persuaded to experiment with PollEv’s more advanced poll types and reports, use asynchronous surveys in order to prepare for lectures or gather anonymous feedback on their own teaching?   Carlos will offer pragmatic solutions to questions like these and also “promising practices” to promote active learning more generally among students learning online.  

Because Poll Everywhere now allows sharing polls and reports among members on Teams, Carlos will also outline strategies for collaboration among co-teaching faculty and TAs in large lecture series. Any faculty member can share with another faculty member on the same Team a PowerPoint deck with embedded polls and colleagues can preview beforehand or report on the poll results afterwards, in preparation for their own lectures. Similarly, a professor or a head TA can create polls and share them with all the other TAs on a Team, so that they offer a consistent curriculum in a large lecture series – while TAs retain enough autonomy that each can respond flexibly to the individual needs of their students in section. 

In this way Poll Everywhere can help meet both traditional and online learning challenges—but it can even help administrators and staff like myself, whose job it is to demonstrate the tool for faculty and TAs.  By sharing his screen, he can also briefly SHOW how surveys and pinned polls are created, in addition to the most common activity (poll) types and reports.  Finally, Carlos will share the results of the Center for Teaching and Learning’s survey this past June, when we asked all of our Presenters how they were using Poll Everywhere.

For practical reasons Carlos will end with a preferred list of resources to get started. Given the surplus of documentation for all forms of online teaching right now, this starter kit of useful docs and a few take-aways for more advanced users are indispensable for a rapid adoption of polling software. However, the main value of this presentation will not be technical: it will be an opportunity to critically reflect upon the affordances of polling for active learning, and also for the audience to ask questions about their own efforts to engage students actively online. In order to reach students faculty themselves need to re-engage and re-form course content they may have been teaching for years in-person and this requires empathy, not only for the students, but also for the faculty themselves.  

Media and Handouts to be shared:

1. Case Study of Poll Everywhere with Katherine Preston https://youtu.be/aUwe_Lekl5s 

2. 10 Tips to take advantage of a full Presenter Account

3. A preferred list of resources documenting Poll Everywhere.

4. Center for Teaching and Learning’s Poll Everywhere Survey (June 2020)

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The Right Remote Proctoring Tool: Navigating the Options | Discovery Session

Academic integrity with testing in the home environment can be promoted using remote proctoring tools, but there are many types and options to choose from. This session will feature a remote proctoring tool evaluative guide and implementation recommendations for adaptation by other institutions."

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Extended Abstract

During the COVID-19 pandemic, many universities transitioned traditional classrooms to a remote learning modality. The School of Nursing in a small, private university sought a scalable and affordable remote proctoring solution to uphold the integrity of examinations (for nursing licensure preparation) administered in the home environment. There were several vendors and types of remote proctoring tools to choose from, but the literature lacked guidance for the selection process. The School of Nursing worked collaboratively with the university’s Information Technology and Center for Academic Technology to develop a guide to evaluate remote proctoring tools and inform the selection process. An automated proctoring tool was selected which was a switch from a live proctoring tool previously used. The tool was quickly implemented in the learning management system to ensure continuity of the assessment process during the pandemic. The remote proctoring tool evaluative guide and implementation recommendations are included for adaptation by other institutions. Although administration of examinations in the home environment is not ideal, remote proctoring tools can be used to help monitor students from a distance in effort to deter and detect academic dishonesty.  

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Virtual Field Experiences: What Works? | Discovery Session

How do you provide educational field experiences when schools are closed? This session focuses on pre-service school librarian field experiences, and effective efforts that preparation faculty and school sites make to provide valuable virtual experiences. 

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Extended Abstract

Library/ information schools are all affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. In most cases, classes need to transfer to an online environment. As educational information professionals, creating these accommodations is usually not too difficult. Most school librarians have teaching experience and know how to design and deliver instruction, they know how to access and curate relevant resources, and they know how to integrate technology meaningfully.

                This situation also highlights one specific challenge in maintaining student progress in their school library programs: field experience. How do students get real-life experience running a school library if that library – and the school – are closed? As much as possible, schools want students to keep on learning. School librarians can mirror what library educators are doing: adjusting instruction to online delivery, using alternative telecommunications means such as phones, creating information products such as websites and tutorials, coaching other teachers on transforming instruction online, helping their peers and students with information and media literacy, reaching out to families and other community members with suggestions for reading and other learning activities, and networking with other librarians to share ideas and resources. Pre-service school librarians can collaborate with their pre-assigned site school librarian supervisors in discussing how their school operates in times of emergencies, and how the library can serve as a vital player in such situations. Pre-service school librarians can help create information and instructional products, and can work with a classroom teacher in providing a library-related learning experience for that class’s students.

                Library educators can use this situation to model responsive iterative instructional design for their students, sharing the process used to provide ongoing education. Library educators can also provide students and colleagues with online resources that can help educators adjust instruction to deal with remote learners in cases of pandemics and other emergencies. They can also create and disseminate online tutorials such as screencasts that show how to use technology tools – or leverage whatever resources they have on hand – to continue to provide learning experiences. Beyond that, as information professionals, library educators can keep an eye for relevant informational resources about the emergency as the basis for developing and maintaining webliographies about pandemics and other disasters for communities at large; these websites can include health information, local emergency contact information, and alternative learning activities. One such example is my website on COVID-19 resources for education and libraries: https://www.merlot.org/merlot/viewSite.htm?id=9160587. As Helen Boelens suggested, school librarians can pool their knowledge using collaborative tools, and then disseminate their ideas online. Indeed, all of these actions showcase the expertise of library educators – and librarians in general. They can serve as leaders and guides on the sides for educators in general.       

