Agenda

Date and TimeTitle
Oct 30, 2022
11:00am - 8:00pm (Eastern)
Rise and Shine: Daily Fitness Jumpstart with Coach Jesse | Other |

Get a jumpstart on your conference day with Coach Jesse!  In this 60-minute workout, Coach Jesse will walk attendees through a series of functional fitness movements that will help get the mind and body ready for a full day of conference sessions! Scaling and modifications are available to accommodate all fitness levels. Please wear workout clothing and workout shoes. Be sure to bring a water bottle and come ready to move!  Attendees will be asked to sign a waiver before participating. Jesse is a National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer and a Crossfit Level 1 Trainer.

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Oct 31, 2022
11:00am - 1:00pm (Eastern)
Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs: Get Started Through the Sharing of Practices, Strategies, Tools, and Resources | Workshop | Zoom Room 1

HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators will share their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. Join us at the pre-conference workshop and get started on your own AL$ programs. It is OPEN to all.

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Extended Abstract

For the past 6 years, the HBCU Affordable Learning Community has been building the organizational, programmatic, and technical foundation for their Affordable Learning Solutions program for all HBCUs.  Tennessee State University (TSU) has successfully institutionalized the Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) strategy and has been recognized as outstanding and exemplary by Berkeley project.   TSU have been successfully incubating AL$ projects at various HBCUs by leveraging the Hewlett grants in partnership with the California State University Long Beach MERLOT-SkillsCommons programs. Along with other vanguard HBCU institutions, we now have a community of over 20 HBCUs that have implemented AL$ and has successfully enabled HBCU faculty to redesign their courses and adopt OER to reduce if not eliminate the cost of course materials for their students.   MERLOT-SkillsCommons closely collaborated with the HBCU leadership group to design and maintain the HBCU AL$ Community Portal that showcases the individually customized, institutional AL$ portals, and all the open educational services that all HBCUs can use.

The HBCU AL$ community, in partnership with MERLOT-SkillsCommons, have designed an open portal (http://hbcuals.org) that provides easy access to:

  • the largest aggregate collection of  free and open e-textbooks, open courseware, open access journals, open learning objects, and more
  • A collection of free and online teaching-learning resources that have can be used to ‘culturally contextualize’ course curriculum with resources about Africana leaders and histories of HBCUs.  The collection also lets users explore materials that have been authored faculty from HBCUs across a variety of disciplines as well as materials “curated” by faculty from HBCUs.
  • over 50 general education course with multiple free and open e-textbooks aligned with the course curriculum
  • free and open collections of virtual labs in STEM and workforce development curriculum
  • over 100 free and open teaching ePortfolios that showcase faculty’s adoption of OER across a broad range of disciplines
  • a free and open library of planning tools, guidelines, and professional development resources to support HBCUs developing and implementing their own AL$ programs
  • free and open methods for sharing their use, reuse, revision, remixing, redistribution, and retention of OER that they have adopted and authored

The pre-conference workshop will begin with the leaders of AL$ programs at the HBCUs sharing their strategies, practices, and outcomes as the first step in helping workshop participants develop their strategies and plans for an AL$ program on their campuses.   We will outline a “readiness checklist” for planning your AL$ program and review a planning template for participants to consider how they might customize it for their campuses’ plans.   Participants will share their ideas, concerns, and questions for the HBCU leadership team.

Oct 31, 2022
4:00pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Turn Your Bats and Beasties into Beautiful Besties | Evening Event | Zoom Room 1

What are the passion projects you wish you had time for but never started? Come share your big ideas with the engagement folks. Playfully create something that will be beneficial. Select an accountability partnership that will bring your project to light.

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Nov 1, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Technology Test Kitchen: Reimagining Peer to Peer Interaction | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Discussion boards are a great tool for online learning, but why not take it a step further towards something more engaging? Explore how Flipgrid can take discussions to the next level with social media style video exchanges providing your students with the ability to share their voice and connect with peers on a new level.  - To find the list of ASYNCHRONOUS Technology Test Kitchen sessions, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Technology test Kitchen".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 1, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by our Slack channel anytime for help, guidance and recommendations.

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 1, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Join An Innovation Crew! | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Innovation Crews are flexible communities convened around shared community interests before and during a conference experience. Facilitated by a “Crew Leader”, they provide a space for colleagues to connect, converse, support each other, and be part of a smaller group within the larger conference. Select a group that aligns with your interests and join a cohort of colleagues dedicated to both navigating OLC Accelerate together and co-constructing a meaningful learning experience. We’ll be facilitating Crews around the following six interest areas this year: Instructional Designers; Allies (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion); Immersive and Simulated Learning; Gameful Learning; Weavers of Several Interests Not sure which Crew is the best fit for you? Spend some time reviewing the descriptions to learn more about each of these unique Crews. - To find the list of Innovation Crew Meet-Up's, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Innovation Crew Meet-Up".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 1, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
"Anytime" Asynchronous Engagement | Other | Asynchronous Engagement| Atlantic Exhibit Hall - OLC Cafe (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Not sure what to do between sessions? Consider checking out OLC Accelerate's fully virtual and asynchronous engagement space. Each of the volunteer-driven engagement teams have prepared and carefully designed fun, engaging, and thought-provoking activities for you to take up on your own time. If nothing else, it is a great place to get new ideas for how to engage with others and build community. Plus, you'll get to learn more about OLC Accelerate's 2022 Engagement Team (a group of dedicated volunteers from across the field who designed this year's engagement programming). Just visit the "OLC Engagement Hub" and  "Your Engagement Experience" of the engagement team pages in Engagez (e.g. Speed Networking Lounge, Field Guides, OLC Live!, Technology Test Kitchen, OLC Cafe & Mercantile, OLC Sanctuary, Escape Room, Innovation Crews, and more!).

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 1, 2022
9:15am - 9:45am (Eastern)
Canvas Coffee Talk | Other | Zoom Room 4

Are you part of the Canvas family? Join this informal session to ask questions, learn new things or share your tips with others looking to improve teaching and learning. (PS, session open to anyone considering Canvas too)

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Nov 1, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
Virtual Field Guide Power Hour | Other | Zoom Room 2

Join your volunteer Field Guides and other conference attendees for the synchronous Field Guide Power Hour, where they will help you plan your conference experiences based on your areas of interest and help create an OLC Accelerate engagement plan. During this power hour, you’ll have the chance to organize your conference schedule and select presentations and activities you want to attend. The OLC Field Guides will be there to suggest interesting presentations and virtual social activities, train you on the use of the OLC Accelerate Virtual conference venue and website, and point out Engagement Maps designed to help with your program planning. We’ll also discuss the variety of ways to participate virtually - including Slack and Twitter! Meet old friends, make new acquaintances, and plan your schedule. We can't wait to see you there!

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Extended Abstract

          

Nov 1, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
First Time Attendee Welcome and Onboarding | Other | Zoom Room 1

If you’re looking for support in orienting to the conference, the First Timers Welcome and Orientation is a must! Get support in planning your conference experience and kick things off with some casual networking.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
10:45am - 11:15am (Eastern)
OLC Live! Engagement Overview | Other | Zoom Room 4

Make the most out of your conference experience by joining OLC Live! co-hosts Olysha Magruder and Mel Edwards in a kickoff discussion with the Accelerate 2022 Engagement Chairs about specially designed opportunities to engage with fellow attendees virtually at the conference!

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Discovery Time! | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 1

Join us for a fun and interactive session centering on OLC Accelerate’s Discovery Sessions! Starting with a little bit of orientation, some guided roadmapping, and most certainly lots of key reflection and collaborative learning, this session will get us thinking about the possibilities for asynchronous online engagement.

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Extended Abstract

A staple of OLC’s Accelerate's Conference is the asynchronously presented sessions. Whether these took the form historically of a poster or more recently, a pre-prepared digital presentation, these sessions afford presenters and participants alike a unique opportunity for sustained engagement because they were designed with the asynchronous in mind. But taking the time to orient to these types of sessions in a conference setting, as well as meaningfully engage with them is not always easy, particularly given all of the other opportunities presented to us. As such, this interactive session was designed to address those two considerations specifically. We’ll start off making sure you know how to access the sessions, as well as a brief orientation to the presentation platform (PlayPosit). We’ll then spend time collaboratively engaging with the sessions themselves, with dedicated space and time to share lessons learned, things we noticed or thought were cool, and strategies we picked up along the way. Our work will be guided by an intentionally designed Discovery Session Roadmap, which will help us identify which sessions to start with and those we want to intentionally plan to get to in the future. Best of all, along the way, we’ll have a chance to talk about the many amazing and exciting possibilities for asynchronous engagement in online, digital, and blended learning environments, as well as walk away with new ideas for how to design with the asynchronous in mind. Even better, we’ll be experiencing this session in a synchronous, online format (while referencing and engaging in asynchronous content), affording us the opportunity to further reflect on these types of learning experiences.

Nov 1, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Inclusive live online presentations with automated real-time captions/subtitles: Understanding students’ experiences | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

We discuss our qualitative study that explored students' experiences when using real-time automated captions/subtitles during live online presentations. Universal Design for Learning served as the study framework. Attendees will experience PowerPoint Live, discuss challenges and opportunities when offering equal access to content, and share ideas for practice and research.

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Extended Abstract

Often, educators find diverse learners with various cultural backgrounds, abilities, and learning preferences in their classrooms. Universal Design for Learning (UDL) is a research-based framework that addresses such expected variability through the design of instruction and the curriculum (CAST, 2018a). By implementing the UDL principles and guidelines, variability is acknowledged when learners are empowered to choose their learning path among options for multiple means of engagement, representation, and action and expression. Thus, UDL-based instruction promotes inclusive learning that meets the diverse needs of all students.

The UDL guideline to provide options for perception, under the UDL principle to provide multiple means of representation, suggests that options for perception should be provided “to ensure that key information is equally perceptible to all learners by … providing the same information through different modalities (e.g., through vision, hearing, or touch); [and] providing information in a format that will allow for adjustability by the user” (CAST, 2018b, para. 1). The UDL checkpoint 1.2 suggests that alternatives for auditory information can be offered by using “text equivalents in the form of captions or automated speech-to-text (voice recognition) for spoken language” (CAST, 2018c, para. 2).

In general, research has shown that captioning is beneficial to many, including individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing, hearing adults wanting to retain what is heard, and persons learning a second language. Specifically, educators can offer captions or subtitles as a text-based alternative to auditory information to make content equally accessible to all learners.

On the other hand, advances in automated speech-to-text or speech recognition technologies (SRT) have facilitated the production of captions for recorded videos and enabled real-time subtitling in multiple languages during live sessions. Thus, the use of SRT-based applications during live class presentations could be a cost-effective approach to providing text-based alternatives to auditory information, as suggested in UDL checkpoint 1.2.

However, how effective and useful are these SRT-based applications for live class presentations, online or on-site? How accurate are the captions/subtitles generated in real-time by SRTs? How do instructors and students describe the benefits and challenges of using these applications? How do instructors and students experience real-time automated captions/subtitles for teaching and learning? To partially examine these questions, we conducted a qualitative study to understand students’ experiences when using real-time automated captions/subtitles during live online class presentations with Microsoft PowerPoint Live (Microsoft, n.d.).

In our study, we referred to captions as the transcription of the presenter’s spoken words in their language and subtitles as the transcription of the presenter’s spoken words in a different language. The technologies we used were (a) PowerPoint Live (Microsoft, n.d.) to deliver the presentation with real-time caption/subtitles; and (b) Zoom video conferencing system to connect the remote group (i.e., presenter, researchers, and participants), transmit the presenter’s spoken words, and conduct the research focus groups. We expected that the findings of the study would help educators effectively integrate SRT-based applications to address the diversity of learners in their classes and promote inclusive learning when providing automated captions/subtitles as an alternative for auditory information in live presentations.  

Session Goals

At the end of the session, attendees will be able to

  1. discuss challenges and opportunities when addressing equal access to content with automated real-time captions/subtitles in PowerPoint live during online class presentations, and
  2. articulate ideas for practice and research.

Level of Participation

The session will be structured as follows:

  1. We will describe the study, share the main themes that emerged from study participants’ experiences, and discuss recommendations for practice and research (25 minutes)
  2. Using their mobile devices or another computer browser, attendees will connect to a brief PowerPoint Live presentation and follow it in their preferred language (10 minutes).  
  3. Attendees will share their experiences with PowerPoint Live caption/subtitles and conclude with ideas for practice and research (10 minutes).

References

CAST (2018a). Universal Design for Learning Guidelines version 2.2. http://udlguidelines.cast.org

CAST. (2018b). Guideline 1, provide options for perceptions.  https://udlguidelines.cast.org/representation/perception/alternatives-auditory

CAST. (2018c). Checkpoint 1.2, offer alternatives for auditory information.  https://udlguidelines.cast.org/representation/perception/alternatives-auditory

Microsoft. (n.d.) Present Live: Engage your audience with Live Presentations. https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/office/present-live-engage-your-audience-with-live-presentations-039aa2cc-67fa-4fb5-9677-46ed8a060c8c

 

Nov 1, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Building Hyflex Programs through Crossfunctional Collaboration | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

The advantages of a HyFlex modality became apparent through the COVID-19 pandemic, but continues to raise questions on training and implementing the modality properly. Our session outlines the aforementioned components of creating a HyFlex environment, as well as the experience specifically within our institution regarding its implementation, successes, and challenges. 

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Extended Abstract

Hyflex as a modality came into prominence as campuses tried to move beyond the Covid-19 pandemic. Many students thrived on the flexibility that online learning granted and chafed at the “return to normal” that such a change required. Many students felt uncomfortable being back in person at all considering the emerging variants and difficulty enforcing vaccine mandates. 
Hyflex as a modality allows students to choose how to engage with the course. Students may stick with one modality all semester, or oscillate back and forth depending on preference or life circumstance. Developing best practices for this modality is difficult as it is new and untested. Further, given the high degree of technical and pedagogical skills that teaching in multiple modalities requires, this requires deep consideration on effective instruction. Our pilot training didn’t utilize the potential for an asynchronous modality, however such an option can be included for future implementations.

All of these factors combined makes designing and implementing the HyFlex modality extremely difficult and complicated. Our institution accomplished it using multiple avenues of resources and integrated collaboration from multiple internal departments and stakeholders. For the purposes of this document, we are separating them into categories of “pedagogy workshops” and “technical training”, but all stakeholders were essential to each step of the process. This cross-functional team took different leadership roles based on the specific aspects of the training itself.

Our semester-long HyFlex pilot consisted of 8 courses with 4 HyFlex enabled rooms. 

Overall: 

Each faculty met with the Instructional Technologist/Designer to discuss their course and the ultimate goal. Using a backwards-design approach, the faculty and designer designed the structure of the course around the ultimate pedagogy. First the learning outcomes were defined, and through that, course content, mechanisms of engagement and assessment. 

As each course design was customized for the faculty and course, there was no standardized training. However, many of the courses utilized the below strategies. We find that these types of engagement mechanisms were effective at engaging students in both modalities in the HyFlex course. 

Pedagogy Workshops: 

The Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) took the lead in designing the pedagogy of HyFlex on our campus, and the pedagogy of the training workshops for faculty. The pedagogy was based on use cases in other similar universities as well as understanding key aspects of quality pedagogy in both online and in-person courses. The pedagogy workshops consisted of planning out the pedagogical nature of the course, as well as how and when educational technology tools could be effectively implemented. Faculty were trained in engaging students through the multiple modalities, how to engage online and in-person students, and how to maintain engagement with co-located students.

Aggregate Engagement: 

To facilitate students in both modalities participating together, instructors were trained on effective use of aggregate engagement tools. Tools like Padlet, MentiMeter, or Polleverywhere. For example, a large lecture survey course used Mentimeter for “snap” type polls to gauge understanding and thoughts on the topic at hand.

Small group engagement: 

If the course pedagogy is suited for small group engagement, students would be paired up in small groups to discuss the topic at hand in more detail. Groups would use collaborative tools such as Google Slides, Padlet, or Google Jamboard to create and brainstorm around a set of ideas. This can be done through an informal “think pair share” or more formal cohesive presentations. For technical reasons, collaboration happens most effectively in a within-groups model; in essence, online students collaborating with other online students and the same for in-person students. Contingency plans were discussed in the case of an imbalance of students present in each modality, but the numbers stayed fairly consistent throughout the semester. 

Technical Training: 

CTL and the Office of Information Technology Services (ITS) built the technical training together, which was run by ITS. The technical training ensured faculty were comfortable implementing all of their chosen educational technology in the classroom. Faculty were trained on effectively managing multiple displays to see the virtual students as well as course content and resources. The ITS technical training customized the training to focus on resources applicable to the faculty’s pedagogy as well as the physical resources in the classroom itself.

The training was situated in the classroom the faculty would teach in. This allowed faculty to get comfortable with both the theoretical and practical aspects they would encounter during lectures. Additional support was virtually present during the onsite technical trainings to simulate the online students. 

One aspect of the HyFlex modality that faculty reported they supported was knowledge they could “pivot” easily if the situation required it. There was great apprehension about the return to in-person courses as faculty were afraid of another “ping-pong” semester- where week-to-week one would need to replan everything based on new variants. 

Assessment of HyFlex Pilot: 

Assessment of the pilot was conducted through multiple avenues. First was direct feedback gathered anonymously through surveys after each stage of the initial training.  Next was informal feedback gathered at checkpoints throughout the semester.The informal checkpoints were conducted through a faculty peer, thus allowing the faculty to communicate more openly then they might have felt comfortable with otherwise. Finally, an end of semester anonymous survey was distributed to faculty asking for feedback in the overall process. 

Outcomes assessments will compare HyFlex course outcomes with similar courses of other modalities, as well as comparing course evaluations. However, at the time of this submission that information is not available. 

Results: 
Preliminary results from the pilot revealed multiple interesting points.

Functional:
Certain technological resources are an absolute necessity for the smooth functioning of a HyFlex course (i.e. a second monitor set up). In cases where this technology was not available, the course suffered and teaching was impacted. 

A rapid response unit was a necessity. If a faculty member was teaching and encountered an issue, a technician needed to be available to resolve the issue immediately. The standard 2-4 business days ticket filing system was insufficient for this pedagogical set-up. Our institution mobilized a combination of IT and CTL personnel to fulfill this role, depending on the nature of the issue at hand. 

Continuous communication and collaboration was absolutely necessary for a successful implementation. The Provost’s office, CTL, and ITS were continuously in communication with each other and able to discuss and resolve higher level issues as they arose. 

Teaching: 
Certain faculty struggled at first with the concept of teaching HyFlex, especially when they had to deal with technical issues. As they became more familiar with the technology and modality in general, their comfort level rose and issues reported decreased. 

Faculty reported they needed to use alternative engagement modalities then they traditionally used in face-to-face courses. They also noted that students who would otherwise have had to miss class– due to illness or other– had an easier time catching up then in more traditional face-to-face classes. Students reported that they enjoyed having the flexibility to take the class online if they wished, and even further- knowing that classmates would not feel pressured to come to class if they were feeling unwell. 

Future: 
As we understand more about the modality and its specific implementation on our campus, we plan to refine both the training and the equipment around what would best suit the pedagogy of the course. Further down the line, we might launch a HyFlex certification process akin to one that one would take to teach online.  

 

Level of Participation: 
This is a highly participatory session. Rather than lecture at the audience for 45 minutes, the presenters will frame the session around conversations of student success in Hyflex as well as the challenges one might have implementing such a process. The conversation will tackle both the pedagogical aspects of implementing a HyFlex training/pilot as well as the technical and administrative aspects of the process.  

A large chunk of the session will also be spent in scaffolded engagement breakout rooms. Essentially, after presenting the problem to a large audience members will have the option of moving into a breakout room guided by a presenter focused on topics that the audience seemed most interested in earlier in the presentation.

To support and engage our audience at all levels, engagement during the session will be scaffolded. During the breakout rooms participants can also choose to engage: 

  • Discussing with the other members of the session via audio/video in Zoom, or in the chat
  • By sharing resources and ideas in a shared collaborative resource page.

Session Goals: 

  • Understanding the challenges and strategies to implement HyFlex on your campus.
  • Formulating a collaborative team in making HyFlex (or other such projects) happen. 
  • Understanding the pedagogy of HyFlex and how to communicate its difference from other more established modalities. 
  • Outlining key stakeholders, and the types of communication necessary between those stakeholders to facilitate and support HyFlex courses
Nov 1, 2022
12:00pm - 12:30pm (Eastern)
Speed Networking: Conversation Starters & Impactful Partnerships | Other | Zoom Room 4

In this space, you will change your Zoom background to something unique to you and share it with us all! It can be something meaningful, funny, or just something you love! Whether you are new to OLC or a regular attender, this could be the start of a meaningful partnership!

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
What Can We Learn from HyFlex Teaching? Engaging Online and On Campus Students in Bichronous Environments | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

From 2020-2021, Social Work committed to creating lively, active classroom engagement while adhering to safety precautions. With enrollments too large to bring all students on campus at once, the presenters modified evidence-based HyFlex strategies to teach in a bichronous format, with students participating both on campus and simultaneously synchronously online. 

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Extended Abstract

The Social Work program faced the challenge of bringing students back to campus, maintaining lively and active classroom engagement while honoring safety precautions. Class enrollments were too large to bring all students back at once. After a literature review, we looked at HyFlex strategies to modify teaching for a synchronous hybrid format. Courses were taught bichronously with half of the students attending class on campus and half the students participating online.  

Faculty modified their teaching to address technological challenges such as online audience disengagement, limited microphone range, and audio lag.  This presentation will present techniques to address these challenges. These include utilizing a video conference device known as a Meeting Owl Pro, enlisting a Zoom assistant to monitor chat, connecting a second device to the Zoom call to better see and connect with online students while screen sharing, adjusting physical and online small group activities for the split environment, and establishing clear classroom participation norms,.  

Technology used in the classroom included a Meeting Owl Pro, a classroom presentation kiosk which included a desktop computer and projector, and either a laptop or tablet. Meeting Owl Pro is a conference device featuring a 360 degree camera, a microphone with an 18 foot pickup range, an amplified speaker so participants in the classroom could hear online students, and motion detection that points the camera on speakers in any part of the room.  By placing the Owl in the center of the room, both the faculty and in class participants could be heard by the students attending online. The Owl was connected by USB cable to a classroom presentation kiosk, which hosted the Zoom call.   

Faculty were also encouraged to join the Zoom call with a second device, typically a laptop or tablet. To eliminate feedback, this second device joined the Zoom call without joining audio.  By using a second device, faculty were able to see and feel more engaged with online participants. They could also monitor the chat and be alerted to raised hands from online participants. This left the presentation kiosk free to focus on screen sharing and hosting the call. Some faculty also recruited an in-person student as a Zoom monitor to keep an eye on chat. 

Based on literature focused on engaging students in an online format, best practices that were shared with faculty to manage the online/hyflex classroom were using breakout rooms for small group discussions, having the groups report out in the larger room from the breakout room discussions, having students turn their cameras on while on zoom, and using platforms like Kahoot or polls in zoom to provide more engaging activities in the class. 

Faculty facilitated small breakout room activities that blended in person and online students. Students were encouraged to bring a laptop to allow online participants to collaborate with face to face students. Groups met in the hallways surrounding the classroom so that online students could hear and be better heard.  

Adding a layer of technology to course delivery also required establishing course norms to account for some of the challenges technology introduces.  Zoom communication is slightly delayed, and the delay is lengthened by the amount of time it takes for a student to unmute themselves.  Faculty were coached to wait slightly longer than usual to give time for online students to respond to discussion prompts.  

Presentation Objectives 

Participants attending this session who are teaching a synchronous hybrid course (virtual and physical) will be able to utilize classroom management strategies that maintain student engagement for both audiences. They will apply techniques that address the challenges this format presents. 

Nov 1, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Reframing Syllabi to be Equity-Minded and to Develop Students’ Growth Mindset | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

Educators can make a difference in reaching each learner’s intellectual potential through caring of each learner’s learning, no matter their backgrounds. How do educators establish a nurturing learning environment from the syllabus? This session will share strategies/practical ideas to reframe syllabi to be equity-minded and to develop students’ growth mindset.

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Extended Abstract

As confirmed by human learning principles, an individual’s intelligence is partly determined by genes and partly by nurture and supportive learning experience. Educators can make a difference in reaching each learner’s intellectual potential through course design, teaching, and through our caring of each learner’s learning, no matter their backgrounds. Every course has a syllabus that tries to offer learners a big picture of the course and illustrate the policies and expectations. How do our educators establish a nurturing learning environment to show our caring about every student’s learning, starting from this essential document—the syllabus? Are all syllabi we have provided and have accessed keep equity in mind and motive students’ learning by supporting learners’ growth mindset? This session will share strategies and practical ideas to reframe syllabi to be equity-minded and to develop students’ growth mindset.

The session will share examples and facilitate discussions among participants. For example, why and how tone and language matters? Why do we need to avoid rigid obligation policies and how to reframe them? How can we reconsider evaluating student work? How do we talk about the ways to succeed in our courses? How do we create favorable failure climate to make failure productive?

Learning Objectives

After participating in the workshop, each participant has opportunities to:

  • Identify at least one strategy or practical idea to revise their own syllabus (to be equity-minded and to develop learners’ growth mindset).
  • Bring one suggestion provided by the presenter or session participants to their institution and share with the community.
Nov 1, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Using Technology to Engage Students in an Online Course | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 2

Today's higher educational institutions are offering more online courses, but professors see a noticeable decline in engagement in online courses. How can professors engage students in the learning activities and course content? Professors can use technology when teaching online to engage their students and help them learn!

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Extended Abstract

Today's higher education students are looking for more online course offerings. To meet this demand, higher educational institutions are adding more online courses. Still, there has been a noticeable decline in engagement in online courses. Online learning presents new challenges compared with traditional face-to-face learning because students are separated from their professors by a computer screen. How can professors engage students in the learning activities and course content when teaching online?

Increasing student engagement while teaching online has its hurdles. For example, students can turn off their cameras or do other things instead of participating in their learning activities. This presentation will introduce helpful suggestions to increase engagement, such as tips to engage students before, during, and after an online live lesson. In addition, professors can recommend other ways to increase engagement by setting clear course expectations and ensuring the technology will be user-friendly and not cause a challenge with using digital formats.

Using technology can help students learn and engage them simultaneously. The technologies we'll be demonstrating are PlayPosit and Cengage MindTap. PlayPosit is an interactive video where students watch it and engage by answering the interactive questions. Cengage MindTap has integrative features such as a dashboard so students can monitor their progress. The MindTap Reader is an excellent way for students to highlight key text and add notes, along with Cengage's Readspeaker feature that reads text aloud to students on the go. The MindTap learning path is a way to make learning informative and fun.

Level of Participation:

This session introduces the different types of teaching modalities at DeVry University and how technology can be used with each one; onsite, online, and the combination of onsite with online coined by DeVry as OnLive. Tips to engage students before, during, and after the live lessons are presented. Demonstrations with PlayPosit and MindTap will be shown. All participants can engage in the PlayPosit activity. The MindTap demonstration will showcase a level 100 course engaging students with technology through automatically graded assignments and thought-provoking activities. The demonstration will also show how easy it is for the professor to manage multiple students by extending dates, providing feedback, and how the course works with the current Learning Management System (LMS). The session will end with a technological activity that all can participate in using their phones as a review of the presentation using Kahoot, just like in the online classroom.

Session Goals:

Attendees will learn tips on engaging students before, during, and after an online lesson. Attendees will gain information on how to take a traditional onsite class to an interactive online experience. Several technologies will be discussed. Finally, attendees will participate in a demonstration of PlayPosit, MindTap, and Kahoot.

Nov 1, 2022
1:30pm - 2:45pm (Eastern)
The Balance of Precision and Speed: How Online and Blended Learning Can Accelerate Student Success | Keynote Address | Zoom Room 5

As institutions strive to deliver high-quality instruction, programs, and services, it is now more important than ever for such resources to be as flexible and student-centered as possible. This session will describe how professionals are working to transform student experiences in ways that leverage technology, promote collaboration, and ensure equity. Dr. Parnell will share examples of current campus efforts and present practical strategies for how faculty, staff, and administrators can use virtual resources to help students successfully navigate their learning journey.

Prior to the start of the keynote, we will recognize our 2022 OLC Award winners.  Please also join us Tuesday, November 2 from 11:15am-12:15pm US Eastern Daylight Time Zone (EDT) for our OLC & Awards Gala & Social, where we will celebrate our award winners' achievements and have the opportunity to ask them questions.

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Extended Abstract

          

Nov 1, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
An interactive classroom success story: examining a large multi-year study of how to successfully deploy engagement tools | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

Learn how community college faculty studied the impact of implementing a multiple-solution platform in their instruction and experienced significant quantitative increases in course success rates across learner demographics. Faculty will discuss these study findings and share best practices for using interactive engagement, assessment, and media tools to connect with students.

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Extended Abstract

One of the biggest challenges for any community college today is ensuring that students are remaining properly engaged in the classroom. This has been especially true with recent and necessary trends that bend towards remote and hybrid learning. As many instructors and administrators know, this causes a host of new decisions and challenges: which tools are best to deploy? How can we tell whether the students are actually learning the material and not just showing up? How can I make it easy for my instructors and faculty to teach courses without an added burden? How can I ensure that a given technology platform accounts for certain inequities across a spectrum of backgrounds, ages, languages, etc?

 

During this presentation, you will hear from a community college faculty member who independently conducted a research study over a two year period in Allied Health classes using a classroom engagement platform. In the study, four sections of the course utilized the platform, and four sections of the same course did not - otherwise, the curriculum and assessments were identical in each section. Overall, students in sections using the platform showed a nearly 20% higher course success rate, as well as lower withdrawal and failure rates, compared to the control group. Further, higher course success rates were seen across all demographics including gender, race/ethnicity, age, academic load, and instructional location. The specific data, and the importance of these results as they relate to community college priorities, will be shared and discussed by the faculty and audience in depth during this session.

Attendees will also have the opportunity to experience how the instructional platform works by participating in examples of learning activities from a student’s perspective. With this approach, attendees of the session can familiarize themselves with one platform that builds deeper connections through interactivity, dynamic media, formative assessments, and more; allowing for the increased course success rates, for all learners, as seen in the study.

Nov 1, 2022
3:00pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Trauma and the Virtual Classroom: Trauma-Informed and Healing-Centered Pedagogical Principles in Online Education | Workshop | Zoom Room 2

Trauma (and recovery!) is pervasive in the lives of individuals across the globe. In recognizing that each student’s lived experience is unique and that many have faced heightened stress in recent years, this workshop will explore how we can implement trauma-informed and healing-centered pedagogical principles to support student success.

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Extended Abstract

In this workshop, we will examine ways that psychological trauma may be defined. We will explore trauma-informed teaching practices and healing-centered engagement and how we may implement these pedagogical principles in our work with adult learners in the online learning environment. We will reflect on the heightened stress that many of our students have experienced in recent years related to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated long-standing inequities, and our role as faculty in recognizing trauma responses and promoting student well-being. We will also consider our role in bearing witness to the trauma and resilience of our students and ways to foster hope and healing. 

Individuals in attendance will be invited to engage in reflection at the beginning and conclusion of the workshop on questions related to their implementation of trauma-informed and healing-centered practices in their virtual classrooms and specific strategies they might like to consider weaving into their courses. Attendees will be provided with the opportunity to share their reflections in small and whole group discussions (LO's 1 & 2). Those attending will also be invited to participate in an exercise to identify their top five signature strengths (Peterson et al., 2005) as part of small and whole group discussions examining strengths-based approaches to our work with students (LO 3).  

Participant Learning Outcomes

Following the workshop, individuals in attendance will be able to:

1. Discuss trauma-informed and healing-centered pedagogical principles

2. Describe several examples of how trauma-informed and healing-centered pedagogical principles could be translated to their work with adult learners in their specific online learning environment

3. Identify their top five signature strengths for further reflection

Faculty members are the intended audience for this workshop. They will be invited to explore how they may implement trauma-informed and healing-centered pedagogical principles in their work with students and specifically, what these practices may look like when translated to their own discipline. 

This workshop will include 40 minutes of presentation with whole group discussion, 40 minutes of interactive exercises and discussion in small groups, and 10 minutes for question and answer. 

No materials are required for those in attendance other than their own device.  

References

Peterson, C., Park, N., & Seligman, M. E. P. (2005). Assessment of character strengths. In G. P. Koocher, J. C.  Norcross & S. S. Hill III (Eds.), Psychologists’ desk reference (2nd ed., pp. 93-98). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Nov 1, 2022
3:00pm - 4:00pm (Eastern)
OLC Live! Beyond the Keynote (Join the conversation in Slack)| Other | Slack

Join OLC Live hosts for a rich post-keynote discussion focused on open learning trends, strategies, and collaborative efforts. This session will feature shared insights and highlights from conference attendees related to the virtual keynote by Dr. Ameila Parnell.

Nov 1, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
Web3 and Education: An Optimistic Primer on Online Learning's Blockchain-based Future | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

The internet is changing and online learning will necessarily change with it. Terms like "crypto," "blockchain," "NFT," "DAO," and "Web3" are possibly not entirely new to you, but do you know what to expect when these stop being theoretical and become infused into the very bedrock of online learning? Join our panel of experts and educators to help answer questions like "What problem does this solve?," "What value does this add?," "How does it work?," and "What does it even do?"

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Extended Abstract

With the shifting fundamental, underlying structures of how online learning is designed and delivered, it is important for educators, researchers, instructional designers, even leaders and students to understand just what this means and how to prepare. There is widespread confusion and concern over the (what many see as inevitable) move into a decentralized, transparent internet and what that could mean for online education if not approached with care, consideration, and intention. For example, how does one approach designing instruction for decentralized delivery and facilitation? What does that even mean? Isn’t a wallet just the same as a portfolio? What happens when there is no centralized, gated vault of knowledge, but rather a democratized outpouring of it? And how do we address authenticity and accountability? This discussion seeks to move beyond simply the excitement of the potentials of Web3 and address possible concerns and criticisms, as well. The Web3 space has a very steep learning curve, something this panel hopes to flatten at least in the online learning space. In short, the goal is to, to quote one of our panelists, "Discern signal from noise."

The panel will have a set number of groundwork-setting topics and questions but will be open to questions from the audience. In fact, this is highly encouraged. As per usual, attendees will be able to submit questions throughout the discussion and the moderator will do their best to get to them.

Given the relatively short timeframe for the session and the likelihood of being able to answer everyone's questions during, attendees of this session will be invited to a growing, vibrant community of educators, researchers, and leaders in the Web3 space with a focus on not just "doing Web3," but doing it right, where the conversation can continue and grow. Attendees will also leave with a working understanding of what these concepts actually mean and the ability to engage authentically in the conversations that will inevitably arise. Finally, attendees will leave with their (likely) first true engagement with the Web3 ecosystem: an NFT! (No annoyed monkeys, we promise. And if you a) don't know what that is, or b) are skeptical about it, this is definitely the panel for you!)

 

Nov 1, 2022
3:45pm - 4:15pm (Eastern)
Crew Connect (Innovation Crew Meet-Up) | Other | Zoom Room 4

Participants are invited to engage with Crews by attending the same session(s) or activity(s). Meet up with your crew lead to debrief and plan your next steps.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
The Dual Mindset – Placing Traditional and Online Education on Equal Footing | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

As the online degree market expands, it is essential to remain competitive in how we serve students and vigilant in how we assess services. At our institution, administrators promote a dual mindset when working with on-campus and online students, thus ensuring all learners have equal access to campus resources.

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Extended Abstract

“As institutions of learning increasingly turn to technology to deliver instruction, the on-line writing center will become much more the norm, if not the model for how to blend technology and pedagogy” (Gillespie, & Lerner, 2000, p. 146). The authors’ prediction rings true today when we consider how co-curricular programs have moved to the center of student success and retention efforts in many institutions of higher education, including our own.

When serving online student populations, it is important to know where your students come from. For example, does your institution have students who reside outside of your geographic region? This belief was expressed in Dr Chris Schultz’s ACTLA Keynote address: “You can’t meet your students where they are until you know who they are” (ACTLA, 2022). As emphasized by our Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Engagement in Academic Affairs, campus services should have a dual mindset when serving in-person and online students. This means that one should always consider both student populations when adding new services or improving existing services. The same sentiment is echoed by the Director of the Office of Online Education: "If universities want to stay relevant to modern learners, or even just keep their doors open, they must put online education on equal footing with on-campus education. The market demands it. Learners are increasingly likely to be older … with careers and responsibilities that make it impossible to go to campus full time" (Foley, 2020).

Thanks to visionary leadership at our institution, the dual mindset has been in place since the inception of online services in 2009. Online academic support services were designed to complement existing campus services. For example, writing services provide online wrap around support for all students from first year through to graduation (bachelor’s and master’s degrees). This ensures online students have access to similar support from the same tutoring team. The same is true for math services. Synchronous online sessions complemented with wrap around asynchronous support for 100 & 200 level math courses ensure the same service is available for online students. Like in-person services, online support facilitates a smooth transition “handshake” from Online Math Support to Online Supplemental Instruction when students reach 300-400 level math courses.

To best meet the needs of all students, tutors are trained as a single team to focus first on higher order concerns before moving on to lower order concerns for both in-person and online consultations. Higher order concerns may involve commenting on the paper as a whole. For example, does the paper follow the assignment guidelines? Do the paragraphs have adequate support or development? Low order concerns may involve misspellings, grammar problems, sentence-level concerns, etc. Higher order concerns should always come first, else the consultant is at risk of mimicking an editing service. In math and science sessions, addressing higher order concerns first translates to the tutors providing conceptual support. Workers are trained to comment about overall conceptual errors in the student’s thinking before moving on to specific computational errors, sign errors, etc.

It is important to monitor the wellbeing of each worker as a Learning Center Manager. “You can’t pour from a cup that’s empty” (Raine Porter, Student Keynote, ACTLA 2022). The Writing Center Assistant and Math & Science Resource Center Assistant act as liaisons between student workers and Center Managers. The Center Assistants help monitor local and distance workers for burnout and fatigue to help them maintain a healthy balance between academics, personal life, and tutoring responsibilities. Experience shows that it is harder to spot problems and attempt interventions when dealing with remote workers. Thus, Learning Center Managers and Assistants should develop strategies to effectively monitor the well-being of online workers. When caught early, imbalance can often be handled by listening to the worker or by temporarily reducing their workload so that they can bounce back. On occasion, to handle more advanced situations, the worker may be referred to the Center for Health Promotion.

To ensure online support is on par with in-person support, multiple forms of assessment are conducted throughout the academic year. The first assessment is student impressions, which are captured through automated feedback in real time throughout the semester. This allows administrators and tutors to adjust in a timely fashion to better serve the students. The automated feedback is in place for online asynchronous and online synchronous support. Similar feedback will be coming soon for in-person consultations in the walk-in Centers.

Student Feedback is based on a 4 point scale with 4 being “Stongly Agree” and 1 being “Strongly Disagree”. Feedback is collected for six key aspects of the online support and submission process. See the table below for student feedback results:

Student Feedback

Writing - Spring 2022 Average

  • The review I received helped me improve my assignment = 3.76
  • I understood all of my tutor’s suggestions = 3.74
  • I felt the review was a fair assessment of my assignment = 3.80
  • Submitting an assignment was easy =  3.88
  • The wait time for my review was reasonable = 3.79
  • I would recommend this tutoring service to other students = 3.91

Math - 2020 – 2022 Average

  • The review I received helped me improve my assignment = 3.81
  • I understood all of my tutor’s suggestions = 3.85
  • I felt the review was a fair assessment of my assignment = 3.86
  • Submitting an assignment was easy = 3.82
  • The wait time for my review was reasonable = 3.85
  • I would recommend this tutoring service to other students = 3.92

Anecdotally, this is what students had to say about online writing and math support for the Spring 2022 term: “This was a challenging and time consuming problem. I appreciate the time and effort given by both Tutor 1 and Tutor 2. That is some commitment” (Calculus 2 student). A Calculus 1 student said: “Really glad to get this clarification on the content!” A graduate student in Social Work said: “Tutor 3 provided great comments and suggestions. She was prompt and her assistance was much appreciated!” And finally, an undergraduate student submitting a paper for an English class commented: “All I can say is, "WOW!" Tutor 4 did a fantastic job, was very thorough, and I appreciate the time she took to help me.”

The next assessment to ensure the same level of support is provided to all students happened when the Higher Learning Commission visited our campus in February 2022. At this visit, the 2019 High Impact Practices and Engagement Analysis showed that the Writing Center and the Math and Science Resource Center (combined as “Academic Support” in the analysis) are consistently among the top three most effective cocurricular programs at IU East (as cited in Indiana University East, Assurance Argument, 2021). The campus Student Engagement Division is continuing to assess and improve co-curricular student services through pre and post assessments, using Qualtrics surveys of services and their workers.

Following the Higher Learning Commission’s visit, our campus is continuing the assessment of both in-person and online co-curricular programs. However, instead of assessing all components at once, student services units will be assessing one component at a time on a rotational basis. Schendel and Macauley (2012) caution in their book titled Building Writing Center Assessments that Matter: “Don’t assess everything all of the time” (p. 121). Following their advice, during the 2021-2022 academic year, all of the campus co-curricular student services conducted critical thinking assessment of workers in each unit using Qualtrics surveys. A Critical Thinking Pre-Test was conducted in Fall 2021, and a Critical Thinking Post-Test was conducted in Spring 2022. The tests were conducted by the Assistance Vice Chancellor for Student Engagement in Academic Affairs who will work with the Office of Institutional Research, Effectiveness, and Planning to perform a qualitative analysis of survey results, including analysis of the open-ended questions in the surveys.

In conclusion, as the online degree market continues to expand, it is essential to remain competitive in how we serve our students and vigilant in how we assess our services. At our institution, faculty, staff, and administrators strive to maintain a dual mindset when working with on-campus and online students. This deliberate mindset allows us to ensure all learners have equal access to campus resources and services.

 

References

Foley, C. J. (2020, February 19). From the desk: Director says online education is a university’s ‘heart and lungs’. News at IU. https://news.iu.edu/stories/2020/02/iu/inside/19-from-the-desk-director-says-online-education-is-universitys-heart-and-lungs.html

Gillespie, P., & Lerner, N. (2000). The Allyn and Bacon guide to peer tutoring. New York: Longman.

Indiana University East. (2021). The 2019 high impact practices and engagement analysis. Assurance Argument.

Porter, R. (2022). Student keynote address. Association of Colleges for Teaching and Learning Assistance.

Schendel, E., & Macauley, W. J. (2012). Building writing center assessments that matter. Logan, Utah: Utah State UP.

Schultz, C. (2022). Keynote address. Association of Colleges for Teaching and Learning Assistance.

Nov 1, 2022
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Personas and Pathways for Professional Development in Education | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

In this session, explore a framework for identifying personas and pathways for professional learning for faculty, including practical tools and strategies.

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Extended Abstract

When it comes to professional development for online, blended, and digital learning, knowing your audience and understanding their needs is critical to success. In this session, the OLC Institute for Professional Development will provide an effective framework that institutions can use to identify personas and pathways for professional learning, including practical tools and strategies for communicating opportunities to faculty and instructors who want to improve the quality of their online teaching.

Nov 1, 2022
5:00pm - 5:30pm (Eastern)
OLC Live! Conference Preview (Programs and Pathways) | Other | Zoom Room 4

There’s so much to take in, explore, and learn at Accelerate 2022! Join the conference leadership and planning team for an introduction to all of the exciting events, programming, and ways to engage and connect in this conference kickoff session. OLC Live! co-hosts will interview the conference chairs to share all of the exciting ways to make the most of your Accelerate 2022 experience.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Eastern)
Fostering Connectedness and Engagement Across the Field: A Spotlight on OLC Findings in Digital Learning in 2022 | Featured Session | Zoom Room 1

In this ever-changing educational landscape, our work sharing diverse perspectives, emergent themes, and empirical findings are critical as we forge our new learning futures. In this high-energy session, participants will hear from OLC staff members in a series of lightning talks on their work within digital learning research and community engagement. At the conclusion of each talk, participants will be able to contribute to the conversation of what’s next - including sharing their own ideas and opportunities for advancing connectedness and engagement in collaboration with the OLC.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 1, 2022
6:30pm - 7:15pm (Eastern)
Playlist of Travel Songs - Name That Tune! | Evening Event | Zoom Room 4

What tune would you play on a roadtrip? Come innovate with destination theming and backgrounds that match your playlist. Team up to stump your competitors and win bragging rights as creator of the most engaging journey.

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Nov 2, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by our Slack channel anytime for help, guidance and recommendations.

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 2, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Technology Test Kitchen: Interactive Education | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

Looking for new ways to engage your students? Check out how Nearpod can help add interactivity into your course and enrich the learning experience! Explore Padlet as a tool to connect, collaborate and learn from and about one another.  - To find the list of ASYNCHRONOUS Technology Test Kitchen sessions, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Technology test Kitchen".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 2, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
"Anytime" Asynchronous Engagement | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Not sure what to do between sessions? Consider checking out OLC Accelerate's fully virtual and asynchronous engagement space. Each of the volunteer-driven engagement teams have prepared and carefully designed fun, engaging, and thought-provoking activities for you to take up on your own time. If nothing else, it is a great place to get new ideas for how to engage with others and build community. Plus, you'll get to learn more about OLC Accelerate's 2022 Engagement Team (a group of dedicated volunteers from across the field who designed this year's engagement programming). Just visit the "OLC Engagement Hub" and  "Your Engagement Experience" of the engagement team pages in Engagez (e.g. Speed Networking Lounge, Field Guides, OLC Live!, Technology Test Kitchen, OLC Cafe & Mercantile, OLC Sanctuary, Escape Room, Innovation Crews, and more!).