                All of these library experiences provide great learning opportunities because they concretely highlight the need to plan for emergencies instead of just responding, and they show how librarian expertise can provide a repertoire of strategies to keep librarians flexible and responsive in a timely manner. Since at least fifteen years ago, when heavy rainstorms have pounded Hong Kong, schools implement their alternative educational plans. Library education in these emergency times can reveal great expertise and its vital contribution to education. It also highlights the importance of networking with librarian peers to optimize strategies to address issues. And, most importantly, it provides a unique opportunity for pre-service school librarians to prepare and weather the storms that can hit at any time. 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
What's in Your Hip Pocket? Ideas for Lessons When You Need Them | Discovery Session

There are snow days, storms, pandemics...how can you be ready?  Check out our sample lessons (created in MERLOT’s Content Builder), attend this session, and discover how to do it yourself.

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Extended Abstract

The problem:  You suddenly have to shift your mode of presentation…. “go online” or have a lesson prepared when you are ill and do not have a substitute.  There are snow days, storms, pandemics...how can you be ready?  Create ready-to-use lessons that can help you always to be prepared (Ferdig, et al, 2020).  For example:  virtual field trips, social justice lessons, opportunities for students to be creative researchers, lesson plans for sick days, etc.   

A solution:  Use MERLOT’s Content Builder, Google Docs, or your favorite online creation tool to develop a lesson to use when you have to shift what you are doing without much time to prepare (Kelly, 2020).  The presenters will upload their “hip pocket” lessons for viewing prior to the session; thus time in the session can be spent brainstorming ideas for attendees’ own just-in-time lessons, referencing the presenters’ examples, and sharing resources with the facilitators.

By the end of the session, participants will be able to create a lesson that can be shared with students and colleagues.  Participants will be able to search for other examples of lesson plans for emergency use.  

Attendees will come away with examples of just-in-time lessons to use whenever the need arises and the ability to create their own lesson.

  

References:

Ferdig, R.E., Baumgartner, E., Hartshorne, R., Kaplan-Rakowski, R. & Mouza, C. (Eds).    (2020). Teaching, technology, and teacher education during the COVID-19 pandemic: Stories from the field. Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved June 15, 2020 from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/216903/.

 

Kelly, M. (2020).  Good emergency lesson plans can take the stress out of an emergency. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/emergency-lesson-plans-8283.

   
Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
PK-12 Teachers’ TPACK and Self-Efficacy in Online Instruction During the COVID-19 Crisis: What Do the Principals Think? | Discovery Session

Due to the COVID-19 emergency, Illinois’ teachers have shifted rapidly from traditional instruction to online teaching. The study investigates principals’ perceptions about PK-12 teachers’ Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) and self-efficacy in effective online instruction and shares the success stories of teachers in creating and delivering their online courses.   

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Extended Abstract

During the COVID-19 emergency, all Illinois schools were closed for face-to-face instruction beginning on March 17, 2020 and continuing through the 2020-2021 school year (ISBE, 2020b). Illinois schools were required to implement alternative instruction referred to as online learning. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) released statewide policies that required school districts to accommodate online learning for all students and prohibited grade or retention penalties for students unable to complete the online learning at home. This resulted from concerns over disparities in technology access between various demographic groups and individual districts across Illinois, especially the differences in local conditions for technology resources, educator skills and training, and student technology access. As a result, online learning implementation ranged from independent paper-and-pencil activities to a mixture of synchronous and asynchronous virtual instruction. With the potential for ongoing online learning in Illinois, the presenters investigate principals’ perceptions of PK-12 teachers' knowledge and self-confidence in the design and delivery of online instruction. The presenters focus on four challenges teachers face in online instruction: 1) quality of the online teaching, 2) online engagement, 3) online learning outcomes, and 4) working online with students with disabilities. This presentation will utilize the theoretical frameworks of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge [TPACK] (Mishra & Kohler, 2006) and Self-Efficacy Theory [SET] (Bandura, 1986). First, the TPACK framework focuses on technological knowledge (TK), pedagogical knowledge (PK), and content knowledge (CK). It outlines the essential foundation and productive approach of content, pedagogy, and technology integration for teaching and learning. Research suggests teachers’ development of TPACK is critical to effective online instruction. When teachers lack foundational TPACK, it is difficult for them to create new knowledge bases for online instruction, especially technological aptitude (Pamuk, 2011). Research suggests teacher preparation hinders TPACK “when educational training focuses more on classical pedagogical practices, which are helpful in the traditional lesson planning, but provide little preparation for the advancement and interaction of TPACK” (Author, 2020, p. 93). Second, SET—an important concept in Albert Bandura’s Social Learning Theory—describes the self-confidence of the individuals toward their capability to perform certain behavior or solve a specific program well and successfully (Bandura, 1994). Teachers’ self-efficacy beliefs in online instruction affect how they feel, think, and motivate themselves to design and deliver online learning. SET also emphasizes that cognition of self-efficacy beliefs plays a critical role in teachers’ attitude and engagement in online instruction, as well as the strategies they will take to complete the online instruction, regardless of their skills or actual ability (Pajares & Johnson, 1996). The TPACK and SET theoretical models will help the presenters identify the capabilities, beliefs, and intentions linked to implementation behavior needed for PK-12 teachers to overcome the abovementioned challenges and engage in further online instruction. The presenters chose to investigate the perceptions of principals regarding the TPACK and self-efficacy of teachers in online instruction during the COVID-19 crisis. As leaders for learning (Copland & Knapp, 2006), principals are qualified to assess the TPACK and self-efficacy of teachers. Through classroom observations and professional conversations, principals gain first-hand knowledge of the practices, skills, and beliefs of their staff. The presenters chose a mixed-methods design with the sequential explanatory variant (Creswell & Plano Clark, 2017; Ivankova et al., 2006). Research suggests this presentation's design model is the most frequent mixed-methods approach used in the social sciences (Bryman, 2006). In phase one, quantitative self-administered surveys are emailed to all principals in Illinois (ISBE, 2020a) and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. In phase two, criterion-i sampling (Palinkas et al., 2015) identifies 12 participants from phase one for in-depth, semi-structured interviews to explain and illuminate the survey findings. Complementarity strengthens the validity of the study when the semi-structured interviews illustrate, explain, and clarify the results of the surveys, especially any unexpected or surprising findings (Greene, 2007). The interview protocol is informed by the data analysis in phase one. The interviews are transcribed and analyzed for recurring themes. The findings of both phases and the success stories of teachers in creating and delivering their online courses will be integrated in the discussion of the presentation. The objectives and goals of this work-in-progress study will be discussed in the presentation to gain feedback and to establish contact with similar projects for improvement and extension.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Reinventing the Discussion Board: A Design Thinking Workshop | Discovery Session
Text based discussion threads abound in online higher education. But are they the best method of collaboration? How much cognitive engagement and co-construction of knowledge do they facilitate? What are the alternatives in Education 4.0?  This session will use design thinking to explore this issue. 

 

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Extended Abstract

The discussion forum is ubiquitous in online higher education. Most learning management systems (LMS) have the in-built facility to host asynchronous discussions via a discussion board of some sort. The question this design thinking workshop raises and aims to explore is: What are the issues that users have with text-based asynchronous discussion boards, and what are the alternatives in Education 4.0? 

Some of the issues with discussion boards have been well summarised by de Lima, Gerosa & Conte (2019): 

"Discussion forums can experience both periods of inactivity and intermittent flurries of messages. (Filippo, Fuks & de Lucena, 2009). Without adequate feedback, only low levels of cognitive engagement occur, and students may feel isolated. (Abawajy & Kim, 2011).  Feeling isolated can result in limited participation or lack of depth and quality of the discussion" (Watson 2008). 

 

Despite the idea of discussions facilitating a community of practice in higher education units, they are often under-utilised. Some institutions make them mandatory or assign grades to them in an effort to drive engagement, but the truth is that these strategies are at best, a failsafe to ensure that they are used, and at worse coerce students into meaningless collaboration or contribution without collaboration. 

Design thinking has risen in popularity since Brown (2008) and Martin (2009) first propelled the idea onto a world stage. This is partly because of its ability as a framework to allow for co-design of meaningful products that are useful to the end user. Used in educational design, design thinking has the same ability as it does elsewhere to create meaningful solutions to real problems. In this workshop, we will use the first three stages of the design thinking process: Empathise, Define and Ideate. 

In Stage 1: Empathise, we will create personas in small teams.  The participants will discuss their institutions’ issues related to text-based discussion boards and co-create a persona of someone who interacts with online discussions in some way. This persona could be a student, an instructor, a designer, or a technician. We suspect that most participants will create personas of either students or instructors but are open to surprises. 

In Stage 2: Define, we will use these personas to find a 'problem worth solving' and settle in each group on one problem that will be the focus of the rest of the workshop and beyond. 

In Stage 3: Ideate, we will come up with as many creative solutions as possible to the problem worth solving. We will consider ideas that go beyond the bounds of possibility, including hopefully some that would get participants fired from their current position. By pushing the boundaries in this space, we hope to come to a final idea that fulfils the following criteria: 

  • Useful to the end user
  • Ground-breaking 
  • Workable (i.e. Cost-effective, doable in the time allowed etc.) 

The workshop will close with the intended goal of participants taking back to their institutions or professional practice one such idea, which they will then use to implement the last two stages of the design thinking process: Prototype and Test. 

The results of the Prototype and Test stages of each project will be shared via a LinkedIn group set up by the workshop leaders, as well as no doubt leading to other meaningful cross-intuitional collaboration and sharing of ideas. 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
One Model for Building a Video Library for First Year Student Support | Discovery Session

Everyone knows that video can be a powerful tool for engagement and instruction in online classes. But what might a comprehensive strategy look like – one that encompasses all the classes in a university first year sequence, one that aims to develop an intentional roster of student-facing video content, and one that is designed to support student success while providing an additional tool for adjunct faculty and advising partners?

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Extended Abstract

Everyone knows that video can be a powerful tool for engagement and instruction in online classes. But what might a comprehensive strategy look like – one that encompasses all the classes in a university first year sequence, one that aims to develop an intentional roster of student-facing video content, and one that is designed to support student success while providing an additional tool for adjunct faculty and advising partners? In this presentation, we’ll describe the genesis of the project and walk you through the development – including our roll-out plan to generate faculty consensus and buy-in, the on-boarding content-creation materials, the conceptual framework for the videos themselves, and the production cycle all leading to the launch of our YouTube page. We’ll also share some of the (always changing!) analytics data we gathered, discuss how we got the word out to other stakeholders within the University, and to students, and we’ll conclude by pointing the way forward with practical tips and lessons learned along the way.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Designing an OER for an Online RN to BSN Nursing Course | Discovery Session

In this session, I will review the rationale for creating and designing an OER for an online RN to BSN course. Additionally, I will review the research I conducted comparing the learning gains between this open textbook with the previous commercial textbook.

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Extended Abstract

There are a limited number of open textbooks available for baccalaureate level nursing courses. In online nursing education, non-traditional students can benefit greatly from free, instant access, high-quality textbooks. Using textbooks created specifically for a chosen course further accentuates the value and use of a textbook. In this session, I will review the rationale for creating and designing an open textbook for an online RN to BSN course. I will also review the research I conducted comparing the learning gains between this open textbook with the previous commercial textbook.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Best Practice and Course Reconceptualization in Online Undergraduate Quantitative Reasoning | Discovery Session

We reduced QR attrition rates from 18% to 5% by implementing theory-based practices, including: Rationale for theory identification, construction of a philosophical framework for course implementation, collection of stakeholder input, implementation, evaluation of impact on attrition, post-implementation maintenance and communication, and institutional socialization of the new paradigmatic shift. 

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Extended Abstract

“I found myself dreading the class too but I take it all back. I have learned a lot and understand that I use quantitative reasoning without even knowing it.” 