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 2, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Join An Innovation Crew! | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Innovation Crews are flexible communities convened around shared community interests before and during a conference experience. Facilitated by a “Crew Leader”, they provide a space for colleagues to connect, converse, support each other, and be part of a smaller group within the larger conference. Select a group that aligns with your interests and join a cohort of colleagues dedicated to both navigating OLC Accelerate together and co-constructing a meaningful learning experience. We’ll be facilitating Crews around the following six interest areas this year: Instructional Designers; Allies (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion); Immersive and Simulated Learning; Gameful Learning; Weavers of Several Interests Not sure which Crew is the best fit for you? Spend some time reviewing the descriptions to learn more about each of these unique Crews. - To find the list of Innovation Crew Meet-Up's, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Innovation Crew Meet-Up".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 2, 2022
9:15am - 9:45am (Eastern)
Meditation and Mindfulness - A Guided Virtual Meditation Session | Other | Zoom Room 4

Start your day with some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Accelerate Virtual Conference in a healthy and present way together.  Whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned practitioner, all levels are welcome to join us for this session.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
Collaborating to Infuse DEI into Online Course Quality For All | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

This session will present the results to date of a cross-institutional collaboration to simultaneously address DEI and online course quality. SUNY, Cal State LA CETL, and others are working to develop an online, openly-licesned, and freely available resource of annotations for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in online course design that can be used with any of the main online course quality rubrics, i.e., CVC-OEIOSCQRQOLT, or QM

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Extended Abstract

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) and online education experts from SUNY, and expert staff and faculty from Cal State Los Angeles, Center for Effective Teaching and Learning (Cal State LA CETL) and the California Community Colleges are collaborating across our institutions to develop a flexible framework that infuses DEI practices into any online course quality rubric. The aim of this project is to help institutions, faculty, and instructional designers ensure equitable, diverse, and inclusive online teaching and learning environments without disrupting existing quality assurance processes. 

 

With cross-institutional teams of experts in DEI, online teaching and online instructional design, this collaborative workgroup has reviewed existing inclusive teaching practices, and adapted them to the online teaching and course design environments. The team has collaborated to cite, research and document, write, and tag a set of online, openly-licensed, and freely available DEI annotations, examples, and practices that can be mapped to Online Course Quality standards, and incorporated into the main existing online quality tools such as CVC-OEIOSCQRQOLT, and QM.  This flexible framework infuses DEI practices into any online course quality rubric, or initiative to address DEI in online course design and instruction. 

 

In addition to the collaboration with our California colleagues, the SUNY team is working in parallel to review current OLC OSCQR Scorecard standards with the online DEI lens, idendify any DEI-related gaps in standards, make recommendions on the need to add DEI standards, and determine if any DEI revisions are needed to the rubric and online support materials. Results of this project will be incorporated into the next version of OSCQR.

 

Targeting online teaching and learning environments, the DEI annotations that result from this collaborative project will assist institutions, online instructional designers, and online faculty to inform, influence, and ensure equitable, diverse, and inclusive online teaching and learning environments, and contribute to a national conversation to build further DEI awareness on effective online practices, tools, and resources for DEI-informed online education in general.

 

This session will provide participants with: 

  1. An overview of the project.
  2. A prototype demonstration of the annotations and platform.
  3. An opportunity for participants to discuss and provide input and feedback to the annotations.
Nov 2, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
Game On: Exploring Game-Based Methods for Asynchronous Instructional Delivery | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

A faculty member and instructional designer share their collaboration to rethink the structure of a graduate course to enhance the learner experience and instructional capacity through gamification.  Come discover the game-based methods implemented throughout the course, as well as the student response and benefits they have seen as a result.

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Extended Abstract

Gamification has been around for more than 100 years and has been utilized as a way to motivate learners or participants.  With the continuing advancements in technology and online education the concept of gamification has become of greater interest in higher education.  This concept along with the need to motivate online students in the midst of a pandemic sparked the collaboration between a faculty member and an instructional designer.  Wang (2021) writes “A gamified learning process has the potential to immerse your students in the curricular content and cultivates a positive attitude toward study” (para. 3).  During the extensive course redesign process, Malone’s Theory of Intrinsically Motivating Instruction and ARCs Theory of Motivation served as models on how to increase student motivation through game-based learning practices and strategies.  Creative storylines, levels, awards, graphics and characters are just some of the unique elements of fantasy, challenge and curiosity that were utilized within the course design and in turn enhanced student engagement, motivation and overall enjoyment of the course.  In this session, you'll hear from a faculty member and instructional designer who collaborated to rethink the structure of a graduate-level comprehensive course to enhance the learner experience and instructional capacity.  During this session will ask participants to pause and reflect on the methods that they currently employ and brainstorm emerging pedagogical strategies, such as gamification into their current course design and how collaboration among a faculty and an instructional designer can be mutually beneficial to expanding their instructional capacity.   Come discover how you can implement various game-based methods and strategies to create a positive and engaging learning environment for students and how effective collaboration and thoughtful design strategies can enhance the student experience. 

 

In this session, participants will engage in an interactive session by:

 

  • Exploring the concept of gamification, its elements, and how it can transform a traditional course

  • Learning the value of game-based methods within an online course and how to implement various strategies to enhance the student experience.

  • Examining  how the relationship and collaboration between faculty and an instructional designer can improve the course design experience.

 

 

Session Structure:

 

The structure of the session will mirror some game-based methods. The layout of our session is as follows:

 

  • Backstory & Choose Your Adventure (5 minutes)

  • Using Poll Everywhere, participants will vote for which adventure they’d like to go on first.

    • Adventure: Understanding Game-Based Methods (8 minutes)

      • Benefits of game-based methods

      • What is a game?

      • What is gamification?

      • What are some examples of game-based elements that can be added to a course to improve learner engagement?

      • What are the benefits of utilizing game-based methods?

    • Adventure: Course Redesign Process (8 minutes)

      • Initial consult and goal settings

      • The design and gamification brainstorming process

      • The design strategies and techniques implemented within the course

  • Student Feedback & Key Takeaways (4 minutes)

  • Playing an interactive game, participants will explore collaboration strategies among faculty and the instructional designer. (10 minutes)

  • Questions (5 minutes)

 

Takeaway #1: After attending this session, attendees will be able to brainstorm and share ideas of how game-based methods can enhance course design.

Takeaway #2: After attending this session, attendees will be able to evaluate how their courses can be enhanced through utilizing game-based methods. 

Takeaway #3: After attending this session, attendees will be able to share how collaborative instructional design efforts can lead to strong course design.

 

Nov 2, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
It takes a virtual village: Building professional community in an online world | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 3

Amidst the pandemic online enrollment in higher education continued to trend upward and a need for virtual connection among online educators emerged. Mindfully curated inclusive support opportunities are shared.  Innovative online community was fostered through faculty lounges, professional consultation, curated online HUB services, and inclusive office gatherings using virtual platforms.

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Extended Abstract

This workshop covers current research regarding the profound and influential impact of the COVID 2019 pandemic upon the field of online education.  Specifically, one direct change in the field has been an increase in students entering graduate online programs and or traditionally “on ground” programs quickly moving to teach temporarily online.  This influx of students resulted in a need for additional instructors, some who were new to virtual instruction.  Discussion regarding the transition to virtual teaching and the lack of in person interchange among professionals was compounded with the added stress of an isolated work environment.  Review of research supports that having regular conversations with colleagues in supportive environments assists in reducing level of stress.  A necessity to develop a unified community to foster connectivity among graduate professors was paramount for program connectivity and success. As a result, virtual and alternative modes of communication, with diversity, inclusion and equity in the forethought, were created.  

During this workshop you will learn how to mindfully curate community engagement opportunities and learn specific strategies we developed based on the identified needs of our faculty within an online graduate school. Furthermore, you will learn how to individualize these strategies to meet other program specific needs.  Examples will be shared regarding the development of tools and events to aid in promoting virtual networking, consultation and professional support designed to encompass multiple venues and capacities.  Focus will be placed on how these opportunities for small and large group meetings as well as drop in versus fixed start time were and can be implemented.  Throughout the development the needs of the user were reflected upon and the activities were created in a manner to promote community engagement among all our faculty in a respectful and collaborative manner.  This transparency in development illustrates the building blocks for attendees to duplicate these tools while being mindful of unique program and individual needs.  Review of inclusion methodology to enhance anti racism, inclusion and equity for the design and implementation is covered and appreciated. The introduction and instruction regarding the use of state of the art interactive virtual platforms as well less sophisticated strategies like drop in zoom office hours are demonstrated. Topics covered include strategies for successful online teaching, professional self care suggestions, networking, and professional consulting.  Informal and formal gathering events including inclusive social gatherings are exhibited and include attendee participation.  The audience will assist in the design of a virtual gathering and such a gathering will be shared in real time.  Helpful instructions on how to advertise community building/instruction as well as helpful tips for successful interaction during touchpoints are provided.How to advertise each opportunity for community building and helpful tips for successful attendance is provided. Flexibility is a key component and adaptations for growth as well as diversification across professionals within online higher education are shared.

In summary, measurable outcomes and activities for participants will include implementing a  casual virtual gathering aimed at creating academic and professional support and connectivity. Participants will be able to identify how to create virtual interactive meetings being mindful of diversity, inclusion and equity. Lastly, participants will be able to identify three virtual resources to increase community and support online educators.

 

Nov 2, 2022
10:45am - 11:15am (Eastern)
OLC Live! Engagement at Accelerate 2022 | Other | Zoom Room 6

Learn more about that the OLC Engagement Committee is doing behind the scenes for the onsite conference happening in November. You'll get a sneak peek at some of the highlights so you can be prepared to be entertained and engaged!

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
11:15am - 12:15pm (Eastern)
OLC Accelerate 2022 Awards Gala | Other | Zoom Room 4

Join us for a session full of ceremony and celebration as we spotlight the achievements, elevate the innovations, and honor the commitments of this year’s award recipients.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
What skills are essential for success in teaching online? Insights from long-term online instructors | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

As online programs grow, the need for skilled instructors persists. But what skills are valuable? This presentation shares results of a study with experienced instructors who answered a question about the most valuable ed skills for online teaching. Results provide insights for the professional development of new and continuing online instructors.

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Extended Abstract

With the sharp pivot to remote instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, opportunities for online learning continue to evolve. However, there is a variation in quality of online programs, courses, and instruction due in part to faculty preparation. The degree of faculty training to teach online differs between institutions (Morh & Sheldon, 2017), which may impact the quality of online instruction. In addition, instructors at some institutions lack access to instructional designers, and instead can only rely on peers who may also have limited experience as to how to improve the quality of their online courses (Jaschik & Lederman, 2019). As online programs grow there is a sustained need for skilled instructors who can deliver high quality online courses to a growing number of online students. Therefore, it is important to assess what skills are needed to successfully teach courses online.

According to Martin, Ritzhaupt, Kumar & Budhrani (2019), seasoned experts are an “untapped source” of information (pp. 34), offering valuable insights on “best practices, standards, and competencies” (pp. 34) for excellence in online teaching. Therefore, this presentation is designed to share the results of an interview-based study of 33 faculty who have taught online for 10 years or more at a highly ranked R1 institution for online education. A qualitative analysis of participant responses to the following question, “What skills do you think are most valuable for online instructors to have?”, will be discussed.

Learning objectives

By attending this session, attendees will be able to: 

  1. Describe the 6 key skills identified by experienced faculty for success in online teaching
  2. Describe at least two ways these skills can be applied to the professional development of both new and experienced online instructors
  3. Discuss at least two ways these skills can enhance the quality of online education

Study Overview

The instructors in this study had taught online at their current institution for an average of 14 years, with one who had taught online for 31 years. The largest percentage (45%) of the instructors were in the 55-64 age range and 59% identified as female. The majority (67%) were full time faculty/instructors.

Data were collected in two stages. First, participants filled out a pre-survey that asked for basic demographic information and some information about their online teaching history. The next stage included a series of three, one-hour virtual interviews in which instructors were asked to reflect on their experiences as an online educator and how their perspectives have changed over time.

A qualitative analysis of the responses to the following question was conducted: What skills do you think are most valuable for online instructors to have? Responses were initially coded by a member of the research team. After initial coding and codebook generation for the question, a second member of the research team double-coded each of the responses. Then, the two researchers met together to discuss coding until they reached full agreement on the codebook and results. The results of the qualitative analysis revealed six major themes that will be presented and discussed in the plan described below.

Presentation Overview and Audience Engagement Plan

Part 1: 10 minutes of presentation & 5 minutes of discussion

The presentation will begin with a theoretical framework to ground this qualitative research, along with information about who the participants were and the method for conducting the interviews with participants. Then we will share the coding and analysis of participant responses to the question, “What skills do you think are most valuable for online instructors to have?” Following this section, attendees will be invited to ask questions about the study design and study methods. The presenter will also ask attendees to predict what skills they think might emerge from participant responses. Attendees will be encouraged to share questions/ideas both verbally and in the chat.

Part 2: 10 minutes of presentation & 5 minutes of discussion

The second section will reveal the results of the qualitative analysis, which yielded 6 valuable skill themes. Direct quotes from participant responses will be shared to illustrate each of these skills. Following this section, attendees with be invited to share their reactions to the skills that emerged from this analysis, as well as the extent to which the study findings might or might not have aligned with their expectations. Attendees will be encouraged to share questions/ideas both verbally and in the chat.

Part 3. 15 minute interactive discussion

Attendees will be asked to consider and discuss the following questions:

  1. How can the study findings can be applied to the professional development of new and experienced online instructors?
  2. In what ways can these findings help promote the quality of online courses?

During this discussion, one presenter will lead, while the second presenter will follow the discussion in the chat. Ideas emerging in the chat will also be shared verbally. At the conclusion, key ideas that emerged from the discussion for both professional development and promoting quality will be summarized.

References

Jaschik, S. & Lederman, D. (2019). 2019 survey of faculty attitudes on technology. Inside Higher

            Ed & Gallup. 

Martin, F., Wang, C., Jokiaho, A., May, B., & Grübmeyer, S. (2019). Examining Faculty Readiness to Teach Online: A Comparison of US and German Educators. European Journal of Open, Distance and E-learning, 22(1), 53-69.

Mohr, S. C., & Shelton, K. (2017). Best practices framework for online faculty professional development: A Delphi study. Online Learning Journal21(4), 123-140.

Nov 2, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Dish Up Some Delight with a Dynamic Synchronous, Fully Facilitated, Virtual Technology Test Kitchen | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 3

Attendees in this workshop will participate in a facilitated synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen, testing technology tools, investigating how to construct interactive, synchronous online Technology Test Kitchens, and discussing the significance of a safe/fun space for exploring existing and emerging technology tools to incorporate in courses across the disciplines.

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Extended Abstract

By their very nature Technology Test Kitchens are interactive. Pre-pandemic, Technology Test Kitchens resembled cooking competition shows such as Iron Chef. At individual stations set up around the room, the “head chef” and a number of “chefs de partle” demonstrated a specific technology tool that the faculty “commis chefs” could then try out with a knowledgeable chef on hand to provide guidance and support while the faculty “commis chef” experimented with the tool. A menu highlights the existing and emerging technology available for testing, and the “head chef” provides “recipes” for how to use each technology tool that faculty could take with them. Then COVID-19 struck, forcing everyone in education to think outside of the classroom, training, and teaching and learning center box. As seen with taking on-campus courses online, creating a virtual Technology Test Kitchen wasn’t as simple as just transferring the in-person experience to the online environment. The Technology Test Kitchen needed a complete renovation.

Nevertheless, how can an online Technology Test Kitchen best serve the faculty community accustomed to immediate support? This is especially relevant when faculty feedback indicates that the most important components of the Technology Test Kitchen are the one-on-one collaborative practice and the guidance on standby to assist. Can these crucial pieces be replicated in an online Technology Test Kitchen? What might this look like?

Listening to our faculty’s comments and concerns, we established our entirely online Technology Test Kitchen as a synchronous and fully facilitated in real-time venue through our LMS Canvas. The virtual Technology Test Kitchen accommodates both the drop-in-for-a-short-while instructors and the stay-for-the-whole-time participants. Additionally, it showcases under-utilized LMS and other educational and emerging technology tools by building the menu around them. The popularity of the virtual edition of our Technology Test Kitchen far exceeds that of our pre-pandemic in-person version to the point that we have gone exclusively and permanently online, holding a virtual Technology Test Kitchen during the fall and spring semesters. Lastly, just as simulations provide students with a safe environment in which to fail and try again, our virtual Technology Test Kitchen offers faculty a space to safely tinker with technology tools.

Similarly, this “try it yourself” workshop gives attendees the chance to explore an actual, facilitated, synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen. Investigate diverse pedagogical approaches that incorporate educational technology in order to accelerate student engagement and motivation. Play with some technology tools that you can easily plug into your upcoming courses. Gain hands-on experience in turning everyday technology tools into online games or game elements. Reflect on some technology tools that enhance student knowledge acquisition or transfer while balancing cognitive load.

Level of Participation:

Attendees will learn how to use some technology tools by testing them in an actual synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen. Furthermore, working in teams, attendees will participate in a game created in Padlet. This will initiate a brainstorming session on unique ways to incorporate tested technology tools in online courses. Afterward, we will demonstrate ways of setting up a synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen. We encourage attendees to pose questions throughout the workshop.

Session Goals:

Attendees will be able to strategize ways to implement a synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen, utilizing the tools available in their institution’s LMS and other available and new educational technology tools. Additionally, attendees will be able to communicate the benefits of real-time, interactive virtual Technology Test Kitchens.

The takeaways for participants in this express workshop include ideas for how to design and execute a synchronous virtual Technology Test Kitchen, a few strategies for diverse ways of incorporating educational technology in courses, and, perhaps, attendees will gain a different perspective on existing or emerging technology.

Nov 2, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Thinking Outside of the Virtual Walls: Creating Contextualized Activities to Enhance Online Learning | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

How can we bring subject matter to life online? In this session, we will bust through the myth that content equals learning and discover strategies to enhance digital classroom activities through contextualization. Large and small group discussions will allow us to explore how contextualized learning works across different disciplines.

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Extended Abstract

As educators, we know that having engaging course content is crucial for motivating and engaging adult learners. However, we don't always know how to make this happen, particularly in online and hybrid environments. How can we bring subject matter to life in an online course?

In this session, we will:

  • Bust through the myth that content equals learning and discover strategies to enhance digital classroom activities through contextualization.

  • Engage in large and small group discussions, which will form a collaborative think tank to explore how contextualized learning works across different disciplines.

Contextualized learning encourages students to apply classroom knowledge to real-world scenarios. It also equips students to find connections between the subject matter and personal experiences, making concepts more meaningful and relevant, which assists them in advancing their knowledge base. This session will inspire you to re-design normative learning activities by turning them into assignments that are practical, engaging, and ultimately more meaningful for your students.

 

Nov 2, 2022
1:15pm - 1:45pm (Eastern)
Networking Design Sprint - Part 1 (Reflecting Onward) | Other | Zoom Room 4

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the first of OLC Accelerate's Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of two days. This year the sprints will center a playful interpretation of the conference theme "reflecting onward."

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Extended Abstract

      

Nov 2, 2022
1:45pm - 2:30pm (Eastern)
2022 Year in Review: Highlighting Key Research and Trends from the Online Learning Journal (OLJ) | Featured Session | Zoom Room 2

This session will provide an overview of a special issue of the journal Educational Psychologist dedicated to advancing an interdisciplinary agenda for online learning research at the intersection of educational technology, educational psychology, and the learning sciences. Panelists are authors of papers in the special issue and editors of the Online Learning journal and/or the special issue of Educational Psychologist. This special issue addresses a longstanding gap in online learning research, building bridges between researchers working in various traditions to provide a more comprehensive account of the broad array of factors that shape teaching, learning and assessment in online environments.       

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
2:30pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Speed Networking: Using Reflective Engagement For Ongoing Learning | Other | Zoom Room 4

In this session we will model reflective practices in order to develop catalytic thinking. We will engage in an activity that will help shape generative questions that are invented to shift and shape one’s future actions. Join us and spin the question wheel for thought-provoking and playful activities that help focus your intentions and connect with your colleagues around stimulating conversations to ignite your creativity.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
Improving Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) Initiatives Through the Application of Strategic Management Concepts | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

There have been impressive advances in the development and application of educational technologies that have made online education more inclusive of previously marginalized populations. Similarly, there has been impressive work in the development of processes, templates, and tools to render course content design and delivery more responsive to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). Unfortunately, advancements in the strategic management of DEI have not been the same. Many DEI initiatives at educational institutions respond to mandates, requirements, or grassroots efforts, limiting the scope and impact they could have. The development and implementation of DEI strategy should reflect on specific institutional considerations, including resources, capabilities, and constraints. Join us for a conversation about strategic management frameworks and how they can be used to frame DEI planning and implementation at your institution. We will explore DEI strategy formulation using examples from two very different institutional contexts: A large Latin American university and two small US-based colleges. Through the discussions, participants will be able to outline an action plan for improving DEI strategy and DEI strategy implementation plans so that they reflect their specific institutional contexts within the context of DEI work.

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Extended Abstract

There have been impressive advances in the development and application of educational technologies that have made online education more inclusive of previously marginalized populations. Similarly, there has been impressive work in the development of processes, templates, and tools to render course content design and delivery more responsive to diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). While many technical DEI tools are available for instruction and course design, fewer solutions have been developed to bring tools to bear and to move DEI effectively and efficiently from discussions to organizational action. To work, the development and implementation of DEI strategy needs to integrate specific institution-specific conditions, including resources, capabilities, and constraints. For example, Is DEI a dotted-line relationship, or is there formal authority in the organizational structure? What is the relationship between DEI and the organization’s culture? What are the institutional definitions and goals for DEI at the outset? What are the human and other resources being allocated to DEI? Is DEI based on academic departments, instructional design, student services, or other? DEI can be furthered across all conditions, but the strategy and implementation plan need to integrate answers to the above and other questions in order to maximize the likelihood of real gains, institutional engagement, and action -versus frustration and disengagement by faculty and staff, and leadership. 

Join us for an engaging conversation about strategic management concepts/frameworks and how they can be used to frame DEI planning and implementation at your institution. We will explore DEI strategy formulation using examples from two very different institutional contexts: A large Latin American university and two small US-based colleges. Strategic management concepts that will be examined include articulating purpose and values; internal and external environment analysis (e.g., internal factors); strategy formulation; factors that drive the implementation plan (e.g., organizational structure and leadership); and control and feedback (e.g., metrics, timeline design).

Through the discussions, participants will be able to outline an action plan for improving DEI strategy and DEI strategy implementation plans so that they reflect their specific institutional contexts within the context of DEI work.  

Level of participation

Facilitators will engage the audience using insights, prompts, and polls to guide discussions. Participants will engage in individual and collective exercises to explore DEI as they share their experiences and lessons learned.

Session goals

After the session, participants will be more familiarized with strategic management concepts and tools. They will also have a better understanding of their role in supporting the success of DEI initiatives. In addition, participants will look at the challenges and solutions from the perspectives of different stakeholders (staff members, faculty, and students) at their institutions and others. Lastly, participants will leave with a toolkit, including a framework, glossary of terms in plain language, key questions, and resources that they can use to ask key questions, frame discussions, and engage colleagues at their institutions to advance DEI goals.

 

SPEAKERS

Rolando J. Mendez, M.A.C., is the Institutional Director of Online Academic and Student Services at the Inter American University of Puerto Rico. He is a learning experience designer, manager, and facilitator, helping organizations create sustainable, scalable, inclusive, and user-centered practices to leverage knowledge and learning. Rolando has over a decade of experience designing, improving, and managing online programs, processes, and services. He specializes in training and development, instructional design, content creation, inclusive practices, and change-management processes. He is an advocate for accessibility, equity, and inclusion in online learning practices. 

Alexandria Mills, M.A. is a Senior Instructional Designer at Los Angeles Pacific University. Currently a doctoral student at George Fox University, with a concentration in instructional design and development. Alexandria is interested in how learners can have an effective, engaging, motivated learning community through integrated multicultural curriculum design approaches and frameworks.  

William Prado, D.B.A. William (Bill) Prado has over 15 years of experience in online education, including in administration, instruction, and course and curriculum design. He teaches sustainable business and other management subjects and has served as Dean of Graduate and Online Programs at Green Mountain College and at Prescott College. Currently, Bill is the Director of the MBA in Sustainability Leadership and Sustainability Management programs at Prescott College. He’s designed business courses and curricula for Green Mountain College, Prescott College, and for higher education clients of the publishers Cengage and Pearson. He also serves on the Institutional Advisory Committee of NC-SARA and is an OLC volunteer. Bill’s work in education is informed by a focus on BIPOC and marginalized students’ success, including integration of diversity, equity, and inclusion dimensions rooted in his experience as a first-generation American Latinx and also as a first-generation college graduate.

Nov 2, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
We’re In This Together: Classroom Strategies and Technologies to Implement Trauma-Informed Pedagogy | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

With growing concerns about student wellbeing in higher education, this interactive session provides an overview of trauma-informed pedagogy and its application to teaching and learning. Specific classroom strategies and technologies that address toxic stress and promote self-care for students will be highlighted.

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Extended Abstract

Ongoing trauma experienced throughout this pandemic has led to an increasing concern for student well being and mental health in the classroom. Even as students begin to re-enter the classroom, there is still a concern for how they might be coping with the effects of disease, war, climate change, violence, and threats to democracy. These sources of toxic stress can feel demoralizing and powerless.

This session provides guidance on what trauma-informed pedagogy is and how to implement it in the context we currently find ourselves in. By introducing Dr. Janice Carello’s Principles for Trauma-Informed Postsecondary Teaching and Learning (TITL), this interactive session will allow participants to think collaboratively about useful classroom strategies and supportive technologies to empower students working through toxic stress.

By attending this session, participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the impact of current global disruptions on learners and explore ways to address student well-being through trauma-informed pedagogy

  • Identify potential barriers and common misconceptions to implementing these practices in the classroom and introduce Dr. Carellos Trauma-Informed Principles for Postsecondary Teaching and Learning to address them.

  • Discover classroom strategies and concrete examples to implement the framework in class and how technology can support this.

Session Agenda

Introduction (5 min) What is trauma-informed pedagogy? Describe the context, relevance, and timeliness in today’s world.

Think-Pair-Share Activity (3 min) Identify potential barriers and common misconceptions for session participants on this topic.

Explain the principles (8 min): Focus on specific TITL principles as they relate to building support, trust, and an equitable learning community.

Application with best practices (9 min): Describe how to provide students with TITL opportunities in class and important considerations.

Brainstorm Activity (3 min): Identify trauma-informed classroom ideas from the group and what other institutions are doing.

Technology to support this (10 min): Digital storytelling and sharing through asynchronous video communications tools, discussion boards, podcasts as well as collaborative docs to build community, collaboration, and growth mindset.

Questions (7 min)

 

 

 

Nov 2, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
Liftoff! Reimagining, Retooling, and Relaunching Quality Assurance  | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

Online learning administrators from a public university system in the southeastern United States will share their experiences planning and implementing quality assurance in online education at their respective campuses. Join this panel discussion to learn about challenges faced and methods for success, including strategies to engage stakeholders and increase faculty buy-in.

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Extended Abstract

As Henry Ford eloquently said years ago, “Coming together is a beginning; Keeping together is progress; working together is succuss.” In this presentation, colleagues from a large public university system in the Southeastern United States propose sharing their experiences in reimagining, retooling, and rethinking quality assurance in online courses at their respective institutions.

Presented as an interactive panel, representatives are able to connect with conference participants through lenses of implementing innovation at research one and mid-to-small regional institutions. This panel discussion will be moderated by a system project director who has experience with large statewide initiatives from concept idea through liftoff and sustainability. Each campus representative will discuss the specific approach taken on their campus, including but not limited to reimagining quality standards laser focused on student-centered success, retooling course design rubrics in partnership with faculty to create buy-in, and relaunching successful quality assurance programs post pandemic while reflecting the mission, vision, and culture of the campus.

Background:
The mission of the state university system is to serve the citizens of the state and beyond through education, discovery and outreach that enables strong economic, social, and environmental well-being. As the higher education landscape has changed, even prior to COVID-19, System leaders committed to exploring enhanced quality online offerings. In late 2019, campus provosts appointed members to a systemwide RFP committee to solicit bids for a provider who could deliver the technology to host a cost-effective platform that would allow campuses to share vacant seats in online courses being offered. A 24-member intercampus Online Consortium Steering Committee begin work to develop a platform that increases access and affordability by allowing students to take online courses across the various campuses in the state.

Strongly recommended by the Steering Committee was an internal mechanism for ensuring the quality of courses offered via the new online Consortium. Two of the campuses already used Quality Matters (QM) and encouraged consideration by the group. This discussion resulted in unanimous agreement that a systemwide contract with QM would benefit both the Consortium as well as each campus and be much more cost-effective compared to implementing individual agreements for each campus.

As the work moved forward, each campus took a unique approach to planning and implementing online course quality standards. One campus had already established a system for managing online course reviews in 2015. First, reviews were conducted internally and later externally using the Quality Matters Rubric. A program to incentivize faculty to redesign courses using the QM quality assurance standards and to complete the QM review process through course certification was launched. Prior to the pandemic, all instructors teaching online and hybrid as well as new faculty at the university were required to complete the Quality Matter’s Applying the Quality Matters Rubric (APPQMR) workshop.  During the pandemic, this requirement was not enforced, however, faculty were still incentivized to complete the QM review process through course certification.  Numbers dramatically decreased in both attendance at the QM APPQMR workshop as well as in the number of courses being sent to QM review and receiving certification. Conversely, post-pandemic, the number of online courses has dramatically increased at the University and new fully online/hybrid programs are now being created.

Challenges and questions faced by this institution include:

How do we re-launch interest in the quality assurance process for online and hybrid courses? How do we train faculty to become effective online teachers after practicing emergency remote teaching?  How do we develop new policies for the development of online courses and programs?  In addition, if policies are established, who should be responsible for enforcing those policies and how will they do so?

Another campus launched a program called the Engaged Online Course Initiative (EOCI) with the goal of developing an internal rubric for quality course design that would serve as a tool for both evaluation and continuous improvement of online courses. Standards from the QM rubric, the SUNY Online Course Quality Review Rubric (OSCQR), and others were leveraged during the creation of a new rubric and internal review process. A cohort of experienced faculty and staff representing a variety of departments met bi-weekly to collaborate on the development.

Challenges and questions faced by this institution include:

How do we engage stakeholders across campus to begin implementing quality assurance principles? How do we elicit faculty buy-in? How do we create a process that limits barriers and facilitates utilization within departments?

After the pandemic hit, the newest addition to the state university system began integrating online pedagogical techniques into instruction and this was uncharted territory for many of the faculty. The institution became part of the state system, and focus shifted from technology-centered to learner-centered. As part of that shift, the campus will utilize an online course rubric to structure a self-review process for online courses. In an effort to provide a well-rounded approach to online quality assurance, the institution continues to expand their instructional and technological knowledge base in order to provide resources to faculty and students so they may be successful in these new educational environments. These resources include how-to videos and articles for instructional technology, better onboarding resources, and small-group workshops.

Challenges and questions faced by this institution include:

How do we continue to build on the student-centered approach to quality assurance? How can we meaningfully engage faculty in discussions about quality in online teaching and learning without overwhelming or intimidating new instructors?

While each campus has a taken a unique approach, they have faced similar challenges along the way. Many of those challenges may be familiar to others in online learning and higher education. A main goal of the panel discussion is to provide attendees an opportunity to share their own stories of promoting quality standards in online courses and to learn from one another in the process. This session is designed to help attendees plan for and launch a successful quality assurance program at their home institutions, regardless of the size of the school or their history with online education.

Plan for Engagement and Interactivity:

At the start of the session, attendees will answer a few poll questions to help inform the conversation. After providing overviews and slides of individual institutional strategies developed at the various campuses, panelists will engage the audience in the following ways:

The panel moderator will actively pose questions and solicit answers from the audience, including:

What are the challenges your institution is currently experiencing and what steps are being taken to ensure the quality of online courses? How have you engaged stakeholders to begin implementing quality assurance principals at your institution? What barriers have you experienced during the process?

The panel moderator will also facilitate the development of a Quality Assurance Planning Template in Google docs that all attendees will have access to edit and save. 

Takeaways: Attendees will leave with strategies for engaging /re-engaging stakeholders, including specific examples of how to gain faculty buy-in and support, and a planning template they can edit and use at their respective institutions.

Nov 2, 2022
3:45pm - 4:15pm (Eastern)
This Is Our Why! (Innovation Crew Meet-Up) | Other | Zoom Room 4

Crew members are invited to join at least one synchronous, virtual gathering (facilitated by Crew Lead) to engage in the activities and push the crew conversation.
 

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 2, 2022
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Discovering the Voice of Faculty and Staff at Minority Servicing Institutions in Their Authored and Curated Materials Within MERLOT | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 2

Finding disciplinary content that could be culturally contextualized by educators at minority serving institutions can help faculty address their diversity, equity, and inclusiveness goals.  The workshop will demonstrate and enable participants to use MERLOT’s new search tools to find materials authored, selected, and curated by people affiliated with HBCUs, HSIs, AANIPISIs, and TCUs.

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Extended Abstract

For the past 6 years, the HBCU Affordable Learning Community has been building the organizational, programmatic, and technical foundation for their Affordable Learning Solutions program for all HBCUs to significantly reduce the cost of course materials for their students.  With Tennessee State University as the national lead institution and with the support from MERLOT-SkillsCommons, we have developed a easy-to-use portal for free and open educational resources to help faculty find quality educational content with confidence.  One of the goals for the project is also to support HBCU faculty in contributing their expertise in selecting as well as creating ‘culturally contextualized’ curriculum for Africana students across disciplines and institutions.  By sharing over 500 of these free and open educational resources within the HBCU AL$ Community Portal, the HBCU AL$ community is providing easy access to all MERLOT users for these resources.  The mission of the HBCU AL$ community continues to develop and will be focused on:

  • Scaling the institutional capabilities of HBCUs to adopt and sustain AL$ programs on their campus
  • Sustaining a continuously growing collection of OER focused on African history, culture, and contributions across all disciplines which can support more inclusive curriculum in all higher education institutions.
  • Creating a continuously growing collection of Open Educational Practices (OEP) that is focused on inclusive educational pedagogies across all disciplines in all higher education institutions.  MERLOT-SkillsCommons’ Open Educational Practices portal of over 1,000 teaching and institutional open ePortfolio provides a foundation for more inclusive open educational practices.
  • Supporting faculty leadership in creating and implementing culturally contextualized OER by facilitating faculty communities of practice.

What does “Build Africana-contextualized collections of MIT OCW and open educational practices that are adopted by HBCU faculty and are shared with the world” mean?  Here are some initial guidelines:

  • Educational curricula across almost all disciplines can be contextualized with social-cultural-racial information and practices.
  • When disciplinary concepts are presented, are examples used to illustrate these concepts relevant and meaningful to Africana students?
  • When the researchers, artists, and scholars who contributed to the knowledge base of a discipline are presented, are Africana scholars included?
  • When students are given assignments required to demonstrate their understanding of the disciplinary concepts and operations, are the assignments relevant and meaningful to Africana students?
  • When faculty implement pedagogical practices to engaging students, including how students engage with each other, are these pedagogical practices respectful and responsive to the social-cultural-racial expectations of their communities?

MERLOT has been “putting educational innovations into practice” for 25 years and on new capability that MERLOT has added is to enable MERLOT users to easily find materials that have been authored by, contributed by, and/or curated by faculty, staff, and students at minority serving institutions.   The purpose of these new advanced search capability is to help people find materials across disciplines that are more likely to present content that is more contextualized by an Africana, Asian, Hispanic, and/or Native American culture and voice.  

The express workshop will first demonstrate and then will lead participants in the use of MERLOT’s advanced search tools to:

  1. Find all types of teaching in learning resources that have been authored, contributed, and/or curated by members of:
    1. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
    2. Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)
    3. Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs)
    4. Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs)
  2. Find MERLOT members who are affiliated with
    1. Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs)
    2. Asian American Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)
    3. Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs)
    4. Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs)
  3. Find materials that are cataloged related to:
    1. African Studies
    2. African topics included across discipline
    3. Diversity, equity, and inclusiveness in
      1. Education
      2. Workplaces
      3. Professional Organizations.

The workshop will conclude with questions and discussions with the participants about what other free and open educational services might be helpful for them to achieve their diversity, equity, and inclusiveness goals at their institutions.

Nov 2, 2022
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Navigating Difficult Conversations: 7 strategies to increase instructor buy-in for improving assignments | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

In this interactive discussion, we will identify common objections to improving assignments; and describe 7 strategies that instructional designers can use to help increase instructor buy-in for improving assignments. 

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Extended Abstract

Instructional design is hard!

Instructional designers are expected to be proficient in ID models and processes, learning theories and strategies, technology, project management, assessment, evaluation, professional development . . . (Ritzhaupt et al., 2021).

Just as importantly, instructional designers must be expert communicators and collaborators (Lowell & Ashby, 2019; Richardson et al., 2019; Ritzhaupt et al., 2021).

Role confusion can contribute to the challenges instructional designers face when working with instructors (Halupa, 2019). Indeed, when it comes to improving assignments, the line between what is content--typically the purview of instructors--and what is pedagogy--typically more of the instructional designer's interest--can blur.

Short of gaining full institutional buy-in or carte blanche control to redesign a course, instructional designers need strategies that give space to the concerns of the instructors with whom they are working while also helping those instructors to realize the importance of making strategic adjustments to assignments to obtain better alignment with objectives and better overall student outcomes.

In this interactive discussion, we will identify common objections to improving assignments; and describe 7 strategies that instructional designers can use to help increase instructor buy-in for improving assignments.  

Nov 2, 2022
4:15pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Transcending Online and On-Ground: How On-Campus and Online Teaching Inform Each Other | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

In this interactive session, a group of colleagues from a graduate school of education share lessons and reflections about the development of their online programs, and examine the reciprocity of online and on-ground progressive teaching. Participants will be invited into an exchange of ideas to discuss and apply practices.

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Extended Abstract

As faculty in a graduate school of education dedicated to equity and progressive educational practices, we have spent many years honing our on-ground practice. Teaching online gave us the opportunity to look at our finely-honed practice anew, which led to growth and change. For a number of years, we have also been developing online programs to expand our approach. When all of our programs moved online during the COVID-19 pandemic, faculty came together to further explore the progressive possibilities of online teaching—to preserve and translate those aspects of on-ground practice we cherish, and to innovate new approaches that would transcend the distinction between online and on-ground. How, for instance, might the move to online enrich our teaching in general? How might elements of good teaching guide our practice, no matter the context?

Plan for Interactivity

The panelists will share stories of learning and questions that arose during these experiences. Participants will have the opportunity to engage with panelists in small group breakout discussions to share strategies, examples of promising practices and problems of practice.  We will then return to the large group and participants will offer highlights and next steps to consider in their own practice. 

The Takeaways: What Attendees Will Learn

We believe that an online pedagogy holds new possibilities for student agency, teacher growth, and learning spaces characterized by flattened hierarchies and student-teacher partnerships in which all members of the community are contributing to learning. We will offer what we appreciated about the shift to online while holding onto our deeply-held commitment to our pedagogy. We identify three conceptual frameworks that support the thinking and discussion of progressive online practice. In this session, we will share examples of these frameworks in action, based upon our own experiences while teaching in higher education, and invite attendees to do the same. We believe that these conceptual frameworks are critical and evergreen as we meet the challenges of our current era, holding promise well into the future.  The three conceptual frameworks are: 

  • An interactive-developmental approach to working with adult learners. We design experiences that prioritize students’ interactions with one another and with the task and materials, which enable us to coach the students across a developmental landscape of learning. This approach guides us as we decide which experiences should be asynchronous or synchronous and how these experiences in fact belong to a single dynamic whole. In progressive education, teachers think carefully about the design of the learning environment before students ever enter the classroom; we approach asynchronous (as well as synchronous) task design in just this way. When we design for student agency and equity in the very structure of learning tasks, we enable students to engage directly in a process of discovery. This process need not be fully mediated by the teacher in order to be meaningful, which in turn frees the teacher to focus on each student’s development. These designs can take many forms, including solving rich tasks in collaborative settings and using video recordings for reflection. 

  • Promoting embodiment and engaging the senses. We use progressive pedagogy to challenge the notion that online learning is not embodied learning. By prioritizing interactivity, we optimize the physicality of learning in online settings. This move is an essential aspect of teaching for social justice; for decades, critical feminist scholars have shown us that embodiment is a powerful dimension of BIPOC and women’s meaning-making and leadership in the classroom (hooks, 1994). Relatedly, as we contemplate the ways in which pandemic lockdowns have impacted the senses (Allen, 2021) and the roles that the senses play in education (Todd, 2021), we design learning experiences that intentionally engage our students’ senses and move beyond words.

  • Online progressive pedagogies that humanize our teaching and sustain community, such as those identified by Sharon Ravitch in her framework Flux Pedagogy (2020), which includes critical pedagogy and emergent design. These pedagogies hold the potential to diminish hierarchies, attend to student well-being, promote student engagement, and deepen our teaching practice. It was essential to our pedagogy to explicitly build community online, and we wanted evidence that the seeds of community were being planted. This focus made us question our assumptions about the on ground community, which led to an intentionality of building community on ground. We built ways for students and instructors to interact in small groups and get to know each other by reconsidering the structures that promote authentic interactions and creating intentional spaces for social-emotional care for one another, inviting and harnessing student inquiries to guide the direction of discussions and activities, and create brave space norms to guide discussions. 

Works Cited

Allen, L. (2021). The smell of lockdown: Smellwalks as sensuous methodology. Qualitative Research. Published in SAGEjournals OnlineFirst.  Retrieved from     https://doi.org/10.1177/14687941211007663

hooks, b. (1994). Teaching to transgress: Education as the practice of freedom. Routledge. 

Ravitch, S. (2020). FLUX pedagogy: Transforming teaching and leading during Coronavirus. Perspectives on Urban Education, 17.  Retrieved from https://urbanedjournal.gse.upenn.edu/volume-17-spring-2020/flux-pedagogy-transforming-teaching-and-leading-during-coronavirus

Todd, S. (2021). Education, contact and the vitality of touch: membranes, morphologies, movements. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 40, 249-260. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11217-021-09765-w.

 

Nov 2, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Eastern)
Re-imagining Computer Literacy Instruction with an Equity and Inclusion Lens | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

Join us to see how we updated instruction in an online computer literacy course from an equity and inclusion lens, by moving away from a PC (windows) centric approach to one acknowledging that students complete coursework on a myriad of devices, and that technology access is varied, limited and inconsistent.

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Extended Abstract

This presentation will discuss one institution’s efforts at implementing authentic, meaningful, and sustainable actions related to equity in computer literacy instruction and access to technology. The COVID-19 pandemic has served to highlight the fact that disparities in technology access can often play a pivotal role in determining whether a student is successful in their studies. Other factors, such as motivation and academic preparedness often become irrelevant if the student cannot access digital learning products such as electronic textbooks, or the LMS and/or create digital products such as documents, spreadsheets, etc. Institutions must do more to ensure equitable outcomes and opportunities for all students regardless of the devices they use to access and complete coursework. For our institution, this came in the form of moving away from a PC (windows) centric instructional approach to one that acknowledges the myriad of devices students can use to access their class and complete coursework, and that it may vary from week to week.

There were two additional reasons for this shift. First, this course, being one of the foundational courses for all undergraduates, has a domino effect on student success if students are not successful in this class: Students are ill-prepared for subsequent coursework which required creating documents using common office productivity software. Second, this approach also mirrors real life where one may have a Chromebook at home but be expected to use a Windows PC at work. Thus, this broadening of instruction results in better preparedness for the diversity of devices that our students are bound to encounter.

Our institution requires an introductory (100-level) FYE course on computer and information literacy of all undergraduate students, counting towards our General Education requirements. Examining data from multiple sources pointed to a need for changes that would help us address extremely low assignment submission rates which indicated that students were not engaging with the content. Our goal in this presentation is to share how we sought to increase student engagement in the class as measured with assignment submission rates and the Fail/Withdraw rates for the course. We will also brainstorm collectively on how this approach may be adapted for other institutions and types of student served.

Challenges:

Our university was faced by the several issues related to this class. These included:

  • Student access to technology was limited, inconsistent, unpredictable and varied from week to week due to a variety of reasons:
  • Unable to prioritize the purchase of equipment over other more basic needs.
  • Waiting for financial aid disbursement to purchase additional, suitable equipment.
  • Relying on equipment at work or the local library or a device borrowed from family/friend/neighbor.
  • Lacking confidence to use the information provided by the university to purchase the equipment on their own.
  • Pandemic related restrictions when public libraries closed and workplaces shifted to work from home, or students lost their jobs.
  • Students with varied levels of technology expertise and comfort level.
  • Students experiencing high anxiety at learning this content for the first time.
  • Students feeling embarrassed to share their lack of access.

As a result, students were often working on their smartphone, tablets or other devices not supported/addressed in the class, which was mostly PC (windows centric). Individual faculty were providing just in time instruction to students when they reached out to them for assistance with completing assignments on alternate devices. But faculty expertise across multiple devices and availability for help as needed was limited. In addition, many students just gave up without even contacting their advisors or instructors for assistance. This resulted in low assignment submission rates, and consequently, high failure and withdrawal rates, and a high percentage of students repeating the class multiple times.

The General education program initially launched a special initiative for students retaking the class. This initiative had retakers assigned to one of four faculty’s sections. These faculty were selected because of their high touch instructional practices and a history of success with retakers. They were each well-versed in at least one of the devices most commonly used by our students: PC (windows), PC (Mac), Mobile phone and Chromebook. As part of the initiative, they each recorded detailed walk-throughs of assignments using that specific device and shared across their course sections. They also conducted extensive proactive outreach to discern which device the student was using and subsequently to assist them in completing assignments using that device. Success with this group of students gave us insight into the need to implement this approach for all students and not just retakers.

Changes Implemented:

  1. Device specific walk-through videos for all the assignments in the course (PC (windows), PC (Mac), Mobile phone and Chromebook)
  2. Simplified navigation of instructions and ease of access to instructions/templates/videos etc. to complete work on the assignment.
  3. Rewritten assignment instructions and rubrics to ensure both were clear and comprehensive, so students could complete assignments independently without the necessity of follow-up explanations from the instructor. This was especially important because our students often work on assignments at the last minute, literally hours before the midnight deadline.
  4. Simplification of language listing the university hardware software requirements.
  5. Inclusion Admissions and Advising in this culture shift by sharing the device specific videos and brainstorming ways to tackle student anxiety with this course.

Changes planned for future sessions:

  1. Address device differences in the initial lessons in the course and then focus on common features of common productivity software regardless of device.
  2. Provide students with inexpensive, yet classroom appropriate devices if they were unsure or unable to obtain them themselves.