-Student who just finished a QR course that used theory-based practices 

 

For decades, student attrition has been a challenge in undergraduate general education math (UGEM).  Research finds a major contributing factor is the gap in translating theory to practice. Some literature reports that studied and effective practices that were shared as long as 40 years ago are still not common practice in schools. More so, some of these best practices are not even part of teacher education programs. Higher education faces an even greater challenge in addressing this theory to practice gap since most professors and teachers of higher education are specialists in specific subject matter without formal training or knowledge of the findings from education research. In many cases, there is little motivation for faculty to explore knowledge in education research since it is very rarely acknowledged as part of the rigorous and time requirements to obtain institutional tenure. While there have been recent changes in some institutions to reward faculty for their pursuits in teaching, these initiatives are recent and have not closed the multi-decade knowledge gap between education research and practice. 

This session describes University of Phoenix’s process to reduce student attrition by closing the theory-to-practice gap. In particular, the purpose of this session is to disseminate the implementation of theory-based practices in UGEM toward reducing student attrition, including: Rationale for theory identification, the construction of a philosophical framework for course implementation, collection of stakeholder input, implementation, evaluation of impact on attrition, post-implementation maintenance and communication, and institutional socialization of the new paradigmatic shift. 

The first step identified the leading research-based education theories. Much research has advanced pedagogical theory in recent decades. Many such theories are now well-validated and well-accepted. We sought such modern, validated theories toward closing the gap in UGEM courses, and settled on 7 such theories: Metacognition and Affect [Dole1998], Conceptual Change [Strike1992][Chinn1993], Social Constructivism [Vygotsky1986], Academic Self-concept [Marsh1985][Bong2003], Holism [Dewey1997][Mahmoudi2012], Systemic Functional Linguistics [Halliday1992][Holliday1994], and 21st Century Knowledge Framework [Kereluik2013][Mishra2019]. These theories were selected because not only are they seminal works, but they are also in alignment with the mission and vision of the University. 

The second step was to adjust each course feature to apply as many theories as possible. There were 9 course features: Discussion questions, late work policy, grade pass back to students, reading assignments, homework assignments, exams, advisory language, remediation, and rigor. Before adjusting, 0.8 theories were implemented on average per the course feature (i.e., less than 1 theory per feature), and 5.3 theories per course feature after adjusting. The point is that each course feature changed dramatically. For example, each week, course instructors post a question on the class forum for discussion questions. A student earns course points for responding to the question. Before adjusting, questions asked students to interpret the content, such as identifying and discussing some part of an expression. After adjusting, questions asked students to apply recently learned concepts to everyday experiences, requiring prediction, transfer, and application of knowledge; many questions also required students to reflect about their thinking and learning of the content to promote a self-regulative process in assessing and directing their own learning. 

The third step was to run focus groups with other Associate Deans, faculty, and academic councilors; and then conduct a pilot study. The intention was to quickly evaluate the efficacy of the changes for rapid iterative improvements. We used the agile development framework, as our university had recently adopted it. Key takeaways from the focus group included: The math courses’ learning materials were not consistent with what students needed to know, students tended to be fearful of math and did not find math relevant to their goals, student dissatisfaction with the course, and segmented learning that may have hindered the ability for students to develop functional models of mathematical knowledge. The pilot study included a control group with 520 students and intervention group with 152 students during a term in October 2019. The control offering’s attrition was 14.6%, whereas the intervention’s was 5.3%. Student surveys found the intervention’s students were much less stressed and had a more positive perspective of the course than the control’s students. One student quote from the intervention’s group was, “The concepts in this class made me realize that I use math more than I thought. I used to say that I hate math and scared of it. I am no longer scared of it. I understand it more and can relate to the topics and understanding.”  

The fourth step was to decide on next steps. A critical reflection was conducted to determine the next steps at both a course level and then programmatic level. The pilot data validated the feature changes, so implementation across all sections of QR1 and QR2 was pursued. The process of coming to these conclusions was achieved by engaging a programmatic evaluation lens to make sense of and interpret the data collected from the pilot study. The inputs to the decision were: Historical data, pilot data, stakeholder feedback, the University’s strategic direction, best practice from the scholarly field, and intended learning outcomes for students. The outputs associated with making the decision for moving forward were: Changes for future iterations, implementation plan, and communication plan. The pilot data showed that student attitudes and outcomes improved. This contrasted strongly with the historical data, which supported a decision to move forward with changes. However, before moving forward, data was presented to a variety of institutional stakeholders to secure buy-in and limit any potential barriers to implementation. Additional information considered was the alignment of proposed changes to University strategy, mission, and vision. The newer materials were more strongly aligned to the ability for adult learners to have meaningful experiences and aligned to supporting career advancement. Math education literature was referenced to ensure anecdotal and limited quantitative evidence was consistent with trends reported and generalized by the scholarly field. A subsequent cross check of student learning outcomes was completed to ensure proposed changes would support students through subsequent programmatic coursework. Once each of the constructs described was assessed, the decision was made to implement the changes to QR1 and QR2. The input information helped to guide decisions about improvements prior to implementation, the actual implementation plan, as well as the communication/training plans required for successful roll out of large-scale implementation. 

The fifth step began with a full implementation in QR1 and QR2 courses, and then full implementation in the other UGEM courses. We compared student attrition rates (W+F) in course offerings before the feature changes and after the feature changes, using the same terms of the respective years. QR1 had 5,851 students before changes and 7,716 after changes; the attrition rate dropped from 17.5% to 4.7%. QR2 had 6,619 students before changes and 8,083 students after changes; the attrition rate dropped from 13.9% to 4.0%. Interestingly, post-term faculty surveys found an almost bimodal distribution in the faculty’s perspectives of the feature changes, i.e., while many faculty had positive perspectives of the feature changes, many other faculty felt strongly that the feature changes were worse for students. The other UGEM courses included varying degrees of theory-to-practice translation, and each had significant decreases in attrition rates. 

 

References 

Dole, J. A. and G. M. Sinatra (1998). "Reconceptualizing change in the cognitive construction of knowledge." Educational Psychologist 33(2-3): 109-128. 

Strike, K. A., & Posner, G. J. (1992). A revisionist theory of conceptual change. In R. Duschl & R. Hamilton (Eds.), Philosophy of Science, Cognitive Psychology and Educational Theory and Practice (pp. 147-176). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. 

Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1993). The role of anomalous data in knowledge acquisition: A theoretical framework and implications for science instruction. Review of Educational Research, 63, 1-49.  

Thought and Language - Revised Edition (Paperback)  by Lev S. Vygotsky (Author), Alex Kozulin (Editor) Publisher: The MIT Press; Revised edition (August 28, 1986) ISBN-13: 978-0262720106  

Marsh, H.W., and Shavelson, R. J. (1985). Self-concept: Its multifaceted, hierarchical structure. Educ. Psychol. 20: 107–123.  

Bong, M., and Skaalvik, E.M. (2003). Academic Self-Concept and Self-Efficacy: How Different Are They Really? Educational Psychology Review 15(1).  

Dewey, J. (1997). Experience and Education. Publisher : Free Press; Reprint edition (July 1, 1997) ISBN-10 : 0684838281   

Mahmoudi, S.; Jafari, E.; Nasrabadi, H.A.; Liaghatdar, M.J. (2012).  Holistic Education: An Approach for 21 Century. International Education Studies, 5(2).   

Halliday, M. K. (1992). Towards probabilistic interpretations. In E. Ventola (Ed.), Functional and systematic linguistics (pp. 39-63). Mouton. 

Holliday, W. G., Yore, L. D., & Alvermann, D. E. (1994). The reading–science learning–writing connection: breakthroughs, barriers, and promises.  Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 31, 877-893. 

Kereluik, Kristen, et al. "What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning." Journal of digital learning in teacher education 29.4 (2013): 127-140.  

Mishra, Punya, et al. “Developing the future substance of STEM Education: A Concept Paper”. December 2019. https://education.asu.edu/sites/default/files/substance-of-stem-education-concept-paper.pdf 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
A Simple Plan and Awesome Tool for Making Your Live Online Sessions More Engaging | Discovery Session

To maximize the potential for making connections during live online sessions, this presentation will highlight:

  1.  a framework for generating content before live sessions, exploring the content during the session, and continuing to develop that content after the session.
  2. a tool that seamlessly connects the student experience and content.
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Extended Abstract

At this point, we've all been forced to become expert teachers in online, hybrid, hyflex, and whatever other methods we have come up with for teaching these days!

Though these experiences have been challenging in so many ways, I think most of us will agree that we have become better teachers all-around, using new tools and techniques to engage our students.

Of course, our favorite tool by far is Zoom or one of its counterparts. We love getting to meet with our students face-to-face, even if only digitally.

While these live sessions are great for connecting with our students, without proper planning they can be less effective at connecting what students learn before, during, and after the session.

However, one of the greatest benefits of these live sessions is the ability to make connections--make connections with our students and just as importantly make connections with the content we are teaching.

To maximize the potential for connections during these live sessions, this presentation will introduce participants to:

  1.  a framework from creating a holistic plan for generating content before each live session, exploring the content more fully during the live session, and continuing to build onto that content after the live session.
  2. a tool that seamlessly connects the student experience and content they generate.

The outcome of using this framework and tool is that students share in the task of shaping the experience of the live sessions, are actively engaging in building new knowledge during these sessions, and are meaningfully invested in the continued development of ideas after the session.

 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
"Wibbly-Wobbly, Timey-Wimey": Perceptions of Time in Online Teaching and Learning | Discovery Session

Many online students, when given the space to manage their own time, do not have specific strategies that work for them, despite understanding that time management is important. This presentation considers both clock and experiential time in relation to self-regulation and time management.

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Extended Abstract

Session Topic: Perceptions of Time in Online Teaching and Learning

Time is relative. It’s not a new notion, and we’re certainly not the first to have said it, but the relativity of time is important in online courses. We, here, take up Barbara Adam's (2004) definition of clock time as imposed time. Clock time has become the type of time by which we’re all expected to operate; however, understanding that time is also cultural and experiential, and that how we perceive clock time to pass and how we each experience time are critical to online courses. We need to consider that previous experiences with both the content and the learning processes (e.g., reading, lecturing, certain types of activities and assignments) all impact how a student experiences the act of doing them again.  For example, variations in reading speeds might impact not only how much clock time but also how much perceived time doing a reading might take our students.

While face-to-face students may also struggle to manage their time outside of class, they have time constraints built into the face-to-face time for their class. The online student population is typically short on a particular resource: time (e.g., Gayton, 2013;  Globokar, 2012; Morris and Finnegan 2009). Students are usually self-selecting to take online courses for a reason. Online students who are not traditionally college-aged are more likely to work, usually full-time jobs, be responsible for the care of others (children, parents, siblings, a partner), and be more likely to not be able to compromise on the time spent on those two pieces of their lives (Nash, 2005). These students elect to take online courses for a variety of reasons, but flexibility in scheduling is often a top concern because of the other responsibilities that pull on these students’ time (Moore et al, 2003). When choosing between those they care for (or their job that feeds their families) and school, they do (and should) be choosing their job or their family. Our online student population is often the most vulnerable and most at risk (Pontes, et al, 2010; Nichols, 2010; Moore et al, 2003), which means that we need to consider our approaches to timeliness in online courses as a question of social justice. 

This idea of perceptions of time intersects with and conflicts with concepts of time management, which already has ties to student retention in online learning. Time management is often discussed in terms of self-regulation. While there are many self-regulation models, for our purposes here, self-regulation is the ability to manage your own thinking and actions for a specific purpose (Zimmerman, 2011; Wandler and Imbriale, 2017). Attending tutoring sessions, emailing the instructor, and tracking behaviors are some self-regulating learning strategies (SRLS) identified, in the literature, as useful to students’ success. Specifically, studies have found that a lack of ability to self-regulate and use specific self-regulating strategies may be a contributing factor to online student drop out (Wander and Imbriale, 2017; Song et al., 2004). It is important to note that the processes of self-regulation are umbrellas for specific strategies (Wander and Imbriale, 2017). For example, time management is one of many self-regulatory processes that has been suggested to be important to student success (Song et al, 2004). Time management is a process that has specific strategies like setting goals and breaking down projects into smaller steps; however, what is not often considered is the impact of how students experience time (experiential time) on self-regulation, time management, and student retention.  