Data and Results:

The course revisions have now run for four sessions, and the outcomes have been both rewarding and promising. Assignment level and session level data reveal that more students are submitting work, and the grades for work completed are better. This has resulted in pass rates improving by almost 10% (from around 46% to 56%) as can be seen in the graphs depicting F/W rates across four sessions of data from before (July- November 2021) to four sessions after (December 2021 – April 2022) the changes were implemented. This is the biggest improvement we have seen in the last few years, attributable in large part to increased submission rates, but also in improved grades on individual assignments. Presentation will include graphs for the following:

  1. Fail rates comparing four sessions of data from before (July- November 2021) to four sessions after (December 2021 – April 2022) the changes were implemented.
  2. Withdraw rates comparing four sessions of data from before (July- November 2021) to four sessions after (December 2021 – April 2022) the changes were implemented.
  3. Submission rates for five paper assignments comparing four sessions of data from before (July- November 2021) to four sessions after (December 2021 – April 2022) the changes were implemented.

Qualitative Feedback:

Faculty and students Comments received from students and faculty mirrors the positive results seen with F/W and submission rates. Whereas students are often silent when things are going well in a course, they have shared positive comments on the student end of course surveys regarding the device-specific videos:

  • This was a hard class for me because I didn't know a lot about using the computer. With the support from my instructor with the step-by-step instruction in the assignment I feel that it help me a lot to understand the assignment and feel that I have learned a lot that will help me as I move forward in my career.
  • The videos was extremely helpful, also intellipath was of great help.
  • The class offered all the tools necessary to complete the work which was presented in an easy to understand manner.
  • Thanks for a great course! Those assignment videos were perfect.

Similarly, faculty have shared positive feedback regarding the device-specific videos during monthly UNIV106 faculty cohort meetings:

  • The videos are a great help. I think we have a larger number of visual learners and they respond better to them.
  • The videos are super helpful!
  • I seem to have a lot more struggling in their personal lives. Videos are helping and I can tell those who are using them.
  • The videos seem to be working well in my classes.

Session Focus and Goals

This presentation will highlight how literally walking in a student’s shoes can sometimes provide insight into the changes needed for course content or instructional strategies. While the data was telling us that something needed to be done to address low submission rates for assignments, more of the same (additional instruction in the PC (windows) centric approach) was clearly not what was needed. What the institution needed was to pivot and truly see where the students were (and on which devices) to then take them where they needed to go.

Presenters will share the ‘before and after’ sample assignments and grading rubrics as well as the slides used in the presentation (including the data). The goal of the session will be for participants to come away with ideas for improvements they can implement at their institutions from this technology equity lens. Hence we will devote about 25 minutes to sharing our approach to the data collection and resulting revisions, and the rest of the time (20 minutes) to engage the audience so participants can:

  • Share the challenges their students encounter with technology access (and how they gather this information)
  • Describe what strategies they have adopted and how they have worked
  • Share best practices in both curriculum design and instruction of such courses
  • Brainstorm how some of our strategies can be adopted at their institution
Nov 2, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Eastern)
In Their Words: Student Perspectives on Support, Learning and Faculty Relationships | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

This spring, students at Lumen Learning’s User Testing Centers lead interviews with more than 100 of their peers to better understand the needs of students from historically marginalized communities. In this discussion, they’ll share their insights, their biggest surprises and what institutions can do to better support student success in uncertain times.  

Student panelists include:

  • Rafhilene Sanchez (Rockland CC)
  • Jordan Hernandez (CSU-Fullerton)
  • Pascalyn Omotosho (Baruch College) 

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Extended Abstract

The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, coupled with years of social unrest and economic uncertainty, have impacted nearly every student on today’s campuses. But emerging research shows that those impacts, while perhaps universal, have not been evenly felt. Students from marginalized communities have shouldered greater risk (financial and economic) in recent years and experienced greater learning losses. 

An exacerbating factor may be that many of the online learning tools that campuses have turned to in recent years have been designed to meet the needs of “many” rather than the explicit needs of those struggling the most. And those solutions are often designed for, rather than with the students themselves. 

To upend that approach, a national courseware provider partnered with two 2-year colleges (both minority serving institutions) this spring to launch their first “User Testing Centers.” Through these partnerships, students at each college are trained in human-centered design and spend weeks gathering feedback and testing ideas with their peers. Their goal? To understand the unique experiences and needs of students from historically marginalized communities and to generate ideas for how to support those students’ success through courseware. Through months of interviews and testing cycles, a clear portrait has emerged of the challenges today’s students face and the environments in which they thrive. 

In this panel discussion, the User Testing Center lead will facilitate a conversation with three student members of the user testing team as they share what they’ve learned about student needs and experiences with online learning. They’ll discuss what students talked about most as the key differentiator in their learning experience (hint: it’s all about their instructor), the mindsets that many Black and Latinx students enter the classroom with and what today’s students wished faculty understood most about their lives today. Using stories from their own lives and insights from more than 100 students, they’ll share simple ways that faculty and institutions can better support students in uncertain times. 

Throughout the presentation, participants will be invited to submit and rank questions for the student panel using Slido. The session will close with a series of questions for individuals - and the higher education community, as a whole - to reflect on for the future. 

 

Nov 2, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Eastern)
Our Journey to Exemplary with the OLC Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

Experience the process of benchmarking a program against the OLC Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs. You will hear about our journey to Exemplary, how we completed our internal review (e.g., tools, processes) along with how we are leveraging the review findings to continuously improve our online program.

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Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance:

Proving that quality exists within online education programs can be a daunting and complex task. Typically, metrics such as course completion, student logins, survey responses, and internal reviews are used to demonstrate engagement and quality outcomes. These instruments lack the authority of a rigorous program review by an outside body of experts.  Nevertheless, we as educators must continue the quest to achieve the ideal learning environment and share effective practices for advancing quality for our students. At the same time, we need to demonstrate to all stakeholders that online education works, and works well, if guidelines and standards are followed like the Online Learning Consortium’s Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs (OLC QSAOP). The scorecard is helpful in:

  • providing benchmarks and standards to evaluate your online learning program
  • determining strengths and weaknesses of your online learning program
  • initiating planning efforts towards focused areas of improvement
  • demonstrating elements of quality within your program, as well as an overall level of quality, to higher education accrediting bodies
  • giving steps needed to identify, measure and quantify elements of quality within an online education program
  • providing the metrics to uncover and evaluate quality indicators in key categories which include institutional support, technology support, course development / instructional design, course structure, teaching & learning, social and student engagement, faculty support, student support and evaluations & assessment

Our session will introduce you to the components of the OLC QSAOP and tell our story. You will hear about our journey and experience of the quality review process. We will share how we planned, implemented, executed, engaged stakeholders and collaborated across our institution to complete our internal review, and how we are leveraging the OLC external review findings report to continuously improve our online program. 

Session Goals:

In this session, you will be able to discuss which resources and approaches we have used, which can be applied to your own online program internal review using the OLC QSAOP. You will be able to identify which of the following strategies will be effective, efficient and practical to your institution:

  • Identify lead coordinator(s) who will manage the review team and the internal review process
  • Create project specifications that include team roles and responsibilities, timeline and milestone deliverables, lead coordinator for each OLC QSAOP category, review steps and phases, and links to relevant files and folders
  • Meet with the OLC QSAOP coordinators for project specifications feedback, questions and/or clarifications
  • Hold a kick-off meeting with the review team to discuss project specifications and communication channels 
  • Build a technology ecosystem that includes shared drives for organizing materials, resources and artifacts, project management tool for staying on track, and communication and collaboration tools for collecting evidence from team members within and across departments
  • Select a consistent naming convention and specification for all assets (i.e., files, folders, artifacts, screen captures, resource links)
  • Enumerate and navigate course, department, school and campus resources with artifacts that can justify quality indicator scores
  • Establish review phases such as initial review, collect evidence, score quality indicator, write justification, organize artifacts, copy-edit, final review

Finally, you will have an opportunity to discuss with us the lessons we have learned, what worked and what didn’t, additional tips, and the steps we are taking to improve our online program after receiving the OLC external review findings report.

Participation Level:

This session will start with a quick poll on your familiarity with the OLC Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs and a presentation of our internal review process. We will share some quality indicators and ask how it may be scored and addressed in your institution. Then, we will share how we scored ours based on the evidence we collected so you can see our review phases in action. Following this activity will be an open forum where you can ask questions and share which strategy could be useful in your particular institution.

Nov 2, 2022
6:30pm - 7:15pm (Eastern)
What's In a Game? | Other | Zoom Room 4

This session promises an eclectic mix of parlor type virtual games for the inner child and playful adult. Bring your game face and let's get going. Prizes and bragging rights are yours for the taking. Show up and get gaming.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Technology Test Kitchen: Redefining Knowledge Checks | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

Learn how to leverage Kahoot! to create fun and engaging quizzes and knowledge checks for your students. Whether asynchronously or as a live event there’s no doubt you and your students will find Kahoot! to be a hoot!  - To find the list of ASYNCHRONOUS Technology Test Kitchen sessions, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Technology test Kitchen".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 3, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
"Anytime" Asynchronous Engagement | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Not sure what to do between sessions? Consider checking out OLC Accelerate's fully virtual and asynchronous engagement space. Each of the volunteer-driven engagement teams have prepared and carefully designed fun, engaging, and thought-provoking activities for you to take up on your own time. If nothing else, it is a great place to get new ideas for how to engage with others and build community. Plus, you'll get to learn more about OLC Accelerate's 2022 Engagement Team (a group of dedicated volunteers from across the field who designed this year's engagement programming). Just visit the "OLC Engagement Hub" and  "Your Engagement Experience" of the engagement team pages in Engagez (e.g. Speed Networking Lounge, Field Guides, OLC Live!, Technology Test Kitchen, OLC Cafe & Mercantile, OLC Sanctuary, Escape Room, Innovation Crews, and more!).

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 3, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Join An Innovation Crew! | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

Innovation Crews are flexible communities convened around shared community interests before and during a conference experience. Facilitated by a “Crew Leader”, they provide a space for colleagues to connect, converse, support each other, and be part of a smaller group within the larger conference. Select a group that aligns with your interests and join a cohort of colleagues dedicated to both navigating OLC Accelerate together and co-constructing a meaningful learning experience. We’ll be facilitating Crews around the following six interest areas this year: Instructional Designers; Allies (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion); Immersive and Simulated Learning; Gameful Learning; Weavers of Several Interests Not sure which Crew is the best fit for you? Spend some time reviewing the descriptions to learn more about each of these unique Crews. - To find the list of Innovation Crew Meet-Up's, visit the "Virtual Conference Program" page and Filter Sessions under "All Categories" by: "Innovation Crew Meet-Up".  (Don't forget to change your filter back to "All Categories" to see the full conference schedule!)

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 3, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station | Other | Asynchronous Engagement (NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY)

NOT LIVE SESSION - INFORMATION ONLY

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by our Slack channel anytime for help, guidance and recommendations.

HOW TO ACCESS / ENGAGE:

Please note that this is a fully asynchronous experience, accessible to you throughout the virtual conference. Access the experience and link up with this year's engagement volunteers through the Engagement Hub (hosted in Canvas). 

You can also connect with the engagement team through our dedicated OLC Accelerate Slack space. 

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Nov 3, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
The Changing Landscape of Online Education: Findings from the CHLOE 7 Study | Featured Session | Zoom Room 3

The pandemic has prompted changes in the way institutions are managing online learning and accelerated initiatives that had begun but had not yet taken hold. Connectedly, Since 2016 QM and Eduventures Research have partnered to explore and fill the knowledge gap about how online learning is actually being managed at post-secondary institutions in the United States. They have done this by surveying the people who are most closely involved in this endeavor: those serving as chief online officer at their institutions. Join us for this rich and thought-provoking session, which will feature the full report of the most recent Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE) study.

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Extended Abstract

Since 2016 QM and Eduventures Research have partnered to explore and fill the knowledge gap about how online learning is actually being managed at post-secondary institutions in the United States. They have done this by surveying the people who are most closely involved in this endeavor: those serving as chief online officer at their institutions.

These Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE) studies have resulted in in-depth yearly reports, beginning in 2017 - with two during 2020, including a special report on the pivot to remote teaching. The CHLOE surveys, of which OLC is a Gold sponsor, run the gamut from the day-to-day management of online learning to student, faculty, and staff support to quality assurance to strategic planning.

The pandemic has prompted some changes in the way institutions are managing online learning and accelerated initiatives that had begun but had not yet taken hold. As we move forward with the current of the pandemic ebbing and flowing, it is crucial to have a good context for planning and managing online learning. What are institutions, on the whole, doing to support students, faculty, and staff? How about institutions similar to mine? What functions are centralized and decentralized and to what extent? How are services from third parties incorporated to help institutions meet their online learning goals? What is the demand for online learning now and for the near future? How can an institution effectively assure its students are having a quality learning experience and achieving their learning goals? 

All of these questions will be addressed in this rich and thought-provoking session, which will also have a full report as a resource for participants to reference.

Nov 3, 2022
10:45am - 11:15am (Eastern)
Speed Networking: Thoughtful Takeaways and Ideas for Implementing Learning Beyond the Conference | Other | Zoom Room 4

This has been a tremendous experience of gathering together. In this session, we will guide you through a quick and fun activity designed to help you reflect upon what you have learned from the conference and make a plan to implement changes that you want to see in your daily workflow, professional development, or organization.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Beyond Belonging: Creating Online and Blended Spaces for First-Generation Students to Flourish | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 2

This session will focus on strategies and approaches that can be used to go beyond belonging to create inclusive academic experiences for first-generation students. Participants will leave the session with ideas they can incorporate immediately into their own online and blended courses, and resources for continuous course improvement.

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Extended Abstract

Although first-generation students—those first in their families to pursue higher education—comprise a sizable portion of gateway (or general education) course enrollment, little, if any, attention has been given to the pedagogical approaches that might be used to meet the needs of this diverse student population (Baldwin et al., 2021). This session will focus on strategies and approaches that can be used to go beyond belonging to create inclusive academic experiences for first-generation students.

The session will begin with a focus on existing research on (and with relevance to) first-generation students and their academic experience (e.g., Baldwin et al., 2021), including contemporary research on levels of “first-generationness” (Darrah, Humbert, & Stewart, 2022), and theoretical frameworks (e.g., Yosso’s Community Cultural Wealth Model, 2005). Information about gateway courses and the gateway course impact on students identifying as first generation will also be discussed. This part of the presentation will include several reflective questions aimed at helping participants understand the nuances associated with first-generation student identities.

Then, we will explore pedagogies and practices—ranging from examples of small teaching practices to more extensive forms of course redesign—all of which are particularly responsive to students who identify as first generation. Furthermore, the emphasis will be on small changes that are evidence-based and applicable across the disciplines and modes and modalities. Specifically, we will explore aspects of humanized/humanizing and critical compassionate pedagogy (an approach used with first-generation identifying students), and the use of the Transparency in Learning and Teaching or TILT framework  and Universal Design for Learning to reduce or remove aspects of unwritten curriculum and provide opportunities for all students to be successful in our courses. This section will conclude with a brief introduction to and discussion about designing our courses to foster self-regulated learning—a metacognitive approach to learning that can benefit all students—but has all been found improve course performance for first-generation identifying students (Bernacki, Vosicka, & Utz, 2016; Vosicka & Utz, 2017, as cited in Horrowitz, 2019, p. 25).

Finally, we will reflect on and commit to ways in which we can incorporate the strategies, approaches, and ideas from the session into our own teaching practice. To this end, participants will leave with a plan to employ small course changes with the goal of going beyond belonging to create inclusive academic online and blended experiences for first-generation students.

This session is designed to be interactive, and as such, a variety of purposeful active learning strategies will be used. First, throughout the session participants will be provided multiple opportunities to reflect on and share, as they feel comfortable. Participants will be provided with a Google Doc that they will use to capture their personal reflections, during and after the session, that will ultimately, become a personal plan. Short case studies will be shared and discussed, potentially in breakout rooms if there is sufficient session attendance. Additionally, the presenter will engage participants in feedback about the various strategies and approaches (and potential application) shared in the session through the use of the online chat, Mentimeter, and Google Jam Board. The presenter will also share a Wakelet of resources from the presentation and invite participants to add to that “living” resource.

  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe characteristics of first-generation students and common influences on their transition and success
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to articulate several pedagogical approaches that are responsive to first-generation students
  • At the end of this session, participants will be able to identify ways in which they can adapt and apply the pedagogical approaches for use in their own online and/or blended course(s).
Nov 3, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
"CLASS" is in Session- Coaching (At-Risk) Learners for Academic Student Success | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

Retaining At-Risk Students is a dilemma facing all higher-education institutions. This is especially challenging in on-line learning. Faculty can use a coaching approach to encourage At-Risk Students to not only remain in college, but to enhance their learning capabilities. In doing so, coaching builds social presence and fosters student success. 

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Extended Abstract

The Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Worldwide College of Business launched a Coaching Program in 2018.  Since that date the Program continues to evolve with changes in resourcing, as well as demand.  The one constant has been the original intent – that is to provide a holistic educational experience and positively impact the academic journey. 

The focus of this interactive presentation is on identifying and implementing ways to not just keep At-Risk Students enrolled, but to enhance their student experience.  Scholarly literature suggests that student coaching may be one way to help students succeed in college. Students often require a “nudge” (Thaler & Sunstein, 2008) to complete complex tasks and overcome challenges.  A coaching service is a mechanism capable of “nudging” students, especially those that are At-Risk, to reach their true potential.

According to Education Reform (2013, para 1), At-Risk Students in higher education involve learners who “are considered to have a higher probability of failing academically or dropping out of school.”  Circumstances that hinder student success include both intrinsic personal and institutional, systematic challenges. In some cases, it can involve “learning disabilities, low test scores, disciplinary problems, grade retentions, or other learning-related factors that could adversely affect the educational performance and attainment of some students” (Education Reform, 2013, para 1).   

There is no shortage of reasons why there are At-Risk Students. Some of the more common factors can involve finance, not prepared for the rigors of college, family life, taking too many courses, and work requirements. While these and other reasons can contribute to a Student’s struggle in college, research shows elevated challenges in online courses.

Online courses can and do tend to be impersonal. Compared to traditional classroom modalities there are fewer interactions between Students and Faculty.  As Faculty we are often perplexed in trying to bring our personalities into an online course. The apparent lack of interactivity can be seen by some Students as not caring for them on the part of their instructors. And that is true in a number of cases.

To address the need to break down some of these barriers we have been exploring various methods to increase the social presence within online courses. The goal here is to make online courses feel more like in-person courses. While this could and should benefit the majority of Students, it can especially assist the At-Risk Students.

Faculty Engagement Strategies for Serving At-Risk Students

For the past few years, we have been addressing At-Risk Students in a multitude of ways, through outreach, coaching and the greater use of engagement activities.

The outreach effort begins with Faculty reviewing the Dashboard Data information on Students in the course to be taught.  The Dashboard Data contains each Student’s GPA, major, and the number of courses taken over the past two years. This is vital information for the instructor as it identifies Students who may either be At-Risk now or may become At-Risk.

While Faculty can utilize the Dashboard Data for all Students, there can be a focus on Students who need some special attention. The information from the Dashboard Data can be carried forward to our use of Zoom Introduction and Coaching Sessions with each Student at the beginning of each semester. Through end of course evaluations over 92% of students agreed or strongly agreed that these Zoom Introduction Sessions were effective in bridging the Student-Faculty interaction gap.

These Zoom Sessions offer confirmation that the Faculty is a “real person” (do not laugh, as some Students think robots are teaching them) and cares for their learning development. These Zoom Sessions have led to Students agreeing or strongly agreeing by 98.3% that there is a mutual climate of respect with their instructors. In addition, the caring aspect of the Zoom Sessions have led to a rating of 98% in Students believing that Faculty are interested in their academic progress.

Coaching (At-Risk) Learners for Academic Student Success

In early 2018 we began a Coaching Program, originally for graduate Students, but it soon expanded to undergraduate Students. In some courses coaching was optional, but in other courses it is a requirement, especially in the introductory courses for new Students.

A new coaching initiative serving a select group of At-Risk students was initiated in the May 2022 term. The objectives of the coaching effort are to determine whether coaching can help these students become successful in college and elevate the students’ perception of their college experience. The results of this initiative will be presented at the OLC Accelerate Conference in November 2022.

The information from the Dashboard Data is extremely helpful with the Coaching Sessions. The Students set the agendas for the Coaching Sessions. The 200-Level Students (mostly early in their college careers) tend to want to discuss what to expect from college. The differences between high school and college can be daunting. Some of these Students already are At-Risk. For example, some report having made the wrong choice in attending college or going back to college after a few years away. Coaching to At-Risk Students is invaluable here. Faculty can give a degree of guidance and virtual support to these Students. It can make the difference for an At-Risk Student staying in college or leaving.

From surveys, 90.6% of these Students agree or strongly agree that the Coaching Sessions have been effective.

  • I am providing feedback from our Zoom Coaching meeting this morning and enjoyed what we discussed.  I will apply your recommendation about taking the Leadership course and pursuing my PMP Program Management Professional. I will make the adjustments and correct the errors of mine in the course.  I will maintain those adjustments in the rest of my time with Embry Riddle and in the workforce.  

 

Research

Given the overwhelmingly positive results of coaching, we aim to extend the service to student segments that are at higher risk of underperforming. 

As previously mentioned, to further understand the impact of coaching on the At-Risk student population, a targeted coaching effort is underway for the May 2022 term. For the purpose of this research effort, we intend to offer individual coaching services to students that have a GPA below a 2.6. Faculty coaches will be assigned to meet for periodically throughout the term with proposed meeting points at the beginning, mid-point and near the end of the May 2022 term.  At the conclusion of the May 2022 term, we will measure and evaluate the performance and satisfaction measures of the involved At-Risk students. Student feedback on their academic performance and course experience will be measured and through the end-of-course evaluation questioning and survey at the conclusion of the coaching.  While the sample size will not allow for generalizable outcomes, this preliminary research effort will provide anecdotal evidence from which to scale and conduct secondary research efforts.   

At-Risk Coaching and Student Success Results

NOTE: additional details will be added to the abstract following the observation period and reported during the 2022 OLC. 

We will report the results of the At-Risk coaching initiative to include whether or not there were positive outcomes within the At-Risk students that participated in coaching services. 

Following this pilot and an evaluation of the results, we hope to expand coaching services to other student segments deemed At-Risk, including but not limited to those that have not taken a course in greater than 6 months, and in jeopardy of dropping out.  It is our continued hope that this student success strategy will offer the support students

Conclusion

Student support services are an important part of the student experience, especially for students that may fall within an At-Risk category. The implementation of a student-oriented coaching program offers multiple benefits to include improving student relations and experience, delivering on a commitment to serve the “whole student”, and preparing students for successful careers. Administering coaching service to At-Risk students has the added benefit of potentially impacting academic performance, persistence, and retention. 

References

At-Risk definition. (2013). The Glossary of Education Reform. Retrieved from https://www.edglossary.org/at-risk/

Thaler, R. and Sunstein, C. (2008). Nudge improving decisions about health, wealth and happiness. Yale University Press.

 

Interactive Activities During Our Presentation:  

Here are some of the interactive activities we intend to use during our Presentation:

  • Questions and Answers
  • Role Playing
  • Situational Analysis
Nov 3, 2022
11:15am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Hope and Connection: An institution-wide effort to strengthen online social support and improve students’ mental health | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

Experiencing the pandemic's ongoing stress among faculty, students, and staff, the university launched an institution-wide initiative called Hope and Connection to strengthen its online communities' support and highlight mental health awareness. Come to share and discuss the different ways to engage students virtually and the learnings we discover!

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Extended Abstract

This session focuses on an online university’s attempts to address the on-going COVID-related impact on its communities, including faculty, students, and staff. The institution takes a comprehensive, multi-facet approach to engage students and provide different ways to build resiliency and support mental health wellbeing in a virtual environment. It is important, timely topic for higher education institutions to work together and share effective practices for helping students and others. It also brings ideas to the institutions new to online offerings regarding student engagement and support.

Background

Providing support for mental health well-being has never been more critical as the impacts of the pandemic and other stressors over the last couple of years have taken a toll on everyone, including our students, faculty, and staff. The unique challenge addressed in this presentation is how to authentically connect, empathize, and support the whole person from a distance. 

The Intervention (offered fully remote)

As part of the university’s Hope & Connection campaign, the university sponsored a series of co-curricular events and training opportunities to engage the university community in discussion of stress, coping, self-care, and mental and physical well-being. Additionally, the university implemented changes in process and expectations to allow faculty and staff the time and space to support the student’s whole self. Members of the community were invited to join in a series of synchronous sessions and ongoing online discussions supporting the campaign. A place on the virtual campus was created to house resources, session recordings, and community discussions. Faculty were encouraged to modify courses to build time for contemplation and action to support mental and physical wellness.

The interactivities for this session include

  1. Ask the audience to share their observations on the mental stress and COVID related impact on their communities (faculty, students, and staff). Depending on the size of the participants, they may be organized into small groups.
  2. Ask the audience to share what their institutions have done to address mental health awareness and to provide additional student support in a virtual or on-ground environment. Discuss success and/or relevant obstacles in their situation.
  3. Participants will begin building an action plan for their institutions

 

Takeaways for the audience

  1. Understand and share COVID-related impact on the online communities of faculty, students, and staff.
  2. Share and learn ways to support students and faculty in a virtual environment.
  3. Discuss and plan for actions that are relevant to their institutions.
Nov 3, 2022
12:00pm - 12:30pm (Eastern)
Pick a Project (Innovation Crew Meet-Up) | Other | Zoom Room 4

Each virtual crew picks a project that the in-person crew will create. This could become a “visual takeaway” from the conferences.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
From Grassroots to the Highly-Orchestrated: Online Leaders Share Their Stories of the Evolving Online Organizational Landscape in Higher Education | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

Join us for a panel discussion on the inaugural publication of the OLC Press "From Grassroots to the Highly-Orchestrated: Online Leaders Share Their Stories of the Evolving Online Organizational Landscape in Higher Education.” The panel will be facilitated by OLC’s Director of Research, Dr. Kristen Gay, and will feature the “Grassroots to Highly-Orchestrated” editorial team, Drs. Bettyjo Bouchey, Erin Gratz, and Shelley Kurland, and select authors, Dr. Conna Bral, Carissa Fralin, and Dr. Melissa Vito.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Less, but More Germane: Consistency and Predictability as Principles for Course Design | Education Session | Zoom Room 2

Creativity matters in course design, but too much variability can be counterproductive for students and instructors alike. This session highlights techniques from Penn’s Master of Health Care Innovation that prioritize consistency and predictability—and reduce stress—to help students focus their cognitive energy on high-priority learning goals like integrating knowledge.

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Extended Abstract

In online courses and programs, a taste of the unexpected may stimulate curiosity and delight. Instructors and designers devote a great deal of energy to finding inventive ways to deliver content and creating innovative activities that help students process information, test out ideas, and spark connections that lead them to integrate knowledge.

But the line between inventiveness and disorganization is narrow. And deployed indiscriminately, these elements can create extraneous cognitive load that distracts from course learning objectives, causes confusion, and diminishes overall student experience. We can see this in teaching scholarship across disciplines. Students in a 2013 study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior expressed “appreciation of a weekly rhythm for assignments and due dates” and identified unpredictability as a significant source of dissatisfaction (Connors 2013). In a 2015 reflection on teaching online, a language learning instructor found that among herself and her colleagues, a “similar structure each week and predictable due dates for weekly assignments” were key to student success (Polk 2015). And the impetus for a 2019 study of student satisfaction in one online MPA program was the “challenges expressed by students in identifying course materials as instructors structured their courses differently” (Scutelnicu 2019). Taken together, it seems clear that the unexpected unexpected—areas of course delivery that students think should be stable but are not—lead to undesirable outcomes.

This conclusion coincides with our observations in the University of Pennsylvania’s online Master of Health Care Innovation, and related credit and non-credit programs. We have found that when applied deliberately, surprising, creative, and innovative course elements enhance student learning. But to be effective—especially in an online setting—these activities must be deployed within a frame that minimizes distractions and cognitive overhead, and that allows students to plan their time from week to week, and course to course throughout the program.

In this presentation, instructional designers from Penn’s Health Care Innovation programs will offer an informal framework for minimizing the unexpected unexpected—for prioritizing consistency and predictability such that instructors can focus their creativity where it is most germane and students can focus their cognitive energy on high-priority learning goals, rather than tracking an ever-shifting set of requirements and due dates. Techniques in this presentation have been developed iteratively over the life of the program, based in no small part on student feedback. They include establishing:

  • Patterns of work that are consistent throughout each course.
  • Predictable due dates and expectations for when students will receive grades and feedback.
  • Templates for course elements, to standardize the location of key information.
  • A communications plan, so that students receive relevant reminders when they are most timely.
  • Program-wide course policies—including expectations around assignment submissions, late work, extensions, etc.

Within the Master of Health Care Innovation, this framework has helped ensure that key information is clear and accessible to students where and when they need it most. It has helped create cognitive space for adult students managing full-time employment in health care fields to pursue challenging, project-driven coursework. And as we will discuss during this session, with some up-front planning, it is adaptable to many undergraduate and graduate settings—online, hybrid, and in person.

Works Cited

Connors, Priscilla. “Delivery Style Moderates Study Habits in an Online Nutrition Class.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 45, no. 2 (March 1, 2013): 171–75.

Polk, Randi L. “Online Lessons Learned.” The French Review 89, no. 2 (2015): 164–67.

Scutelnicu, Gina, Rebecca Tekula, Beth Gordon, and Hillary J Knepper. “Consistency Is Key in Online Learning: Evaluating Student and Instructor Perceptions of a Collaborative Online-Course Template.” Teaching Public Administration 37, no. 3 (October 1, 2019): 274–92.

Nov 3, 2022
12:30pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Validating an Online Learner Readiness Instrument: From Readiness to Self-reflection | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

This session will feature researchers from two universities collaborating on the development and evolution of a tool to measure online learner readiness. Panelists will share an analysis of the readiness scale, as well as a reconceptualization and implementation of this tool to support 21st century learners.

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Extended Abstract

As different learning modalities have become more common during the pandemic (e.g., online, hi-flex, hybrid), higher education personnel are increasingly interested in factors that prepare students for learning. While several measures specifically assessing online learner readiness are currently available, most were developed over 5 years ago, and include outdated questions about technology. Our study sought to fill this gap by adapting Dray and colleagues’ (2011) online learner readiness scale in combination with consultation from student success professionals and academic advisors.

This panel will feature researchers from the two collaborating universities. They will share ways in which this instrument has evolved from past research, the results of their validation study, and how this instrument is being reconceptualized as a tool to support undergraduate learners. Panelists will discuss the application of this instrument as a tool for: 1) learner self-assessment; 2) connecting students with resources and support services; and 3) helping student support coaches identify opportunities for students to further develop learning skills.

This presentation will include three sections: 1) online learner readiness scale development and key findings; 2) continuity and change in the readiness scale over time; and 3) a reconceptualization and application of the readiness scale. At the end of all three sections, participants will first be asked to respond to questions on google slides. In part 1, they will be asked to write down their thoughts and ideas about the readiness scale, and the ways in which it can be applied at their institutions to promote learner success across a range of modalities. Key themes of their responses will be discussed among the panelists. In part 2, participants will be asked to identify barriers in using this readiness scale at their own institution and key themes will be discussed among the presenters. Finally, in part 3, participants will be asked to write a few ideas about how they might use a readiness scale for student support in their current role. The google slides will be available to the participants after the presentation. If there is a capacity in the online platform, participants will be asked to verbally share their thoughts during these activities.

By attending this session, attendees will be able to: 

  1. Describe how online learner readiness applies to learners more broadly
  2. Describe the types of questions used in a readiness measure.
  3. Discuss the application of learner readiness tools to promote self-reflection and support seeking among undergraduate students.

About the Study

Two universities collaborated to revise and update the online learning readiness instrument, focusing specifically on measuring students’: 1) self-efficacy; 2) locus of control; 3) skills within the context of course work; 4) communication with students and instructors; 5) challenges with time, coursework, and outside commitments (work, family); and 6) technology efficacy.

The scale was tested at institution A with 853 newly enrolled online students, and then cross validated at institution B with all enrolled online students (n = 9408). Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify and remove items that were not reliably related to each subscale. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to validate the reduced instrument, a 25-item scale. Results of the confirmatory factor analysis revealed four subscales with adequate reliability scores for both institutions.

Newly developed items for this measure fit well into the communication efficacy and self-regulation efficacy subscales, suggesting that these dimensions continue to play an important role in learner readiness (e.g., Jansen et al., 2016; Sun & Rodgers, 2020). In addition, the continued emergence of locus of control and technology efficacy suggests the dimensions of online learner readiness have remained remarkably stable over time (e.g., Zimmerman et al. 1992; Hung et al., 2010).

As the lines between face-to-face and distance learning continue to blur, the results suggest that “online learner readiness” might be more broadly applicable to all learners in higher education. Consultations with key stakeholders (e.g., student success coaches, academic advisers, senior administrators) further suggest that- beyond a diagnostic tool to evaluate student “readiness”- our instrument might best serve students as an opportunity for self-reflection throughout their academic tenure.  In collaboration with academic advisors and student success coaches, this instrument could further be used to provide students with personalized support services and resources as they move through their learning journey.

Beyond “readiness”, the reconceptualization of this instrument as a “learning self-reflection tool” might best serve 21st century students in higher education, as well as the stakeholders who support them.

Therefore, the revised instrument was re-named the Learning Self-reflection Tool (LSRT). At institution A, the LSRT is being built into the online orientation for online students. Upon completion of each subscale, students will be directed to specific resources related to the types of skills. Success coaches and advisors are planning to use the instrument as a tool to talk about skills for successful online learning.

At institution B, the LSRT is being built into a website. Upon completion of the four subscales, students will receive an individualized report with a sub score for each subscale and will be directed to resources specific to each subscale. Students will also have the choice to schedule time with a student success coach, a new program under development.

References

Dray, B. J., Lowenthal, P. R., Miszkiewicz, M. J., Ruiz-Primo, M. A. and Marczynski, K. (2011). Developing an instrument to assess student readiness for online learning: a validation study. Distance Education, 32(1), 29-47.

Hung, M-L., Chou, C., Chen, C-H., & Own, Z-Y. (2010). Learner readiness for online learning: Scale development and student perceptions. Computers and Education 55 (3), 1080-1090. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compedu.2010.05.004

Jansen, R. S., van Leeuwen, A., Janssen, J., Kester, L., & Kalz, M. (2016) Validation of the self-regulated online learning questionnaire. Journal of Computing in Higher Education. https//doi.org/10.1007/s12528-016-9125-x.

Sun, Y., & Rogers, R. (2021). Development and validation of the Online Learning Self-efficacy Scale (OLSS): A structural equation modeling approach. American Journal of Distance Education, 35(3), 184-199.

Zimmerman, B. J., Bandura, A., & Martinez-Pons, M. (1992). Self-Motivation for Academic Attainment: The Role of Self-Efficacy Beliefs and Personal Goal Setting. American Educational Research Journal, 29(3), 663-676.

Nov 3, 2022
1:15pm - 1:45pm (Eastern)
Networking Design Sprint - Part 2 (Reflecting Onward) | Other | Zoom Room 4

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the second of OLC Accelerate's Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of two days. This year the sprints will center a playful interpretation of the conference theme "reflecting onward."

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
1:45pm - 2:30pm (Eastern)
Is it time to say goodbye to bound textbooks? | Education Session | Zoom Room 3

There is no doubt that the COVID-19 pandemic fundamentally changed higher education. One such change has been the accelerated acceptance of (and even preference for) digital course materials. This presentation uses large-scale national survey data to examine this trend and speculate on what the next few years will show.

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic has impacted the criteria that faculty use in selecting their course materials. After an initial period when the rush to convert courses for remote instruction forced all other activities to the side, faculty are once again taking the time to research and select the most appropriate materials for their classes. This process remains much the same as before the pandemic, with faculty evaluation of textbook content at the core. There has been one fundamental change, however: Faculty, now more than ever, prefer materials in digital formats.

During the pandemic, the large-scale adoption of digital materials provided faculty and students with a real-time laboratory. Their experience was compelling — they now overwhelmingly prefer increased use of digital course materials.

This presentation draws information from multiple Bay View Analytics surveys to trace the growing acceptance (and preference) for digital course materials. Results include those from the Digital Learning Pulse Survey (DLPS) project, which examined changes in teaching and learning in six surveys from Spring 2020 to Spring 2022, and the ongoing series of higher education Open Education Resources reports.

Growing acceptance of digital course materials is not new. Prior Bay View Analytics research demonstrated increasing faculty adoption, with faculty opinion becoming more optimistic about digital materials than traditional print products. What is new is the pervasive nature and magnitude of the recent change.

Results from the Spring 2022 DLPS survey showed that 46% of faculty were now more optimistic about using digital course materials than before the pandemic, compared to only 8% who were more pessimistic. Results for academic administrators mirrored those of the faulty, with 51% more optimistic and only 7% more pessimistic.

Even more compelling is faculty data on their intentions for using digital materials, and student preferences for the same. For example, in the Fall of 2021 faculty were asked about their future use of digital materials. More than two-thirds (70%) of faculty agreed or strongly agreed that their preference was for increased use, with only 10% disagreeing. The results for students were similar, with 63% reporting that they preferred to have more digital materials included in their courses. This result is not surprising: 48% of students reported being more optimistic about digital than before the pandemic.

The result is clear; both students and faculty agree: digital materials are at the core of the future of education.

Nov 3, 2022
1:45pm - 2:30pm (Eastern)
Supporting Dynamic Case-based Learning Discussions in Online Marketing and Business Courses that are Comparable to Face-to-Face Engagement | Express Workshop | Zoom Room 2

To support the attainment of learning outcomes using remote online case-based learning (RO-CBL), this workshop seeks to explore suitable practices, as well as challenges for online course design and online learning activities for higher education marketing and business programs that seek to integrate case-based learning (CBL). In CBL students work in small, collaborative groups to solve problems. CBL can be a valuable tool to support deep learning about realistic problems in a range of fields by inducing more critical thinking skills. As CBL relies heavily on discussion, in-class reflection, and the learners’ ability to convey their views, effective communication is important. The effective use of CBL in online education (remote online CBL or “RO-CBL”) presents both opportunities and challenges when compared to use of CBL in traditional face-to-face courses. This workshop seeks to support effective use of CBL in online business courses.

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Extended Abstract

Case-based learning (CBL) is an educational approach where students work in small, collaborative groups to solve problems. CBL can be a valuable tool to support deep learning about realistic problems in a range of fields by inducing more critical thinking skills. As CBL relies heavily on discussion, in-class reflection, and the learners’ ability to convey their views, effective communication is important. The effective use of CBL in online education (remote online CBL or “RO-CBL”) presents both opportunities and challenges when compared to use of CBL in traditional face-to-face courses.  To support the attainment of learning outcomes using RO-CBL, this workshop seeks to explore suitable practices, as well as challenges for online course design and online learning activities for higher education marketing and business programs. 

 

Following a plenary session review of the salient findings in the literature comparing RO-CBL with traditional face-to-face CBL, participants will break out into zoom groups to explore the challenges and opportunities related to the integration of RO-CBL in the business and management programs at their institutions. In addition, participants will be invited to share their approaches to challenges faced by other participants. The group will then reconvene in a plenary session to share highlights of the breakout group work with all attendees.     

 

Level of participation

 

Facilitators will engage the audience using insights, prompts, and polls to guide discussions in the plenary and breakout discussions. Participants will engage in individual and collective exercises to explore RO-CBL as they share their experiences and lessons learned.

 

Session goals

 

After the session, participants will be more familiarized with RO-CBL as a tool to support learning about realistic problems in a range of fields, including business and management. They will also have a better understanding of how situational course and program factors impact the approach to RO-CBL in the online classroom. Lastly, participants will leave with a toolkit, including a framework, key questions, and resources that they can use to ask key questions, frame discussions, and engage colleagues at their institutions to advance effective use of RO-CBL. 

 

SPEAKERS

 

Carolyn Marsh, M.B.A has over 6 years of experience in online business education.  She teaches and designs courses in sustainable business including marketing, leadership and organizational development at Green Mountain College and Prescott College in the MBA in Sustainability Leadership program.  Prior to teaching Carolyn had a 30+ year career in sales and marketing at IBM and currently is a consultant in marketing and business development. She leverages this extensive practical business experience to provide her students with real world insights in the virtual classroom setting.

 

William Prado, D.B.A. has over 15 years of experience in online education, including in administration, instruction, and course and curriculum design. He teaches sustainable business and other management subjects and has served as Dean of Graduate and Online Programs at Green Mountain College and at Prescott College. Currently, Bill is the Director of the MBA in Sustainability Leadership and Sustainability Management programs at Prescott College. He’s designed business courses and curricula for Green Mountain College, Prescott College, and for higher education clients of the publishers Cengage and Pearson. He also serves on the Institutional Advisory Committee of NC-SARA and is active in the Online Learning Consortium, where most recently Co-Chaired the 2022 Conference DEI Committee. Bill’s work in education is informed by a focus on BIPOC and marginalized students’ success, including integration of diversity, equity, and inclusion dimensions rooted in his experience as a first-generation American Latinx and also as a first-generation college graduate.

 

Nov 3, 2022
1:45pm - 2:30pm (Eastern)
Expanding the Pedagogy of Kindness Discussion: Faculty Excellence through a UDL Approach | Education Session | Zoom Room 1

As higher education transitions towards inperson, many instructors are moving away from the kinder and accommodating practices they adopted during Covid19. The presenters will discuss how they expanded on the previous PoK discussion series to launch a discussion about implementing kind practices across modalities and the university as a whole. 

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic shift to emergency remote instruction revealed there was not just a dearth of knowledge about best practices for teaching online, but a far more ingrained problem: a lack of necessary empathy in our courses by themselves. The Pedagogy of Kindness is a paradigm which restructures and reframes course design and teaching as a whole into a more collaborative, emphatic learning process- where accessibility and inclusiveness are woven into the design itself. This reframing towards the Pedagogy of Kindness seeks to build learning experiences that are of higher quality, with better engagement, and inclusive and accessible to all. 

We initially launched this series locally for our specific campus. We utilized faculty whom we worked with who had been embodying Pedagogy of Kindness ideals and practices in their own work, and how such practices could be applied beyond that. These local implementations had between 7-8 sessions and over 300 participants per series. Feedback from faculty who attended these sessions was very positive. Faculty reported changing policies and procedures in their classrooms to ones that were more inclusive of Pedagogy of Kindness principles. We later collaborated with departments that wanted to integrate these types of discussions and ideals into their courses as a whole. 

This expansion was very exciting, but we wanted to expand the scope even further. In collaboration with the CUNY Innovative Teaching Academy, and recipient of one of their grants, we developed and launched Pedagogy of Kindness: Faculty Excellence through a UDL Approach Across CUNY. This series expanded on the initial focus of Pedagogy of Kindness principles to also emphasize utilizing UDL (Universal Design for Learning), as well as utilize and serve faculty from across teh 25 colleges in the CUNY university system. All sessions both focused on concrete strategies that can be used in the classroom as well as the more abstract aspects of pedagogy. 

All sessions emphasized discussion over lecturing, with presenters being framed more as facilitators over lecturers. This allowed faculty attendees to explore how the strategies the facilitators presented could apply in their discipline, courses, and student advisement activities. With the expanded scope, we were able to reach a wider group of experts across the 25 campuses of our CUNY university system. 

Before launching our series, we were alarmed at the entrenched, unempathetic rhetoric coming from faculty who sought our support. It is important to note that much of this reasoning came from a place of misunderstanding, not malice. Faculty were often unaware of why such non-inclusive design is both harmful and ineffective at accomplishing goals. Some of these alarming requests and ideas faculty shared with us were: 

  • A test that gives 10 seconds to answer each multiple choice question to prevent “googling” an answer.
  • Requiring cameras on at all times, asking permission before going to the bathroom.
  • Requiring students maintain specific posture on cameras at all times. 

Hearing of extremely similar experiences from colleagues in other institutions, we realized this is an endemic and widespread problem. Our office pursued a two pronged approach at changing this paradigm. First, we integrated Pedagogy of Kindness and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) mentality and methodologies in all Online Teaching and Learning training and collaborations. Second, we facilitated a faculty run discussion series aimed at changing the mentality of the campus community as a whole. Since the success of the first two iterations of the discussion series, we were able to successfully launch a 10-part series for its third iteration across the City University of New York, bringing together faculty from our 25 campuses.

Faculty Collaborations:

As course design and review was an essential aspect of our existing training structure, it gave an easy window into making sure courses were in line with UDL and Pedagogy of Kindness best practices. An important, if not the most important component of these conversations, was backing up all best practices with extensive data and research. We found academics, if nothing else, are extremely receptive to data backed arguments. In this way, we made clear that we wholly respected the faculty’s breadth of knowledge in their field, while also making it clear that for that knowledge to come across effectively- it should be in line with pedagogy of kindness and UDL guidelines. 

This process was repeated with great success with hundreds of faculty collaborations across disciplines. While we are very proud of our work on helping faculty achieve inclusive design, we realized that a more encompassing conversation on the “why” of the pedagogy of kindness as a whole was needed.

Faculty Discussion Series: 

The Pedagogy of Kindness: Faculty Excellence through a UDL Approach Across CUNY discussion series expanded upon the two previous Pedagogy of Kindness discussion series iterations. This garnered a reset for faculty members to evaluate the practices they are putting forth in their courses.The topics were tailored to the common issues in this vein that we noted in the faculty population at our university. The events in the third iteration of the discussion series were: 

  • Session 1 Keynote: Origins of Pedagogy of Kindness (with Cate Denial)
  • Session 2: Building an International Environment of Collaborative Learning
  • Session 3: A Universal Design Learning (UDL) Approach to Inclusive Teaching
  • Session 4: Trauma-informed Pedagogy
  • Session 5: Navigating the Classroom Environment through Mindset GPS
  • Session 6: Promoting Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Higher Education
  • Session 7: Alternative Assessments: Ungrading and Assignment Scaffolding
  • Session 8: Setting boundaries in the classroom
  • Session 9: Flipped Classroom Approach to Teaching 
  • Session 10: Humanizing the Classroom

The main objectives of the sessions were to build community in the classroom through creation of learning collectives, establishing classroom boundaries during the transition to hybrid/HyFlex learning, effective alternative assessment styles for mixed learning,, generation of mindfulness in the classroom such as syllabus transparency, being able to use trauma-informed pedagogy practices during a time of social reform, collaborative projects with international students and faculty, and creating a caring environment within the classroom

With the grant funding, we were able to have Cate Denial serve as the Keynote speaker, setting the tone for the series as a whole. The remainder of the sessions were curated from two primary sources. First, by invitation or recommendation based on their implementations of relevant practices from across the 25 campuses of CUNY. Second,  we invited select faculty back from our prior two iterations that our assessment and feedback showed a significant impact as a result of their sessions. 