Interactivity Plan: 

    For this Discovery session, we plan to provide a brief overview of literature on time and perceptions of time followed by some of the ideas we’ve been thinking through in terms of equity and inclusion and course design in student perception and enactment of time in online courses. In our VoiceThread, we will stagger slides that will prompt participants to think about how they perceive and experience time themselves, how they’ve addressed time in their online courses, and how they might change their classes, followed by slides that include our own ideas with prompting to consider those ideas. We plan to ask attendees to participate using VoiceThreads commenting features throughout the presentation.

Takeaways:

Attendees will end the VoiceThread presentation with a better understanding of their own perceptions of time, how perceptions of time might impact student experiences in online courses, and some concrete ways to enact equity and inclusion as they relate to time in course design. 

References: 

Adams, B. (2004). Time. Wiley.

Gaytan, J. (2013). Factors affecting student retention in online courses: Overcoming this critical problem. Career and Technical Education Research, 38(2), 145–155. https://doi.org/10.5328/cter38.2.147 

Globokar, J. L. (2012). Introduction to online learning: A guide for students. Thousand Oaks, SAGE Publications.

Moore, K., Bartkovich, J., Fetzner, M., & Ison, S. (2003). Success in cyberspace: Student retention in online courses. Journal of Applied Research in the Community College, 10(2), 107–118.

Morris, L. V., & Finnegan, C. L. (2009). Best practices in predicting and encouraging student persistence and achievement online. Journal of College Student Retention: Research, Theory and Practice, 10(1), 55–64. https://doi.org/10.2190/CS.10.1.e

Nash, R. D. (2005). Course completion rates among distance learners: Identifying possible methods to improve retention. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 8(4). http://www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/winter84/nash84.htm

Nichols, M. (2010). Student perceptions of support services and the influence of targeted interventions on retention in distance education. Distance Education, 31(1), 93–113. https://doi.org/10.1080/01587911003725048

Pontes, M. C. F., Hasit, C., Pontes, N. M. H., Lewis, P. A., & Siefring, K. T. (2010). Variables related to undergraduate students preference for distance education classes. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 8(2). www.westga.edu/~distance/ojdla/summer132/pontes_pontes132.html

Song, L., Singleton, E. S., Hill, J. R., & Koh, M. H. (2004). Improving online learning: Student perceptions of useful and challenging characteristics. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(1), 59–70. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.iheduc.2003.11.003

Wandler, J., & Imbriale, W. J. (2017). Promoting College Student Self-Regulation in Online Learning Environments. Online Learning, 21(2). https://doi.org/10.24059/olj.v21i2.881

Zimmerman, B. J. (2011). Motivational sources and outcomes of self-regulated learning and performance. In B. J. Zimmerman, & D. H. Schunk (Eds.), Educational psychology handbook: handbook of self-regulation of learning and performance. London, UK: Routledge. 

 
Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Introducing Pressbooks Directory and Pressbooks Results for LMS | Discovery Session

For years, Pressbooks has supported the authoring and adaptation of open educational resources (OER), providing the accessible, intuitive, and customizable Authoring & Editing Platform on which faculty have created and shared the resources they need. In recent months, we’ve developed new features and services that will improve the users’ ability to share and discover OER and to deliver and assess the use of those resources in the classroom. During this Discovery Session, Sarah Fennessey will be demonstrating Pressbooks Directory and Pressbooks Results for LMS and taking you Pressbooks questions.

 

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Extended Abstract

      

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Challenges and Opportunities for Online Doctoral Students During COVID-19: Perspectives of Dissertation Chairs | Discovery Session

COVID-19 has impacted teaching and learning at all levels.  This presentation synthesizes research on challenges and opportunities faced by today’s online doctoral students and discusses how experiences during COVID-19 may impact online doctoral learning.  Results of a qualitative study utilizing open-ended interviews with online Dissertation Chairs are presented.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted teaching and learning in almost every context and at all levels of instruction.  Most K-12 and higher education institutions in the United States were forced to provide emergency remote learning in place of traditional on-ground instruction beginning in March of 2020.  Fairly early statistics in the United States’ pandemic timeline established that more than 4,000 U.S. colleges and universities were seriously impacted by COVID-19, with greater than 25 million students already affected at that time (Kelly, 2020).  That number has grown over the ongoing pandemic, with the bulk of university students’ coursework being completed online during the fall of 2020. Supiano (2020) provided a current and timely look into these new realities for instructors and students in higher education.  This abrupt and massive change toward online instruction will likely remain in some form as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, and perhaps beyond. 

Some institutions, such as K-12 cyber schools and fully online universities, were already providing instruction entirely online before COVID-19, but still needed to make emergency modifications and adjustments for learners who were experiencing various personal, medical, and other life-related issues (COVID-19: Higher Education Resource Center, 2020).  These challenges have required significant expertise in the three presences for online teaching, particularly the social presence (Rapanta et al., 2020).  One group of students in this particular category is the sizable and growing number of doctoral degree-seeking students who attend programs that are designed to be entirely online.  Being a doctoral student, and especially an online doctoral student, involves its own unique set of stressors and experiences.  Exploring online doctoral students’ unique experiences during COVID-19 can enhance understanding of the challenges and opportunities faced by this unique group of students at this specific time of worldwide crisis. 

One lens through which to view the challenges and opportunities of online doctoral students during COVID-19 is the perceptions and experiences of the Dissertation Chair, who plays a pivotal role in the life of a doctoral student.  Dissertation Chairs have the specific role of guiding the doctoral student’s progress longitudinally, not only regarding academic outcomes, but also often in terms of social and emotional issues and outcomes. Simply put, the ongoing relationship between the doctoral student and the Chair is crucial. On the general topic of online learner-instructor interaction and engagement, Baker’s (2010) findings strongly suggested a positive relationship between instructor presence and the degree of instructor immediacy. Further, Baker found a linear relationship between both of these instructor qualities and students’ affective learning, cognition, and motivation, making them clear predictors of these desired outcomes.  Furthermore, “Students perceive a sense of belonging when they can interact with instructors and perceive that they are at least accessible through multiple means” (Bolliger & Martin, 2018, p. 569).  Research and recommendations from Peacock and Cowan (2019) and Meyer (2014) echoed these sentiments, with specific strategies and tips for online instruction.

The presenters for this session synthesize research on the unique challenges and opportunities that today’s online doctoral students typically face, along with a discussion of how the COVID-19 pandemic may impact the online doctoral learning experience.  Qualitative analysis of open-ended interviews with 12 online Dissertation Chairs will be presented.  The research methodology for this qualitative case study entailed recruiting volunteers from a fully-online, accredited, doctoral degree-granting institution.  Twelve Dissertation Chairs participated in live, open-ended interviews via Zoom.  Interviews followed a 13-question protocol of open-ended questions developed by the researchers/presenters.  Regarding the use of Zoom as a data collection method, Gray, Wong-Wylie, Rempel, and Cook (2020) specified the current relevance of utilizing Zoom for one-on-one interviews for qualitative research when in-person interviews are not feasible.  Interviews of the 12 Dissertation Chairs were divided between the three presenters for this session using a random order for who would conduct each interview.  This design helped to ensure trustworthiness and dependability of data, while reducing any potential bias.  The presenters for this session will discuss several themes that emerged from the qualitative inquiry and will explore how these emerging themes relate to the current research literature on doctoral student experiences, online learning, mentoring, social-emotional learning, student engagement, and persistence.

This presentation will be interactive, with opportunities for ongoing participant chat within the chat box.  The presenters will engage the audience in a whole-group activity in which participants can relate the session material to their own specific contexts.  For example, attendees who have switched abruptly to online teaching and learning from a more traditional modality could reflect on the specific challenges and opportunities that have been faced by doctoral candidates at those institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The presentation exemplifies effective practice by illustrating both the challenges and opportunities faced by online doctoral students during COVID-19.  The use of a research site that is a fully-online, accredited, doctoral degree-granted institution helps to inform best practices in doctoral level education, especially with regard to serving all students’ social and emotional needs during the pandemic.

References

Baker, C. (2010). The impact of instructor immediacy and presence for online student affective learning, cognition, and motivation. Journal of Educators Online, 7(1), 1–30. Retrieved from https://www.thejeo.com

Bolliger, D. U., & Martin, F. (2018). Instructor and student perceptions of online student engagement strategies. Distance Education39(4), 568-583.

COVID-19: Higher Education Resource Center. (2020). Retrieved September 22, 2020, from http://www.entangled.solutions/coronavirus-he/

Gray, L. M., Wong-Wylie, G., Rempel, G. R., & Cook, K. (2020). Expanding Qualitative Research Interviewing Strategies: Zoom Video Communications. The Qualitative Report25(5), 1292-1301.

Kelly, R. (2020, April 16). 4,000 plus U.S. higher ed institutions impacted by COVID-19; more than 25 million students affected. Campus Technology. https://campustechnology.com/articles/2020/04/16/4000-plus-us-higher-ed-...

Meyer, K. A. (2014). Student engagement in online learning: What works and why. ASHE Higher Education Report, 40(6), 1–114.

Peacock, S. & Cowan, J. (2019). Promoting sense of belonging in online learning communities of inquiry at accredited courses. Online Learning, 23(2), 67-81.

Rapanta, C., Botturi, L., Goodyear, P. et al. (2020). Online University Teaching During and After the Covid-19 Crisis: Refocusing Teacher Presence and Learning Activity. Postdigit Sci Educ. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-020-00155-y

Supiano, B. (2020, April 07). 'On a Desert Island with Your Students': Professors Compare Notes on Teaching Remotely in a Pandemic. Retrieved June 25, 2020, from https://www.chronicle.com/article/On-a-Desert-Island-With/248452?fbclid=...

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Choose-your-Own Learning: Using Google Forms to improve asynchronous learning | Discovery Session

 Asynchronous learning opportunities can include engagement and be created with free software...right? This panel will explore the use of Google Forms to create engagement-heavy learning objects for asynchronous learning. In this interactive session, presenters will share actual Google Form creations and their findings from the creation and implementation process.

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Extended Abstract

Being able to create asynchronous learning opportunities is essential, not only in a COVID-19 educational space where most classes are online and room for information literacy instruction is shrinking, but also in a world where blended learning is a critical component to delivering meaningful information literacy instruction. In addition, we recognize that the more instruction that we can flip outside of the classroom, the more time there is for active engagement with these ideas during our valuable synchronous time with students. 

This session will explore using Google Forms to create asynchronous learning opportunities for students at a post-secondary institution; the creation time and work involved; and the experiences of the librarians using them in their teaching. Participants will be able to “choose their own learning” from a selection of hands-on examples of Google Forms used in information literacy instruction in disciplinary areas including Nursing, Biology, Massage Therapy, and Early Childhood Education. Using Google Forms, Participants will choose the topics of most interest to them throughout the session. We will also be showcasing some of the great features that Google Forms has to enable interactions, as well as issues and ways around them. The audience is expected to interact with the examples not only to explore what kinds of interactivity are possible but also to get a feel for some of the realities associated with using Google Forms to create asynchronous learning tools. Attendees of this session will be able to take away actual examples of Google Forms activities that they can use or adapt for their own teaching. They will also have a solid idea of what aspects the presenters found most difficult when creating interactive Google Forms, and most effective methods of overcoming these difficulties.”

 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Copy and Paste: Why Transnational Education Online Models Need to Consider Cultural Humility and Sense of Belonging | Discovery Session

As universities develop online programs at a rapid speed to meet transnational student enrollment numbers, it is important to consider cultural humility in student learning. This session will highlight best practices learned through a 2020 international study that can be applied to the development of online learning in transnational education.