The panel discussions were excellent ways to demonstrate how faculty within and across different disciplines and modalities implemented the relevant Pedagogy of Kindness topic. By expanding the scope to the university at large, we were able to draw on the much larger as well as more diverse expertise that exist at the different schools.

We found a discussion series was a very effective mechanism of delivery, as it provided experienced faculty with a platform and resources to share their experiences, while engaging directly with their peers. Our aim was to encourage organic and fluid discourse with the panelist(s) and the attendees. This allowed faculty members to be comfortable sharing their experiences while getting guidance and context for the related pedagogy of kindness topics.

Assessment:
Efficacy of faculty collaborations and the series as a whole was gauged on the following metrics. First, the collaborations were measured against overall course design and how well they aligned with UDL and Pedagogy of Kindness guidelines. That was measured against faculty survey feedback and experience with the collaborative process and workshop as a whole. This information was used to adapt and improve on collaboration measures.

Efficacy of the discussion series was gauged on immediate feedback after each session as well as ultimate outcomes assessments of future project implementation as a result of the series.

Future

We plan on expanding on topics that garnered the most interest during the series as well as offering related hands-on workshops on how these concepts are applied through other facets of teaching. One requested topic so far has been how to implement these essential pedagogies with a specific lens towards technology and hybrid learning.

Building upon our new found connections with various departments around the University, we plan to build upon the momentum and implement faculty interest groups (FIGs) to hone in on specific topics for further faculty discourse.

Level of Participation:

This is a highly participatory session. At key intervals (defining the challenges that faculty bring and what strategies were used in other institutions), the presenters will poll the audience for how they handled similar scenarios and challenges. A large chunk of the session will also be spent in scaffolded engagement breakout rooms. Essentially, after presenting the problem at large audience members will have the option of moving into a breakout room guided by a presenter focused on one following topics: 

  • Challenges and strategies at implementing large scale projects like these
  • Changing faculty perspectives on the Pedagogy of Kindness

During the breakout rooms participants can choose to engage: 

  • Directly over Zoom
  • By sharing resources and ideas in a shared collaborative resource page.
  • On Twitter with the designated hashtag: # (removed here for document anonymity, if accepted it would be replaced with the full hashtag).

Session Goals: 
Audience members who attend this session will emerge with a clear understanding of what the pedagogy of kindness is, how it applies to higher education, and why it is so important. They will have solid strategies on how to work with colleagues and faculty at their institutions on integrating the pedagogy of kindness strategies and methodologies into their courses. They will also have a full framework of launching a similar series at their institutions.

Nov 3, 2022
2:30pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Networking Coffee Break with OLC Live! | Other | Zoom Room 4

Join OLC Live co-hosts Olysha Magruder and Mel Edwards in a virtual lounge. Bring your coffee, share your ideas and inspirations, and hear from other attendees as you explore the virtual OLC Accelerate conference.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 3, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Eastern)
Charting a Learner-Driven Future for Online Learning: A Student Panel on Centering Humanization and Care | Plenary | Zoom Room 1

In this plenary panel, we will close the virtual conference week and transition into the onsite conference with a compelling amplification of the voices of our students, gleaning their perspectives and ideas for the future of online learning that centers quality, equity, and care. Weaving together the emergent themes from the conference as well as diverse narratives of the lived-in experiences of our featured students, this panel will leverage the wisdom of our students in collectively charting a path from the pandemic into a new reality where access to quality education within online, blended, and digital learning is open to all learners, anytime and anywhere.

Student panelists:

  • Kiara Williams, ELE Student Fellow - moderator
  • Mark Lannaman - ELE Student Fellow
  • Mika Odaira - ELE Student Fellow

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Extended Abstract

In much of our work in support of students in digital learning environments, our learners are relegated to the sidelines of the design, delivery, and continuous improvement process. As a means of leading with the best practice of humanizing the digital learning environment, numerous educators, administrators and designers have worked hard to center student voice as a driver for creating learning experiences that center engagement, rigor, and care. In this plenary panel, we will close the virtual conference week and transition into the onsite conference with a compelling amplification of the voices of our students, gleaning their perspectives and ideas for the future of online learning that centers quality, equity, and care. Weaving together the emergent themes from the conference as well as diverse narratives of the lived-in experiences of our featured students, this panel will leverage the wisdom of our students in collectively charting a path from the pandemic into a new reality where access to quality education within online, blended, and digital learning is open to all students.

Nov 3, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Eastern)
Accelerate 2022 Virtual Conference Closing Celebration and Onsite Preview | Other | Zoom Room 1

The sessions may be over, but the fun doesn't stop there! Live music, fun games, virtual celebrations, organically unpredictable Zoom antics...what's not to love? The OLC Accelerate 2022 Closing Celebration will be an experience you don't want to miss, and we hope to see you there!

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Education 4.0 Engineering student learning environments including Virtual labs and the development of Digital Twins | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The Pandemic has caused very creative solutions and accelerated the development of education learning environments. This presentation will explore the development of engineering learning environments and the enhancements made to address these challenges for today and future careers

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Extended Abstract

Education 4.0 Engineering student learning environments including Virtual labs and the development of Digital Twins 

 

Relevancy: In Higher Education, there is the need to help people (students) prepare for current and future careers with lifelong learning skills. This presentation helps to address some of these issues and lessons learned from seemingly ever-changing environments.

 

Interactivity Plan:

Using Discovery Asynchronous format, people will be able to interact by leaving comments or questions and responses to the information presented asynchronously. This method will allow participants explore and review the material at a rate that would better match their needs. 

 

Discussion:

It would seem from current experience; we need to adapt to a normal of constant change.

With various course modalities, adjusting to various environmental conditions, and changing technology, we need to stay focused on student learning. This presentation will address student learning using technology and techniques to adapt to changing student learning needs.

Learned lessons from COVID remote and online teaching challenges are presented. The Pandemic has caused very creative solutions and accelerated the development of education 4.0 learning environments. This presentation will explore the development of engineering learning environments and the enhancements made to address pandemic challenges. Including incorporating Virtual Labs as part of the learning environment.  

Remote and online learning skills are well positioning our students for current and future work environment. Teleconferencing software like Zoom has been adapted for students to interact and engage each other on technology that would be difficult in the traditional classroom.  However, this does not just happen. The design of the learning environment is different than just presenting information to a group. Tools and skills must be developed within a learning situation focused on an outcome or outcomes like a project. This provides a context for learning the skills needed to accomplish the tasks for an end goal like a project.

The concept and practice of developing digital twins (or clones) helps students build their own confidence and re-enforces key learning concepts.

The course design includes many different approaches and builds on a team approach with diversity, inclusion, and universal design for learning.

Examples are presented and explored in the presentation.

Takeaways:

  • How technology and techniques can help facilitate learning environments (engineering given as an example)
  • How Digital twin development needs to be done early in the design phase, helping to re-enforce student learning
  • Designing in Universal Design for Learning and Accessibility into the course 
  • How to address issues of student learning; engagement, confidence, and cheating.

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Using AI and Cognitive Apprenticeship to Improve the Writing Capacity of Nursing Students | Graduate Student Discovery Session | PlayPosit

Discover how to use artificial intelligence to assess college students’ scholarly writing performance. Learn how to apply the cognitive apprenticeship model to instructional design to improve students’ writing success in one semester. Mixed methods from a quasi-experimental research study will also be shared and recommendations for improving educational equity in higher ed.

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Extended Abstract

Dr. Red Wolf will share the results from her Ed.D. dissertation, “Exploring the Scholarly Writing Development of Master’s Nursing Students.” Rebecca evaluated the effectiveness of a Writing Workshop course in developing students’ writing capacity and self-efficacy and found significant gains in both with large effect sizes. The interviewed students discussed transformations in their scholarly writing, critical thinking, professional communication skills, and confidence after participating in the course. Several of these students identified as non-native English speakers. Artificial intelligence was used to assess students’ pre- and post-course writing performance. The instructional design of the writing course and self-efficacy survey will be shared. Handouts on the instructional design and cognitive apprenticeship model will also be provided. Attendees will learn about brand new research results with recommendations on how to improve students’ writing success through AI assessment, instructional design, and a cognitive apprenticeship approach. (If I am allowed to present in a more interactive format, I would love to share samples of students’ writing and have attendee’s review the samples in small groups so they can learn how to use formative feedback to improve writing instruction!)

 

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Joy of Online Education: The Unexpected Moments | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

COVID-19 disrupted financial, socio-emotional, and educational systems on a global scale. Educators strategized how to teach competencies while instilling joy and adhering to the program's mission. This virtual discovery session will detail leveraging technology to reimagine learning and expect the unanticipated joy from innovative learning experiences.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted education from primary school to the university level worldwide. This virtual discovery session will detail how one university graduate program in the United States responded to the challenges imposed by the pandemic. Public health restrictions impacted classroom instruction and students’ ability to complete internship hours. A large national school of social work adapted its field education/internship programming to meet CDC guidelines while maintaining the learning requirements set forth by the national professional accrediting body, the Council on Social Work Education. Social work educators strategized to ensure students could complete field requirements safely, successfully and on time while adhering to the mission of the profession. Two programs using asynchronous and synchronous delivery methods evolved to meet the needs of students, the School Social Work Field Training (SSWFT) and the Experiential Learning Labs (ELLs). In the spirit of the Social Work Grand Challenge of “Harnessing technology for social good, these learning opportunities were completely virtual. However, the programs allowed for skill building and experiential learning, which are critical in field education. Unexpected outcomes for students and presenters included opportunities to expand learning outside the specific curriculum topics, exploration of passion topics and a sense of community, bringing the joy back in an educational setting challenged by quarantine and isolation.

SSWFT, a virtual program already in existence within the school for students in school social work, increased roster size and adapted the program delivery format to accommodate the specific field hour requirement. SSWFT is a trauma-responsive 12-week school social work virtual training for Virtual Academic Center (VAC) students placed at K-12 school sites. The training provides student enrichment during the summer semester when their clients, K-12 students, are experiencing summer breaks. The program's enrollment goal initially included the participation of 25 students per summer semester. The demand for student learning opportunities in the summer of 2020 was a surprising 62 students. In response, the SSWFT program began planning to offer additional engagement opportunities and learning delivery formats. Evaluations following the training reveal that despite the large roster size, students believe that SSWFT is helpful to their future professional goals as MSW school social workers. The additional asynchronous hours added to the training, in addition to the multiple avenues of community building like the use of Slack, provided a forum for connection, idea sharing, support, and enthusiasm for the content. Students were excited by the relationships that they were forming with content experts and the opportunity to integrate concepts into practice in the smaller consultation meetings.

The Experiential Learning Labs (ELLs), a program offered between May 2020 and August 2021, were synchronous learning opportunities offered to MSW students. ELLs used real-world environments developed by faculty members and content experts that were based on The Experiential Learning Cycle for MSW students to learn, observe, practice, and receive feedback (Kolb, 1984). The ELLs were offered for a calendar year and utilized multiple technology platforms to engage and inform students. The ELLs intersected with existing tools and processes to minimize disruption for the Field Liaison, Field Instructor, and MSW student. The Field Instructor assigned at the student's community-based placement could receive information about the ELL takeaways through a Reflective Learning Tool. A Reflective Learning Tool is a document that students complete based on their field placement experiences and process with their Field Instructor for professional growth. Kolb’s cycle of learning, observing, practicing, and receiving feedback (1984) provides a sense of meaning and accomplishment that exudes joy.

Many lessons were learned about best practices of virtual learning and leveraging of internal capacity for crisis response during the creation of these programs. One of the unexpected takeaways from this experience was the joy of connection in the virtual world. During the pandemic, isolation and disconnection were pervasive across professional and educational realms. The redevelopment of existing programs and the creation of new programming challenged educators to reimagine a virtual setting that could increase interactivity. SSWFT and ELLs focused on increasing connectivity while building upon the subject experience of faculty. Students had increased opportunity to interact and learn from faculty across different lines and university programs. In addition to increased synchronous time, asynchronous strategies included discussion questions, polls, and Slack boards to create a community. Students in different programs who did not have the opportunity to interact prior to the pandemic had the opportunity to form unexpected relationships with other students and faculty. There was also the opportunity to learn about content outside the standard social work curriculum customarily offered. Additionally, faculty enjoyed presenting their professional interests and meeting with students who shared their interests in the subject matter.

As the school continues to endure the COVID-19 pandemic, the SSWFT and ELL programs continue to evolve to overcome new challenges and create best practices to provide real-time solutions to field education disruptions while creating connections between students, staff, and faculty, which in turn creates a sense of belonging and joy. This virtual discovery session will provide a brief overview of the SSWFT and ELL programs followed by a series of prompts created ahead of time as well as organically during the session. The attendees of the virtual discovery session will take away the following:

· Describe multiple ways to connect online learning with joy using examples.

· Construct components of online learning and how they can contribute to joy.

· Reflect upon the responses of others to prompt questions in an asynchronous format to further expand your thinking and understanding of joy in an online environment.

During the asynchronous component of the discovery session, attendees will receive prompts such as in order to increase engagement and interactivity:

· Beyond the curriculum, how would you integrate online learning in your program?

· What opportunities are available for developing an emotional connection between students, faculty and staff?

Join these lively and fun social work faculty members as we demonstrate how to add some joy into online learning.

In the spring of 2020, the initial prediction from public health experts was that the quarantine would last for several weeks. A few weeks turned into months and eventually years of lasting impacts and challenges. The development and evolution of the SSWFT and ELL programs were born out of crisis management but blossomed into a new enthusiasm for virtual learning. The pandemic thrust upon educators the demands of reimagining the virtual learning environment and how to engage large numbers of students creatively. Initially, the desired outcome was to ensure that students met their learning goals and requirements; however, the unexpected outcome was a renewed joy in learning and teaching. The dependence on technology and isolation allowed for a wholehearted embracing of the virtual space, especially in education. Educators were provided an opportunity to reimagine their work without physical boundaries, and students were provided learning opportunities beyond the scope of a traditional curriculum.

Council on Social Work Education. (2020). Social work student perceptions - Impact of COVID-19 pandemic on educational experience and goals. https://www.cswe.org/Research-Statistics/Impact-of-Covid-19-Pandemic-on-...

Garner, A. S., Shonkoff, J. P., Siegel, B. S., Dobbins, M. I., Earls, M. F., McGuinn, L., ... Wood, D. L. (2012). Early childhood adversity, toxic stress, and the role of the pediatrician: translating developmental science into lifelong health. Pediatrics, 129(1), e224-e231.

Kolb, D. (1984). Experiential learning: Experience as the source of learning and development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Kourgiantakis, L. & Lee, E. (2020). Social work practice education and training during the pandemic: Disruptions and discoveries. International Social Work, 63(6), 761-765. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1177/0020872820959706

Morris, D., Dragone, E., Peabody, C. & Carr, K. (2020). Isolation in the midst of a pandemic: Social work students rapidly respond to community and fieldwork needs. Social Work Education, 39(8), 1127-1136. Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1080/02615479.2020.1809649

Singh, M. I., Doyle, K., Wobbe-Veit, L. (2021). Social Work Field Education: Harnessing technology to connect social work education and practice during COVID-19. International Journal of Digital Society, 12(1). 1695-1699. DOI: 10.20533/ijds.2040.2570.2021.0211

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Impact of Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning: A Blessing or Curse? | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The purpose of this session is to gain audience perspectives regarding the challenges and opportunities of Emergency Remote Teaching and Learning (ERTL), leading to determining if the experience of transitioning to online during the pandemic was/ wasn't a blessing in disguise. 

 

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Extended Abstract

An online course is “a course where most or all of the content is delivered online. Typically have no face-to-face meetings'' (Allen & Seaman, 2008, p.4). Emergency remote teaching is an unplanned “ temporary shift of instructional delivery to an alternate delivery mode due to crisis circumstances'' (Hodges et al., 2020, p.n.). Unlike Emergency Remote Teaching, conventional online teaching is usually planned and may not be temporal.  The pandemic presented various challenges and opportunities in education. With the move to online learning, it was clear that not many instructors were prepared for the transition which may affect students' learning.  According to Whalen (2020), “this global pandemic exposed a significant gap in teacher preparation and training for emergency remote teaching, including teaching with technology to ensure continuity of learning for students at a distance” (p.189). Also, faculty were facing some pedagogical challenges and lack of support from the Ministry of Education (Shamir-Inbal & Blau, 2021). As a result, one of the benefits of this challenge is the exposure of the need to train faculty on ERTL. For students, one study found that there was “an increase in students' academic performance in emergency remote teaching, supporting the idea that organizational factors may contribute to successful implementation of emergency remote teaching” (Iglesias-Pradas et al., 2021, p.1).

 

Purpose:

            This session will focus on the opinions of instructors, students, and instructional designers regarding the impact of emergency remote on teaching and learning. In addition to defining the session goals, sharing them with the participants, and defining any key information and abbreviations, the speakers (instructional designers and instructional design & technology graduate students) will do the following:

  1. Share their insights on the topic of emergency remote teaching and its effect on learning and teaching in higher education, and

  2. Engage the audience in an interactive discussion, using crowdsourcing, develop a list of positive and negative experiences from the use of emergency remote teaching to possibly research in the future.

The following are examples of some of the questions which will be posed to prompt discussion during the presentation: 

1.     What are the challenges you faced during ERTL as students, instructors, or instructional designers?

2.     What opportunities did ERTL present to you as a student, instructor or instructional designer?

3.     From your perspective, in general do you think ERTL was beneficial or detrimental? Why?

References

Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2008). Staying the course: Online education in the United States, 2008. Sloan Consortium. 

Hodges, C., Moore, S., Lockee, B., Trust, T., & Bond, A. (2020, March 27). The difference between emergency remote teaching and online learning. EDUCAUSE Review. Retrieved November 30, 2021, from https://er.educause.edu/articles/2020/3/the-difference-between-emergency-remote-teaching-and-online-learning

Whalen, J. (2020). Should teachers be trained in emergency remote teaching? Lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 28(2), 189-199.

Iglesias-Pradas, S., Hernández-García, Á., Chaparro-Peláez, J., & Prieto, J. L. (2021). Emergency remote teaching and students’ academic performance in higher education during the COVID-19 pandemic: A case study. Computers in Human Behavior, 119, 106713.

Shamir-Inbal, T., & Blau, I. (2021). Facilitating emergency remote K-12 teaching in computing-enhanced virtual learning environments during COVID-19 pandemic - blessing or curse? Journal of Educational Computing Research, 59(7), 1243–1271. https://doi.org/10.1177/0735633121992781

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Fictional University - Real-Life Applications: Mustang University and Mixed Reality in Higher Ed | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Mustang University, a fictional university that includes many components, exists in the Higher Ed program in order to provide a place for students to apply their theory and skills in real-time simulations within a mixed reality setting. Students can explore authentic experiences within the Mustang University setting, including a web site, forms, social media posts from students, etc. As students explore Mustang University, they preprare for an interaction within the mixed reality lab. In the lab, protocols for discussion and reflection help shape a powerful and engaging experience for students. Students can participate in the mixed reality setting either in a lab or virtually. Come and learn how our structure has produced deep learning. 

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Extended Abstract

Mustang University, a fictional university that includes many components, exists in the Higher Ed program in order to provide a place for students to apply their theory and skills in real-time simulations within a mixed reality setting. Students can explore authentic experiences within the Mustang University setting, including a web site, forms, social media posts from students, etc. As students explore Mustang University, they preprare for an interaction within the mixed reality lab. In the lab, protocols for discussion and reflection help shape a powerful and engaging experience for students. Students can participate in the mixed reality setting either in a lab or virtually. Come and learn how our structure has produced deep learning. 

The program lead for the Master's of Higher Ed Program, the Senior Academic Technology Services Director for the School of Education, and the Simulation Specialist for the mixed reality lab within the Simmons School of Education at Southern Methodist University created Mustang University in order to offer a rich environment for students to apply their knowledge and skills within scenarios based on real-world Higher Ed occurrences, such as roommate disputes, struggling students, or a theme party gone wrong. Throughout their time in the program, students have the opportunity to visit Mustang University more than once, making the experience that much richer for all involved. Our hope is to continue to build scenarios within Mustang University so that students hoping to have a career in Higher Ed can practice their skills in a variety of situations. Because the avatars respond in real-time and can pivot based on the interaction with the students, the students have more freedom to try new approaches. 

This session will discuss the pre-work involved, the use of specific tools, and some of the protocols presented for discussion and reflection. 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Open Educational Resources: Basics Of Open Licensing | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

 

Recent years have seen a growing interest in the Open Education Movement, which seeks to make high-quality research, teaching, and learning materials available to classrooms across the world (UNESCO, 2012). Promotion of Open Educational Resources (OER) to address inequities in education is increasing internationally and at the state and local level, according to the 2017 National Education Technology Plan (Department of Education, 2017). Openly licensed online courses have further helped to fill a void during the virtual pivot in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the legal facets of Open licensing are easy to gloss over when materials can be published in the click of a button. This session aims to clarify misconceptions regarding the licensing and sharing of digital and offline materials by exploring tools to identify, adapt, create, and distribute OER. Participants will distinguish between Open and Closed copyright and identify the range of permissions expressed through various Open licenses.

The presenters will begin with an overview of Open and Closed copyright and take participants through steps to identify license types. They will then guide participants through exploration of the range of permissions expressed through various Open licenses, as demonstrated by the five “Rs”: Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix, and Redistribute (Creative Commons, 2017), using authentic lesson plans, videos, articles, and course materials as examples. Participants will walk away with user-friendly OER guidelines and templates and increased confidence in creating, reusing, and adapting OER.

 

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
"Quality Can’t Be Done in a Checklist”: Applying Faculty Perspectives about Online Course Reviews | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Online course reviews have been in place for five years at our institution. To continuously assess their effectiveness, participating faculty were asked to describe their review experience via surveys and focus groups. In this session, we will identify factors that relate to review success as well as obstacles we plan to overcome.

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Extended Abstract

Despite years of evidence suggesting that there are no significant differences between online and face-to-face environments with regards to learning, the question of online course quality remains. More institutions are offering online courses and programs, so there is increasing pressure to show evidence that their online courses are high in quality. Online course reviews are becoming more commonplace in higher education as a way to show evidence of a quality online learning experience. There is evidence to suggest that online courses that go through a formal online course review process do show an improvement for students (see FIU Online, 2016). 

At the institution in which the authors are based, a state initiative was established that called for a certification process for online courses within the state system. A faculty member who is credentialed to design online courses opts into the review of their online course and an instructional designer reviews the course. A consultation follows in which the faculty member and instructional designer discuss the feedback and collaboratively generate a plan for revisions. When satisfactory revisions are made, a certification (Quality designation) is achieved. Since its inception in 2017, over 700 online course designations have been earned by over 300 faculty members. Despite this success, many challenges continue to be faced, namely an abundance of courses to be reviewed, faculty reluctance, and concerns about strategic impact. 

Our goal is to satisfy the state requirement in a way that makes the faculty experience satisfying, and results in actual improvement of courses for students. To do this, we must incorporate feedback from faculty members. In 2021, any faculty member who had participated in an online course review was invited to take the survey about their perceptions of the online course review experience. 314 faculty were asked in all, and 110 participated, resulting in a 35% response rate. The survey consisted of questions about motivation to participate in reviews, how well they understood aspects of the review process, relationship with ID, items themselves, and how they thought the process could be made more valuable. After the survey results were analyzed, two focus group sessions took place. The purpose was to better understand the survey results and allow an open-ended space for faculty to share their feedback and perceptions on the online course review experience. Survey respondents were randomly selected and asked to participate. Two sessions via Zoom were conducted (6 and 8, so 14 faculty total). The sessions were transcribed and the researchers came back to discuss and settled on main themes that emerged.

When asked about their motivations to participate in the online course review, the majority (74%) of survey respondents said the main reason was to improve the learning experiences for students. 85% were extremely satisfied with the course review process in general, and 90% agreed or strongly agreed that the course review process improved the design of the course. Specific design improvements mentioned included better organization, accessibility, and student performance. The relationship with the instructional designer was positively regarded. 94% agreed or strongly agreed that the collaboration helped to generate strategies to improve course design.

Three points stood out as deserving of more attention: (1) understanding certain concepts regarding the review process, (2) refining the instructional designer-faculty relationship, and (3) clarifying the student perspective. We asked faculty how well they understood aspects of the review process. Some stood out as not understood well, namely “when the designation expires,” “what course modalities are eligible for a review,” and “how a High Quality designation is achieved.” Another point had to do with the nature of the review itself, which is design-focused rather than teaching. As one faculty member declared in the survey, “Quality can’t be done in a checklist.” An additional concern was when an instructional designer would recommend actions that the faculty did not personally agree with. As one faculty noted in the focus group, “I did things my ID told me to do to get the badge even though I didn’t really want to….” In addition, knowing the status of the review also emerged as a theme, with some faculty not knowing when they would hear about the review’s next steps. Finally, there was confusion about how students understand the certification (“No students ask about it,” “How do they know about it?” “Can they see it when they sign up for the course?”). 

Based on this feedback, we plan to:

  • More clearly articulate the intention of the reviews and clarify the points that were not well understood, which will require modifications to the institutional website and instructional designer training. 

  • Explicitly relate faculty motivations to participate with benefits of completing a review. 

  • Leverage existing relationships. The collaborative element of course reviews between instructional designers and faculty is critical. We will stress more emphasis on better understanding what the faculty member is trying to achieve through the review process, rather than informing them what they need to do to earn the certification. 

Presentation Style

This is an asynchronous virtual session. We plan to present these findings for around 10 minutes, and ask participants to virtually interact along the way through poll questions and discussion. To allow for continued conversation, we will provide our contact information and link to our resources such as the survey. Our intention is that attendees will walk away with some solid recommendations that will enhance their own online course quality assurance plans.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Influence of Instructor-Generated Video Content on the Quality of Assignments Completed in Asynchronous Online Philosophy Classes | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This research project focused on the potential relationship between instructor-created explainer videos and student satisfaction (measured by EOC surveys), student engagement (measured by student course access and content completion), and performance (grades and persistence). Sections of PHIL200 were conducted with and without additional instructor explainer videos to guide students in their assignment completion. No other changes were made to the courses. The project somewhat replicated a study by Draus, Curran, and Trempus (2014) in which the overall satisfaction and performance of students were measured when instructor-created video content was added to the discussion forums. Attendees will learn about the interventions applied and the results in students' reported satisfaction and data-verified performance, with a discussion about implications for generalizing in other courses and settings. 

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Extended Abstract

This research project focused on the potential relationship between instructor-created explainer videos and student satisfaction (measured by EOC surveys), student engagement (measured by student course access and content completion), and performance (grades and persistence). Sections of PHIL200 were conducted with and without additional instructor explainer videos to guide students in their assignment completion. No other changes were made to the courses. The project somewhat replicated a study by Draus, Curran, and Trempus (2014) in which the overall satisfaction and performance of students were measured when instructor-created video content was added to the discussion forums. Attendees will learn about the interventions applied and the results in students' reported satisfaction and data-verified performance, with a discussion about implications for generalizing in other courses and settings. 

As noted in a previous study, instructor-created video content has been shown to improve student satisfaction as indicated in end of course surveys, higher average course grades, and no effect on student persistence. As a practical intervention in a general education course, the present study somewhat replicates the earlier study but modifies its aims to focus specifically on guiding teacher presence through explainer-videos in which faculty provide guidance at the assignment description area, rather than in the lessons as was done in the previous study. The researchers in the present study hypothesized that such video content in the assignment section of the course, where students are most likely to need it, would promote measurable increased student success on performance measures and related increased persistence. This is particularly important in PHIL200, a course known to be challenging to students. If the hypothesis proved correct, it could be concluded that instructor explainer videos may be a substantial way through which student success might be improved through successful course completion.

Research questions include:

1. How does instructor presence demonstrated by video relate to students' engagement in an online course?

2. How does instructor presence demonstrated by video relate to students' satisfaction in an online course?

3. How does specific instructor guidance demonstrated by video relate to students' performance and persistence in an online course?

In order to explore the relationship of instructor-created explainer videos, a study was developed including consecutive sessions of PHIL200 sections, taught by two specific faculty members. A high-enrollment general education course, Philosophy 200 was chosen for the study and content was taught in the Brightspace "My Classroom" learning management system. The philsophy course is standardized for all faculty who teach it, ensuring that few variations in content occurred. The course ran for eight weeks each session, and it included the same number and description of assignments in each course section, with no variation. In half of the sections, no additional videos were included. In the other half of the sections, videos were included that specifically mentioned upcoming assignments, provided a preview of what to expect, explained the assignment requirements and how to successfully meet them, and generally guided students.

The objectives for the project included designing a brief faculty tutorial to guide philosophy students in their completion of written assignments in PHIL200, loading videos into the courses for students to view, gathering data from courses with no videos and those with the intervention, analyzing data according to pre-determined methods, and drafting results, conclusions, and the complete report to share out. Key results identified through this project will be shared with participants, as well as suggestions for potential generalization in other courses. For example, one might consider modifying the approach to teaching an online of blended course across the university in other subject areas to enhance student satisfaction, success, and performance through the use of guiding instructor-created explainer videos connected to written assignments.

Please note that this study is currently being conducted and will be concluded with relevant and timely findings in the fall of 2022, giving the results and findings both recency and timeliness for attendees.

References:

Draus, P.J., Curran, M.J., & Trempus, M.S. (2014). The influence of instructor-generated video content on student satisfaction with and engagement in asynchronous online classes. Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 10(2), 240-254.

Magda, A.J., & Aslanian, C.B. (2018). Online college students 2018: Comprehensive data on demands and preferences. Louisville, KY: The Learning House, Inc.

Yigit, M. F., & Seferoglu, S.S. (2021). Effect of video feedback on students'  feedback use in the online learning environment. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, DOI: 10.1080/14703297.2021.1966489.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Are We Supporting Online Students’ Mental Health? | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The mental health and well-being of students in postsecondary institutions of education has been explored in the last decade in an effort to provide better services to students and support their academic success.  The pandemic of 2020 has significantly changed access to education for many, but the impact of this pivotal change on mental health and well-being is not yet known.  We present a case study of 1752 surveyed students at a liberal arts institution and their need for and access to mental health services.

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Extended Abstract

While the world population seems to be moving on past COVID-19, many continue to be significantly impacted by A study of 502 college students across the US indicates that a majority (85%) of college students say they continue to experience increased stress and/or anxiety as a result of COVID-19, with women reporting higher rates of coronavirus-related stress than men (93% vs. 78%).  The top three causes of stress and anxiety of students are related to academics: 72% feel uncertainty about the future of their education, 61% fear falling behind in their coursework, and 60% have experienced struggles with remote learning. Worries about future career and job prospects (50%) and fears about their health and/or the health of loved ones (49%) rounded out students’ five most common concerns (Dennington, 2020).  The National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and Course Hero conducted a study in fall of 2020 with a sample of 3,500 full-time students currently enrolled in four-year degree programs.  In this study,  one in five students are constantly “anxious” about the pandemic and are spending more time on their coursework and less time sleeping and exercising.  All of this data would seem to imply a greater need for mental health services on campus.  Current research also indicates however, that despite this increasing need for mental health care services at institutions of higher education, very few students will seek support or counseling services on campus  (Tian, Li, Yang, Tian, Shao, Tian,  2020).   Research indicates that a negative stigma associated with counseling or mental health services has decreased student adherence to treatment and possibly even a discontinuation of treatment (Eisenberg, Down, Golberstein and Zivins,  2009; Kaiser, Sattler, Bellack and Dersin, 1996).

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted a variety of populations mentally and physically.  Epidemics can create stressors such as fear and worry for oneself or loved ones, constraints on physical movement and social activities due to quarantine, and sudden and radical lifestyle changes.  A recent study confirmed pandemic stressors such as infection fears, frustration, boredom, inadequate supplies, inadequate information, financial loss, and stigma (Anderson, 2020: Brooks Webster et al, 2020).

Symptoms of mental health conditions were reported to be significant in college student populations even before the COVID-19 pandemic (Center for Collegiate Mental Health, 2019).   Another national study indicates that the prevalence of depression increased from fall 2019 to spring 2020, while substance use decreased in spring 2020.  Students also reported lower levels of psychological well-being in spring 2020 and stated that their mental health negatively impacted their academic performance (Anderson, 2020).  

 

Methodology

This is a case study of a private liberal arts institution which transitioned to completely online programming in 2020.  The total number of students in the traditional undergraduate liberal arts program is approximately 1752.  Participation in this study was voluntary and students completed an online survey.  Students were invited to enter in to a drawing for $50 Amazon gift cards as incentive.  No particular hypotheses are proposed as the research is exploratory.  All data is analyzed with SPSS. 

Survey Instrument

The survey was delivered to students online in Qualtrics.    The survey is a Likert scaled questionnaire with 20 questions regarding students’ sense of well-being, how they may have or have not utilized mental health services, the origins of their anxiety during the pandemic, and whether or not their academic program has changed as a result of the pandemic.  Students are also asked an open ended question regarding ideas they have relative to strategies to better support overall student well-being during the semester.  Students are asked about the types of mental health services they would like to have available.

Results
 

Six hundred and thirty-eight students responded to the survey distributed online.   While 44% of students said  they would take advantage of virtual counseling services, 30% were unsure, and 26% of students said they would not pursue virtual counseling services.  Only 27% said  they actually used traditional counseling services via campus.  Additionally, when asked why they have not accessed services, the most frequent response was students are “too busy.”  Also, students believed they did not need the services.  Eighteen percent said they weren’t sure how to access services and 16% said they were nervous about using the services. Thirty-nine percent of students said they would use virtual counseling services via the campus counseling center. 

Females are more likely than men to utilize counseling services χ2 (4, N = 601) =9.487, p < .025  and general telehealth services χ2 (3, N = 597) = 10.53, p < .02.  Freshmen are also more likely than upperclassmen to have used telehealth services χ2 (4, N = 598) = 13.04, p < .01.   Students who had previously used telehealth (25% )  are more likely to have accessed campus counseling services  χ2 (1, N = 601) = 36.68, p < .000 than those students who have not used the services.

Students also included open ended responses.  The most popular suggestion from students as to how the institution might improve services to students was: better and more frequent communication about services. Students noted things like “The school needs to communicate better with students; I didn’t even know mental health services were available. I must’ve missed an email.”  Others said things like “I need time to decompress from all the stress,” and “I need to understand how I can recover from the stress.”

One of the more popular suggestions was more “mental health days.”  Students’ comments included “A day off in the middle of the week would help” or “A four day week might make it easier to manage school and work.”  Some students commented on workload: “Online and hybrid doesn’t mean you overwhelm students with work.”  Many commented on faculty: “Faculty need to be more understanding,”  “Explain to professors that mental health  is a real thing.”  “Have counselors available in online classes to speak so students know more about services,” and “make mental health services part of a course syllabus.”   Students also advocated for virtual sessions (such as videos or other online offerings). “Students need services available to them when it’s convenient for them; online services make this easier.”  There are opportunities to improve communication to the students who may be unsure about services and to provide training to faculty via the counseling center.

 

Implications and Discussion

During the session we will present additional results from the study and conduct a poll with our audience members regarding mental health support services provided by their institutions.  We will discuss possible models for successful online mental health support as well as the challenges presented with supporting mental health for online students.

 

REFERENCES

Anderson, Greta (2020).  “A Generation Defined by the Pandemic.” Inside HigherEd.  Accessed at https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2020/10/15/students-continue-be-stressed-about-college-their-futures. December 22, 2020.

Brooks SK, Webster RK, Smith LE, Woodland L, Wessely S, Greenberg N, Rubin GJ. (2020).  “The psychological impact of quarantine and how to reduce it: rapid review of the evidence.” Lancet. 2020 Mar 14;395(10227):912–920.

 Center for Collegiate Mental Health (2020). University Park, PA: Penn State University; 2020. [2020-05-11]. 2019 annual report. Accessed December 22, 2020 https://ccmh.memberclicks.net/assets/docs/2019-CCMH-Annual-Report_3.17.20.pdf.

Dennington, Alan. (2020). “College Students’ Mental Health Continues to Suffer from COVID-19.”  Timely MD.  Accessed at https://www.timely.md/college-students-mental-health-continues-to-suffer-from-covid-19-new-survey-by-timelymd-finds/. December 26, 2020.

Eisenberg D, Downs MF, Golberstein E, Zivin K.  (2009).  “Stigma and help seeking for mental health among college students.”  Med Care Res Rev. Oct;66(5):522–41.

Kaiser, M.  Sattler,F.  Bellack, A. and K. Dersin (1996).   “A conservation of resources approach to a natural disaster: sense of coherence and psychological distress.” J Soc Behav Personal; 11:459.

 

Luxton, David D, et al. (2012). “Social Media and Suicide: a Public Health Perspective.” American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, May 2012, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3477910/.

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators. (2020).  “Student Wellness During COVID-19. What Role do Universities Play?”  Accessed December 11, 2020 https://reports.collegepulse.com/student-wellness-during-covid-19.

 

Qiu J, Shen B, Zhao M, Wang Z, Xie B, Xu Y. “A nationwide survey of psychological distress among Chinese people in the COVID-19 epidemic: implications and policy recommendations.” Gen Psychiatry.

 

Shuchman M.(2007).  “Falling through the cracks:  Virginia Tech and the restructuring of college mental health services.” N Engl J Med. Jul 12;357(2):105–110. doi: 10.1056/nejmp078096

 

Tian F, Li H, Tian S, Yang J, Shao J, Tian C. (2020). “Psychological symptoms of ordinary Chinese citizens based on SCL-90 during the level I emergency response to COVID-19.”  Psychiatry Res. 2020;112992.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
A lesson in modern pedagogy: A technology-driven shift from passive to active online learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Higher Education faculty and staff are using technology to create a new type of classroom. Andriena’s session will inspire the audience to re-evaluate how technology can help create impactful digital/hybrid classrooms, highlighting the types of features and tools that support accessibility, active learning, and modern pedagogical practices.

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic-induced shift to digital/hybrid learning in 2020 was hurried. Out of necessity, institutions and edtech companies prioritized availability and rapid integration over purpose-built, student-centered solutions. Now that higher education has nearly two years of digital/hybrid experience under its belt, faculty and staff are using technology to create a new type of classroom. Thanks to the rapid advancement in educational technology, educators can shelve the passive nature traditionally associated with online learning, and instead create an accessible, collaborative environment that prioritizes inclusivity, engagement, and student success. 

 

This session, targeted to higher ed admin and faculty, will be led by Andreina Parisi-Amon, Vice President of Learning & Teaching at Engageli. Andreina has over 15 years’ experience across academia and industry building partnerships, doing research, creating curriculum, teaching, and working closely with product developers to innovate in education. Andreina’s talk will inspire the audience to re-evaluate how technology can help create impactful digital/hybrid classrooms, highlighting the types of features and tools that support accessibility, active learning, and modern pedagogical practices. 

 

Andreina will also lay out how educators can utilize these features to maximize student success. She will discuss how to use engagement data and analytics to optimize classroom experiences; ways to leverage social and collaborative teaching techniques to foster stronger classroom connections for both students and faculty; and methods for seizing the shift to a more flexible higher ed model to make the industry more inclusive and accessible as a whole.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Effective Faculty Development: Building Leadership Relationships to Support Online Faculty Training Programs | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Leveraging a matrix of college leadership to support professional development programming offers a chance to strengthen institutional strategies, inter-departmental communication, and student success. This presentation will equip attendees with effective processes, strategies, and resources to support college-wide professional development programming, from initial planning through implementation and follow-up analysis.

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Extended Abstract

This session will cover effective processes, communication strategies, and resources to lead and support a faculty cohort through the successful launch of a new professional development program. Leveraging a matrix of leadership roles, including the college dean, program chairs, lead faculty, and adjunct faculty to support a new faculty development program can mitigate uncertainty while providing opportunities to strengthen institutional goals, inter-departmental communication and student success. This presentation will equip attendees with effective processes, strategies, and resources to support college-wide professional development programming, from initial planning through implementation and follow-up analysis.

Viewers will be equipped with a set of processes and resources for a multistage faculty development programming plan that leverages opportunities to:

Create an organized faculty development program
Set context for and manage change
Establish instructional expectations
Manage and assess faculty development programming cycle
Evaluate programming effectiveness

The presenters will cover strategies for how to implement, manage, and evaluate a faculty development program that will prepare faculty to leverage leadership relationships, communication strategies, and data crosswalks to evaluate overall course health. Viewers will gain insight into the intentional building of leadership relationships, including the dean, program chairs, lead faculty, and adjuncts to manage communication, change, faculty development programming implementation, evaluation, and follow-up. In addition viewers will be able to interact with the presenters asynchronously, posting comments and questions.

Learning Outcomes

1. After reviewing this presentation, viewers will have an understanding of the common challenges that arise before, during, and after implementing a new professional development program, and strategies to manage those challenges.

2.  After reviewing this presentation, viewers will be equipped with tools to support faculty at each stage of the faculty development programming, including implementation, evaluation, and follow-up analysis.

3.   After reviewing this presentation, viewers will be equipped with a set of processes and resources to organize an effective faculty development program and communication plan.

4. After reviewing this presentation, viewers will gain insight into how to leverage data points to track the effectiveness of instructional, outreach and engagement strategies.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Cameras Optional: Equity-Minded Teaching with Zoom | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

How can we design learning experiences that counter-balance the panoptic qualities of Zoom? Based on the results of a study of student and instructor experiences of online synchronous learning, we will explore equity-minded strategies for teaching with Zoom that center humanity through the context of learning and encouraging student autonomy.

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Extended Abstract

Video conferencing technologies such as Zoom are increasingly being used to facilitate synchronous online courses (Massner, 2021); however, current research is limited to faculty perceptions of student camera usage in these courses (Lowenthal et. al, 2021) and little is known about how camera usage influences student learning experiences. In this session, I will share the results of an informal study I conducted in Spring 2022, where I examined the relationship between instructional strategies, course design choices, and camera usage in synchronous online teaching and learning through Zoom from the perspective of both an undergraduate student and instructor. 

Foucault’s (Foucault, 1977) theory of Panopticism provides a lens for understanding the anxiety and pervasive sense of “being watched” that students can feel in online synchronous learning environments. These feelings are, unsurprisingly, not conducive to learning. At the same time, online synchronous learning, when designed intentionally, can create access and opportunities for students - and instructors - that did not previously exist.

Founded in the results of this research, we will explore practical online synchronous learning experience design strategies that seek to recognize the human-ness of this type of teaching and learning. Our exploration will focus on three themes - the context of learning, intentional course design, and student autonomy - with examples and activities that you can utilize in your own teaching practice. Participant sharing is encouraged, so come with your own equity-minded online synchronous teaching and learning strategies to share and discuss.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Resources for Onboarding Nursing Students to Online Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Although this topic focuses on RN to BSN students in an online program, the resources for onboarding students to online learning are applicable regardless of discipline and setting. All student populations benefit when they are intentionally socialized them to their program and the online learning environment.

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Extended Abstract

A highly educated nursing workforce is paramount for serving local and global populations and achieving quality healthcare outcomes. RN to BSN completion programs contribute to the nursing workforce by providing registered nurses holding an associate degree or diploma in nursing, a pathway to earn a baccalaureate degree in nursing.  Rather than face to face classes, online RN to BSN completion programs have become the most prevalent learning modality. However, student beliefs regarding online learning can be an obstacle to learning. Some students are wary of online learning and believe it will be too difficult to manage the online environment. In contrast, other students believe online learning will be “less rigorous” than the traditional classroom learning, and they will be able to complete the degree with little effort. RN to BSN applicants have many questions about online learning and how they will be supported. For this session the focus will be about utilizing designated onboarding courses with specific course resources extending extra support for students new to the program and online learning.

 

Although this topic focuses on RN to BSN students in an online program, the resources for onboarding students to online learning are applicable regardless of discipline and setting. All student populations benefit when they are intentionally socialized them to their program and the online learning environment.

 

Because we began providing onboarding courses with student resources prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, once the crisis hit, and the RN to BSN students were struggling with work-life balance due to working FT, and often working mandatory overtime, we did not have to create additional resources for them. Even though we are recovering from the pandemic, students continue to struggle with work demands due to staffing issues and all the other life challenges with being an adult student. Many students are in a similar situation with the fallout of the pandemic. For this session, I will be visually sharing how I set up my resources so you may revise for your student population. Attendees will be able to discuss and share best practices.

 

As of 2009, our RN to BSN program nursing courses have been delivered online.  Beginning in 2016, Instructional Designers collaborated with faculty to review and revise online courses to support best practices and consistency within the Learning Management System (LMS). Courses are delivered in a 7-week online, asynchronous delivery method. Each semester includes Term A with 7-week course(s) and Term B with 7-week course(s). Thus, 6 start times are available per academic year.

 

To help support students, a specific navigation video for the actual course is recorded rather than using pre-made videos about the LMS technology. Additionally, instructional videos are created for all the difference aspects of the technology students will use for that specific course. For example, some onboarding courses require students to video record their project presentation. Therefore, I create a video walking them through the steps. Again, we have access to videos about using specific technology, but I know my student needs and using a generic video has not been helpful. Case in point, after watching one of the pre-made videos, students would need to meet with me via video-conferencing, and I would have to show them step by step how to use the video-recording device. Therefore, I felt it was less time-consuming and more accessible for them and me, to have a video-recording I created based on the needs of my student population. I have a specific section in the course, the Syllabus and Resources section, where I store all the resources for students. Having videos and resources has saved the students and myself time and frustration. Now that students have technology videos and other specific resources relative to their course, I rarely have to answer questions about the technology, and we can concentrate on the learning.

 

Another mechanism we use to informally mentor and support student is via our LMS generated RN to BSN organization site. The RN to BSN director consults with course faculty and the advising team to post regular announcements within the organization. These postings include FAQs about the program, reminders about scheduling advising appointments, information about registering for classes, scholarship opportunities, clinical course information, and information about our nursing honor society.

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
How Presence in Online Courses Support Students' Persistence | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The qualitative research I conducted was focused on how presence in online courses support students' persistence. I discovered seven themes including faculty support, faculty communication, course expectations/student expectations, social connections, student collaboration, student initiative, and making learning connections. This research is valuable to higher education faculty members and administration.