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Extended Abstract

This 2020 international research study examined student experiences in an online learning transnational education model by exploring the flipped classroom pedagogy at two Microcampuses in South East Asia. Interviews were conducted with forty-nine participants across three countries, the U.S., Cambodia and Indonesia. Participants in Cambodia and Indonesia included students, lecturers and administrators. U.S. participants included U.S. Instructors and administrators. Six Microcampus courses were analyzed through a document analysis process, which included an adaptation of the Quality Matters Rubric. Additionally, six in-person classroom observations occurred in Cambodia and Indonesia using the Teaching Dimensions Observation Protocol observation methods. The study used Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance (1997) to conceptualize how dialogue, learning autonomy and course structure engages transnational students in their learning through sense of belonging.  The findings in this study indicated that transnational education models need to consider transnational student needs including: student identity, sense of belonging, course structure, interaction across borders, student plans post-graduation, and intentional content delivered through a cultural humility lens. By integrating these findings, this study’s implications focused on three main concepts: student learning in a flipped classroom model, best practices for transnational education students in online learning across borders and defining transnational education students for future research and student support. This study contributes to existing literature on transnational education and furthers the conversation by challenging the field of higher education to consider transnational education student identity, student learning goals, and the role of cultural humility in online student learning.

In this conference presentation, the presenter will highlight transnational education in South East Asia and share best practices learned that can be widely applied to: development of online learning in transnational education, cultural humility in curriculum development, and developing sense of belonging. 

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
DEI-Responsive Curriculum: Transform your School by leveraging Professional Learning Communities and the Tuning for Equity Protocol | Discovery Session

ABSTRACT: Transformational, DEI-responsive curriculum is a necessity. But how do we create Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) that support our teachers in this process? A DEI-responsive PLC program inspires teachers to curate both curricula and classroom spaces that are diverse, equitable, and inclusive for all learners.  

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Extended Abstract

OVERVIEW: Magic happens when teachers reflect upon their craft within a supportive, peer-based environment. As educators and administrators, we curate the learning spaces where students come of age. Students’ world views are powerfully shaped by our courses, classrooms, and curricula. A DEI-responsive PLC approach provides an action-oriented, peer-supported structure within which all faculty build their capacities as DEI-responsive educators. We must offer both curricula and classroom spaces that are diverse, equitable, and inclusive for all middle school learners.

OUR MODEL: We have scaled a robust PLC model at our school for sixty educators across an EK-12 setting. The mission of our PLC work is to build capacity with DEI-responsive curriculum through utilizing the Tuning for Equity Protocol within Professional Learning Communities.

ENGAGEMENT OPTIONS AND TAKEAWAYS: During this Discover Session, we will present the details and layers of this work. Participants will walk away with actionable ideas to implement at their schools. These include the following:  
- Access a deep resource list on DEI-responsive classrooms.

- Explore how to implement PLCs at your school, and examine how Critical Friends Protocols provide frameworks for challenging conversations.

- Assess your school's current curriculum using a thorough DEI-responsive curricular rubric.

- Brainstorm guiding questions that could deepen DEI-responsiveness within your school’s curriculum.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Crash Course: Navigating Digital Information | Discovery Session

The internet is full of information, a lot of it notably wrong. Crash Course Navigating Digital Information is a 10-episode YouTube series designed to teach the hands-on skills needed to evaluate online information. It was developed in collaboration with the Stanford History Education Group, The Poynter Institute, and MediaWise.

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Extended Abstract

The internet is full of information, a lot of it notably wrong. Crash Course Navigating Digital Information is a 10-episode YouTube series designed to teach the hands-on skills needed to evaluate online information (https://thecrashcourse.com/courses/navigatingdigitalinfo). It was developed in collaboration with the Stanford History Education Group, The Poynter Institute, and MediaWise. The course is based on the Stanford History Education Group's research into how professional fact checkers evaluate online sources.

Mar 20, 2021
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Designing Blended Learning Environments: Exploring What and How to “Blend” to Support Student Success | Discovery Session

With broad adoption of technology in teaching and learning, blended learning is increasing in higher education, particularly at the COVID-19 pandemic time. This session will share practical ideas and resources about what and how to “blend” to optimize student learning and support student success through designing meaningful blended learning environments.

 

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

With broad adoption of instructional technology in teaching and learning, blended learning is increasing in higher education. While blended learning may mean different things to different people, research (Allen & Seaman, 2010; Garrison & Kanuka, 2004; Graham, 2006) shows classroom face-to-face learning and online learning as two essential elements in blended learning. Graham (2006) defined blended learning as combining “face-to-face instruction with computer-mediated instruction” (P. 5). Garrison and Kanuka (2004) defined blended learning as “the thoughtful integration of classroom face-to-face learning experiences with online learning experiences” (P. 96). Allen and Seaman (2010) defined a blended learning course as follows: “Course that blends online and face-to-face delivery. Substantial proportion of the content is delivered online, typically use online discussions, and typically has a reduced number of face-to-face meetings” (p. 5), with a suggestion that the proportion of online content delivery should be 30-79% in blended learning. Moskal, Dziuban, and Hartman (2013) stated that blended learning emerged as “the dominant label for an educational platform that represents some combination of face-to-face and online learning” (p. 15). To sum up, blended learning is instruction taken place in a traditional classroom setting augmented by computer-based or online learning activities to replace some classroom seat time.

Research has discussed benefits of blended learning, such as increased access and flexibility for learners (Bonk, Kim, & Zeng, 2006; Graham, 2006; Moskal, Dziuban, & Hartman, 2013), more effective pedagogy (Graham, 2006; Joosten, Barth, Harness, & Weber, 2014), enhanced cost-effectiveness (Graham, 2006; Moskal, Dziuban, & Hartman, 2013), improved student success and satisfaction (Moskal, Dziuban, & Hartman, 2013), and increased faculty satisfaction (Moskal, Dziuban, & Hartman, 2013). Increased flexib