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Extended Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to understand how online undergraduate students enrolled in a 300-level business course and online faculty members in the College of Business describe presence components in online courses that support students’ persistence at one higher education institution in Colorado. This study’s sample for this study consisted of 12 students and 12 faculty members at an accredited higher education institution in Colorado. The conceptual model that guided this study was the community of inquiry model. The research questions that guided this study included how online undergraduate students enrolled in a 300-level business course and online faculty members in the College of Business describe teacher, social, and cognitive presence components in online courses that support students’ persistence. The researcher conducted 12 in-depth interviews with students and 10 in-depth interviews with faculty. After analyzing the interviews, the researcher conducted separate focus groups with 10 students and 12 faculty about the initial themes drawn from the interviews. Braun and Clarke’s method was used for thematic analysis. The researcher used hand-coding and MAXQDA qualitative data analysis software to identify recurrent words in the transcripts, developed codes, categories, and themes. The researcher identified seven evident themes in this research study, including faculty support, faculty communication, course expectations/student expectations, social connections, student collaboration, student initiative, and making learning connections.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Using Learning Analytics Dashboards to Encourage Continuous Course Improvement | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Learning analytics dashboards has helped us sustain course design relationships with faculty and productively use our implementation terms. This session will offer a look at the dashboards, discuss their development and use, highlight successes of using data with course design, and share the next steps.

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Extended Abstract

In this session, we will share how our course and program design team has used learning analytics dashboards to refine design recommendations, sustain course design partnerships, and monitor the impact of design iterations on student learning outcomes. Our pilot results suggest that efforts like these can close assessment loops, improve student outcomes, promote a culture of continuous improvement, strengthen faculty and design team partnerships, and save time. To start, we’ll discuss the main problem we were trying to solve – once courses had been developed and launched, faculty gradually drifted out of our design team’s orbit. This limited our ability to make quick, targeted improvements and assess the impact of our changes. We will also share a couple of early, primarily unsuccessful, efforts to use data to inspire sustained engagement with our design teams. Then, we will discuss how teams across our organization collaborated to design, develop, and deploy assignment outcomes dashboards, sharing what they look like, how we have used them, evidence of increased faculty satisfaction and improved student outcomes, and how we intend to dovetail these efforts with our burgeoning user experience research team. We will encourage attendees to engage via quick surveys and discussion threads to ask participants to share experiences and questions throughout the presentation. 
Our simple approach could interest any professionals curious about how learning analytics, instructional design, user experience research, and assessment professionals can partner to improve student outcomes. 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Do Graduate Students Utilize the Virtual Research and Writing Development Center in Writing their Dissertations? Why or Why Not? | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

What are graduate students’ characteristics who use the online research and writing development center (RWDC)? How often do they visit, what for, and how are the visits associated with dissertation progress?  We share research results with three cohorts of graduate students (n = 150) that examined RWDC engagement and dissertation writing progress.

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Extended Abstract

Overview of Research

              Program Background: Over 500 students are enrolled in our online professional 3+ year doctoral degree, which includes 9 cohorts of 40–90 students each. While working on their degree, students can visit the program-specific Research and Writing Development Center (RWDC) for help with class assignments or planning documents leading up to their dissertation. In students’ fifth term of the scheduled course sequence, students enroll in a course designed to facilitate writing their literature review and methodology chapters. While working on a dissertation, starting in their fourth term, the RWDC allows students to book a 30-minute appointment once every 21 days subject to consultant availability.

             Participants and Data Collection: We examined three cohorts of doctoral students’ (n ≈ 150) frequency of engagement with the RWDC midway through their doctoral program. Using a survey, we collected demographic information, including perceptions of previous writing experiences, and, if applicable, the reasons for not visiting the RWDC. Second, using RWDC records, we investigated the frequency of visits and topics covered in those meetings during the dissertation writing course in the fifth term. Finally, we collected whether the students earned candidacy at the end of the dissertation course to examine the relationship between the outcome and RWDC visits. 

             Preliminary Results (2 Cohorts): Seventy percent of students had visited the RWDC before term 5, while 30% had not per student reported data. We discovered that students who supervise others in their professional contexts were more likely to have attended the RWDC than their peers who are not supervisors. Our Black students and students with a parent who was an English Language Learner were less likely than their classmates to have visited the RWDC. The themes we found in a qualitative analysis of their motivations included: scheduling, not seeing a need due to perceived skill or faculty feedback, feeling insecure or anxious, or not seeing value in working with the RWDC. 

According to RWDC data, 96% of students attended RWDC consultations (~270 appointments) during their fifth-semester dissertation course, while 4% did not. On average, students attended two appointments during term 5, with nearly 20% of students attending 3–5 appointments. The RWDC utilizes 19 categories to track the topics discussed. The most prevalent topics were: Outlining/Macrostructural organization (14%), Topic Sentences/Paragraph Breaks (12%), and Baylor Formatting (9%).

             Implications & Recommendations:  Given these results, it is important to seek to encourage students that are less likely to reach out for ongoing writing support. Understanding what makes students more or less likely to visit the RWDC can help advisors and RWDC faculty to better support students and target outreach and support to those less likely to seek it out on their own. Since the majority of conversations in RWDC consultations was macrostructural, those guiding graduate students’ writing might benefit from prioritizing outlining and topic sentence development. These conversations underscore a need for additional research into how graduate students access writing support. 

 

Session Goals:

Individuals viewing this virtual presentation will learn details about how the online program-specific research and writing development center serves graduate students who are writing their dissertations. You’ll learn from our research which students are utilizing the services and how they use the RWDC and which students are not and their reasons why. Viewers learn how graduate students’ actions relate to getting to doctoral candidacy.

 

Interactive Participation:

Individuals viewing this virtual presentation are invited to provide presenters with complete a short-reflective submission and provide suggestions for future research. We are also inviting partners from other universities in researching online graduate student persistence and/or graduate student writing to collaborate on submitting for large-scale grants.  

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
An SEL-based Approach to Intrinsically Motivating Curriculum and Instruction for Adult Online Learners | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Adult learners choose online learning for convenience and relevance.  Disengagement can hinder retention. Infusing Social Emotional Learning into instruction and curriculum optimizes motivation and engagement. This session explores three elements of intrinsic motivation in online learning: competence, relatedness, and autonomy. Attendees explore strategies for boosting students’ intrinsic motivation with SEL.

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Extended Abstract

Adult learners choose online learning for its convenience and relevance. Online learner engagement is key. Curriculum and instruction infused with Social Emotional Learning (SEL) practices optimizes students’ intrinsic motivation. This session explores competence, relatedness, and autonomy in online learning. Attendees will identify SEL-infused curriculum and instructional approaches and brainstorm specific strategies for harnessing adult online learners’ intrinsic motivation. According to Lyn and Broderick (2023), educators have traditionally been placed at the center of learning, which implies the responsibility of motivating students. While many educators have shifted away from this teacher-centered approach, a transition to online education can often mean the resurfacing of more traditional methods. When educators take on motivating their students, disengagement and procrastination can fester as soon as the teacher is not actively present. 

Carrots and sticks, or As and Fs, produce fleeting bouts of personal drive. Innovative technological instructional design strategies such as badging activities and virtual rewards can be fun and engaging but are mostly extrinsic and superficial. While wins fuel some individuals, others may be driven by failures. Either way, extrinsic motivators fade into the distance, and a person is left to look inside themselves for the incentive they need to carry on, climb the mountain, and achieve all they have dreamed (Lyn & Broderick, 2023).

The most lasting way to motivate online adult students entails infusing curriculum and instruction with SEL, nourishing students’ true and ongoing intrinsic motivation. Effective online educators become models, mentors, coaches, and consultants for students, and SEL competencies help to infuse meaningful interpersonal relationships and depth into curriculum and instruction in the online classroom. These rich interactions in turn optimize students’ intrinsic motivation, which is a powerful driver of success and well-being. Ryan and Deci (2017) explained that extrinsic and intrinsic human motivation exist on a continuum of influences. Humans engage in reward-seeking and punishment avoidance when the influence is mainly on the extrinsic side of the motivation continuum. Extrinsic motivators such as grades and badges, tend to be temporary and often do not deliver the happiness and satisfaction intended (Ryzner & Dutton, 2020). Temporary satisfaction falls short of providing the sustained catalyst needed for ongoing motivation in online learning. Adult learners choose education in pursuit of advancing their goals and actualizing their passions (Knowles, 1984a; 1984b). Intrinsic motivators, like the belief that what is being learned will enable oneself to take competent action in an area one is passionate about, are a driver of engagement and success. 

Infusing SEL into online curriculum and instruction can nurture students’ intrinsic motivation because it is human, personal, deeply fulfilling, and lasting. The belief that human beings are naturally oriented toward growth and mastery is the construct self-determination theory is built upon (Ryan & Deci, 2017). Decades of research has identified three elements as having a profound influence over an individual’s experience of intrinsic motivation: competence, relatedness, and autonomy (Ryan & Deci, 2017).

Fundamental to self-determination theory is the belief that human beings are naturally growth oriented (Ryan & Deci, 2017). The desire to influence their environment and engage in effective action is intrinsically satisfying. While external rewards may be a goal for participating in adult education, the satisfaction derived from gaining competence nourishes people and fulfills their need for feeling efficacious.

Relatedness refers to an individual’s sense of belonging and connectedness. People’s intrinsic drive for belonging is the motivator for a variety of behaviors. Studies have shown the impact students’ sense of belonging has on attrition (Russell & Jarvis, 2019). A sense of belonging develops from feeling acknowledged and affirmed. Relationships lacking these qualities fall short of fulfilling this need. According to Ryan and Deci (2017), relationships range from “impersonal transactions” to “meaningful encounters” (p. 295). Meaningful encounters are supportive in nature and convey a quality of caring about the other. This element of feeling cared about provides individuals with a sense of belonging that is fulfilling and motivating. Educators are positioned to cultivate relatedness with and between students. The belief that human beings are naturally oriented toward growth and mastery is the construct self-determination theory is built upon (Ryan & Deci, 2017). Decades of research has identified three basic needs as having a profound influence over an individual’s experience of intrinsic motivation: competence, relatedness, and autonomy (Ryan & Deci, 2017).

Competence is rooted in the desire to take effective action. Self-efficacy is personally satisfying. When efficacy is thwarted frustration may take over and interest may be lost. Interruptions or difficulties with the technology in online learning is one example of how a barrier to feeling efficacious can result in disengagement and attrition. Relatedness is about belonging and feeling connected. Students’ sense of belonging has a strong impact on retention and attrition (Russell & Jarvis, 2019). According to Ryan and Deci (2017), “meaningful encounters” convey care and support thereby strengthening feelings of belonging (p. 295). Online educators can cultivate students’ sense of belonging by engaging in meaningful encounters and fostering student interaction.

Finally, it is autonomy that fuses together fulfillment of these three basic needs (Ryan & Deci, 2017). Autonomy represents human beings’ need to be self-governing. Feeling competent and cared about helps to create the conditions for taking autonomous action. Conversely, autonomous interaction carries the genuineness essential to meaningful encounters. Likewise, conditions that welcome autonomous action foster competence. Promoting student autonomy in online learning means intentionally making space for and elevating students’ voices and choices. 

SEL-infused curriculum and instruction creates the conditions for learner competence, relatedness, and autonomy to flourish in the online learning environment. Broderick and Lyn (2022) proposed the degree to which educators embody social and emotional intelligence governs and inspires their approach to learning, inclusivity, and relationships. Further, the educators’ capacity for integrating social emotional learning into the course design and delivery can enhance or diminish students’ opportunities to experience intrinsic motivation. This session presents a framework for enhancing students’ autonomy, competence, and sense of relatedness thereby elevating intrinsic motivation. The framework infuses SEL into the online educational approach in three distinct ways:

1.  The dispositions embodied by the educator.

2.  The instructional strategies implemented by the educator.

3.  The culture created in the educational environment.

These three items relate directly to curriculum and instruction, which can be mindfully created or chosen by the instructor with SEL competencies in mind.

Attendees will identify SEL-infused curriculum and instructional approaches and brainstorm specific strategies for intrinsically motivating curriculum and instruction for adult online learners.

Interactive components of this presentation model the theme of nurturing adult learners’ intrinsic motivation to enhance engagement. At various points throughout this session the online Mentimeter polling and word cloud generating tool will be utilized in real time for ongoing interactive elements about key points and takeaways. Attendees' prior knowledge and existing intrinsic motivations will be mindfully addressed. The last 10 minutes of this session include a brainstorming activity to generate specific strategies for infusing SEL into online curriculum and instruction for adult online learners within attendees’ unique teaching contexts and perspectives.

References

Broderick, M. & Lyn, A. E. (2022). Integrating Social Emotional Learning into the Formative Development of Educator Dispositions. In. S. Clemm von Hohenberg (Ed.), Dispositional Development and Assessment in Teacher Preparation Programs. IGI Global.

(In press) Lyn, A. E. & Broderick, M. (2023). Setting the Stage with SEL: Intrinsic Motivation in Online Learning. In Lyn, A. E. & Broderick, M. (Eds.), Motivation and Momentum in Adult Online Education. Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

Knowles, M. (1984a). Andragogy in action. Jossey-Bass.

Knowles, M. (1984b). The adult learner: A neglected species (3rd Ed.). Gulf Publishing. 

Russell, L., & Jarvis, C. (2019). Student withdrawal, retention and their sense of belonging: Their experience in their words. Research in Educational Administration & Leadership, 4(3), 494–525.

Ryan, R. M. & Deci, E. L. (2017). Self-Determination Theory : Basic Psychological Needs in Motivation, Development, and Wellness. The Guilford Press.

Ryznar, M., & Dutton, Y. M. (2020). Lighting a fire: The power of intrinsic motivation in online teaching. Syracuse Law Review, 70(1), 73–114.

 
Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Overcoming ABD in the Online Doctoral Program: A Study on Writing Self Efficacy, Apprehension, and Anxiety When Starting the Dissertation Process | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Despite the extensive research on writing self efficacy, apprehension, and anxiety, few studies have explored the significance of these three factors for online doctoral students writing their dissertations. This convergent mixed methods study examined diverse graduate students' (n = 53) writing self-efficacy during the dissertation writing process in an online program.

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Extended Abstract

Despite the rapid changes in doctoral education over the last three decades (e.g., the rise of online doctoral programs and professional degree doctoral programs), one of the more consistent aspects of postgraduate education research remains the often cited 50% attrition rate that plagues academia (with variations across disciplines, departments, and modalities; Berelson, 1960; Bowen & Rudenstine, 1992; Golde, 2006; Kennedy et al., 2015; Locke & Boyle, 2016). While the investigations into these attrition rates have noted many potential contributing factors, the challenges faced in the dissertation-writing process has become a central area of inquiry (e.g., Boote & Beile, 2005; Lavelle & Bushrow, 2007; Ondrusek, 2012; Spaulding & Rockinson-Szapkiw, 2012). One challenge to studying doctoral student writing, however, is the diversification of program delivery methods, types, and goals with the rapid expansion of online and practitioner-oriented doctoral programs (Council of Graduate Schools, 2007; Hyland, 2009, pp. 5–10; Neumann, 2005; Trigwell et al., 1997). Each of these program differences can introduce complications and potential barriers to a student’s writing progress, which in turn can result in the need for reimagining the writing support needed to maximize a student’s chances of success (Blevins et al., 2021; Nobles, 2019; Werse, 2021; Werse et al., 2022).

Parallel to this scholarly trajectory on doctoral writing, many scholars have identified academic self-efficacy as a positive mediating factor that correlates with positive academic outcomes, even in the midst of complications and barriers  (e.g., Caprara et al., 2008; Eakman et al., 2019; Fokkens-Bruinsma et al., 2021; D. H. Schunk & DiBenedetto, 2016; D. H. Schunk & Pajares, 2002). Scholars of writing instruction, therefore, have logically applied these implications to writing development, noting that perceived writing self efficacy often serves as a mediating factor that can help students achieve positive writing outcomes despite potential obstacles. While such inquiries have yielded implications for the study of writing development, they tend to focus on students early in their academic journeys, such as college composition students (e.g., Lane et al., 2003; Prat-Sala & Redford, 2012; Wachholz & Etheridge, 1996; Woodrow, 2011) or students writing in a second language (e.g., Abdel Latif, 2015; Arroyo González et al., 2021; Han & Hiver, 2018; Lee & Evans, 2019; Ruegg, 2018; Sun et al., 2021; Sun & Wang, 2020; Teng et al., 2018, 2020; Tsao, 2021; Zabihi, 2018). Despite the potential that self efficacy theory has to contribute to the scholarly understanding of the dissertation writing process, comparatively few studies have focused specifically on writing self-efficacy at the doctoral level (e.g., Dupont et al., 2013; Hines, 2011; Varney, 2010).

Given how costly doctoral student attrition is to both the student and the department (Garcia, 1987; Pritchard, 2018; Santicola, 2013) as well as the potential of writing self efficacy to serve as a positive mediating factor for doctoral students writing their dissertations, this convergent mixed methods study explored changes in writing self-efficacy and writing apprehension among 53 doctoral students throughout their first semester of a dissertation writing course designed to guide them through the composition of the first two chapters of their dissertation. This study answered the following three research questions:

1.     Quantitative RQ: Is there a significant difference in graduate students’ writing apprehension, writing mechanics self-efficacy, academic writing self-efficacy, or relational reflective self-efficacy before and after taking the 1-semester dissertation writing course? 

2.     Qualitative RQ: In what ways have doctoral students’ perceptions of their writing abilities changed after they have completed a course to write their literature review and methodology chapters? 

3.     Mixed Methods RQ: To what extent do doctoral students’ written reflection data help explain their perceived writing apprehension, writing mechanics self-efficacy, academic writing self-efficacy, and relational reflective writing self-efficacy scores?

Results indicated no significant differences in pre- and post-course measures of writing self-efficacy. Analysis of written student reflections showed students felt more confident, benefited from specific feedback, built relationships through their peer working group, and identified their academic writing strengths and weaknesses. Implications point to the need for multiple resources within online programs to help support and provide targeted, iterative, and personalized feedback to students. 

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Nuts and Bolts of Collaboration: Bridging the Gap Between Faculty Advisors and Student Support Staff to Help Online Doctoral Students Thrive throughout the Dissertation Process | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Join us to learn how we reimagined the relationship between student support staff and dissertation advisors to maximize student success throughout the dissertation process in a 500+ student online doctoral program. This collaborative system integrates writing center staff into dissertation writing courses and the defense process to support student writers.

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Extended Abstract

Without a doubt, the faculty advisor remains the single most important influence in a doctoral student’s journey through the process of writing a dissertation (Baird, 1995; Barnes, 2005; Barnes et al., 2010; Cockrell & Shelley, 2011; Creighton et al., 2010; Lunsford, 2012; Lyons et al., 1990; Nettles & Millett, 2006, pp. 95–101, 191; Pritchard, 2018; West et al., 2011). Students who have positive experiences in their doctoral program frequently speak of the valuable writing mentoring and iterative feedback that they received from their advisor. Traditionally, the dissertation writing process takes place in the “master-apprentice” model of doctoral work, in which a single expert “master” mentors a single (or small number of) “apprentice” doctoral students. This system allows for the faculty advisor to invest substantive, personalized time into the research and writing development of emerging doctoral students as they write their dissertations. It comes as no surprise, therefore, that regular, iterative, and highly personalized feedback from the faculty advisor is one of the most commonly recognized factors in online doctoral student completion rates (e.g., Litalien & Guay, 2015; Nettles & Millett, 2006).

One of the emerging challenges in the field of doctoral student writing research, however, remains considering how best to provide supplementary writing support to doctoral students within this highly individualized, and at times siloed, expert-apprentice relationship. The emergence of writing development manuals for doctoral students reveals both the need and market for such support (e.g., Aliotta, 2018; Bell et al., 2019; Bolker, 2009; Evans et al., 2014). One area of emerging interest is the potential value of graduate writing center support (Lawrence & Zawacki, 2018; Simpson et al., 2016; Summers, 2016; Waring, 2005), particularly for online doctoral students who are physically separated by their geographical distance from other more established support structures at the university (Blevins et al., 2021; Werse et al., 2020, 2022). While often identified as valuable for graduate student writing development, navigating the relationship between the faculty advisors’ feedback and the feedback from an outside writing development specialist can be complicated. This complexity is seen with Gruba and Zoebel’s (2017) warning to graduate student writers about seeking writing center support under the heading “Plagiarism and Research Integrity.” Such “warnings” contribute to the recognized uncertainty among many writing center professionals about their institutional place within the university (e.g., Behm, 1989; Clark, 1988; Healy, 1993), especially when it comes to mentoring graduate student writers who have formal mentors in their advisors—each of whom may have widely different expectations and assumptions about writing development.

In this session, a collaborative team of faculty advisors and writing center professionals will present on how they went about reimagining the relationship between the faculty advisor and writing center support throughout the dissertation writing process, specifically to support online doctoral students in an effort to maintain high completion rates within the target time-to-completion timeline for the program. We launched a department-specific EdD Writing Center to support our 500+ online doctoral students throughout the dissertation writing process. We recognized that many students felt “out of practice” or unfamiliar with academic writing. At the same time, writing a dissertation at an aspiring-R1 institution required meeting high standards and expectations. To empower our students to succeed throughout this writing process, we built a robust team of seven full-time and four graduate assistant writing development specialists who work closely with faculty advisors across the curriculum sequence to support student writing. The EdD Writing Center offers nearly 500 writing consultations per trimester and works closely with faculty advisors to craft individualized writing development plans that are uniquely tailored to students’ different learning styles and language proficiencies.

The EdD Writing Center team is integrated into the methodology and Problem of Practice Dissertation writing course sequence to facilitate students’ writing growth across terms. The EdD Writing Center contributed materials to the construction of these courses, visits courses to offer workshops, and works with students across terms as they write their dissertations, publications, and more. Additionally, a member of the EdD Writing Center team meets with faculty advisors weekly to discuss their students’ progress. When students submit their dissertation documents for review to their faculty advisors, the EdD Writing Center team first runs a turnitin.com report and then provides preliminary feedback on the writing style, APA, and formatting before the advisor comments. This process allows them to carefully track statistics concerning student progress, such as the time spent with students, topics addressed, engagement with feedback, writing support needs, and research focus to inform program-level strategic planning.

A member of the EdD Writing Center team also serves on every dissertation defense committee. Because the EdD Writing Center team reads every Problem of Practice Dissertation across advisors, cohorts, and courses, they have a broad perspective from which to advise both students and faculty advisors throughout the writing process. The EdD Writing Center team can flag documents of concern for advisors, share with advisors how previous cohorts and advising teams handled certain situations in the advising experience, and can help an adviser determine when a document is ready to move forward to the next stage in the writing process. The results of this highly integrated student support system into the course sequence have been highly successful. Not only has the three-year completion rate far surpassed industry trends among EdD programs (83%, 74%, and 70% among the first three cohorts respectively; n=167) but the presentation of scholarly-practitioner Problem of Practice dissertations has impressed university stakeholders.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
If the shoe fits: Making a course to fit any instructor | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Brainstorm ways to amplify adjunct faculty voices in the model course design and revision process.

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Extended Abstract

Hastened by the covid-19 pandemic, the use of the master course model in online teaching and learning has been growing. Simultaneously, the use of adjunct faculty has been increasing over the years, and is now averaging near 50% of the overall faculty population. In most instances, institutions do not have a formal process to include the adjunct faculty in the master course revision process. As a result, they are often left teaching a course that they don’t like, don’t agree with, or envision completely different. Join us to discuss ways that we could begin to account for adjunct voices in the master course revision process.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Evolution of a Faculty Learning Community Model to Support Blended Course Design and Teaching | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session describes the evolution of a faculty learning community model over a decade: how it evolved from supporting design of reduced-seat-time hybrid courses, to embracing blended learning broadly during the pandemic, and finally to developing faculty resilience and leadership in teaching and building community.

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Extended Abstract

The Birth 

The centerpiece of a hybrid pilot program established in 2011 in a university teaching and learning center was the creation of hybrid faculty learning communities (FLC). These FLCs were offered in a 10-week hybrid format with both asynchronous online learning activities and 5 face-to-face group meetings. At least two hybrid learning communities were facilitated annually with multi-disciplinary cohorts of 6 to 12 instructors. Each FLC  member was offered professional development funding for participation and the redesign of an existing campus course as a reduced-seat time hybrid. 

 

FLC  activities included synchronous and asynchronous discussions, tech demos, readings, videos, blogging, and use of hybrid course planning tools. Guest presenters included experienced hybrid course instructors and campus tech support staff. Each FLC culminated with a participant showcase of planned hybrid course designs.

 

From the outset, the FLCs had 5 learning outcomes:

  1. Describe recognized effective practices for design and delivery of a hybrid course, for example, methods to foster student engagement in a blended learning environment.

  2. Design a hybrid course syllabus and develop course content that employ effective practices for blended learning, such as techniques to integrate online and face-to-face learning activities and materials.

  3. Identify campus resources and online resources—such as the OLC and MERLOT—to support hybrid course development and delivery.

  4. Recognize and apply policies and procedures applicable to hybrid course development and delivery, such as standards for online course site functionality.

  5. Employ fundamental features of the learning management system for course delivery, for example, posting announcements and facilitating online discussions.

 
The Development

Through the experience of facilitating Hybrid FLCs , seven key factors were identified that support a successful experience: Building swift trust among participants and facilitators, authenticity, iterative sharing, the hybrid format, making space for reflection, providing refreshments, and in some cases providing refuge from participants’ home units.

 

Over the decade, seventeen of these Hybrid FLCs ultimately served 143 faculty and seeded the development of hybrid courses as a recognized modality in the university’s teaching and learning landscape. The university, which had no official hybrid courses at the outset of the FLCs in 2011, now has 945. The learning communities played a significant role in raising faculty awareness of the potentials of hybrid teaching and learning, and supporting quality hybrid pedagogy. 

 

In the early months of the pandemic, the Spring 2020 Hybrid FLC shifted–along with campus teaching–to a remote mode, utilizing Zoom for synchronous meetings along with asynchronous learning activities in Canvas. Simultaneously a collaboration between the teaching center and academic technologies unit led to a one-time Applying Learning Technology FLC. This collaboration between two units focusing on technology and pedagogy grew. In subsequent terms, starting in Fall 2020, the hybrid FLC  and Applying Learning Technology FLC  models were merged into a single Blended Faculty Learning Community model. This move was in keeping with the shifting teaching landscape during COVID, and increased emphasis on campus courses blending synchronous learning (Zoom or classroom) with asynchronous learning (Canvas or elsewhere). 

 

Four of these Blended FLCs  have been offered using much of the structure of the original Hybrid FLCs  but shifting the focus to Derek Bruff’s excellent primer, Intentional Tech. Rather than redesign courses as reduced-seat-time hybrids, each participant works toward solutions–involving blended approaches and improved use of ed tech–to a self-identified teaching challenge. These Blended FLCs  have been co-facilitated by personnel from the Academic Technologies, the Teaching and Learning Center, and a senior instructor.

 

The Future

As of Spring 2022, the Blended FLCs are being reconfigured to emphasize resilient teaching in keeping with the rising focus on the need to support faculty and student well-being and resilience in the wake of the vast disruptions in higher ed in the past two years and a teaching environment that has not fully settled. The Resilient Teaching FLCs  will stress sustainability of teaching practices and teaching careers in shifting terrain of higher education today and in the future.

 

Relevance/Importance to OLC Community

Following the gradual shift toward hybrid instruction in higher education during the past two decades, the pandemic era has brought about a rapid acceleration in the development and delivery of hybrid courses. As hundreds of colleges and universities have moved “back” to more on-campus instruction in 2021-22, there is far more interest than before in blended instruction and demand for faculty development to support blended course design and teaching. This session will tell the story of how one university has supported blended faculty development through faculty learning communities.

 

Plan for Interactivity

Attendees will be engaged through use of Jamboard, discussion, and Q&A to compare and contrast various institutional approaches to supporting hybrid course design and teaching, blended learning, and resilient teaching.

 

What Attendees Will Learn/Takeaways

This session is relevant to teaching faculty, instructional designers/technologists, faculty developers and administrators. Participants will come away with specific lessons about faculty development that we’ve learned from a decade of organizing and facilitating FLCs. They will also learn ways that FLCs can evolve to meet the changing needs of teaching faculty in an ever-shifting, dynamic environment.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Helping online students succeed: Identifying and addressing gaps in technology and support services | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

We used institutional data and surveys of students and faculty to assess the needs of our online students. Based on our results, we implemented specific improvements to online student resources, and developed a plan to follow up and gauge their impact.

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Extended Abstract

How should colleges and universities address the needs of their online students? This is a major concern in higher education, and simply knowing where to begin can be a significant challenge. Much of the existing literature focuses on adult learners, and often concerns only specific programs. Having evidence specific to one’s own institution, with its unique population of online students, is useful in updating the available resources and supports.

The COVID pandemic brought forward a number of issues affecting the success of online learners. For instance, academic and student support services are traditionally designed for and promoted to fully in-person students. This can be the case even for institutions with large online student populations. When the pandemic temporarily forced most in-person classes into various online formats, academic and student support services likewise required a dramatic shift to online delivery. As a result, we have seen what is possible under duress; now is the time to consider continuing and improving key resources for online students. We just need to determine where to focus our efforts and construct a plan for assessing the success of the measures that are implemented.

We used a combination of institutional data and surveys of online students and faculty to find areas where we could work to improve student success. From institutional data we were able to identify which of our online student groups were most in need of support. In particular, we learned that the first year for undergraduate online students is crucial. Fully online first-year students had lower course pass rates compared to those who were only partially online (i.e., taking at least one course in person). In contrast, not only was the course pass rate for sophomores greater, but there was also a less marked distinction between those who were fully vs. partially online. These results suggest that some students, particularly first-year undergraduates, may benefit from being on campus at least part of the time. However, in-person learning is not always an option.  Having more resources available online, and raising awareness of resources already available, could help to narrow the gap between online and on-campus students.

With the surveys, conducted in the fall of 2021, we specifically examined student readiness for online learning as it concerns access to and fluency with technology and awareness of and willingness to use academic and student support services. We also learned about faculty experiences with online instruction and captured their assessments of online student needs.

Technology was a focus area because of its vital role in interactions within online courses. Students who do not have consistent access to required technology, such as a stable internet connection and a computer or tablet, are at a disadvantage. Those who are not fluent with technology skills and practices, such as using communication and media tools appropriately, are less likely to succeed. We compiled a list of the most used types of technology tools in our institution’s online courses. In addition to the LMS and MS Office, these included video cloud platforms, audiovisual conferencing platforms, and academic integrity tools. From the list, we identified specific areas in need of attention.

Another survey focus was the support services available to online students. These include academic support services, such as library services, advising, the writing center, and tutoring; and student services, such as counseling, financial aid, admissions and registration, and accommodations for students with disabilities. We sought to gauge student awareness of and willingness to use these services. Certain supports by necessity are only available in-person at our institution, including the food pantry and career closet. Other services, such as the writing center, offer both in-person and online services. We learned that slightly more than 40% of our online students were fully online at the time of the survey. The remaining students were still on campus at times for in-person learning and so could benefit from campus-based services if they were aware of them. We noted positive responses from online students who had used the on-campus services, indicating that raising awareness might result in increased use of such services, at least for students who could make the occasional trip to campus. Likewise, students and faculty tended to respond favorably to questions about remotely offered services, although there were suggestions for improvements. For example, the library database collection was highly rated, but survey respondents indicated a desire for more training in its use. The Help Desk received overwhelmingly positive responses, but a need for extended hours was repeatedly noted.

Technology and support services are areas where our institution could quickly implement improvements. We have undertaken certain steps to provide resources for online students based on our findings. We collected links to established resources such as tutorials for common technology tools used in online courses. We commissioned a series of short instructional videos to help students with common technology-based processes, such as setting up webmail as a new student, and using the library’s databases. We ordered a collection of infographics addressing topics such as learning opportunities and support services available to online students. Faculty and students repeatedly expressed the wish for a central online location for all student resources. In response, a single web page functions as a hub dedicated to online students and their needs.

It is worth noting that students and faculty alike were affected by the shift to online instruction driven by the pandemic. Not all faculty surveyed taught exclusively online courses prior to that time; in fact, only about 35% reported that their teaching modality was unaffected because their courses were already either fully or partially online. Only approximately 60% of the students surveyed had at any online course experience prior to the spring of 2020, so the rest had their first experience learning online due to the pandemic. Institutional data from that time is predictably knotty, but we look forward to the availability of data from more recent semesters and onward to compare to our pre-pandemic data. We will continue to use a combination of institutional and survey data to gauge the impact of our improvements over time and identify additional areas where we may work to increase online student success.

Level of Participation

The asynchronous virtual presentation will be a short slide presentation (10-15 minutes) with voiceover. We will avoid dense text in favor of uncomplicated visuals (suitable for online viewing) and brief text points for emphasis. To help drive discussion, we will intersperse question prompts and opportunities to reflect among the informational slides.

Session Goals

Attendees will identify several possibilities for increasing online student success at their institutions. We anticipate the session will be of broad interest to administrators, faculty, and staff. We would be especially appreciative of students who share their perspectives in the discussion.  

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Central Instructional Design Support Practice: Lessons Learned in International Collaboration on Quality Online Course Development | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The session will share the practice and lessons learned in a multi-national multi-university collaboration in quality online course development in higher education. Individuals joining this session will be able to discuss the challenges, approaches, strategies, resources, and recommendations to manage the quality course development in such an endeavor.

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Extended Abstract

The session will share the practice and lessons learned in a multi-national multi-university collaboration in designing and developing quality online courses in higher education. The endeavor involved five universities from Canada, China, Australia, The U.S., and Philippines. It leads to the design and development of a dozen of quality online graduate certificate courses with fundamental content as OER. The vision is to develop a regionally recognized core online curriculum aimed at updating senior students, young faculty, and mid-career professionals with the changing knowledge of the subject matter in a changing world. In such an endeavor, with course authors on board with diverse culture background and teaching experiences, it is really challenging to keep everyone on the same page, have an easy start, meet quality standards, and complete the project within timeline.
 
Managing the quality online course development is a complex process in multi-national multi-university collaboration in higher education. It starts with an innovative idea, but rarely can one academic unit achieve success on their own. Selecting the right collaborators and form effective course development and management team can often be just as important as the idea or vision itself. Where do you find the collaborators and resources that will truly support your efforts? And how do you create opportunities for each course development team to increase their advancement potential through the project?
 
Without careful planning and support at your institution, effective management of quality online course development may not occur in multi-national multi-university collaboration. Knowing what central instructional design support available at your institution is almost as important as the innovative idea itself. Knowing how instructional and learning designer works in supporting such initiatives is critical to your success. By developing relationships with the central support unit or center and with instructional and learning designers at your institution, it allows you to engage in the process of systematic course design to ensure the quality design of your courses. As a result, you will have the ability to implement similar innovative ideas that use the systematic design approach you learned while working with instructional and learning designers. These are skills that need to be developed and knowledge that needs to be acquired. How the team-based approach might look like in such an endeavor? What might be the practical instructional design process or model to follow to ensure quality design and development in such an endeavor? What and how quality benchmarks can be implemented in such an endeavor? All of these questions and more will be discussed in this engaging digital presentation and asynchronous discovery discussion. So come join us for a lively asynchronous discussion to help increase your knowledge on instructional design, international collaboration, and quality online course development.

Level of Participation:

Anyone interested in managing multi-national multi-university collaboration in designing and developing quality online courses in higher education are welcome to join the session.

Session Type:

This virtual discovery session is structured as an asynchronous online conversation for virtual presenter to virtual audience. The presenter will share a 15-minute digital presentation on PlayPosit with discussion prompts. Attendees will view the presentation on-demand and contribute to asynchronous comments and discussion. Interactivity will be personalized based on comments by audience members visiting the asynchronous presentation. We welcome deeper connections and more detailed discussions during and after the conference.

Session Outcomes:

Individuals joining this virtual asynchronous online discovery conversation will be able to:

  • Discuss the challenges in multi-national multi-university collaboration in designing and developing quality online courses in higher education.
  • Observe what central instructional design support can offer in such an endeavor.
  • Discuss strategies to manage the quality course development in such an endeavor.
  • Make recommendations for selecting collaborators for similar new initiatives.
  • Suggest strategies for more effective collaboration for similar new initiatives.
  • Identify central instructional design support resources at one’s own institution.
  • Articulate the necessary considerations for acquiring support from central instructional design support when pursuing similar new initiatives.
Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Students Become Better Acquainted with a General Chemistry Scientist Through a Scientist Report Writing Assignment | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

How often do students get to delve deeper into the lives of the scientists typically mentioned in a general chemistry class?  A Scientist Report writing assignment has been used to allow students to do just that.  Join this presentation to learn about the assignment and attempt some scientist trivia.

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Extended Abstract

How often do students get to delve deeper into the lives of the scientists that are typically mentioned in a general chemistry class?  Most of the time, the scientist's name is mentioned and then their scientific contribution becomes the main topic of discussion.  Facts like Arrhenius being Swedish, Lavoisier being beheaded by the guillotine, and that several scientists have craters on the moon named after them may not be shared in the general chemistry classroom.

A Scientist Report writing assignment has been used since the Fall of 2010 in a calculus-based General Chemistry I course to allow each student to become more familiar with one of the scientists normally discussed during the semester.  Students choose a scientist and write a paper about the scientist's life and scientific contributions as well as other relevant historical aspects.  There are a variety of sources that can be used to find the necessary information.  Therefore, students encounter different search engines and research databases.  The papers meet eligibility requirements for a campus-wide library research award presented each year at our college.  It is rare that science students would be able to be nominated for such an award. 

In this presentation, the assignment layout will be discussed as well as the scientists available to be chosen by students.  Student reception and results will be shared, including scientist choice frequency.  In addition, adaptations of the task will be discussed.  These include use in an online lecture format, in a six-week summer course, and basing the report on elements rather than scientists.

Attendees will have the chance to participate in scientist trivia as some interesting details uncovered by students in the course of their research are revealed.  Participants will also have a chance to guess the most frequent scientist and element choices from the past 12 years!  A listing of the most common sources used by students will be talked about after viewers are polled for where they would suggest students look.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Ten Thousand Little Things: Maximizing Engagement in Online Courses | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Do you want a quick impactful way to ensure student success? As a key element of student success is faculty presence, this session will provide a formula to achieve high visibility and foster personal connections in your online classes. Participants will learn why and how to personalize their courses.

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Extended Abstract

Faculty presence is a key contributor to the learning experience of students in online classes. Student engagement, connection, and retention are linked to increased learning and depend on faculty presence in an online learning environment. You will learn strategies to maximize student learning by increasing your presence in class as students progress in your online course. The relationship between the high visibility of instructors and student success will be emphasized. Additionally, the impact of instructor personalization of courses will be discussed. Personal traits of instructors, such as creativity, adaptability, and kindness contribute to instructor presence and student success. Making your course personal will benefit the students by making connections to the instructor, as well as increasing learning and retention. Also, the promotion of social connections facilitates a sense of community in the class. Furthermore, the instructor will benefit by making teaching more enjoyable and less repetitive, as well as sparking creativity. Ten strategies for personalization and visibility will be shared. Also, a unique equation for ubiquitous student connection in online courses will be revealed.

 As educators, we tend to focus on the student experience. But here, faculty will understand why their personality matters, and why their happiness impacts students.  We need to know that many little things generate feelings and perceptions in an online environment.

Throughout the presentation, participants will be asked to share their strategies for engagement. Examples of personalized objects will be shown

Participants will leave with quick and impactful ways to personalize their online courses, have fun, avoid boredom, ignite creativity, and help improve student experiences at the same time! They will take away an adaptable formula to leverage small actions for increased visibility and connections to students in just ten minutes a day. 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Role of Assessment and Feedback Design in Enabling Student Uptake of Feedback | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The present study examines the impact of assessment and feedback design on opportunities for feedback encounters, learners’ uptake of instructor feedback, and students’ perceptions of their learning experience in the online component of an undergraduate blended course in English for Academic Purposes. Evidence points towards innovative solutions in the field.

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Extended Abstract

A growing body of literature investigates the importance of student feedback uptake for learning in Higher Education (HE) (Carless & Boud, 2018; Henderson et al., 2019; Nieman et al., 2021; Winstone & Carless, 2020). Research, however, reveals that promoting assessment and feedback design that will sustain productive feedback and affordances for agentic behavior on feedback remains a challenging task for Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) (Bearman et al., 2014; Carless, 2015; Hattie, 2015; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Henderson et al., 2019; Lashari et al., 2013; McConlogue, 2020; Nicol, 2010; Shute, 2008). The present study examined the impact of  assessment and feedback design on opportunities for potential feedback encounters (Esterhazy, 2019), learner uptake of instructor feedback, and students’ perceptions of their overall learning experience in the online component of an undergraduate blended course in English for Academic Purposes. Student evaluations of the course and performance levels on the online component of the course also help explain the importance of reevaluating assessment and feedback design.

In the present study, data collection was based on: a) content analysis of learning content (instructions, prompts, scaffolds, rubrics) and instructor feedback commentaries to students' tasks in the online asynchronous component of the course on Blackboard Learning System, specifically 5 sections with 68 students and 5 instructors, b) learners’ (n=68) anonymous survey on perceived benefits and overall quality of instruction and feedback in the online asynchronous component of the course, c) institutional student course evaluations (anonymous), and d) course students’ grades from a random sample of students.

The researcher used Brooks’ et al. Matrix of Feedback for Learning with three feedback types (feedup, feedback and feedforward) and three feedback levels (task, process, and self-regulatory) to investigate and code the learning content and instructors' feedback commentaries. Content analysis revealed that the learning content, in the online asynchronous component of the course, created several opportunities for potential feedback encounters of feed up type at all levels. It also showed that instructors’ commentaries were frequently feedback type at task level, with some emphasis on feedforward type and process and self-regulatory feedback levels. Furthermore, a growing tendency for productive feedback and learner agentic behavior on feedback was reflected in the number of student resubmissions of tasks and uptake of instructor feedback. Last, the need for instructor diversified feedback types and levels to better sustain learner agency on feedback emerged.

Students’ responses on the anonymous survey, which was piloted, align with and complement the findings of content analysis, as they portray learners’ overall positive learning experiences in the asynchronous component of the blended course. More specifically, in discussing the quality of instruction, students underscored the importance of weekly overviews with the learning purposes of each week, model and examples to complete the writing activities, the suggested deadlines for completing submitting formative and summatice assignments, and instructions and scaffolds (questions and ideas) for the writing activities. Furthermore, students’ self-perceptions of the quality of instructor feedback in the online asynchronous components of the course highlight its efficacy. Students recognized instructor feedback as particularly helpful. In specific, students underlined the importance of instructor feedback to improve study skills and strategies, appreciated the opportunity to use instructor feedback comments to improve their writing, the possibility of resubmitting an improved version of their writing activities, and the opportunity to self-assess their own writing and activities before submission. The vast majority of students reported feeling satisfied with the online asynchronous component of the course.  

Finally, the findings from the institutional student course evaluations as well as students’ final grades on the online asynchronous component of the blended course verify students’ positive learning experience and helped explain students’ ratings on perceived benefits.

Designing HE courses that support student uptake of feedback remains a challenge for educators and researchers. The present study underscores the contribution of assessment and feedback design to student uptake of feedback in a discipline specific blended course. The present findings constitute a systematic, scientific attempt to further research how assessment and feedback design, integral to course design, may enable and improve student feedback uptake. The results also greatly emphasize and support the need for a principled course design, specific to each setting and discipline (Esterhazy, 2019; Henderson et al., 2019; Winstone & Careless, 2020), where feedback design is not subordinated to assement design.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Equity and Innovation: It’s Time to Add Human Voice to OERs | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

While OER use increases, they require more representational modes for accessibility from a UDL perspective. We believe that adding a human voice component to OERs is more effective than technology-based voice-to-text. We offer suggestions for instructors to add audio during OER creation, as well as upon implementing an existing OER.

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Extended Abstract

 We offer suggestions OER creators and implementers might use to add an audio component to their texts. These include budgeting for a vocal professional, writing shorter/more concise texts, and even working with students to create human audio components. This is also where audience involvement matters. We want to engage the audience in brainstorming other ways creators and implementers might add audio components. Moreover, we will challenge the audience to consider their current texts (whether OER or not) and how they could add an audio component now to increase student access.

Attendees will walk away with a better understanding of how human voice audio should complement OERs for better accessibility and inclusion as well as ideas on how to implement a human voice audio component. 

We premise this idea on precarity. Bahrainwala (2020) posited that student precarity—continual wage insecurity—“is shaping a generation of U.S. college students that suffer continually under poor material conditions, exploitative work schedules, and institutions that do not recognize their precarity” (p. 250). Using various statistics, Bahrainwala (2020) explained that 60% of U.S. college students were food-insecure in 2019, that over two-thirds of students graduate with an average debt of $30,000, and 25% of students work full-time while 40% work at least 30 hours a week (p. 250). In addition to student precarity, many students also face accessibility challenges. For the 2015-16 school year, the National Center for Education Statistics estimated that 19% of undergraduates had a disability ranging from physical to learning disabilities. Yet, according to staff writers at Best Colleges (2020), “Only 17% of college students with learning disabilities take advantage of learning assistance resources at their school.” Thus, we likely have students who are facing multiple barriers to accessible education.

One way instructors have attempted to help meet these concerns is through the adoption and use of Open Educational Resources (OERs)—free, open access textbooks readily available to students through the internet. OERs work well with a Universal Design for Learning (UDL) approach to education in which pedagogical environments, from the beginning, “offered options for diverse learner needs” (Meyer, Rose, & Gordon, 2014, p. 3). However, from a UDL perspective, Meyer et al. (2014) explain, “A core tenet of UDL is the understanding that what is ‘essential for some’ is almost always ‘good for all’” (p. 51). By this logic, the medium of the printed text becomes the locus of the problem. Instead, Meyer et al. (2014) suggest, “Providing content in multiple media supports those who require it (essential for some) but also supplies a rich cognitive learning environment where varied options and interactivity create a more nuance experience, enabling learners to explore the content from multiple points of view (good for all)” (p. 54). Moreover, they posit that new media have “shattered the old model” of what is considered literacy. Instead, the “digital environment” allows for learners to “act on materials” to change them and to be accountable for their learning (p. 50). Technology options are, as Meyer et al. (2014) explain, “among the most obvious” when it comes to offering multiple ways for learners to interact with text (p. 54). They offer that multiple modes of representation can increase learners’ strengths, and that offering these alternatives “need not hold learners back” (p. 54). In the case of printed text, another representation of the material can be text-to-speech. Undoubtedly, the COVID-19 pandemic has worsened the precarity and lack of access many of our students are already facing (Lai, 2021). Especially with the pandemic, more readers are accessing books through audiobook formats (Tattersall Wallin & Nolin, 2020). Additionally, research has shown that human voice overs (rather than artificial intelligence) are preferred for stories (Rodero & Lucas, 2021), and that spoken words have instructional benefits for students (Kalyuga, 2012).

References

Bahrainwala, L. (2020). Precarity, citizenship, and the “traditional” student. Communication Education, 69(2), 250-260. https://doi.org/10.1080/03634523.2020.1723805

Best Colleges Staff Writers. (2020, October 27). College guide for students with learning disabilities. https://www.bestcolleges.com/resources/college-planning-with-learning-disabilities/

Kalyuga, S. (2012). Instructional benefits of spoken words : A review of cognitive load factors. Educational Research Review, 7, 145-159. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2011.12.002

Lai, S. (2021, November 1). In return to campuses, students with disabilities fear they’re being “left behind.” Washington Post. https://www.washingtonpost.com/education/2021/11/01/colleges-return-students-disabilities/

Meyer, A., Rose, D. H, & Gordon, D. (2014). Universal design for learning: Theory & practice. CAST Professional Publishing. https://www.cast.org/products-services/resources/2014/universal-design-learning-theory-practice-udl-meyer

National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). (n.d.). Students with disabilities. https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=60

Rodero, E., & Lucas, I. (2021). Synthetic versus human voices in audiobooks: The human emotional intimacy effect. New Media & Society, published online, 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1177/14614448211024142

Tattersall Wallin, E., & Nolin, J. (2020). Time to read: Exploring the timespaces of subscription-based audiobooks. New Media & Society, 22(3), 470-488. https://doi.org/10.1177/1461444819864691

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Getting Aligned: Outcomes-Based Program Planning for the Enterprise | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Curriculum planning can feel like tackling a 10,000 piece puzzle. Our institution found a way to efficiently assemble the pieces by integrating Coursetune, a curriculum mapping software, into our planning process. In this presentation, we discuss how we outlined the curriculum for four programs using a visual, outcomes-based approach.

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Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance

Curriculum planning is a complex, resource-intensive process for many higher education institutions, particularly when multiple stakeholders are involved and resources are spread thin. Using visual curriculum mapping software can help to make this process more manageable and efficient, while being less resource intensive.

In 2020, to meet the need for improved leader education in the armed forces, the Department of Defense directed that all military education programs adopt an outcomes-based approach to instruction which could be directly measured to determine utility and value for the force. As part of this effort, they introduced a more robust reporting process, in which programs must clearly demonstrate how they meet program learning outcomes across their curricula. Our institution, responsible for more than 100 courses across four programs, knew we would need a better approach for curriculum planning, design, and evaluation to achieve this new goal. With only a small team of designers and subject matter experts, we needed a way to expedite and enhance this process. 

Enter Coursetune. We identified the Coursetune mapping and curriculum visualization software as a potential avenue to save time in identifying and mapping our myriad learning outcomes and requirements and provide flexibility in our program planning, design, and evaluation processes as we transitioned to an outcomes-based curriculum.

This presentation will tell the story of how we selected, tested, and implemented Coursetune at our institution to support these new needs.  Participants will leave with an understanding of our institution’s roadmap for getting started with the tool and how it integrates with curriculum planning to support program design and evaluation processes. 

This topic is relevant to higher education institutions for several reasons. First, they must incorporate various requirements from multiple stakeholders into their curricula, which can be challenging to track in a manageable, consistent format. Coursetune provides a standardized way to visualize requirements and where they fit into the curriculum, making it easier to identify (mis)alignments. Next, higher education institutions must always be prepared to adjust for curricular changes. Using Coursetune, an institution can immediately envision how curriculum revisions or additions would affect a program, even comparing several versions of the program to identify the best option. Finally, higher education institutions have to demonstrate to multiple stakeholders how their requirements were addressed and assessed in ways that align within and across courses. Coursetune provides numerous types of automatically-generated reports that indicate how various elements of course design align across different dimensions of the curriculum.
 

Interaction

As this is a Discovery Session, there will be inherent interaction with participants during each discussion round. Our hope is that we can use this time to address institution-specific questions, helping participants from different contexts to tailor our approach to meet their specific needs. 
 

Takeaways

Participants will leave with an understanding of our institution’s roadmap for getting started with the visual mapping tool Coursetune and how it integrates with curriculum planning to support program design and evaluation processes. Specifically, participants will be able to describe how their institution can use a visual curriculum mapping approach to manage and track requirements/outcomes, inform changes to curriculum design, and demonstrate curricular alignment.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Virtual Mentoring: An Electric Vehicle for Teacher Equity | Graduate Student Discovery Session | PlayPosit

This session shares original research that piloted the virtual delivery of a content-specific novice teacher mentoring program to combat arts teacher isolation and attrition statewide.  Learn about its impacts on novice and experienced arts teachers and how to implement a similar initiative in your own state or district.

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Extended Abstract

The ongoing K-12 teacher shortage is of serious concern to students, parents, and all members of the education community.  Although many personal and professional factors influence teachers to leave the classroom voluntarily, poor job satisfaction is the single leading cause of early-career teacher attrition.  Numerous interventions, most commonly professional development and peer mentoring, have been widely implemented to address the high attrition rate among novice educators.  However, teachers of specialized subjects, such as digital media, music, and visual art, are typically isolated in one-person departments, particularly in rural and high-needs school communities.  Not only does this professional isolation lead to decreased job satisfaction, highly specialized subject teachers rarely, if ever, receive professional development opportunities relevant to their academic content areas.  As a result, they are unable to benefit equitably in comparison to their non-specialized colleagues from the supports routinely provided to strengthen teachers’ content knowledge and pedagogical skills, the two areas of self-reported highest need among novice educators.  

This session shares the methodology and results of a recent research study that piloted a virtual peer mentoring program for novice K-12 art and music teachers at high risk for professional isolation and attrition due to their status as one-person departments within their school buildings.  By facilitating a blend of synchronous and asynchronous virtual interactions, the geographic and scheduling barriers that typically prevent access to effective content-specific mentors were removed, enabling these specialized teachers to experience beneficial early-career mentoring in an equitable manner while meeting the state mentoring requirements for continued teacher licensure.  Mixed methods data collection and analysis examined participants’ perceptions of their virtual mentoring experience and evaluated the effectiveness of the intervention through its impacts on teachers’ job satisfaction and likelihood of attrition. 

The virtual program emphasized building an ongoing relationship with a peer mentor matched by similarity of content area, grade level, and school or district demographics, to provide content knowledge and pedagogical support and to engage in collaborative development of digital instructional materials.  Non-evaluative, two-way observations of one another’s teaching were a central component of the program, in keeping with the extant research on teacher education.  By utilizing existing technology assets already in statewide use by public and charter school systems, including a video conferencing platform, shared data storage solution, and learning management system, this mentoring intervention was implemented with minimal technical support queries and no additional financial cost to school districts or the state’s department of education in comparison to the traditional in-person program.

Session attendees will engage in collaborative discussion of notable study findings, brainstorm potential opportunities for and obstacles to virtual peer mentoring in their local or regional contexts, and develop planning and advocacy strategies for implementing similar innovations in their own professional settings.  The session content is most relevant to educator and administrative stakeholders in the K-12 system, as well as those involved with collegiate teacher preparation programs or with research interests related to teacher education and equity, blended learning, content-specific teacher mentoring, or virtual professional learning communities.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Active learning online - From a vague concept to a quantifiable active learning (AL) score | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session presents a pedagogical course review that quantifies the degree to which active learning is present in the design of an online course with an active learning (AL) score. The AL score is arrived by applying evidence-based design principles in a ready-to use rubric to enhance active learning.    

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Extended Abstract

This design-based research (DBR) study had both local and general goals. Its local goal was to increase active learning in the online courses offered at a large research university in the midwestern United States. Its larger goal was to define active learning design principles for online courses in general, so that they might be used to improve the learning experience for wider audiences. While the principles of active learning can be applied to courses in any mode of delivery: flipped classroom, blended, or fully online, the importance of active learning in online courses is highlighted because active learning course design requires numerous upfront considerations. Moreover, because the pedagogical model is structured throughout the online learning environment and thus is made visible, online courses present a unique opportunity to review what is core to the principles of active learning. The design intervention (an innovative course review method) incorporated the principles of authentic e-learning. The study addressed two major research questions: (1) “To what extent does the intervention—a new course review method—indicate the extent to which active learning is present in the design of an online course?” and (2) “How do the principles of authentic e-learning incorporated in the new course review method need to be refined?” To address the first question, the online course review intervention was used to evaluate the learning activities and assessments of 75 undergraduate online courses against these authentic e-learning principles, resulting in an active learning (AL) score for each course. To address the second question, we surveyed the learners in these 75 courses about what made learning meaningful and coded the learners’ feedback in reference to the active learning design principles. The practical outcome of this DBR study is a pedagogical course review that quantifies active learning in online courses. The theoretical outcomes of this DBR study are refined active learning design principles that can serve instructors, designers, teacher educators, and administrators in enhancing the design of online courses. The findings of this study affirm that the authentic task principles as well as newly identified learner-centered design principles together can serve as evidence-based principles to define and refine active learning in online courses.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Powerful Preeminent Presentations: Public Speaking Essentials to Make your Remote Lectures Pop | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Presentation skills are paramount to any instructor but how many have actually received training on public speaking essentials?  Having a PhD doesn't make you a great speaker/presenter. Join Dr. Jory Basso for an evocative discussion on how to improve your presentation skills and create better student engagement and connectedness.

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Extended Abstract

Presentation skills are paramount to any instructor but how many have received any training on public speaking essentials?  Having a PhD doesn't make you a great speaker/presenter. Even veteran faculty members may not be communicating or presenting at the best of their ability. Now that many lectures and labs have moved online speaking and presentation skills are even more crucial to keep your students engaged. Because of this new reality, instructors and students alike may feel disconnected during online delivery. Join Dr. Jory Basso for an evocative discussion on how to improve your presentation skills and create better student engagement and connectedness.

Dr. Basso is an Associate Professor and Acting Faculty Lead at Southern California University of Health Sciences and teaches Clinical Nutrition and Human Biochemistry at the graduate level. He built a successful integrative health clinic as a Chiropractor/Sports Therapist in downtown Toronto prior to moving his family to California to teach full-time and occasionally surf. Dr. Basso has presented educational content at corporations, international conferences including OLC’s Ideate STEM Labs, served as a health/fitness expert on TV, author of 90+ blog articles and creator of 90+ videos for the HybridDrJ YouTube channel. He has a Doctor of Chiropractic Degree, a Master of Education in Digital Learning, and is passionate about empowering individuals with health and science education.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Preparing doctoral candidates through a fully remote virtual residency experience | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session describes a virtual residency model to help doctoral students start their research. Participants will learn hybrid strategies to engage students using synchronous and asynchronous techniques. Participants will experience the residency through the lens of a student to develop a researchable topic for their home institution.

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Extended Abstract

This session will focus on a new way to approach the doctorate in the United States, one that proposes to meet the needs of our communities and address some of the long-standing challenges of doctoral education. While there have been steady increases in enrollments and conferrals over the last 20 years, doctoral education has experienced persistent challenges. These challenges include relatively high attrition rates, low graduation rates, limited resources, and a long time to degree completion. In response to these challenges, the university developed a remote virtual residency experience that allows students to complete critical deliverables of their doctoral project using a remote hybrid course model. Participants engage with the new model's history, development, implementation, and outcomes to develop strategies to launch new models at their home institutions.

 

Background: The Council of Graduate Schools, the American Academy of Education, and the National Science Foundation suggest that while there are some incremental improvements in student outcomes, innovation is needed across doctoral education. Specifically, early development of the research project using innovative curricular models is required to reduce attrition and improve graduation rates. The pandemic has accelerated this change to meet the need for accessible remote delivery models of doctoral education.

 

Virtual Residency Model: In response to the pandemic, the university shifted from offering a hybrid course experience in which students met in person for a 4-day intensive experience to one that was fully remote. Students participated in both 1-1 and synchronous group sessions with faculty to apply research, critical thinking, and writing skills needed to finalize an appropriate research topic. Teams developed synchronous sessions and other course activities to approximate the engaging real-time interactions experienced through in-person residency without the need for travel or added expense. Session participants learn about the experience of launching a virtual residency experience in which students. 

 

Outcomes: Initial data suggests that the remote hybrid model of virtual residency changed the trend of decreasing course success with a 2.5% improvement quarter over quarter. Additional data will be presented to illustrate the efficacy of the model.  

 

Session Goals: Individuals attending this session will:

1. Learn about strategies to improve doctoral student preparation to complete the degree.

2. Discuss synchronous and asynchronous models to engage students in an online, competency-based course. 

3. Share experiences and innovations from their institutions regarding remote synchronous contact with students. 

4. Develop a Research Plan to take back to their home institution.

 

Level of Participation: Participants will engage with the virtual residency model from a student's perspective. Participants will be guided through the experience and develop a researchable topic to return to their home institution. Along the way, participants will share best practices for remote synchronous and asynchronous student engagement.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Inclusive Feedback for Equitable Disciplinary Learning: Balancing Student Needs and Teaching-Intensive Online Workloads | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session offers strategies for providing inclusive feedback that strengthens students’ disciplinary literacy development while also helping instructors manage a teaching-intensive workload. Participants will learn about meaningful and equitable feedback practices for supporting diverse learners who are inexperienced in online learning.

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Extended Abstract

Overview

Feedback is a key teaching practice in any online course, but responsive, individualized feedback is especially important at two-year colleges and other open-admissions online programs that serve students from a diverse range of educational, linguistic, cultural, and social backgrounds. Open-access institutions serve many students whose prior educational experiences have not prepared them for online learning. Integrating multiple and varied opportunities for feedback into the design of online courses helps students both transition to online learning and develop the literacy skills and strategies required for college success in a field of study. Effective and inclusive feedback is mutually beneficial for instructors and their students. Adapting targeted feedback practices to students’ individual needs not only strengthens student learning and increases understanding of disciplinary processes, but it also helps instructors identify and address barriers to course completion and academic success. 

This proposed interactive presentation will provide attendees with practical strategies for supporting online students’ disciplinary literacy development through inclusive feedback that also helps instructors manage a teaching-intensive online workload. The session will help instructors provide meaningful yet efficient feedback to diverse learners, especially those who have faced structural inequities in their prior educational experiences and/or who are inexperienced in online learning. 

The presentation will draw from recommendations in Two-Year College English Association working papers and a white paper on workload management strategies based on a national survey of more than 1000 two-year college English instructors and a follow-up survey about pandemic teaching. The presenters will also build on their own research, teaching, and program administration experiences in open-access online writing programs. 

 

Audience

The presenters will offer feedback strategies that can help any instructor balance students’ needs for regular, meaningful feedback with a hectic and sometimes overwhelming online teaching workload. The session will be especially relevant to instructors who teach students from diverse educational, cultural, social, and linguistic backgrounds at community colleges and open-access institutions, especially online learners who would be excluded from higher education at institutions with admissions standards. 

 

Session Outline

  1. The session will begin with a brief definition of disciplinary literacy. The presenters will provide an overview of the relationship between individualized feedback and students’ development as online learners in a field of study. Participants will identify key disciplinary literacy strategies that are essential for online learning in their own fields of study. 

  2. The presenters will explain and illustrate four qualities of online feedback that support students’ transitions to online learning in a discipline: equitable, effective, meaningful, and efficient. They will discuss why these types of feedback are essential for managing a teaching-intensive online workload while also supporting students with limited or no experience with the literacy strategies required for college-level online learning. Participants will briefly self-assess how they are using each type of feedback in their own courses to support inclusive teaching and disciplinary learning. 

  3. The presenters will then present and discuss a framework for providing students with inclusive, individualized feedback to support online learning and disciplinary literacy development. The presentation will take participants through the process of integrating multiple but manageable types of feedback into a multi-stage project, unit, or entire course. Participants will learn how to prioritize both the types of feedback and the timing of feedback to support students’ success in online courses. Participants will receive a handout that will help them adapt the presenters’ framework to their own disciplines and teaching contexts. Participants will begin to identify inclusive feedback priorities in one or more online courses that they teach. 

  4. The presenters will discuss strategies for providing inclusive online feedback that  balances complex student needs with a teaching-intensive workload, using student reflections and feedback management strategies. Participants will identify one or more action steps that they will take after the conference to manage their feedback workloads while also providing inclusive feedback that supports disciplinary online learning. 

  5. The session will end with an opportunity for participants to share their action steps and discuss issues or questions that arise during the presentation or from participants’ reflective work. 

Participant Engagement

Throughout the presentation, attendees will receive reflective questions that will help them make connections between concepts from the presentation and their own teaching contexts, including their disciplines, pedagogical strategies, local student communities, and institutional contexts. Each section of the presentation will include an opportunity for participants to share their ideas through one or more interactive activities using polling, google jamboard, and Zoom chat. 

 

Learning Goals and Takeaways

Attendees will learn how to identify priorities for disciplinary online learning; match feedback with disciplinary learning goals and students’ individualized literacy needs; cut back on unnecessary, unproductive, and inequitable feedback; and provide students with targeted feedback aimed at recursive online learning. After participating in the session, attendees will come away with strategies for managing feedback at various stages of a project and across entire course by prioritizing both the types of feedback and the timing of feedback to support students’ development as online learners. 

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Teams in the Virtual Classroom A Sharing of Practical Experience | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The rise of remote workers has demanded a change in the way employees work together. Incorporating team projects and providing support for team success in the classroom will be instrumental in helping organizations continue to achieve success in incorporating virtual teams into their workplace and culture

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Extended Abstract

The future of economic growth in an increasingly interconnected global economy will rely on employees who are educated and trained in the skills required for new jobs. Many of these new jobs and skills required to be successful in them have evolved due in large part the increase of virtual work, brought on by the still unknown long-range impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Manpower (2020), an internationally recognized staffing and talent management organization, reported that in the United States 69% of employers reported talent shortages, more than 3 times higher than it was a decade ago. Their findings also reported that globally this number is 54%, the highest in a decade.

 

According to the Job Outlook 2020 survey conducted by the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE), employers cited their top requirements for graduates included proof of problem-solving skills 91% and the ability to work in teams 86%. The online learning methodology, which is an option for students and one that is growing in popularity (Clapp, 2016), can be an integral part of preparing workers to gain the skills required by employers. 

 

As seen in the NACE (2020) data, the ability to work well with others in teams is seen as a key skill that employers look for in educational program graduates. The American Society for Quality (ASQ) defines a team as “a group of people who perform interdependent tasks to work toward accomplishing a common mission or specific objective” (2020, para 1). Robinson (2020) discusses the rise in virtual work and virtual teams accomplishing the organization’s work due to the impact of COVID-19 and cites studies that predict this will become the new normal for workers going forward. Berry comments on the composition of virtual teams, “Virtual team members may be located across the office, but almost as easily across the country or across the world and may rarely or perhaps never meet face to face (2011, p. 187) and suggests that virtual teams that are designed, managed, and implemented effectively can produce results 24x7 irrespective of location.  On the downside, however, if the teams are not effectively constructed and managed, failure is the likely result.

 

The virtual classroom should act as a model for skills development which then can be applied in the workplace.  In the Purdue Global University School of Business and Information Technology, the MBA program courses are 6 weeks in duration. Team projects can be a component of a course requiring high levels of support for students who will need to work together accomplishing assignments possibly with others who they have never met. This type of team is like a project team, where members are brought together for a limited period of time to complete a task. These team members may come from different departments or locations (stakeholdermap, 2017).

 

This researcher incorporates team projects into one of the core classes in the MBA program, Business Fundamentals. Students start working in teams in the first week of class, in anticipation of beginning work on a competitive business simulation, which lasts throughout the class and a final report is required on the team experience in the final week of class. As this class is early in the program, and team skills may not be developed, extensive support has been incorporated throughout the 6 weeks to ensure students are able to go through a successful team experience.

 

 

 

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Futile or Fruitful? Analyzing Students’ Use of Assignment Feedback | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

For assignment feedback to have value, students must read it. While reading feedback doesn’t promise learning, unread feedback has no impact. Data from 10,000+ artifacts was analyzed to understand conditions in which students are most likely to access assignment feedback. Conclusions offer effective strategies for increasing attention to gradebook comments. 

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Extended Abstract

The value and impact of feedback is undisputed. Research has clearly established the value and importance of assignment feedback for promoting student learning, satisfaction, and engagement. Detailed feedback is essential for: 1) correcting students’ conceptual errors, and 2) solidifying understanding. While timely, relevant feedback is essential in all educational contexts, the importance of assignment feedback is increased in the online classroom where an instructor’s feedback to assignments provides one of the key avenues for individualized guidance. But for feedback to have any impact, students must read it. Simply put, students cannot gain anything from unread gradebook feedback. While the issue of unread feedback is troublesome from a learning perspective, it also presents a dilemma for instructors who are investing a considerable amount of instructional time to prepare feedback that may never be read. Research finds that online faculty often spend 40% of their instructional time providing assignment feedback. Thus, if the feedback is not being read, this is dedication of limited instructional time that receives no return on investment. Presentation overviews LMS data on over 10,000 student artifacts in which data is analyzed according to the rate and timing at which students access gradebook feedback in the online classroom. Further, we explore manageable, effective strategies for increasing students’ attention to assignment feedback.

 

The value of feedback for enhancing student learning in the online classroom is clear; so are instructors’ ongoing concerns that students fail to read or utilize the feedback that is left for them. Advances in our LMS now provide a feature that shows if gradebook feedback has been viewed by the student as well as documenting when the feedback was viewed (in terms of delay between the feedback being posted and it being accessed by the student). In the present study, we overview behavioral data on students’ accessing the feedback in relation to discipline and course level. While an indication that a student has viewed the feedback does not tell us how effectively they are using this information (that is a question for future research), failure to access the feedback is a clear indication that the feedback has no potential for improving student learning. While this is troublesome from a learning perspective, it is equally problematic when analyzing the impact of the instructional time invested to create feedback that is not being read. The analytic data on student’s accessing of feedback will be examined in relation to qualitative data from online instructors exploring how they use the “student has viewed feedback” feature of the LMS to inform and foster effective teaching and learning. This data and feedback come together to support a range of manageable strategies that instructors can implement to increase students’ attention to gradebook feedback. Presentation offers concrete suggestions that instructors can implement in the online classroom to promote the effective use of assignment feedback

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Diversity, Equity, & Inclusion Infusion with Intentionality at Rasmussen University: A Trifecta Approach | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

At Rasmussen University, we have chosen an intentional approach to the cyclical process of analysis, design, implementation, with continuous evaluation to ensure we are addressing the need to improve our intercultural competence, by adopting and improving equitable practices and fostering an environment of inclusion for our students, faculty, and staff. This process is guided by a trifecta model that incorporates diversity into course design and curriculum, teaching and learning, and an intentional application using a diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) enhanced lens.

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Extended Abstract

At Rasmussen, we seek to provide an equitable experience and level playing field for all our students. Our recent efforts in doing so have led us to focus on students who are within an achievement gap, which means there is a disparity in academic performance between students who are in different groups. We are continuously identifying, defining, analyzing the factors that have contributed to this achievement gap. We have chosen to take an “Equity-Minded” approach, which includes strategic, diversity-infused curriculum and course design and teaching and learning that fosters inclusivity and belongingness. In taking this approach, we have developed strategies to infuse DEI, particularly an equitable experience within our curriculum and academic practices.

At Rasmussen University, we pride ourselves on making sure our students are equipped with transferable skills—six essential skills that have been added to all our programs—to help students succeed in their field, in the workplace, community, and personally. The term “transferable” indicates that the skills convey success in other academic settings and in careers. We have recently redesigned one of the transferable skills—diversity and teamwork—as “diversity, equity, & inclusion.” In doing so, we created the following three-part progression of proficiency to incorporate DEI in the curriculum of our programs.

Describing the importance of appreciating all types of diversity.

Explaining how to cultivate fair, respectful, and equitable treatment, opportunities, and outcomes for others and oneself.

Practicing intercultural empathy, engagement, and understanding within communities.

This intentional infusion into our cyclical course design process ensures our students are exposed to skills to support their understanding of the benefits and challenges of diversity, strategies to operate with an equity mindset, and tools to create and sustain inclusive environments. We have created a leveling guide that showcases how DEI is infused from the Associate degree through the Doctoral degree, at the Introduction level, Application level, and Mastery level. Our overall goal is to create an experience that prepares our students to live and work as part of a diverse world.

It is critical that our faculty are also infusing DEI presence in their instructional delivery.  We have created the Rasmussen University Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Course Audit Rubric which assigns a score of: Not Equitable, Diverse, and Equitable and Inclusive to the categories of representation, relevance, language, faculty, and access in our classrooms.

Our trifecta approach includes the recognition that DEI is a skill we would like to equip all our students with (Acknowledgement), the infusion into our curriculum and course rooms (Infusion), and continuous improvement through (Maintenance). With our AIM acronym, we aim to empower our students to embrace the fact that DEI is everybody’s responsibility and civic duty, by addressing DEI issues in the community and workplace and striving always to apply equity-minded approaches.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Student Reactions to Yellowdig and How Instructors Can Leverage Them for Learner Satisfaction, Self-Regulated Learning, and Cognition | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Researchers explored student experiences in Yellowdig in twenty courses from January 2021 to the present using validated inventories and thematic analysis. Data suggests that instructors can leverage Yellowdig to increase learner satisfaction, social presence, self-regulated learning, and cognition.

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Extended Abstract

How can students learn the importance and value of their peers, continue to connect with each other, and extend discussions about the content material? How can instructors leverage intentional technology for meaningful and measurable results? 

Bruff (2019) details the importance of course communities for learning. He suggests, “Structured ways for students to learn from and with each other can enhance the learning experience for all students” (Bruff, 2019, p. 144). The obstacle many instructors face is how to help students discover Bruff’s contention of the importance of course communities. Students, particularly undergraduate students, clamor for the instructor's attention, not understanding or valuing their classmates’ background, skills, or knowledge. 

Session Goals and Interactivity

  • Introduce the session. Ask conference participants to brainstorm about the instructional value of learning communities in online courses using Mentimeter [5 mins]

  • Engage willing participants in a hand-ons, immersive experience as a student in a Yellowdig community. Explain basic features of the tool and how it was implemented by the instructors  [10 mins]

  • Explain the longitudinal study, methodology, and methods [5 mins] 

  • Offer preliminary results [10 mins]

  • Connect to the importance of course communities and social presence. Offer research-based best practices  [5 mins]

  • Answer audience questions [10 mins]

How Yellowdig was Integrated into Courses

Yellowdig--a gamified, community-building discussion board platform--coupled with instructor’s pedagogy and careful planning offers one potential solution for helping students see the value they offer each other. This tool offers traditional discussion board features in an aesthetically pleasing environment that allows images, links, poll, and other features.  Yellowdig takes a gamified approach, requiring students to achieve a certain amount of points each week. Yet, how students earn their points is entirely up to them, simultaneously thwarting the tried-and-failed, age-old weekly discussion board paradigm of beginning the week with the instructor's post. Yellowdig’s approach allows students more autonomy; they can create new posts and continue discussions throughout the course. This, in turn, allows instructors more time to focus on teaching the materials and extending the course discussion in meaningful ways. Additionally, students can earn points by using social media reactions (likes, loves, claps, and various emojis and graphics). 

About the Study

This interactive presentation showcases a longitudinal study of five terms of two instructor’s courses from 2021-2022 at a mid-sized, private four-year residential urban university. This university, in the southeastern region of the United States, is predominantly a face-to-face institution, slowly moving toward more hybrid, blended, and online options. It serves 10,500 students from all 50 states and features students from 130 countries.

Student participants using the Yellowdig discussion board were enrolled in nineteen courses over Spring 2021, Summer 2021, Fall 2021, and Spring 2022, and Summer 2022. Courses include Research and Writing, Professional Editing, Technical Writing, Discovering the Leader Within, and Senior Portfolio at the undergraduate level and Global Communication Design, Introduction to Instructional Design, Inquiry and Measurement, Design of Online Collaborative Learning, Introduction to Distance Learning, Trends and Issues, and Management of Change at the graduate level. 

This study explores students’ experiences with a gamified, community-building discussion board called Yellowdig. Drawing from the Social Presence Model as a theoretical lens, researchers explored student experiences with Yellowdig using three validated inventories--one for student satisfaction, one dedicated to self-related learning, and one for cognition. Additionally, researchers triangulated the data by examining students' individual posts in the tool and examining open-ended survey responses through a thematic analysis.
 

Research Question

What is the student experience when Yellowdig, a community-engaged platform designed with social media and gamification in a course community, is mindfully incorporated into courses to improve learner self-regulation, cognition, and satisfaction?
 

Methodology
Researchers selected social presence as the lens for this study because of its unique focus on the importances of learning communities. Thus, the guiding framework for this study is the Social Presence Model (SPM), which consists of five essential, overlapping elements: Affective Association, Community Cohesion, Instructor Involvement, Interaction Intensity, and Knowledge and Experience. We define social presence as participants’ motivation to take an active role in their own and their peers’ meaning-making processes (Author, 2007, 2015, 2017a, 2017b, in review). Figure 1 illustrates the Social Presence Model and its five components. 

Figure 1 

Social Presence Model

 

Methods

This study employs a mixed-method approach to discover students' experiences with Yellowdig within their course community.  Beginning in January 2021, data was collected with a Qualtrics questionnaire with closed and open-ended questions. It was administered to both undergraduate and graduate students across over a dozen courses at a private, mid-sized university located in the southeastern United States. Quantitative results are run through SPSS, and researchers examine and code open-ended questions and posts using grounded theory analysis (Yin 2014; Strauss and Corbin, 1990). 

This study explores students’ experiences with a gamified, community-building discussion board called Yellowdig. Researchers explored student experiences with Yellowdig using three validated inventories--student satisfaction, self-regulated learning, and cognition--and triangulated the study with thematic analyses. The first inventory is Ritzhaupt’s (2019) Electronic Learning Satisfaction Survey (eLSS). This instrument allows learners to rate their experience using bipolar adjectives at opposite ends of a five-point Likert scale. Examples of questions include negative to positive, unnatural to natural, ineffective to effective, and unsupportive to supportive. The second inventory is based on Zimmerman’s (1990; 2000; 2002; 2008) self-regulated learning theory. Finally, the third inventory is called the Cognitive, Affective, and Psychomotor (CAP) Perceived Learning Scale (Rovai et al., 2009). 

Researchers also included two short-answer questions to complement the quantitative data with qualitative data and provide an opportunity for participants to further elaborate upon their experiences. Researchers administered the surveys to the student participants in the final two weeks of the term by pinning the survey to the top of the Yellowdig communities for each course.

 

Initial Findings

Initial findings across multiple courses suggest that instructors can leverage the gameful experience and social media-like engagement in Yellowdig to increase learner satisfaction, self-related learning skills, and critical connections.  

As of Spring 2022, this study features participants (n=145) from a total population of 297 for a 48.9% response rate, consisting of graduate (30%), senior (25%), sophomore (23%), junior (11%), and freshmen (10%) students. They identified as female (75%), male (23%), and transgender male (2%). The majority of participants identified as white, non-Hispanic (75%), followed by equal numbers of Hispanic/Latino (6%), black or African American, non-Hispanic (6%), and equal numbers following in the two or more races including Hispanic (3%) and two or more races, non-Hispanic (3%) Asian, non-Hispanic following (2%), and equally a limited amount of Asian, non-Hispanic, white (1%), and two or more races including black or African American, white, Hispanic and non-Hispanic (1%).

Researchers will be compiling the results of all three inventories. Table 1 offers an example of those results for Ritzhaupt’s (2019) Electronic Learning Satisfaction Survey (eLSS).

Table 1

Overall Learner Satisfaction Levels

Thus far, participants found satisfaction with Yellowdig. One student participant explained, “It was just an easy way to ask questions, and get feedback.”  Another student noted, “It was helpful and raised many new ideas.”

Initial findings across multiple courses suggest that instructors can leverage the gameful experience and social media-like engagement in Yellowdig to increase learner satisfaction, self-related learning skills, and cognition. Best practices, thus far, from the data include repeating the game rules often, reframing the purpose beyond the points, helping students appreciate their course community, guiding students to lead their own posts and gain reactions, and thwarting those trying to game the system.  Researchers will address in the presentation specific ways to leverage these evidence-based results in the online, blended, or virtual classroom. 

Selected References

Author (2007).

Author (2015).

Author (2017a).

Author (2017b).

Author (in review).

Bruff, D. (2019).  Intentional Tech: Principles to Guide the Use of Educational Technology in College Teaching. West Virginia University Press.  

Ritzhaupt, A. (2019). Measuring learner satisfaction in self-paced e-learning environments: Validation of the Electronic Learner Satisfaction Scale (eLSS). International Journal on E-Learning, 18(3), 279-299

Rovai, A. P., Wighting, M. J., Baker, J. D., & Grooms, L. D. (2009). Development of an instrument to measure perceived cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning in traditional and virtual classroom higher education settings. The Internet and higher education, 12(1), 7-13.

Strauss, A., & Corbin, J. (1990). Basics of qualitative research. Sage publications.

Yin, R. (2009). Case study research: Design and methods. 4th ed., London: Sage. 

Zimmerman, B. J. (2008). Investigating self-regulation and motivation: Historical background, methodological developments, and future prospects. American Educational Research Journal, 45(1), 166-183.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Raising the Bar: Grade Inflation in the Online Classroom | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

In this session, faculty and administrators will be presented with ethical ramifications of grade inflation, social constraints, and possible courses of action based on an ethical decision-making framework. Session attendees will be presented key take-a-ways related to raising student academic expectations in the online classroom, provide faculty with tools and resources to augment student learning, provide detailed feedback to further understanding, and for administrators to hold faculty accountable.

 

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Extended Abstract

We have all seen it when grading students’ papers. Papers submitted with a high similarity index indicating they copied or "borrowed” work. Whatever students wish to call it, it is wrong. As educators, we are entrusted to prepare students for the next phase of their lives, either in further educational pursuits or in a career.  Therefore, we bear the responsibility not only to our students but also to each other to set the bar high for academic accountability and integrity. This accountability, in part,  includes grading students’ work based on what they have earned and avoiding grade inflation.

Grade inflation serves not only to weaken academic integrity (Blum 2017), but also impacts earnings and involves re-ranking (Nordin, Heckley, & Gerdtham, 2019). In addition, those highly skilled individuals entering the labor market may potentially be harmed in the end (2019). Academic administrators can partner with faculty to develop policy, training, and best practices that are designed to diminish or even abolish the inflation of grades (Blum, 2017).

The purpose of this session is to examine the issue of grade inflation found in the literature, followed by recommendations for diminishing grade inflation through a multi-dimensional approach for faculty and administrators supporting faculty. This multi-dimensional approach includes setting expectations, engaging student discourse regarding the importance of learning as founded in ethical theory, and providing students the tools for learning as well as the instructional feedback required to support and encourage further learning.

Academic administrators can play a vital role in combatting grade inflation through guidance, consult, and advice gained through understanding the concepts and values associated with ethical decision-making. Faculty and administrators attending this session will have the opportunity to collaborate and brainstorm best practices instrumental in reducing grade inflation. Participants will walk away with the following: 1) a better understanding of how to raise student academic expectations 2) the tools to provide students with the best resources for learning enhancement 3) increased understanding of providing substantive feedback to aid student understanding and 4) the increased ability of administrators to hold faculty accountable to these higher academic standards.

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Peer-to-Peer: Online Learning Initiatives for Scholarly Writing in Graduate School for Nontraditional Students | Graduate Student Discovery Session | PlayPosit

Nontraditional students often enter graduate programs without foundational writing and research proficiency. Instructors rarely cover these basics as the expectation is graduate-level work, yet students are ill-equipped. I created a bridge program taught by graduate students to graduate students scaffolded into four modules focusing on scholarly writing and research skills.

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Extended Abstract

Students teaching students is an effective model that assists in enhanced learning and facilitates ongoing support. Far too often students are accepted into graduate programs yet are not at the academic level professors expect. Instructors must cover course content often leaving little time to teach the process of academic writing and research skills. Universities need effective methods to increase learning opportunities for students in need. Graduate students, without appropriate knowledge of scholarly writing and research skills, rarely have ongoing success.
Informally, students don’t know what they don’t know, right? This brings us to the conscious competence theory (Burch, 1970) which has four stages of competence; ignorance, awareness, learning, and mastery. I have created a curriculum that is intended to bring graduate students from ignorance to learning. The modules bring awareness of what students do not know, which will assist them in beginning their learning journey with additional guidance. This curriculum encompasses four specific modules of research skills and scholarly writing, taught by students for students, which fosters an additional learning environment outside of the traditional classroom. These four modules include: finding scholarly sources, fostering communities, the content, and writing in APA. Notably, these four modules are purposely designed as customizable blocks (e.g., writing in MLA) that can be adapted to any graduate program's needs, but are best taught in the designed module order. 
Student support from a peer may foster greater growth and increased confidence in one’s learning versus feedback from an instructor where one’s grade is prioritized. There is an unequal power differential between professor and student, which is why peer to peer learning is best suited for this curriculum. Peer to peer support can create a sense of community for students, especially in an online learning environment.
Often, graduate students' needs, specific to academic writing in the traditional classroom, are ignored. To bridge this gap, a student taught curriculum provides students with additional support and further success for their future. Students are able to make connections and build relationships with other students that also assists in their learning processes. An online graduate program can easily become isolating. Providing peer to peer support, in an online environment, aids in the need for human connection. This can empower students to take control of their learning journey in a supportive community setting. Online learning is a major advantage for nontraditional students which tend to include adult learners, first generation students, and those who are probationary status students. The advantages to an online learning environment include convenience, flexibility, meeting a wider range of peers, often perceived as less intimidating, and cost-effective. When striving for an equitable learning environment, online learning provides a platform that is effective for nontraditional students. 
This asynchronous presentation provides an opportunity for a roundtable approach that fosters a dialogue around student to student learning in graduate programs. Attendees will be given the opportunity to share their experiences along with strategies to create an inclusive curriculum for graduate programs during or after the conference. This presentation will engage attendees in an in depth thought process around the topic of student to student learning in an online environment. Attendees will be able to see the importance of fostering a space for graduate student growth and ongoing success by a student taught curriculum. Student taught learning gives an opportunity to reinforce what professors are teaching in their courses. Retention is an integral part of higher educational learning for students.  
I will be discussing my experiences during a one year period of providing student peer tutoring services. I will highlight probationary status student needs, adult learners, first generation students, and the positive effects of peer to peer learning and support to enhance future successes. In this curriculum that I present, I will discuss key learning objectives of each module, case examples, and barriers. In module one, students learn to search for scholarly sources, identify appropriate sources for their research topics, how to read articles effectively, and be able to identify peer reviewed sources and scholarly articles. During module two, I cover how to utilize university resources and form productive study groups. Throughout module three, students learn ways to avoid plagiarism, grammar foundations, the importance of proofreading, and creating outlines. In the fourth module, students will learn basic APA 7th Edition guidelines and formatting. 
The curriculum has four live sessions with an asynchronous component. Students enrolled in this curriculum are expected to access online videos and readings prior to their live sessions. Live sessions give students the opportunity to discuss the course contents with peers. These four modules can be utilized across disciplines in graduate programs. Attendees will be knowledgeable about the four modules, understand the key learning objectives for each module, and the benefits of peer to peer teaching for nontraditional graduate school students. 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Creating Structure and Support for Student Success: Lessons Learned | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session will highlight the structure and support that one University department has created to help support online and blended students, particularly those new to online learning. Attendees will leave with tangible resources they can use or adapt for their own use.

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Extended Abstract

Topic: This presentation will outline the structure and support that a social work department has created to help support online and blended students, particularly those new to online learning, and highlight the lessons learned. The presenters are the members of our Department’s Technology Committee and have taken on the responsibility of developing resources and materials for both faculty and students. We have been doing this since 2018 and have observed that although the majority of our students could be considered “digital natives” (Prensky, 2001), they often lack the skills to be successful in online learning or to use technology professionally.  Our focus as a committee has been on creating structure for our students in the online environment (accomplished through faculty support and mentoring) and providing support in the form of resources and tips for success (accomplished through direct student support). With the rapid shift of all courses to an online modality at the start of the pandemic, it became clear that our students needed this guidance and support to successfully navigate their courses and be successful in the online environment.  This presentation will be particularly useful for faculty teaching in higher education and those who support faculty (i.e., administration and instructional designers). 

Support/Mentorship of Faculty: Steinert and colleagues (2006) suggest that faculty professional development related to online learning is most effective through peer and colleague relationships, experiential learning, when faculty have the opportunity for feedback, and can apply effective teaching and learning principles. Online learning requires a different skill set that must be developed, particularly for social work education (Knowles, 2007). Brinkley-Etzkorn (2018) found that faculty training impacts the quality of online teaching and that online instructors need continued support. As the presenters understand the multiple factors that go into successful online course delivery, along with the value of relationships in seeking assistance, it was a natural response to assist our colleagues. Faculty peer mentoring is key in developing online teaching skills and maintaining them over time which is essential to student success. We have previously presented on our faculty support and mentorship model so this will not be the sole focus of this presentation but is an important component of student success. 

In terms of structure, we helped to create and pushed for mandated use of a template for our LMS (Blackboard) for all courses in the department, streamlining the online experience for students. We have also provided support to faculty in the form of a Blackboard training module for all new adjuncts, a VoiceThread presentation for all faculty reviewing the Blackboard template and other key technologies, and additional resources provided to faculty in monthly emails (called “Tech Tips”). 

Student Resources: In addition to our work with faculty, we provided support aimed directly at students. Research has demonstrated that students who are prepared for online learning perform better than those who are not (Joosten & Cusatis, 2020). This includes such skills as time management, self-motivation, and technical or computer skills (e.g., Cho & Shen, 2013; Roper, 2007; Zimmerman & Kulikowich, 2016). Our University’s online learning department has resources for online students. However, given that our program was not online before the pandemic, most of our students were not familiar with these resources; they did not choose to be online learners. To help facilitate this transition, we created resources, including Best Practices for Using Zoom, Netiquette, and the Top Ten Tips for Success in Online Social Work Courses. We also created a module for students in the department’s orientation for new students on the types of courses offered in the department (i.e., understanding section codes) and other key skills to help them be successful online. These resources will be introduced in this presentation and available for participants to use and/or adapt. 

We conducted a survey of our students and their perception of these resources. Initial findings from this survey will be presented, highlighting student feedback and ways support could be improved or enhanced moving forward. 

Interactivity: While this will be an asynchronous presentation, there will be opportunities for participation and interaction among participants and the presenters. Participants will be able to leave comments and questions for other participants and/or the presenters. To elicit discussion, the presenters will post questions throughout the presentation for attendees to consider & respond with experiences and ideas. The presenters will also respond to each comment or question, further engaging participants, and deepening the conversation. This is consistent with an in-person Discovery Session that typically allows for more interaction than a traditional presentation and encourages individual discussion and connection.

Key Takeaways: Participants will leave this presentation with tangible resources that can be tailored for their own use, as well as a potential departmental structure to support online and blended student learning, as well as faculty teaching online.

References:

Brinkley-Etzkorn, K. E. (2018). Learning to teach online: Measuring the influence of faculty development training on teaching effectiveness through a TPACK lens. The Internet and Higher Education, 38, 28-35.

Cho, M., & Shen, D. (2013). Self-regulation in online learning. Distance Education, 34, 290–301.

Knowles, A. J. (2007). Pedagogical and policy challenges in implementing e-learning in social work education. Journal of Technology in Human Services, 25, 17–44.

Prensky, M. (2001). Digital natives, digital immigrants:  Part I. On the Horizon, 9(5), 1-6.

Roper, A. R. (2007). How students develop online learning skills. Educause Quarterly, 30(1), 62–64.

Steinert, Y., Mann, K., Centeno, A., Dolmans, D., Spencer, J., Gelula, M., & Prideaux, D. (2006). A systematic review of faculty development initiatives designed to improve teaching effectiveness in medical education. Medical Teacher, 28(6), 497-526. 

Zimmerman, W. A., & Kulikowich, J. M. (2016). Online learning self-efficacy in students with and without online learning experience. American Journal of Distance Education, 30(3), 180– 191.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Enhancing Online Student Engagement: What Can Be Achieved with the Power of 3D Spaces and Technologies? | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This interactive session introduces how 3D spaces and technologies (e.g. H5P and Mozilla Hubs) are used to create enjoyable and authentic online learning experiences, such as an academic poster conference, virtual language lab, and 3D computer assembly workshop to promote student interactions and motivation.

 

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Extended Abstract

In this interactive session, the presenters will discuss how virtual online 3D spaces and technologies have been used in various scenarios to enhance teaching and learning at an English-medium transnational university in China. Active student engagement is a fundamental component of student learning, particularly in distance education, where students can often become frustrated and detached from their online courses. Dixson (2015) defines student engagement as the degree to which students actively participate by “thinking, talking, and interacting with the content of a course, the other students in the course, and the instructor”. It is thus a crucial factor in maintaining a close connection to their university education and correspondingly to their overall learning and development. In addition, feelings of anxiety and isolation among students have been identified as a major challenge for online learning experiences (Yuan & Kim, 2014). The need to mitigate these feelings and foster a more engaging online learning environment has become ever more important due to the impact of the pandemic (Rizvi & Nabi, 2021).

 

The Community of Inquiry (CoI) framework identifies three elements needed to construct an engaging online learning experience: cognitive presence (CP), social presence (SP), and teaching presence (TP) (Garrison et al., 1999). The use of virtual online 3D spaces and metaverse technologies can enhance all three of these core elements by constructing authentic spaces for students to interact and engage with peers, instructors, and learning content. Gamification concepts such as avatars and 3D characters can represent students’ genuine social presence. They are able to communicate with the instructor and one another through audio and text-based chat with emojis (Reisoğlu et al., 2017) in a manner that resembles online multiplayer role-playing games. Multimedia resources such as images, audio, and video can easily be added to enhance the space and allow students to locate and interact with the digital object. By allowing students to locate and interact with digital objects and one another, they are helped to feel more empowered in the learning process and thus enhance their motivation and fulfilment.

 

The structure of the session will be as follows. The presenters will first introduce the context of this project. Next, a brief showcase of the three examples will be provided: a 3D academic poster conference using H5P, an online language lab in Mozilla Hubs, and a virtual demonstration of computer architecture and assembly with a PC Building Simulator. Lessons learned and practical tips will be shared to help participants adopt this approach to their context. Finally, participants will be provided with links to these 3D spaces so they can interact with the environments and experience how they have been used in real-world scenarios to engage students in online university education.

 

The key takeaways of this session are:

  1. Learn how 3D spaces can be used for various teaching and learning scenarios to enhance online student engagement,
  2. Discover a range of technologies that can be used to construct 3D spaces for learning and teaching purposes,
  3. Identify a few strategies to evaluate the effectiveness of these spaces
Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Effect of Spaced Learning on Student Achievement in Online Advanced Placement Courses | Graduate Student Discovery Session | PlayPosit

This session will explore the impact course pacing has on student achievement, as measured by the scores achieved on Advanced Placement exams. Analysis of how often students view and engage with online course content will be presented in addition to how the design of each course impacted student pacing.

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Extended Abstract

One of the main benefits of online learning is the flexibility for individuals to learn at their own time and pace. Some online courses are self-paced where learners can determine their individual pace in the course while others have spaced deadlines for course assignments to encourage learners to keep a certain pace. The balance between flexibility and targeted pacing affects student achievement in online courses and careful consideration by instructors and designers should be given to how they structure their online courses to promote long-term memory. 

Ebbinghaus's Forgetting Curve explains how learners tend to forget information over time when presented in single instances. Revisiting information in spaced intervals helps learners can help reduce the rate at which information is forgotten.  When learners are able to determine the pace of their learning, they may not consider how the timing of their engagement is affecting their ability to learn and retain what they are learning. The purpose of this session is to explore the impact of spaced learning on student achievement, as measured by an analysis of student page views in an online course in relation to scores earned on Advanced Placement exams. The goal is to determine how the pacing of course content and assessments can be designed to best support student engagement and promote long-term memory.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Experience Age: Gamifying Education to Create an Inclusive Environment for Student Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

While we currently live in the experience age, the ever-changing world created by the pandemic can often make us feel more overwhelmed and isolated than ever.

Gamifying education is one way we can work against this to foster engagement, build upon student’s prior knowledge, and create an inclusive learning environment.

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Extended Abstract

For college professors, teachers, instructors, and librarians alike there has only been one constant over the past couple of years, change. Switching from online to hybrid to in-person back to online to hybrid again, we never quite know what the next semester or even the next week will bring. Because of this constant change, we’ve had to learn how to be flexible, adapt quickly, and always think on our feet. However, this isn’t just a juggling act for instructors, but it’s also become a major issue for students. Not only are they having to re-learn how to learn but many students are being forced into an isolating academic career that was never built for them to begin with. While we are all doing our best to keep up in what feels like a never-ending rat race, students and instructors are experiencing burnout. So, how do we increase engagement, collaboration, and interaction in the experience age when everyone’s current academic experience seems so overwhelming?

Gamifying education is the answer our library came across. Gamification is the implementation of game like mechanics into a usually non-gaming environment, and its goal is to increase engagement, collaboration, and interaction between students. It was an idea the library had been playing around with since the beginning of the pandemic, but in the spring of 2022, it became a reality. For our Research and Information Skills Exploration (RISE) workshops, we held in-person, synchronous, and hybrid workshops through zoom. In the eight sessions we held, every workshop focused on some aspect of research but through a gamified lens.

We leaned into gamification not only because it focuses heavily on student interaction but because it also supports Universal Design for Learning or UDL. Not only is engagement one of the major corner stones of UDL but so is representation. We wanted to make sure our students feel represented and seen in our library instruction classes especially in a time when students feel more alone than ever because of the pandemic. Moreover, we wanted to make sure that students understood that their voices, opinions, and points of view matter in the classroom. Students come into college with different backgrounds, levels of knowledge, lived experiences, as well as different social and economic barriers. We wanted to encourage students that their differences, no matter what they were, added value to the classroom.

Because of this, we believe that the concept of gamification is important to librarians, instructors, and faculty for several reasons. First, it is a new application of learning that is still being explored, which means lots of room to experiment and try out new ideas. In addition, it is a great medium to create an active learning experience for students. It’s one thing to give students a worksheet and tell them to complete it together in a breakout room, but it’s another thing entirely to give student’s agency in the classroom and allow them to build out their learning experience with the instructor. Second, as mentioned earlier burnout is an increasing issue affecting everyone, students, faculty, and librarians alike. Gamifying education creates a space where students get to collaborate and engage with each other, with the instructor, and with the class content. Third and finally, no two students learn the same way; rather, every student has unique learning styles and needs. Gamification is one way of addressing this issue in the classroom and working to create an inclusive environment for all students so they can succeed in the classroom.

We knew why we wanted to begin implementing gamification into our library instruction classes but what did that look like? How could we focus on representation and pull in prior knowledge from students? What does engagement look like online verses in-person? Could we create something that was flexible that could work for any medium we needed when things are still constantly changing? What kind of inclusive space could we create for students where they felt comfortable to share themselves with others? All of these questions and more will be answered in this interactive and gamification session. Please join us in this session as we work to increase engagement, representation, and inclusion through gamified education. The game format includes Mentimeter polls, dice, colored cards, and a Heads-Up Keyword Game. 

Level of Participation:

In this session, participants will go through a gamified library instruction class in order to simulate the student experience. They’ll build on prior knowledge, learn from each other, work together in group activities, discuss their experiences, focus on creating a more inclusive classroom environment, and more. From this session, attendees will learn engaging, collaborative, and innovative ways to present information to students. Moreover, attendees will learn how they can use gaming to help students learn and develop their research skills.

Session Goals:

By the end of this session, attendees will be able to identify ways to foster engaging and interactive collaboration between students through gamification as well as prioritize building upon student’s prior knowledge to support inclusive learning. Moreover, they will be able to demonstrate how to generate keywords to create research questions through a simulated library instruction class.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Gamifying Greece and Rome: Student Perspectives on Video Game Pedagogy | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

How do you get students to want to learn? This session tackles this question through a case study focused on video game pedagogy in a general education history course. Qualitative and quantitative student feedback suggests this may be an effective strategy for building engagement within an asynchronous online educational environment.

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Extended Abstract

Session Overview

How do you get students to want to learn about the past? For many disciplines in the humanities, effectively answering this question is fundamental to survival within the increasingly competitive ecology of higher education. A recent study by the American Historical Association demonstrated that the number of Humanities majors declined approximately 25% during the 2010s, with History having the dubious honor of trailing all 48 disciplines, having lost 34% of its majors between 2011 and 2017.*

Clearly this is a multifaceted problem with no single silver bullet solution. Yet improving student engagement within the field offers one pathway to stem and potentially reverse this trend. One way to build that engagement is to leverage what students are already doing outside the classroom: playing video games. To provide some insight into the efficacy of such a strategy, this Virtual Discovery Session presents an IRB-approved case study on the integration of video games as a teaching tool for the asynchronous online general education course CLAS 160B1: Gateway to Greece and Rome.

During the Fall 2021 semester in the middle of the pandemic, our university revised its introductory western civ course by developing a new assignment sequence in which students used the blockbuster video game Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey to complete a sequence of assignments. The asynchronous online course had previously utilized more traditional methods (i.e., primary and secondary source readings accompanied by written responses to those readings), but in this course, students could choose either assignment sequence – the video game-focused assignments or the reading and writing assignments – since both sought to achieve similar learning outcomes focused on critical thinking, argumentation and evidentiary support, and cultural knowledge acquisition.

A brief example: the “traditional” assignment group would learn about Greek architectural orders by listening to lectures, reading a textbook, analyzing Vitruvius’ De Architectura, and writing a short essay about the major similarities and differences between Doric, Ionic, and Corinthian architecture. Students who chose the “video game” assignment sequence, however, began by exploring religious architecture in Athens within Assassin’s Creed: Odyssey. They would climb around on the Parthenon (Doric), investigate the Temple of Athena Nike (Ionic), and head down the slopes of the Acropolis to the Temple of Olympian Zeus (Corinthian). After this digital survey of the Athenian religious landscape, they would note what they thought the similarities and differences were and then follow that up by reading the same ancient Vitruvian text that the traditional assignment group analyzed. In the end, each group would write a short essay about their findings, thus producing a similar product after taking very different paths to get there.

This presentation will take place in three parts. It begins by providing brief overview of the course, the two assignment sequences, and the video game itself. The audience will have a chance to see the video game in action, while getting a detailed view of what it is like to explore ancient monuments within the game’s digital environment. This is meant both to give them a sense of the assignments for the course and to provide them with a larger sense of what might be possible with such technology.

The core of this Virtual Discovery Session focuses on student responses to and reflections about the assignment sequence they chose. Students were given an IRB-approved survey asking them both quantitative questions (e.g., On a scale of 1 to 10, how much did you enjoy the assignment sequence? On a scale of 1 to 10, how much do you think you learned from your assignment sequence?) and qualitative questions (e.g., What’s one thing that you thought that worked particularly well in your assignment sequence? What’s one thing that could be improved?). By synthesizing these data, the project is meant to provide some practical lessons for the effective implementation of video games within an educational setting.

The conclusion of this session focuses on audience engagement and discussion. Asynchronous audience members are encouraged to voice their own questions and concerns (e.g., What about violence? How much does it cost?) as well as their own suggestions for effective digital gaming pedagogy through the use of PlayPosit’s discussion tool. Participants will be able to voice their own ideas as well as respond to those of others, providing a productive dialogue to conclude the virtual session, while also catalyzing audience members to think about how this might apply in their own settings.

Preliminary results from this study suggest that these video game-based assignments hold significant potential – at least from the students’ perspective. Their “enjoyment” of the video game assignment sequence (9.1 out of 10) substantially outpaced that of the traditional assignment sequence (6.8 out of 10). Students also thought this new technology was more “conducive to learning” (9.2 out of 10) compared to the traditional sequence (7.7 out of 10). More nuanced and qualitative student perspectives on these questions will be presented in the session itself. Next steps in this study will include assessing whether that perception equates with reality by determining the ability of students within each sequence to meet the learning outcomes for the course.  

Level of Participation

As a Virtual Discovery Session, audience members will be asked to participate in a variety of asynchronous modalities. First, they will be provided with downloadable copies of the assignment sheets and information regarding how to purchase the game so that they can follow along. Second, this session will take advantage of PlayPosit’s integrated question feature to allow audience members to interact while they watch the presentation. For example, after presenting an assignment from the course, the audience might be asked to brainstorm a topic from their own field that might be conducive to exploring within a digital game setting. Finally, at the end of the session, audience members will be able to use PlayPosit’s discussion feature both to provide their own feedback to question prompts and to respond to other commenters ideas. In the end, this engagement and feedback will be useful to improve the use of games in my own course and to prompt further exploration of digital games in attendees’ own pedagogy. 

Session Goals

Individuals who attend this session will gain valuable insight into and practical knowledge about the integration of video games as a teaching tool in the college classroom. Through the presentation of the assignment sequence, attendees will gain a broad understanding of the various ways that games might be utilized for history-based lessons. By engaging with qualitative and quantitative student feedback, participants will gain a better sense for the pitfalls and potential of this digital teaching method, allowing them to harness the highlights of this course while avoiding some of its missteps. Finally, by actively participating through PlayPosit’s question and discussion system, individuals will have the opportunity to begin thinking about how to integrate gaming into their own courses while also learning from the experiences of fellow attendees. In sum, the course assignments and student feedback from this case study are meant to serve as a launching point for attendees to effectively experiment with gaming as a pedagogical instrument in diverse higher education environments.

*Schmidt, B. M. (2018). “The History BA Since the Great Recession: The 2018 History Majors Report.” Perspectives on History. Last accessed at https://www.historians.org/publications-and-directories/perspectives-on-... on May 15, 2022.

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Faculty Perceptions of How Their Altruistic and Servant Teaching Behaviors Influence Student Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

This session examines the influence of instructor behaviors and student learning by applying servant teaching theory and altruism theory. Faculty, administrators, and students who attend this session will gain a better understanding of how instructor behaviors can influence students to overcome barriers, and equip faculty to help students reach academic success.

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Extended Abstract

The 21st century brought online education from a concept to a reality around the globe. With the advent of the asynchronous environment, education can be available to students any time and any day. This accessibility offers the potential of many more students completing coursework around the clock. However, an increase in students means facilitating their academic needs and promoting their learning. A key theme among colleges and universities is student retention and completion, underscoring student learning as a central concept. Retaining these online students in a way that moves them toward completion and promotes their sense of community becomes a pressing issue.

An examination of the literature revealed some of the key concepts relating to the online platform. These include the need for readying students for learning through technology (Alamin, Shaoqing, & Le, 2015), and a framework for understanding online instruction, which includes social presence, cognitive presence and teaching presence (Bair & Bair, 2011; Kozan, 2016). The online platform may offer many alternatives for education, but it also requires that the faculty member possess the knowledge of its use and the ability to use it for the benefit of the student. Students must feel a sense of belonging in the virtual classroom and effective motivation for student learning (Mann, 2014; van de Bunt-Kokhuis & Sultan, 2012). The effective faculty member must be able to create such an environment to facilitate student learning.

This session will examine the applications of two theories, altruism theory and servant teaching theory. Insight gained from the application of these theories in the online classroom may offer possible guidance in managing the asynchronous classroom and influencing student learning. This process includes building rapport, expressing values, and developing accountability.

Faculty who attend this session will gain a better understanding of reaching students, and influencing them toward success. In addition, they can use what they learn to mentor fellow faculty. Administrators attending this session will discover desirable traits to look for when hiring new faculty, as well as using these traits in the development of faculty training. Curriculum developers who attend this session will have the opportunity to adapt these concepts in the design, presentation, and assessment of material. Students will walk out of this session with a big-picture understanding of the dynamics of this modality, including the barriers present, the importance of self-motivation, and the role of the instructor in their success.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Future of Arts Education: A First-in-Kind Digital Learning Platform | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The past two years have seen unprecedented growth in demand for online learning and a commensurate increase in the proliferation of digital learning platforms. With learner motivations and interests becoming increasingly nuanced and diversified, this marks the moment for the creation of a new, immersive, accessible digital arts education platform.

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Extended Abstract

 

Extended Abstract (<1500 words):

Why Now?

The market shift from in-person learning to online and blended learning has led education providers worldwide to reflect deeply on this question, ‘how do we continue to captivate diverse learners post-pandemic and beyond?’  As the education sector wrestles with this challenge, our organization [an arts and cultural institution with an educational mission and a $20M+ annual budget] set out to find what today’s learners value in a digital learning experience. For nearly a century, we’ve offered educational experiences almost exclusively in person, on-premises, in our galleries and classrooms. In early 2020, we hastily moved our adult classes online and in just a few short weeks, we began to see enrollment grow, and it quickly tripled, to 5600 students across 48 states and 8 countries with significant new revenue. Our K-12 programs also pivoted to an online format, allowing us to serve over 16,000 students during the first year of the pandemic. 

 

During those early months (March-August 2020), we benefited from what was at the time a captive audience.  We had the foresight to concurrently build the technology infrastructure to position us to scale and occupy a market niche that would help catapult us to the forefront of digital arts education. And as global EdTech expenditures continued to accelerate, the unique space we found ourselves inhabiting (we were becoming a ‘go-to source’ for arts online education) emboldened us to innovate quickly, specifically to: 

 

  • significantly expand our education offerings to attract more diverse audiences around the globe 

  • design new delivery models that encourage interactivity  

  • create new streams of earned revenue.  

 

To continue growing  these innovations, we applied for and received a grant to do a one-year intensive R+D project that would result in a first-in-kind digital arts education platform. Once the project was underway, we began to attract attention from technology companies looking to partner with a world-class arts and cultural institution with an historic educational mission that was diving head-first into Ed Tech.

 

In imagining this new platform, the discussion turned to the level of immersiveness, what the technology will support, ‘real learner interest’ in features, functions, and tools.  While the ultimate future product likely would resemble a high fidelity ‘digital twin’ of the museum, as a first step we are working to  create an immersive and engaging web platform to provide students (both adult and K-12 learners) with a level of agency similar to that of the teachers. . Our "table-stakes" or features that will be available immediately (before any use of VR) include synchronous/asynchronous capabilities, ability for users to control their experience by zooming in and out on an image or object,, and saved classes stored in a virtual library that is transcribed and instantaneously searchable.  As early as Fall 2022, students will be able to manipulate the images under discussion, zooming in on areas of particular interest, thereby experiencing a greater “feeling of presence.” 

 

For us, this proof-of-concept would solve for two perennial and longstanding challenges: accessibility and increasingly diverse learning expectations,  and the immutability of objects in the permanent collection. The journey thus far has led to closer internal collaboration and synergies, in particular cross-functional strategic and operational alignment across Business Analytics, Research, Education, and Interpretation, IT, and Research and Evaluation. 

 

Plan for Interactivity

As we set out to answer this question: How can we design a first-in-kind online learning platform that captivates diverse users from around the globe while also pioneering a new model of financial resilience in the arts? we surfaced qualitative and quantitative measures of emerging shifts and developments in ed tech, stakeholder interviews (academic administrative and faculty leadership, curriculum designers and instructors on digital platforms, and financial and strategic leadership at online arts education organizations, K-12 and continuing education programs) and conducted a field scan based on learning platforms serving both K-12 and adult learners. 

 

These diverse sources include both primary and secondary data collection that helped us to understand how other organizations are tackling similar opportunities and challenges. We found that our plan for interactivity has three key drivers: a) customer needs, b) revenue opportunity, and c) access as business essential.  Breaking down a)-c) into component parts, to best meet customer needs, capture and sustain revenue, and prioritize access, we phased the project in this way:

 

Phase I: Education Audit and Visioning 

We engaged a strategic R+D partner to enable robust local data collection in two forms: observational (in-course) and administrative (student-, course-, and program-level). Our first set of findings showed our strengths around four themes: a) caliber of content, b) expertise of faculty, c) flexibility of format, and c) highly engaging learning environment.  From there, we framed our growth opportunities not as counterweights to our current-state strengths but rather as natural outgrowths of these strengths. They were: the criticality of balancing rigor with accessibility, the imperative to inspire knowledge exchange (in particular, peer-to-peer), the importance of support for visitation through a hybrid model, and the challenge of providing collaborators with tech support. These learnings, coupled with four field trends discussed below, led us directly into the next phases of our project.

 

Phase II: Landscape Analysis

Our competitive and comparative market analysis of more than twenty online learning platforms, peer benchmarking of arts learning offerings, and 30 external interviews with educators and online business leaders reveals four key trends that will inform  the design and development of our first-in-kind arts education digital learning platform:

 

Trend 1: Digitization of learning. With this came shrinking attention spans, the conflation of influence and credibility, democratized content, and contested value of formal education.

 

Trend 2: Diversification of learning outcomes. Learners approach the learning experience with more diverse expectations and motivations, including unlocking personal creativity, redefining career pathways, the value of P2P learning, and increasing interest in STEAM content. 

 

Trend 3: Adoption of emerging technologies. With this adoption comes immersive tech, personalized learning experiences and the imperative to differentiate the learning experience, and the tech fluency divide. 

 

Trend 4: Access as business essential. Globalization of learning, new models of affordability, and persisting community gaps translates to tiered discount rates and the broadening of discount types.

 

Phase III: Prospective User Research

This is where it gets exciting. Integrating our Phase I-II learnings, we are conducting adult and K-12 teacher and student prospective user interviews. Timed to coincide with our UX design partnership (wherein we first collected demographic and psychographic insights (archetypes, use cases, personas) , we will offer a prototype for the later rounds of interviewees to test. 

 

Our goal for our 2023Q1 Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is to achieve interactivity optimized for synchronous/asynchronous; highly manipulatable screen elements for a closer look at course objects and assets; a robust and indexed virtual library. As we continue roadmapping several versions, each more immersive than the last, we will test features with prospective users.

 

Phase IV: Strategic Positioning and Learning Outcomes at Scale

In response to our original research question and anchored by our UX/design purpose statement, we will begin to build and validate wireframe designs to position us for new and existing markets. We expect proof-of-concept capabilities to include: social and multiplayer interactions between on-site and remote learners; the ability of remote users to ‘walk up to art for closer look’; best in market 3D scanning; high quality imaging of individual artworks at high fidelity; panoramic photos for room placement; technology hosting available on web browser (with optional add-in for VR and mobile).

 

As we continue to witness massive market growth in digital learning, increases in expenditures in educational technology and public interest in online learning has led to opportunities beyond what anyone could imagine two short years ago… hence our quest to test and release a first-in-kind digital education experience for today’s learner, who will walk away with an increased understanding of critical thinking through close looking at art; stronger communication skills and in particular a sense of growing art confidence; deepening interest in cultures and in histories outside of one’s own; and higher levels of engagement with arts communities.

 

 

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The changing world of academic libraries: Competencies for online instruction | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Librarians do more than just buy books. They are teachers! The COVID-19 pandemic changed the teaching world permanently requiring libary instruction to move into online spaces. This presentation describes a competency-based needs assessment to develop 24 competencies needed to meet the challenges of teaching online in a changed world.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted academic libraries just as it did in most corners of higher education. The instruction method most librarians use is face-to-face instruction. And, it became very clear in the first month of university closures that librarians were not prepared to teach online whether it was synchronous or asynchronous. Most of the instruction that was done fell safely into the category of emergency remote learning without much understanding of the complexities of designing and delivering instruction in this environment. 

This session describes a competency-based needs assessment used to identify competencies academic librarians need to be successful in providing online library instruction. Research presented will describe the semi-structured interviews done with experts as well as the process of coding and codeweaving to distill competencies gathered over 18 interviews. Discover the 24 competencies expert instruction librarians identified as the most important skills for academic librarians to have as they consider a changed world of an increasingly online learning dominated education environment. 

The expert interviewees also identified potential barriers that may make it difficult for academic librarians to become proficient in all competencies presented. Many of these barriers could be shared across the higher education landscape. To that end, participants will be invited to share barriers they have encountered in their changed worlds to build a word cloud. While these barriers will not be overcome in this session, this continued dialogue is crucial to working to overcome knowledge, skill, and attitude gaps in higher education to expand access to quality online learning opportunities for our students.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
The Asynchronous Cookbook: Recipes for Interaction in Online and Hybrid Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

The Asynchronous Cookbook is an openly licensed resource for faculty and instructional designers to expand their knowledge and use of async activities. Meaningful interaction is the key ingredient in all recipes! Join us to learn about how the recipes can be used to help promote equitable and flexible learning design.

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Extended Abstract

The Asynchronous Cookbook is an openly licensed resource for faculty and instructional designers to expand their knowledge and use of meaningful, interactive async activities in their blended or fully online courses. Working with faculty at our institution, we noticed that faculty tend to equate “asynchronous learning” with one type of interaction only - a self-paced interaction between students and content - and as a result, believe that interaction between students, and between students and instructors, is best left to synchronous modalities. We believe that asynchronous learning can provide meaningful interaction, as well as support the flexible and equitable design of learning by addressing learner variability; barriers to full participation in synchronous learning, including time zone, Internet access, accessibility, and Zoom fatigue; and the need for low-bandwidth online activities. 

The recipes in the cookbook draw on online learning research and good practice to provide concise, specific instructions and examples for a variety of activity types. Meaningful interaction between students, and students and instructors, is the key ingredient in all the recipes! In this presentation, we’ll talk about how we designed the cookbook as a resource for faculty looking for more async activities to add to their repertoire, and share some of our popular recipes.

To help engage our audience, we will ask them to share their experiences with supporting faculty to develop meaningful asynchronous learning opportunities, as well as any recommendations they have for new recipes for the cookbook. We hope that attendees leave our session with:

  • An idea of what meaningful, equitable asynchronous interaction can look like in action.

  • Some inspiration for designing their own asynchronous online activities, and how those activities might be shared out with their colleagues and institution.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Teaching motor control disorders using a new case study in online and hybrid neuroscience and psychology courses | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Teaching Motor Control Disorders Using a New Case Study in Online and Hybrid Neuroscience and Psychology Courses

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Extended Abstract

The COVID pandemic transformed undergraduate teaching from more traditional to digital delivery methods, which presented challenges and opportunities in student engagement and learning. Active learning pedagogy such as case study teaching is a great way to engage students in face-to-face settings. We wanted to investigate whether it is also effective in both fully online and hybrid settings. To accomplish this, we wrote a new case study on Alzheimer’s disease and piloted it in a hybrid Introduction to Neuroscience course and an online Biological Psychology course from Spring of 2021 through Spring of 2022. We also implemented a control course in Biological Psychology, whereupon a literature review paper on Alzheimer’s disease was assigned in lieu of the case study. To evaluate learning, we used exam questions and collected student survey data, which showed no significant difference in learning but improved engagement and positive feedback in the case study group. Furthermore, we have learned valuable lessons regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this new case, along with some pedagogical insights on teaching case studies in online and hybrid courses.

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
Sustaining Online Academic Resources Post-Pandemic | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Many institutions offered new virtual support services for online learners during the pandemic, and plan to continue offering them for the foreseeable future. This presentation will focus on best practices for online academic support, primarily approaches that make maintaining resources sustainable and integrating academic support into larger DEI institutional initiatives. 

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Extended Abstract

This 15-minute asynchronous, interactive PlayPosit discovery session will offer the opportunity for attendees to adapt two critical practices for supporting online learners at their home institutions. First, principles to make maintaining, monitoring, and managing virtual academic support resources sustainable. Secondly, fostering multi-departmental collaborations based on shared goals (such as positioning academic support resources within the framework of equity and inclusion).

 

Many institutions have created or expanded existing virtual resources for online learnings since March of 2020. What most institutions are discovering is that the flexibility of online resources is a benefit students would like to see continued in the future. The 2021 CHLOE report listed academic support as “the highest priority for 43% of institutions” but “only about half of respondents felt those services were working well online” (Kelly, 2021). Students are busier than ever, and, even for students who come to campus for courses, arriving on campus before or remaining on campus afterwards is not always a possibility. Paired with increases in fully online enrollments as well as an increase in students electing to take some coursework virtually, the diverse needs of students have expanded in recent years. Students “enrolled in distance courses tend to be enrolled in those distance courses over multiple terms, but not all of them” (Smalley, 2021). Given budget restraints, duplicating in-person academic support resources virtually is not always possible; nor does it need to be. So how can institutions accommodate learners in all modalities? Leveraging existing high-quality resources to meet the needs of both residential and online learners is both a financially savvy approach and one that eases the bandwidth strains for academic support staff with an already high burnout rate during a time in which many are leaving higher education. It is also vital to student success, especially for new students. While “ninety percent of first-year students who said their college emphasized using learning support services, such as tutoring or writing centers, also said they intended to return the following year …About 10 percent fewer first-year students said they intended to return if their college provided ‘very little’ or ‘some’ emphasis on learning support services” (Anderson, 2021).

 

Creating a sustainable philosophy to academic support resources that meets the needs of students in multiple modalities is only the first part of addressing this increasing concern. Maintaining and managing these resources is a long-term struggle for many institutions, but is critical – if the quality of a resource is perceived to be marginal to students, they will likely turn elsewhere for support. This presentation will highlight two specific examples that demonstrate best practices for maintaining high quality resources while also reducing bandwidth constraints.

 

The first example highlighted will be an FAQ database. We currently host approximately 1,500 online FAQs of internally-created content that is difficult to maintain. Many FAQs include images, videos, or policy language that can be time-consuming to update. Two approaches have worked over the past ten years to ensure these remain current. First, we created a rotating assessment schedule for each FAQ as it is created to make sure it is reviewed before critical periods of time (i.e. when the next student handbook is released). Secondly, we assign FAQs to each team member with consideration to areas of expertise. It is quicker, for example, for a School of Nursing Librarian to update a Nursing FAQ than for another team member to learn needed knowledge and then update it. Third, we partner with departments to provide input when needed. The financial aid department, for instance, is a reviewer for FAQs that require departmental expertise. Tangentially, this also helps remind other departments to promote their FAQs to students. Included in these reviews are peer tutors. Though current students, they often are able to review basic-level FAQs and provide phrasing that resonates with fellow students. While these are ultimately still reviewed by a full-time staff member, there are typically minimal edits needed. Lastly, our FAQs offer a comment space for students. Regular checks for new comments take only a brief amount of time but are often the quickest indicator an FAQ needs to be updated.

 

The second example this presentation will highlight involves Peer Tutoring. Unlike the first example, assessing Peer Tutors is quite different from a static resource. The principles covered here could also apply to any staff member, though the content in the evaluation process would differ. While there is much more to be said around the transition Peer Tutoring programs have made during the pandemic (and would be welcomed in the interactive design of this PlayPosit session as well as in the asynchronous discussion accompanying this presentation), the primary purpose of this example will be on the assessment of semi-virtual employees. Research has shown that both training and evaluation make significant differences in the academic impact that Peer Tutors can make in working with students. “Tutoring, if done right, is ‘among the most effective education intentions ever to be subjected to rigorous evaluation” (Levin and Lohman, 2022). Evaluations play a critical role in ensuring Peer Tutors benefit fully from the professional development experience of the role in ways they can articulate and leverage to their advantage in professional interviews after graduating. There are several approaches that can both provide critical professional development input and maintain the bandwidth of already stretched staff (it is not uncommon for staff to oversee upwards of 100 work-study employees). The first way to make this manageable is to create a prioritized assessment schedule so that not every support resource is assessed at the same time. Norton and Agee (2014) provide an example of such a model in Assessment of Learning Assistance Programs: Supporting Professionals in the Field. A critical piece to this is prioritizing when employees can most benefit from this important feedback – this presentation will recommend at the end of the first term in the role as a means of ensuring extensive onboarding practices are integrated in sessions. Significant onboarding can help with the steep learning curve of new employees. Utilizing an active, growing repository of resources (we use a LibGuide) is one approach that can provide timely support for new employees. We have also found that putting our training course in a CBE format is a benefit to our adult learners. Since the range of work-study employees stretches from those in their first professional job experience to those who have worked in a professional field for upwards of 15 years, the flexibility of a Competency Based Modality course allows new employees to spend their onboarding reviewing the most relevant and useful information for their needs. Lastly, we utilize experienced staff members to provide feedback and coaching to those growing into the role. This both frees up the full-time staff member to work primarily with new or struggling employees and it provides supervisory experience for experienced students to take to their post-graduation careers. Advancing to providing feedback from an online tutoring appointment observation, for example, allows for the staff member to then provide advanced coaching on how to best provide supervisory feedback, and to offer suggestions for employees to consider as they develop their leadership style – all much more meaningful and challenging professional preparation than remaining complacent as solely an experienced Peer Tutor.

 

The final piece of this presentation will focus on developing a more sustainable approach to expanding resources through fostering collaborative relationships with multiple other departments. More specifically, positioning academic support through the lens of DEI initiatives allows for the development of mutually-supported goals related to access and inclusion. This is not a stretch, rather, it is common for academic support to be included in the conversation of ensuring adequate supports for diverse student bodies. Phillips, Jr. and Custer offer academic support as part of “4 Key Steps to Support Justice-Impacted Students” (Phillips, Jr. and Custer, 2021). Mintz (2022) includes it as part of “Tackling Educational Equity Head-On). Farris and Chan (2022) name it as a “program[ming] that truly focus[es] on helping such often-marginalized student groups.” This session will end with an example of a multi-departmental initiative based on this centering point, and focusing on the benefits for each department in the university-wide initiative.

 

References

Anderson, G. (2021, March 16). As Students Dispersed, Tutoring Services Adapted. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2021/03/16/face-face-peer-tutoring-decimated-pandemic-universities-turn-new-tools-times-and

Norton, J. and Agee, K. (2014). Assessment of Learning Assistance Programs: Supporting Professionals in the Field [White paper]. College Reading and Learning Association. https://crla.net/index.php/publications/crla-white-papers.

Farris, J. and Chan, C. (2022, February 8). Guiding First-Generation Students to Success. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2022/02/08/research-based-advice-how-support-first-gen-students-opinion

Kelly, R. (2021, June 16). How Institutions Met Student Needs During the Pandemic. Campus Technology. https://campustechnology.com/articles/2021/06/16/how-institutions-met-student-needs-during-the-pandemic.aspx

Levin, K. and Lohman, I. (2022, May 23). Gov. Whitmer proposes $280 million tutoring investment for Michigan. Chalkbeat Detroit. https://detroit.chalkbeat.org/2022/5/23/23138805/whitmer-tutoring-proposal-learning-loss-280-million-kids-back-track

Mintz, S. (2022, January 25). Tacking Educational Equity Head-On. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/higher-ed-gamma/tackling-educational-equity-head

Phillips Jr., E. and Custer, B. (2021, August 4). 4 Key Steps to Support Justice-Impacted Students. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2021/08/04/need-support-justice-impacted-students-opinion

Smalley, S. (2021, October 13). Half of All College Students Take Online Courses. Inside Higher Ed. https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2021/10/13/new-us-data-show-jump-college-students-learning-onlin

Nov 5, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Eastern)
An instructional designer, a faculty member and a student walk into a bar: Demystifying faculty lack of buy in and connecting across roles to improve overall online experiences | Discovery Session Asynchronous | PlayPosit

Learn about practices that connect faculty, instructional designers and students in healthy communication to produce amazing courses

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Extended Abstract

In this section a faculty member and an instructional designer will share how they engaged in healthy dialogue, applied for a grant for OER resources,  and created an engaging, inclusive online course. 

We’ll demystify the faculty stereotype of lack of buy-in, show how convincing skills connect faculty with instructional designers, and discover how online learning is not like face to face.

 

Nov 14, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Join an Innovation Crew | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

Innovation Crews are flexible communities convened around shared community interests before and during a conference experience. Facilitated by a “Crew Leader”, they provide a space for colleagues to connect, converse, support each other, and be part of a smaller group within the larger conference. Select a group that aligns with your interests and join a cohort of colleagues dedicated to both navigating OLC Accelerate together and co-constructing a meaningful learning experience.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 14, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
The Grading Room | Other | Europe 4

The Grading Room was designed to provide dedicate space and resources for those needing to take time away from conference sessions and programming for things like grading. Please note that this room is expected to be a quite one, meant to facilitate focus and space for those needing to grade or otherwise work. For questions related to the Grading Room, please visit the conference registration desk.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 14, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
The Sanctuary | Other | Europe 2

Everyone needs a break and time to decompress when at a large conference. Take advantage of the opportunities to unplug and refocus. During the conference, join us here for some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice self-care as we turn our focus inward for a few brief moments.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 14, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Designing for Divergence: Establishing Neuro-inclusive Classrooms | Master Class | Asia 1

It is estimated that up to 30% of learners in your classroom may have some form of neurodivergence including autism, ADHD, and more. (Conditt, 2020, para. 4). They are gifted with a unique way of processing information but face challenges of learning in classrooms that do not support this variance.

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Extended Abstract

“The increasing number of students with learning difficulties associated with neurodiversity entering higher education (HE) poses a shared and growing challenge internationally for teachers and institutional leaders” (Clouder, et. al, 2020, p. 757). As educators, it is imperative that we begin cultivating learning environments that are supportive of this type of diversity. In fact, it is estimated that up to 30% of the learners in your classroom may have a condition that classifies as neurodivergent such as autism, ADHD, or Tourette’s syndrome among others (Conditt, 2020, para. 4). These individuals are gifted with a unique way of viewing the world and processing information but are faced with the challenge of learning in classrooms that do not support this variance. 

A major factor that contributes to this challenge is that many neurodivergent learners do not have an official diagnosis or may not have recognized they are neurodivergent until adulthood (Polyzoi, Ahnemark, Medin, & Ginsberg, 2018; Happe & Frith, 2020). A lack of diagnosis prevents students from understanding the support they need in higher education.  Similarly faculty are challenged with addressing the specific learning needs without fully understanding what accommodations they need to provide. To add to that challenge, there is no universal strategy that works for every learner. This trifecta highlights the need for institutions to equip faculty with the appropriate support, techniques, or strategies for creating neuroinclusive learning environments. As educators, it is necessary to take steps to ensure that everyone’s time in academia, including the neurodivergent, truly does accommodate every learner.

While it is hard to know how to design neurodiverse learning environments in HE there are reasonable academic, sensory, and social adjustments that can benefit all learners. First and foremost we need to dismantle the paradigm that views neurodivergence as a disability and to instead reframe our understanding of neurodiversity as a difference in the way individuals process information. Currently “post-secondary administrations seem to view neurodivergence as a disability as well as through predominantly medicalized, legalistic, and deficit-based lenses''. (Dwyer, et al. 2022, p. 3) We fundamentally disagree with this stance. 

In this session, our goal is to shift this narrative and to create an understanding that neurodivergence is a gift. As educators we need to first explore the variations by which neurodivergent learners view and navigate the learning experience. This primarily lies within their executive functions, specifically within the areas of working memory, cognitive flexibility, and inhibitory control. Intentionally designing learning environments that help develop executive functioning skills can provide a foundation for neuroinclusivity.

Working memory is our ability to select “behaviorally relevant information, maintain it in time, and reference it when appropriate” (Chatham & Badre, 2015, p. 23) so we can make decisions on how to act in the world. Working memory is important because it impacts our long term academic and social success into adulthood. Supporting working memory is important because it helps us make the transition from memorizing to doing something with the learned information. 

Cognitive flexibility refers to our ability to switch between tasks or change our thinking quickly and easily. Cognitive flexibility is important because it is how we differentiate between important and unimportant information. Developing cognitive flexibility is essential for students to organize thoughts, make connections between concepts, and manage time and tasks. 

Inhibitory control is a major contributor to educational performance and is what helps students hold back an action that feels automatic or is especially rewarding. Inhibitory control is considered the main building block for our more complex cognitive functions. Developing inhibitory control is essential to help students follow through on long term goals and refraining from behaviors that interfere with reaching a goal or task while providing a strong foundation for developing other executive functions. 

By exploring these executive functions and their impact on learning abilities, attendees will engage in a humanized approach to understanding neurodivergent individuals. Through the investigation of authentic case studies, participants will learn various strategies for supporting and accommodating differences in these areas. Each case study emphasizes a different aspect of the executive functions allowing for deep exploration of the associated affordances and barriers. 

Attendees will be able to:

  • Identify the unique challenges of neurodivergent students. 

  • Engage in exploratory activities to better understand neurodivergence.

  • Learn key strategies for supporting neurodivergent students.

Attendees will engage in the following activities:

Icebreaker
Exploration of authentic casesStudies
Redesign a sample course with an eye toward neuroinclusion

References:

Chatham, C. H., & Badre, D. (2015). Multiple gates on working memory. Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences, 1, 23-31. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cobeha.2014.08.001

Clouder, L., Karakus, M., Cinotti, A., Ferreyra, M., Fierros, G., & Rojo, P. (2020). Neurodiversity in higher education: A narrative synthesis. Higher Education, 80, 757-778. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10734-020-00513-6

Conditt, S. (2020, April 22). Neurodiversity in the college setting. Retrieved from https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/dd1f45e1f2da4ec38f60852226e68928

Dwyer, P., Mineo, E., Mifsud, K., Lindholm, C., Gurba, A., & Waisman, T. (2022). Building neurodiversity-inclusive postsecondary campuses: Recommendations for leaders in higher education. Autism in Adulthood, 1-14. doi:DOI: 10.1089/aut.2021.0042

Happé, F., & Frith, U. (2020). Annual research review: looking back to look forward – changes in the concept of autism and implications for future research. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 61(3), 218–232. https://doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.13176

Polyzoi, M., Ahnemark, E., Medin, E., & Ginsberg, Y. (2018). Estimated prevalence and incidence of diagnosed adhd and health care utilization in adults in sweden - a longitudinal population-based register study. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 14, 1149–1161. https://doi.org/10.2147/NDT.S155838

 

Nov 14, 2022
1:00pm - 4:00pm (Eastern)
Build Your Own Escape Room: Theoretical Foundations, Models, and Practical Design Tips | Master Class | Asia 2

You are trapped in a room and the clock is ticking down! There are a collection of puzzles scattered around the space and you must work alongside friends, coworkers, and potentially strangers to escape in time. Join us as we look under the hood and break down the process for designing, developing, and implementing Escape Rooms in physical or virtual environments.

Escape Rooms offer a framework to engage participants in collaborative challenges, encourage individuals to overcome failure through play, and utilize mystery and curiosity to motivate learning experiences. Such activities are rich for a variety of contexts like team building, self-directed learning, and breaking down social barriers in classrooms, as part of professional development or to hook the attention of individuals from any learning environment. At its core, Escape Rooms can be as simple as a collection of small challenges that are narratively connected. We will focus on this accessible form of Escape Room activities.

During this session we will begin by exploring readymade Escape Room activities from four different creators who bring a variety of approaches to this space. Additionally, these examples are crafted with the intention you could reuse or remix them to suit your own needs. Following this experiential activity, the presenters will share their familiarity, scholarship, and recommendations for using Escape Rooms as engaging activities. Lastly, there will be significant development time for attendees to experiment and craft their own Escape Room challenges alongside the aid of the presenters.

By the end of this session, participants will have the beginnings of their own Escape Room ready to deploy or expand.Following this session, participants will be able to:

  • Access the readymade, and easily customizable, Escape Room elements and activities to implement into their own project
  • Develop a prototype Escape Room
  • Exclusive access to the OLC Accelerate 2022 Escape Room

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 14, 2022
1:00pm - 4:00pm (Eastern)
RSI FTW (For the Win!): Actionable Approaches for Ensuring Regular and Substantive Interaction in Online and Blended Learning Courses | Master Class | Asia 1

Meaningful engagement between instructors and students is an essential component of successful online and blended learning, driving higher quality interactions and experiences. This aligns with accreditation requirements as well as the Department of Education’s rules requiring courses to include regular and substantive interaction (RSI) especially in distance and competency-based education "to ensure federal financial aid funds are used appropriately."

In this workshop, your facilitators will 1) discuss how to create a learning environment that cultivates quality, meaningful interactions and 2) share innovative, best-practice examples of regular and substantive interaction in action across diverse contexts. Participants will explore the tools and approaches to best support students in sharing their ideas and engaging more deeply in their learning, as well as collaborate with their colleagues on developing high-impact strategies for ensuring RSI. This workshop is perfect for educators, practitioners, and designers with any experience level with RSI - it is geared towards anyone looking to reflect on and deppen points of engagement in the courses that they are building, teaching, and continuously improving.

Participants will leave this workshop with greater understanding and practical knowledge for how to:

  • Identify the essential elements of Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI)
  • Apply the OSCQR Rubric to assess and improve RSI within online and blended courses
  • Evaluate use cases for practical, easy-to-use tools to assist in cultivating engagement
  • Develop a plan of action to drive higher quality interactions and experiences

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Nov 14, 2022
3:00pm - 6:00pm (Eastern)
Early Registration | Other | Convention Foyer

Don't wait in line Tuesday morning and miss portions of a our Field Guide events, the Escape Room, or the Blended Learning Symposium.  Check-in at conference registration Monday evening from 3-6pm ET to pick up your conference badge and materials. After you check-in, take part in the Monday evening Exhibit Hall Preview (3:00pm-5:30pm, Atlantic Exhibit Hall), where you will have an opportunity to get a jump-start on your exhibitor stamp card (for fabulous prizes) and enjoy some snacks and fun refreshments.  Be sure to make your travel plans to arrive early enough on Monday to participate in these events and enjoy the Disney Boardwalk area. 

OLC Accelerate 2022 registration is located in the Convention Foyer off the lobby of the WDW Dolphin Resort lobby.   

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Nov 14, 2022
3:00pm - 5:30pm (Eastern)
Exhibit Hall Preview | Evening Event | Atlantic Exhibit Hall

Join us for some fun and casual networking as a way to build community. There will be games, there will be prizes, there will be snacks and refreshments...and there's bound to be some amazing new connections made at this OLC Accelerate Exhibit Hall Preview.

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Nov 14, 2022
3:00pm - 5:30pm (Eastern)
OLC Cafe and Mercantile | Other | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - OLC Cafe and Mercantile

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

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Nov 14, 2022
3:00pm - 6:00pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station - Early Registration Field Guide Consulting | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, or even directions!

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Nov 14, 2022
4:00pm - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Conference Volunteer VIP Cocktail Party | Evening Event | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - OLC Cafe and Mercantile

Our Volunteers are the heart of our conference programming. If you are an OLC Accelerate 2022 conference volunteer, join us for this special evening event so that we can both celebrate your services to our community and gather for light-hearted fun and games.

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Nov 14, 2022
5:00pm - 5:45pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Tour the Swan/Dolphin Resort | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

Join the OLC Accelerate Field Guides and other conference attendees for a tour of the Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort and Convention Center. There is no better way to explore this hotel and learn about conference layout than on a guided tour with the OLC Field Guides.

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Nov 15, 2022
6:30am - 7:30am (Eastern)
All Levels Yoga with Maria | Other | Asia 2

Start your morning with an invigorating all-levels yoga session! This beginner-friendly class introduces the fundamental Hatha Yoga poses and incorporates them into a flow, with a focus on breathing and alignment. Modifications will be provided for more advanced levels.

Note:  OLC Accelerate attendees participate in yoga classes at their own risk.  In the unlikely event of injury, please note that OLC and the WDW Swan & Dolphin Resort may not be held liable.

Yoga mat (we will have towels on hand if you don't have one), comfy clothes, and water bottle needed.

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Extended Abstract

Maria Puzziferro is an Accelerate 2022 conference attendee.  She is a registered RYT® 500 yoga instructor, having successfully completed a 500-hour yoga teacher training that is registered with Yoga Alliance.  

Nov 15, 2022
6:30am - 7:30am (Eastern)
Rise and Shine: Daily Fitness Jumpstart with Coach Jesse | Other | Asia 3

Get a jumpstart on your conference day with Coach Jesse!  In this 60-minute workout, Coach Jesse will walk attendees through a series of functional fitness movements that will help get the mind and body ready for a full day of conference sessions! Scaling and modifications are available to accommodate all fitness levels. Please wear workout clothing and workout shoes. Be sure to bring a water bottle and come ready to move!  Attendees will be asked to sign a waiver before participating. Jesse is a National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer and a Crossfit Level 1 Trainer.

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Nov 15, 2022
7:30am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station - Field Guide Consulting | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, or even directions!

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Nov 15, 2022
7:45am - 9:00am (Eastern)
Attendee Breakfast (Tuesday) | Other | Southern Hemisphere Foyer

Start the first official day of OLC Accelerate 2022 with breakfast prior to the morning's events.  Grab your breakfast in the Southern Hemisphere Foyer (up the escalator from conference registration), then head to one of our engagement activities taking place this morning.   

Nov 15, 2022
7:45am - 8:15am (Eastern)
Meditation and Mindfulness - a Guided Meditation Session | Other | Europe 3

Start your day with some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Accelerate Conference in a healthy and present way together.  Whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned practitioner, all levels are welcome to join us in The Sanctuary (Europe 2) for this session.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 9:00am (Eastern)
Field Guide Power Hour | Other | Southern Hemisphere IV

We're switching things up with this year's Power Hour! Learn what's new at OLC Accelerate this year, sure, but more importantly come reunite with old friends, meet new ones, and start your conference experience with casual fun and community building. Halfway through this session, we will welcome newcomers to the conference as they join the Field Guide Power Hour from an onboarding session.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Join an Innovation Crew | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

Innovation Crews are flexible communities convened around shared community interests before and during a conference experience. Facilitated by a “Crew Leader”, they provide a space for colleagues to connect, converse, support each other, and be part of a smaller group within the larger conference. Select a group that aligns with your interests and join a cohort of colleagues dedicated to both navigating OLC Accelerate together and co-constructing a meaningful learning experience.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 9:00am (Eastern)
First Timers Welcome and Orientation | Other | Southern Hemisphere V

If you’re looking for support in orienting to the conference, the First Timers Welcome and Orientation is a must! Get support in planning your conference experience and kick things off with some casual networking. Halfway through this session, we will join the Field Guide Power Hour to meet the broader OLC community.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
The Grading Room | Other | Europe 4

The Grading Room was designed to provide dedicate space and resources for those needing to take time away from conference sessions and programming for things like grading. Please note that this room is expected to be a quite one, meant to facilitate focus and space for those needing to grade or otherwise work. For questions related to the Grading Room, please visit the conference registration desk.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Cruising The Block With Your Innovation Crew (Innovation Crew Meet-Up) | Other | Europe 7

Participants are invited to engage with Crews by attending the same session(s) or activity(s). Meet up with your crew lead to debrief and plan your next steps. Check Slack and Engagez for specific meet-up times.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
The Sanctuary | Other | Europe 3

Everyone needs a break and time to decompress when at a large conference. Take advantage of the opportunities to unplug and refocus. During the conference, join us here for some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice self-care as we turn our focus inward for a few brief moments.

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Eastern)
Your OLC Accelerate 2022 OLC Live! Experience | Other | Northern Hemisphere C/D

As part of the broader Virtual and Onsite Experience at #OLCAccelerate 2022, OLC Live! is a catered virtual lounge and conversation space where participants can engage directly with keynote speakers, select presenters, and other attendees. Join our OLC Live! hosts Olysha Magruder and Mel Edwards for your chance to connect virtually with a variety of personalities from the OLC community. This year's OLC Live! will be driving around the conference, catching a glimpse of the scenery. Watch out for the ""Stop"" sign - you might get stopped! OLC Live! is open to the entire OLC Community whether you are a registered OLC Accelerate 2022 Conference attendee or not. Come join the conversations!

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Nov 15, 2022
8:00am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
OLC Accelerate's 2022 Escape Room | Other | Northern Hemisphere E4

The OLC Escape Room has become an OLC Accelerate staple. Don't miss out on this fun, gameful, and challenging opportunity to team up with others for your chance at escaping this year's educational escape room!

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Nov 15, 2022
9:00am - 11:00am (Eastern)
Moving from Surviving to Thriving: Effective Practices for Addressing Self-Care and Burnout | Workshop | Southern Hemisphere II

Burned out? Just practice self-care! Except it’s not that easy, is it? In this interactive workshop, we’ll skip right past the hype and look deep under the hood at what causes burn out. We’ll help you to identify what self-care actually means for you, discuss how to influence your own mental models with story, and explore ways to practice self-care holistically rather than individually. 

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Extended Abstract

Since the start of the pandemic, we have been living a “new normal”. Except, the definition of the word “normal” is “conforming to a standard, usual, typical, or expected”. Nothing about the past two years has been typical, usual, or expected. When events begin to settle into what might be defined as normal, another COVID variant appears, inflation increases, jobs gained during the pandemic are lost, a coworker leaves for another job, work from home flexibility is clawed back. There is no “normal” right now. 

This turmoil can cause immense stress and uncertainty, both of which are only added to the typical “normal” stressors that most professionals encounter in their jobs every day. The result? For the past two years, many of us have been surviving, but we haven’t necessarily been thriving.

So how do we move from surviving to thriving in this new, uncertain world? How do we manage burnout in our professional settings, lives, and homes, and learn to truly take care of ourselves in healthy ways? How do we develop a shared language to speak to our teammates and our bosses about how we feel and what we need to be healthy? 

The greatest power for our own happiness that we possess as human beings is the ability to change ourselves. Our brain’s capacity to tell stories, hear them, and believe them to change our perception of situations is remarkable. But it does take some work. Burnout obviously comes from many external sources, in addition to the internal sources that we are susceptible to because of our own working styles and preferences. That makes the “self” a great place to start addressing burnout. Once we’ve addressed the “self” we can then address “others” and how we communicate and ask for help.

In order to start this work, we will define burnout both collectively and individually. We’ll start the discussion in the science and end with the reality inside our own heads. We’ll work to name the emotions that accompany burnout, because naming something gives us power over it. And then we’ll craft a few stories about ourselves and burnout and see what happens when we change the scenery, change the characters, flip the script. 

Once we’ve identified what burnout looks like individually, we’ll work to identify the “self” in “self-care” through values exercises, a hierarchy of needs activity, and storytelling exercises. We’ll also discuss why typical recommended self-care strategies might not be working to ease burnout and how to fix that.

Self-care as it has been hyped in the media is about the self…but only focusing on the self can create an imbalance that can make burnout worse. Sometimes, by caring for yourself, you end up feeling (or even being) selfish, another negative emotion that creates a feedback loop that leads right back to burnout.

Consider an analogy for why self-care needs to be about more than the self. If we are a car, why do we change the oil?  It’s not for the sake of having clean, new oil. Oil isn’t something we see (if everything is working as it should). Do we change the oil to make our car last longer?  To protect the engine?  To save on gas? Yes, probably, but we do not do it for individual reasons, we do it for all of those reasons. In other words, the care is not an end in itself but for a greater purpose. Self-care has a purpose: to be the best version of ourselves in each of the contexts in which we operate: our best self, best mom, best dad, best partner, best teammate, best manager, best contributor. Taking care of ourselves isn’t necessarily just for us, it is for all of the facets of ourselves and our relationships. It is to be able to serve our higher goals - and the organizations we work for benefit from this. 

So, to really work, self-care strategies should be holistic, viewed as ever expanding concentric efforts containing the self (you), your family, your team, your organization. With this in mind, we’ll explore the importance of community, how to leverage work relationships, conversations, and interactions to ease burnout, and how to find meaning in your work. 

This workshop will be hands-on, interactive, and designed for rich discussion and shared understandings around the problems of burnout, stress, and self-care. 

By the end of the workshop, participants will be able to: 

  • Define what burnout is for them personally
  • Identify the emotions that accompany burnout and work stressors
  • Begin the process of crafting mental models and stories to help manage work stress
  • Identify values that contribute to burnout and ease it
  • Identify and discuss strategies to address burnout as a “whole person”
  • Explore ways of discussing burnout with supervisors and teammates 
  • Discuss ways of making the work we do more meaningful and fulfilling

Participants can expect interactive polling, collaborative document creation and collaboration, a few small games, and handouts and fillable worksheets, as well as the chance to build a network of like minded professionals from the session through rich conversation and sharing of experiences. 

Nov 15, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Eastern)
Field Guides - Talk-Abouts | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

A semi-facilitated walk along the lake on the International Gateway leading to Epcot and the Disney Boardwalk with OLC Accelerate colleagues for some casual networking and remarkable sights.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
OLC Cafe and Mercantile | Other | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - OLC Cafe and Mercantile

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Eastern)
Engagement Boulevard | Other | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - Engagement Boulevard

Looking for a place to meet others, try new technologies, relax, have fun, or engage in new models and pedagogies? If this is you, you'll want to be sure to stop by the Engagement Boulevard on your OLC Accelerate 2022 Conference journey. Open throughout the conference during regular Exhibit Hall hours, the Engagement Boulevard will be your main hub for interacting with this year's engagement team and their dynamic programming.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
10:00am - 10:45am (Eastern)
Field Guide Tour the Swan/Dolphin Resort | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

Join the OLC Accelerate Field Guides and other conference attendees for a tour of the Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort and Convention Center. There is no better way to explore this hotel and learn about conference layout than on a guided tour with the OLC Field Guides.

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Extended Abstract

           

Nov 15, 2022
11:15am - 11:45am (Eastern)
OLC Live! Behind the Scenes - Technology Test Kitchen | Other | Europe 8

In this OLC Live! interview, you will hear from the mad scientists in the Technology Test Kitchen. We will highlight an engaging way to broadcast and create videos with streaming tools. And we will also be testing the technology throughout the day!

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Extended Abstract

      

Nov 15, 2022
12:00pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Engagement Block Party and Light Lunch | Other | Northern Hemisphere C/D

Customize your order. The engagement block is structured around participants' needs and aspirations with digital learning explorations, technology innovation and creative expressions. Let our engagement crew members guide you through this pitstop of engagement opportunities that can ignite your ideas, recharge your batteries or give you a cool new set of wheels for your faculty development, student engagement or networking processes. Drive on through, slow down a while and let our crews guide your journey through cool improvements for your work.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
12:00pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
OLC Live! Variety Show | Other | Northern Hemisphere C/D

Come celebrate the vast talents of your OLC community at the Variety Show. This is sure to be exciting and fun entertainment!

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Eastern)
Exposition Foundry Challenge: Improvisational Design | Other | Americas Seminar

Industry partners are key stakeholders in and across the field of online, blended, and digital learning. Apart from bringing us new technologies, services, and other tools and resources, they offer us new insights through thought leadership. Join us for this year's Exposition Foundry Challenge as we test a willing group of industry partners on their improvisational design skills. You can either join a team for a chance to earn a prize or actively participate through key audience member roles.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
12:15pm - 12:35pm (Eastern)
An Introduction to Storytelling: 3 Models for Engaged Learning: An Express Workshop | Express Workshop | Northern Hemisphere A3/A4

Integrating storytelling into your pedagogical practices can be an impactful entry point and anchor for engagement. In this express workshop, you will have the opportunity to interact with three unique models for storytelling in digital learning environments. Those who attend will leave with foundational resources and strategies designed to support you as you weave story into your own practices.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
12:35pm - 12:55pm (Eastern)
Building Asynchronous Learning Environments: An Express Workshop | Express Workshop | Northern Hemisphere A3/A4

In designing quality asynchronous digital learning environments, we must move beyond efforts to directly translate from activities designed for synchronous learning. In this express workshop, we will explore a series of fully asynchronous models and will discuss effective practices for designing with the asynchronous in mind.

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Extended Abstract

          

Nov 15, 2022
12:55pm - 1:15pm (Eastern)
Strategies and Tips for Publishing: An Express Workshop | Express Workshop | Northern Hemisphere A3/A4

Are you working on a project you hope to publish or perhaps interested in learning from member's of OLC's Research Center staff and community about current publishing trends and practices? Join us for this express workshop where you can work directly with others to advance your scholarship and leave with practical publishing tips and strategies. Importantly, bring your ideas, drafts, and projects with you. In the spirit of the Engagement Block Party, this express workshop will by highly interactive and is designed like a writing workshop (where you workshop your ideas alongside others).

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Extended Abstract

          

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Transforming Math Pathways within a University Ecosystem Project Framework | Education Session | Asia 3

Many problems we face today in higher education involve interdependent structures, multiple stakeholders, and often stem from legacy systems that either are working together or are now left siloed. Such problems are wickedly challenging to untangle and require a systems thinking approach. We present an ecosystems framework that paved the way for Math Pathways transformation at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte.

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Extended Abstract

Surviving College Math

Successful completion of math gateway courses is essential to undergraduate students’ progress towards graduation. Common challenges in gateway courses include a lack of alignment to student interests and needs; the narrow focus on procedures and notations rather than practical application and examples; and the lack of personalization or remediation of lessons. An additional challenge is whether math courses in sequence are truly related to student success: for example, does a College Algebra prerequisite actually prepare students for statistics courses or does it merely lengthen time to degree?  All of these challenges have led to trends in high failure rates and equity gaps. In an effort to make math gateway courses more relevant and improve student success rates, the Math Pathways project at UNC Charlotte aims to expand options for students, enabling different paths through their math curriculum, depending on a students' course of study. 

Large Course Redesign Efforts

The Math Pathways project, by nature, is a large course redesign project. When the conversation of a course redesign project begins, a great deal of time is often allotted to course outcomes, student challenges, instructional strategies, and materials selection and faculty development. While much of this work is essential to designing and implementing courses, it is often limited to a course-by-course conversation and rarely transcends to the broader systemic conversation about curriculum pathways and all the support, technology, and human resources that influences course success. 

Ecosystems Framework

“A systems approach is the secret of successful practice” (Moore and Kearsley, 2012, p. 9) and systems thinking helps identify different levels of complexity. This type of thinking drove us to engage in systemic planning and draw an ecosystem framework to create a shared vision among leaders, administrators, and project stakeholders. 

In this presentation, attendees will be able to identify complex strategies involved in the systemic planning of the the Math Pathways project with an ecosystem framework: 

  1. Stakeholder Groups: Buy-In, Mindset, Ownership, and Cultural Change

  2. Project Pillars and Values

  3. Curriculum Pathways, Prerequisites, and Placement Requirements 

  4. Faculty Engagement and Professional Development   

  5. Course Redesign, Piloting, Scaling, and Evaluation

  6. Student Support and Engagement 

  7. Project Staffing and Resource Allocation  

Engagement Strategies

We will do two rounds of “Two-way Q&A,” once after the Large Course Redesign discussion and once after the Ecosystems discussion:

  1. We will ask questions of the attendees, focusing on major concepts where their expertise could inform our processes, such as: 

    • Provide Suggestions on How to Handle Different Faculty Personas & Stakeholder Personas 

    • Suggested Feedback, Improvements, and Considerations

  2. Attendees will be prompted to ask us questions about our project, processes, and approach. 

Our experience is that Accelerate attendees have a lot to contribute to one another’s work in this kind of format.  We will also explicitly offer attendees follow-up opportunities for networking or to learn more about how to get involved in this kind of work at their home institutions

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Roadmap to Authentic Assessment: A Proactive Approach to Academic Integrity in Quality Online Learning | Workshop | Northern Hemisphere A1/A2

Come join us in our exploration of authentic assessment in online learning.  We will share a variety of examples in various formats. This interactive workshop will use role-playing and scenarios to make the case authentic assessment provides accurate evidence of student learning and is a more equitable, student-centered strategy.

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Extended Abstract

Topic 

Authentic Assessment, a term first coined in 1989  by Grant Wiggins, requires learners to demonstrate their understanding, using higher-order thinking and complex problem-solving skills. An authentic assessment differs from a more traditional notion of a “test” in that students are directed to demonstrate their learning through a finished product of their creation. Authentic assessment is realistic, requires judgment and innovation on the part of the learner who is asked to “do the subject, and often replicates or simulates the contexts in which adults are “tested” in the workplace, in civic life and in personal life.  

Authentic assessment can be further understood as more process-focused than traditional “tests” or “exams,” assessing the learner’s ability to efficiently and effectively use a repertoire of knowledge and skill to negotiate a complex task and allowing for appropriate opportunities to rehearse, practice, consult resources, and get feedback on and refine their performance/product (Wiggins, 1993).

Why relevant or important to the community

Authentic assessment is not a new concept,  K - 12 educators have implemented forms of authentic assessments throughout their careers, but higher education has not seen wide adoption of the practice until more recently. The COVID-19 pandemic forced higher education administrators and faculty to address the proctoring problem. Out of the trauma and uncertainty brought on by the pandemic came opportunity. Our higher education institutions understand that each student is unique and has a personal perspective. They also understand that these unique students have various individualized learning needs. Authentic assessment meets many of those needs. 

Traditional assessment based on selected-response test questions rarely assesses the application of gained knowledge from the course. The traditional exam does not contribute to the classroom community as students are not able to share their unique perspectives and skills to demonstrate their knowledge in a real way.  Furthermore, the setting in which these traditional exams take place is rarely conducive to the human condition. Neurodivergent students, for example, find great difficulty in the traditional testing format as it requires laser focus and, when using monitoring proctoring software, little to no ability to move around. 

We make the case that authentic assessments potentially provide more accurate evidence of student learning than the more traditional exam. In our exploration, we will share performance assessments, essays, and reflections on portfolios as potential alternatives to the traditional exam format. Authentic assessment provides more equitable approaches to assessment and course design allowing multiple means of expression (CAST UDL, 2018) to empower students to share their personal experiences while demonstrating the skills and knowledge acquired throughout the semester. Because authentic assessment is baked into the learning from the outset, it provides a more aligned set of learning experiences, scaffolded throughout the course. This also provides opportunities for faculty to meet the Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI) guidelines for online learning.  Such intentional design circumvents cheating and motivates students to invest in the work, empowering them with the agency to make decisions about their learning. 

Plan for interactivity

In this session, the speakers will present a brief overview of authentic assessment, defining and providing examples. The speakers will emphasize the importance of rubrics for evaluating student work and lead a discussion about the efficacy of authentic assessment in online learning, citing current and salient research (Barkatsas, et al., 2021; Fook, 2010; Gonzalez, 2014). Rubrics will factor into the discussion. (15 minutes)

The bulk of the workshop time will be spent in small group activities and whole group discussions/report backs. Using scenarios, role-playing, and sample assessments, the speakers will provide participants the opportunity to contrast authentic assessment to traditional forms, transform a traditional assessment into a more authentic assessment, and make the case for authentic assessment to various stakeholders such as administrators, faculty, students, and design thinkers.

Participants will have an opportunity to transform a current more traditional assessment into an authentic assessment. (60 minutes) 

Here are two sample activities that we will facilitate during the workshop: 

Sample Activity #1: Crowdsourced appropriate criteria for a rubric

We will present a sample authentic assessment and crowdsource criteria for the rubric.

Sample Activity #2: Scenario -- The Ambivalent Math Professor

You are working with a math professor to update a 100-level math course. The professor is open to ideas about how to make the course more engaging for the students; however, the professor does not believe that authentic assessment is something that can happen in a math class. You are the assigned ID. What strategies might you use to get this math faculty on board with authentic assessment?

Two Players: ID and ambivalent math professor

Time: five minutes

Conclusion

At the end of the workshop, participants will come away with a better understanding of authentic assessment and a toolkit of resources to help make the case for, create, and evaluate authentic assessments. (15 minutes debrief and close)

Key takeaways:

  1. Interpret and describe individual learner needs and apply principles of UDL to authentic assessment.

  2. Identify key markers of an authentic assessment and apply.

  3. Evaluate the differences between authentic assessments and traditional assessments 

  4. A toolkit of resources to use when creating  and evaluating authentic assessments

We will work through key questions together such as:

  •  Which assessments need to be proctored and which don’t? Why or why not? 

  • How do I develop student-centered assessments that address student privacy concerns in quality online learning?

  • How can I encourage Academic Integrity in virtual environments?

  • How can I avoid unconscious bias and build equity into my assessment design?

  • What other ways are there to assess student learning, verify student identity, and ensure academic integrity in online learning instead of proctored environments?

References

Barkatsas, T., & McLaughlin, P. (2021). Authentic Assessment and Evaluation Approaches and Practices in a Digital Era A Kaleidoscope of Perspectives (Vol. 5). Koninklijke Brill NV.

CAST UDL. (2018). [Educational]. Universal Design for Learning Guides. http://udlguidelines.cast.org

Fook. (2010). Authentic Assessment and Pedagogical Strategies in Higher Education. Journal of Social Sciences, 6(2), 153–161. https://doi.org/10.3844/jssp.2010.153.161

Gonzalez, J. Holistic, Analytic, and Single-Point Rubrics. The Cult of Pedagogy. Retrieved August 16, 2020 from  https://www.cultofpedagogy.com/holistic-analytic-single-point-rubrics/

Wiggins, G. (1993). Assessing Student Performance. Jossey-Bass Publishers.

 
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Aligning values - An Industry Partner's Role in Supporting Institutional Priorities | Industry Showcase - Presentation | Oceanic 7

In this session, presenters from a leading community college and a regional public research university will share their firsthand experience with an Online Program Experience (OPX) partner and the particular steps they have taken in shaping the elements of their collaboration to fit institutional needs and culture.

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Extended Abstract

With the continued growth and interest in the online learning space, an increasing number of higher education leaders are considering working with Online Program Experience (OPX) partners. In a crowded, ever-evolving and fast-paced online learning space, we need to focus on vision, goals, and relationships for our institutions to partner effectively with an OPX. Regardless of institutional mission, size, geographical locale and target student population, we share certain challenges as well as success strategies to achieve maximal value from a collaboration with a partner providing online support services.

  1. In each case presented here, we have discovered shared commitments to (a) access and affordability (b) quality (c) faculty development (d) scholarship and (e) assessment.
  2. In this collaborative session, presenters from a leading community college and a regional public research university will share their firsthand experience with an OPX partner and the particular steps they have taken in shaping the elements of their partnership to fit institutional needs and culture.
  3. We shall explore the roles of institutional support (centers for teaching and learning, academic affairs leadership, budget, staffing, faculty governance, and IT services) with the necessary parameters of a productive, cost-effective, efficient working relationship with an OPX.
  4. The principles discussed will be applicable to academics working in a variety of institutional contexts as well as companies looking to further engage with a variety of educational institutions.
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Scalable Faculty Development to Support Successful Transition of Institutional Learning Management System | Education Session | Southern Hemisphere II

Learn about a 3-week transition academy with partnerships model that has been shown to successfully equip faculty to transition to a new LMS as well as highlight quality course design standards and development best practices. See samples and ideas shared that you can implement immediately at your institution! 

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Extended Abstract

Supporting faculty in their teaching with the institutional learning management system (LMS) is essential for any quality online program. As institutions periodically review their technology systems, a transition to a new LMS may be needed, at which time broader considerations for supporting faculty through a transition phase may be required. Specifically in the instance where an institution has had the same LMS previously for many years, a transition to a new LMS platform may be particularly challenging.  

After completing a comprehensive learning management system (LMS) review in summer 2021, this large public research institution chose to remain with its current LMS but to proceed in upgrading to the latest experience, a radically different user experience for faculty from the legacy experience that many of the faculty at the institution have taught with for many years. The institution’s teaching and learning center, after having gathered input from institutional leadership as well as faculty advisory and governance groups, collaborated with the division of IT to develop a coordinated plan for transitioning to the new user experience of the LMS.  

Transition Academy 

The core element of this plan was a transition academy for faculty consisting of four components: 

  • Three-week online course on how to use the LMS and best practices for creating an intuitive and user-friendly experience for students 
  • Ongoing consultation with a dedicated "LMS Ambassador"; either a member of the teaching and learning center or a faculty member with experience designing and teaching courses in the new LMS.
  • Commitment to teach using the new LMS in the next semester
  • Membership in the ongoing Teaching with LMS Community at the institution (via Microsoft Teams) 

Faculty who complete the online course, commit to teaching the next semester in the new LMS experience, and make significant progress in developing their course in the new user experience will receive a stipend. 

LMS Faculty Ambassadors

Faculty who are experienced with teaching in the new LMS experience were invited to become an LMS Ambassador, which consists of the following: 

  • Attend an Ambassador kickoff session (virtual, recorded) 
  • Participate in the three-week online course as a mentor 
  • Serve as a partner to 1-2 faculty members through a few in-person or virtual meetings (at the discretion of the Ambassador and your partner) and email exchanges 
  • Record a 3-5 minute course tour video to share they have taught with the new LMS experience 
  • Membership in the ongoing Teaching with LMS Community (via Microsoft Teams) 

Faculty who serve as an LMS Ambassador can expect to spend 2-3 hours a week as a partner during the 3-weeks of the Academy.  

During this session, learn about this 3-week transition academy with partnerships model that has been shown to successfully equip faculty to transition to a new LMS as well as highlight quality course design standards and development best practices. See samples and ideas shared that you can implement immediately at your institution! We plan on a series of quick audience contribution activities during this session to share experience with an LMS transition, including: 

  • What LMS they use and may/will/have transition(ed) from 
  • Pearls of wisdom or things they wish they would have known 
  • Effective practices in transition and what was impactful 
  • Whether and how incentives impacted adoption/transition 

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Is Anyone Watching? Using Analytics to Inform Course Design | Education Session | Europe 2

Many of us create personalized videos and use module overviews and wrap-ups in our courses. However, are students even viewing them? If not, how can we increase these views? In this session, we will discuss how to use analytics to determine how and where to share these resources.

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Extended Abstract

Instructors and instructional designers are often seeking to humanize and personalize the online course environment through lots of instructor presence and customized course videos. While these multimedia assets are often time-consuming and labor-intensive, they are created with the goal of increasing student engagement and sense of community in the course.

It is also a common design best practice to provide module overviews and wrap-ups in online courses to introduce the module topics and objectives and then to summarize and conclude the module at the end. Another recommended best practice is to follow a similar format across courses in a program so students are familiar with the design and can focus on the content. However, is this consistency leading to complacency?

While working with a faculty member on an initiative to increase the instructor presence in the online classroom, we looked at ways to create more placeholders and opportunities for instructors to create and share their own personalized videos within the structure of the course design template. There were already some videos that existed in the course template on the module overview pages and other pages throughout the course, so we began by investigating the analytics of those video and page views. The results were surprising – student views of the module overview and module wrap-up pages had dropped substantially over the course of the 9 weeks of the term. Even fewer of those students were viewing the videos within the pages. While these initial data points were disappointing, we used them as an opportunity for change. Clearly, the design answer was not MORE videos, but instead more strategically placed videos as well as ensuring the video content was relevant and customized.

In our first pilot, we removed the standard module overview videos and added an “Instructor’s Corner” placeholder for the instructor to add his or her own customized videos specific to that course and that term. We also reduced the number of videos shared on other pages to emphasize the importance of these videos and the value in viewing them. However, the results of this pilot still were not as desired. The major challenge was still encouraging students to view the overview page itself where the videos were held.

In the second round of the pilot, we set up module pre-requisites where students could not view the module content until the module overview page was at least viewed. While this did not require students to view the instructor-created video on the page, it still required them to open and view the page. The results from this pilot were very encouraging. There was a dramatic increase in the number of video views by students, thus increasing their engagement with the instructor in the course content.

In this session, we will cover the process of this pilot, as well as the rationale behind it and the analytics utilized throughout to help drive the design decisions made. We will also discuss and address the research-based best practices around instructor-created videos to ensure students are receiving quality content. Finally, we will discuss how instructional designers can and should use data and analytics as part of design discussions with course developers to ensure informed design decisions are made.

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss how to use analytics to inform course design.
  • Explain research-based best practices for instructor-created videos.

In addition to the presenter-led presentation component of this session, there will also be audience interaction and participation through small group discussion and the use of Padlet or a related tool to organize participant thoughts and ideas.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Online Teaching Framework: Implementing a Scalable Online Quality Framework in the Midst of Change | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 2

Dallas College responded to change (with remote learning, organizational restructuring, federal guidelines for distance education, and evolving technologies) by developing its standard for online quality, the Online Teaching Framework. Learn about its adoption and engagement strategies for 70K students, 3K faculty, and 20K courses.

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Extended Abstract

Follow how Dallas College responded to enormous, intersecting changes (with the pandemic and remote learning, organizational consolidation and restructuring, the new federal guidelines for distance education, and with evolving educational technologies) by developing its own standard for online quality, the Online Teaching Framework. Learn about its processes for stakeholder input, resource development, and for iterative refinement as well as its adoption and engagement strategies for 70K students, 3K faculty, and 20K courses. Share Dallas College’s journey and its resources to discover ideas for systematic, transformation opportunities in online learning in the face of change.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Student Engagement through Facebook and Youtube | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 6

A popular adage is "Learning is everywhere;" however, Click-Link-Connect educational programs still struggle with student social connection. Educational programs need continious annual imrovement to improve remote educational experiences. Social media networks can promote learner engagement in a remote setting.  The purpose of this paper is to theoretically demonstrate how a summer program in BELL, or Building Educators for Better Life, was used as a model to redesign a pre-exisiting program that can improve student engagement with technology while maintaining the core goals of the organization. This paper addresses instructional practices that need improvement, how the addition of social media networks can facilitate this while promoting student engagement in a remote environment. The utilization of social media networks as educational tools reveals the flexible nature of scaffolding online learning while mitigating skepticism toward it.

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Extended Abstract

Hostility toward remote learning will never disappear as parents, teachers, and politicians seem to not meet halfway to address everyone’s needs. Given the current COVID-19 health crisis, public schools are continuously faced with difficult dilemmas.  Social media networks can promote learner engagement in a remote setting. BELL, or Building Educators for Better Life, is used as a theoretical model to demonstrate how programs can incorporate social media networks to enhance student learning. This paper addresses BELL program's instructional practices that need improvement and how the addition of social media networks can facilitate this while promoting student engagement. The BELL program’s goal is to be cost-effective and educationally productive, which can be achieved through the addition of social media networks such as Facebook and Youtube.  Facebook and Youtube both provide opoporunties for students to engage in asynchronous discussion forums, while incorporating videos. Rather than simply having students posting comments at each other, they can watch videos along with their comments. The traditional course management system like Blackboard is not a social environment that students associate with a community. Most college students associate social media with an online community. If this is true, then why not take what students ubiquitously use to communicate but change the context. Previous studies have demonstrated how established programs can change in order to address student engagement and technology usage.

     

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Student Success: Voices and Barriers to Online Learning | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 7

The purpose of the study was to identify the barriers and strategies leading to success by returning adults that are non-traditional learners enrolled in online programs. The research team was committed to embracing organic student voices and applying their insight and experiences to guide responsive instructional practices.  

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Extended Abstract

 This research focused on undergraduate, returning adults in online programs. The purpose of the study was to identify the barriers and strategies leading to success by returning adults that are non-traditional learners enrolled in online programs. The intent of this research to was to embracing organic student voices and apply their insight and experiences to guide responsive instructional practices.     

 

The primary research survey was adapted from Muilenburg and Berge (2005) and their work on determining the student barriers of online learning. The current study used a convenience sample with a 15-question survey emailed by the program directors to students each of their programs that met the eligibility criteria of either being currently enrolled in courses or were inactive status in the program. The survey sought to identify and describe the barriers faced in online education. 

 

A total of 205 students completed the survey.   Results of those surveys found that 97% of the returning adults primarily used laptops to complete coursework, 88% reported strong confidence with learning technologies, 70% shared they learned well online versus the traditional classroom, 84% completed up to 29 credits, and 60% have never dropped a class. In addition to the demographic questions, a thematic analysis was completed and found that students rated the following as barriers to their online learning: 1) Quality Instruction 2) Organization/Preparation and Time-Management 3) Technology-Learning Software 4) Communication/Instructor Presence and 5) Relationships.

 

The information that was gathered from those surveys were then taken a step further.  The program directors reached out to successful seniors (based on a GPA of 3.5 or higher) to get insight on challenges experienced and recommendations for instructors. A total of 28 students shared what they felt a quality online course/instructor looked like.  Again, a thematic analysis was completed, and students shared that communication with instructors is the most important piece of a quality instructor.  In addition, they reported having courses that are easy to navigate with consistent formats was important, as well as clear expectations on due dates, rubrics, and assignments.  Students reported higher quality when they were enrolled in courses in which instructors provided video lectures clarifying main points and summarizing text chapters in addition to having a combination of readings, videos, and activities.  Availability of instructor and approachability of instructor were also discussed.  From the information that was gathered from these students, a tip sheet was created for all online instructors to use as a guide when creating and teaching their online courses.

 

  In addition to asking the seniors who had a GPA of 3.5 or higher what they deemed as a quality course/instructor, we also asked them to provide feedback/tips on what they have done to be successful in online courses.  Students reported that having time set aside to work on courses was essential.  In addition, having each week planned out with due dates listed help to keep them on track.  Students also reported that making sure that you keep up with course material is essential.  Keeping old course material was also mentioned as a strategy as students were able to go back and check old coursework to help them to relate it to the new material.  These tips were then all put together in a single PDF were distributed to all online students in the university, not just the three programs.  However, the researchers of this study, took those tip sheets and incorporated them into the introduction course.  Incoming students who were enrolled in the introduction course were asked to reflect on these tips during week 3 of the semester and choose 2 that they were going to use throughout the semester.  In the final weeks of the course, students were asked to report how using those strategies worked for them.  In addition, they were asked to provide any additional strategies that they found to be helpful that were not mentioned on the tip sheet.  Students reported that asking questions to their instructor when they were not sure of expectations helped them to navigate their first online semester. In addition, they talked about how important it was for them to feel like they were part of a community with both the other students and the instructors.  New students also mentioned that having some training in the online management system that is used by the university prior to them starting classes helped them to navigate all of their courses.  Finally, they reiterated how important time management is for online students. 

 

The conclusions from this research highlight the following:  returning adults appear to enjoy online courses as they fit the complexity of their lives, learn well online, engage with the learning platform, and report in-depth experiences. The challenges faced are maintaining quality instruction, providing guidance for the organization and time management of students, adapting to ever-changing technology, and learning software, establishing instructor presence, building relationships/community, and communicating effectively with instructors and classmates.

 

Level of Participation

This session will be structured so that attendees of the conference can come up and hear a brief overview of the study.  The intention of this session is to have one-one one conversations with attendees about not only what this study found but what they have done in their own online courses to help students be successful. 

 

Session Goals          

The goal of this session is that attendees can not only discuss best practices for online teaching but also to take away the strategies that successful online students have shared and be able to take those back to their own colleges and universities and implement online training for all online teachers.  In addition, being able to learn what students find to be helpful in terms of their own success and share those strategies with their own students. 

References

Muilenburg, L. N and Berge J. L. (2005) Student barriers to online learning: A factor analytic study. Distance Education, (1), 29-48.

 

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Ten Years Later: Lessons Learned about Crisis Management and Instructional Technology | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 8

All higher education institutions are susceptible to crisis situations and research shows institutions tend to be more reactive than proactive in crisis situations. In this session, learn about ways to utilize the instructional technology you have to prepare you for the next crisis event. 

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Extended Abstract

Higher education institutions are increasingly susceptible to crisis events, as seen by the COVID-19 pandemic. Research shows institutions tend to be more reactive than proactive in crisis situations. However, using the Crisis Management Cycle can help institutions prepare for any crisis situation. This cycle consists of five phases: planning, prevention, response, recover, and learning. The planning phase consists of planning for possible crisis events and notifying staff of proper procedure. The next step is prevention, when institutions work to avoid crisis stimuli. The third step is response. In this phase, a crisis has happened and the institution has activated the crisis management plan. The fourth step is recovery, in which institutions provide opportunities for healing, and turn their focus to restoring normal operations. The fifth phase is learning. This is a time for reflection on successes and failures of the response and can help revise protocols and update existing plans. Nationwide, institutions across the United States are reflecting on their practices during COVID-19 pandemic and are looking for ways to increase their response for the next crisis. 

Over the last ten years, one higher education institution has implemented its campus wide crisis management plan twice. Once for a natural disaster and once for the COVID-19 pandemic. What does the crisis management cycle look like, you may ask? Come join us as we dive into a case study using a large higher education institution and their application of this cycle, and how the response was increased from one crisis to another using existing instructional technology. 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Top 20 Inclusive Classroom Strategies | Education Session | Europe 1

Join us as we explore inclusive classrooms and share our Top 20 strategies that we use to create classroom inclusivity for our on-campus and online students. We will give you the strategies and tools you need to create your own inclusive classroom during this session, including an inclusive classroom checklist. 

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Extended Abstract

An inclusive classroom refers to the climate and environment of the classroom where all students feel supported academically and intellectually. But did you know that creating an inclusive classroom does NOT require significant changes or time-consuming course redesigns? You can create a space where students and faculty have a sense of belonging in the classroom regardless of identity, learning preferences, or education by being more intentional about your classroom teaching techniques, topics, readings, and assessments. 

Are you wondering how to get started creating an inclusive classroom? Or maybe you want to level up and create a more inclusive classroom? If you answered yes to any of the above questions or are just curious and want to learn more, please join us!   

In this session, we will discuss inclusive classrooms and why the climate and environment of the classroom lay a foundation where ALL students feel supported academically and intellectually. We will share multiple examples of inclusive classroom strategies and highlight our top twenty inclusive classroom examples to help you create your inclusive classroom foundation. Finally, we will give you the tools to develop your inclusive classroom strategy plan by sharing a checklist and a little guidance from us and the audience.  

Throughout the session, there will be opportunities for participants to share their inclusive practices and strategies through interactive polling and discussion. Content and the checklist from the session are based on “The Guide for Inclusive Teaching at Columbia,” Appert, L., Jungels, A., Bean, C., Klaf, S., Irvin, A., & Phillipson, M. (2018). Guide for Inclusive Teaching at Columbia. Columbia Centre for Teaching and Learning.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Animal Behavior- A Living Science Experiment in a Lab Kit! | Industry Showcase - Demonstration | Oceanic 5

Join Carolina Distance Learning to complete one of our remote hands-on labs for students that uses living organisms. We will observe and identify isopod behavior based on movement and analyze the effects of humidity on isopod orientation.

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Extended Abstract

Why use a hands-on approach with a lab kit? Research shows that students who only view experiments (rather than engaging in them) perform worse on conceptual knowledge exams than those who participate in physical or virtual labs (Zacharia and Olympiou, 2011). An online or hybrid course with hands-on experiments, created following carefully designed learning outcomes with safety and rigor in mind, make a very engaging learning experience for online lab science students.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
The Evolution Of Micro-blogging Over Time And Its impact On Student Learning And Engagement In Higher Education | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 10

Active learning and engagement are contributors to students’ success. We followed the use and evolution of micro-blogging over time. We will share our findings regarding how it affected student engagement and success through active learning and assessment. Attendees will be encouraged to share their knowledge and experiences.

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Extended Abstract

With the steady adoption of micro-blogging and other social media for teaching and learning in higher education, the need to better understand its impact on the success of student learning outcomes increases. In online courses, opportunities for students to interact with class members and content are important to support presence and engagement and facilitate the development of knowledge. These opportunities ought to be thoughtfully designed and integrated into learning experiences. To do this, an understanding of the tools used is needed. 

Over the course of several years, we have explored the use of micro-blogging in higher education to gain an understanding of its potential use and impact on student learning. An area of focus has been on student perceptions of using micro-blogging for learning and assessment. Insight into students’ experiences has allowed us to identify both benefits and challenges that have influenced learning design decisions. We will share our findings with attendees and, acknowledging our insight is not exhaustive, we aim to explore the use of micro-blogging with participants though discussion. 

With this new knowledge in hand, attendees will be encouraged to begin creating a learning design that incorporates micro-blogging in a meaningful way for their students. Taking time to discuss some of these designs, we hope attendees come away with a few preliminarily ideas they can refine for their specific uses. 

Level of Participation:
The session begins with an introduction to micro-blogging and its evolution over the past decade or so. Having polled attendees to ascertain their level of knowledge and use of micro-blogging, we will share what we have learned about micro-blogging through our exploratory research in higher education. Approaches to using micro-blogging for assessment of learning will be discussed. Attendees will be invited to share their knowledge of and experience with micro-blogging using an online post-it type tool, on their personal devices.  Attendees are encouraged to share and discuss their ideas for incorporation of micro-blogging in their course.

Session Goals:
Participants will be able to discuss the uses of micro-blogging to increase student engagement and learning in higher education. They will be able to examine the usefulness of micro-blogging as an instructional method in higher education. Additionally, participants will be able to begin crafting the learning design of a course that uses micro-blogging for student engagement and assessment.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Tutoring with Technology: Say Goodbye to Pen and Paper | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 12

College students use their cell phones for everything.  As faculty members have long utilized a variety of teaching and learning strategies which traditionally have been demonstrated through visual examples on a white board or by pen and paper….until now.  The innovative use of iPad technology with the Notability App has effectively reinforced the student learning process for students at the post-secondary level.

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Extended Abstract

This presentation will demonstrate the innovative use of iPad technology together with the Notability App to make tutoring sessions more visual, interactive and malleable for students.  Notability is a note-taking app that allows users to download Power Points or other faculty provided media/resources and overlay notes, drawings, graphs, formulas, and other visual aides to enhance student understanding.  As educators, we are constantly changing our approach to teaching to match the learning styles of our students and the use of Notability embraces their love of technology (phones, iPads, laptops) to expand deeper into topics, allowing for immediate online access and upload for review.  Participants will be offered a hands-on experience with the app at the end of the presentation.

Learning Goal: Participants will learn how Notability can be easily used to reinforce student learning in a tutoring environment.
Plan:  We will demonstrate the functions of Notability through a projection of the app and a step by step instruction.

Learning Goal: Participants will see how the technology is used in different teaching/tutoring sessions with Deaf/hoh students.
Plan:  video clips of tutoring sessions using Zoom and the Notability app on the iPad.

Learning Goal: Participants will experience how easy the app is to use with different kinds of problem solving.
Plan: Participants will have a hands on opportunity to experiment with the app with predetermined problems & handouts.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
The Engaged Online Educator and Student – A Framework for Efficiency, Predictability and Engagement in Wholly Online Part-Time Master’s Program | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 9

Attendees will learn the key aspects of the two course in one model – a framework developed for interleaving multiple courses in a program.  We will focus on the engagement strategies including cases, guest speakers and critical success factors for connecting with students across disciplines with varied skillsets in a wholly online, but largely synchronous environment.

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Extended Abstract

In 2016, the first cohort was welcomed into the MS-Digital Innovation in Marketing program - a wholly online, part-time program for graduate students. The goal of the program was to “provide the skills and understanding to apply digital technologies in today’s complex marketing environment. Graduates will learn how to integrate marketing strategy with the corporate digital infrastructure and maximize the impact on the business strategy.”  When designing the program, the coordinators decided to implement as much synchronous engagement as possible into the design.  According to previous research (Swan, 2001, Wilson & Allen, 2011) and the Community of Inquiry model (Garrison, Anderson & Archer - 1999) it was clear that students and faculty benefit when there is a focus on real-time engagement and interaction with students and their faculty and peers.  A decision was made that rather than provide students with asynchronous content to be digested individually, the program instead focused on professor-student and student-student engagement and content integration.  To enable this engagement and integration, students enrolled in two paired complementary but separate courses each semester.  If offered separately and asynchronously, it would be left to the students to make the connection between the courses, so our school devised an approach to connect and integrate the content in each individual course and thereby generate deeper engagement over content than is typical in most asynchronous online programs.  The approach was developed with three overarching themes, to which the delivery must adhere: consistency, predictability and efficiency.  These themes formed the basis for the framework of delivery and the model by which each pair of courses was designed and delivered. 

The program is focused on the intersection of Marketing and Technology to provide students with an education that dives deep into Digital Marketing and the technology that supports the Marketing function.  Marketing and Technology are often vastly different skillsets and so within this program, the faculty set out to develop a way in which the connections between the two disciplines could be developed across students enrolled in a part time program, juggling multiple commitments.  The faculty developed the two course in one model, whereby two distinct courses are taught by two individual faculty members, but through the design of the course and the focus on efficiency, predictability and engagement, students are able to blend the two concepts together to view the disparate subjects as part of the larger industry.

In this model, students are scheduled for two 3.0 credit courses each semester.  Each course has a separate professor and separate requirements; however, the course schedule is designed so that the content delivery is interwoven. Both courses meet on a repeating fixed schedule each term via an online conferencing tool (in our case, Wednesday and Sunday evenings).  This predictability enables the students to schedule “life” around the meeting times.  In the first-class meeting, both professors join the class and review the syllabus and other administrative details.  The professors also provide the introduction of their respective subjects while referencing the interrelation with the other course’s content.  After the first week, the course schedules are intertwined so that the students meet with one professor for two weeks and then the other professor for two weeks, alternating this pattern until the last class of the semester.   Each semester culminates in a final group project presentation which integrates the content across the two courses (see more below).  In the last class, each team presents their results to both professors, who evaluate the deliverables based on their course materials.  Note that each professor designs their course independently, significantly reducing the coordination and overhead involved compared to other approaches. For instance, co-teaching a course can be very rewarding but requires detailed coordination among the instructors.

After the implementation of the two course in one model, the participating students were surveyed over multiple semesters.  Students were asked to rate multiple aspects of the two course in one model and how they perceived its efficacy on a Strongly Agree to Strongly Disagree scale.  84% of respondents indicated that they either strongly agreed or agreed that scheduling the two courses in blocks was an effective and more efficient way of learning than taking two courses separately.  73% of students indicated they learned more from taking two courses together, rather than if they had taken the courses independently.  In the same survey, students are also asked an open-ended question – “List three things that are working well.”  Respondents consistently reflect and remark positively on the two course in one model, one student noting: “The two course in one model is highly efficient and a great way to learn for motivated students.”  Other anecdotal feedback from students indicates that they truly valued “a predictable and consistent schedule followed by the program” and “alternating classes that tie into each other throughout the course and culminating in a group project was very successful.”

Upon completion of the overview of the framework, we will provide a specific example of the two course in one model. We will showcase the In Class Activities that are designed to make the connection between the courses and also work through a case study with the attendees that was designed for and is delivered in both the Marketing and the Technology course.  Finally, we will highlight the areas of engagement between both classes for the professors, students and guest speakers.  We will also discuss the technology (Zoom, WordPress) used to deliver the connected, engaged experience of the two course in one model.  

It is worth noting that the professors submitting this proposal are two of the faculty that have designed and implemented the model in the program and have been delivering these classes as a "pair" for six years.  

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Benefits and Challenges of Collaborative Learning in Asynchronous Online Course | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere E1/E2

Evidence demonstrates improved educational outcomes when students engage with each other in the educational process (collaborative learning). While asynchronous learning makes this challenging, it does not rule out the possibility. In this session, we review the benefits and perils of online team-based activities, offer measurable learning outcomes, and share student insights. 

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Extended Abstract

Creating significant team learning experiences online can seem daunting, even for experienced instructors. However, implementing meaningful team projects online takes planning and attention to detail. Is it worth the trouble? 

Much evidence has been produced demonstrating improved short- and long- term educational outcomes when students are engaged in the educational process, and particularly when they are engaged with each other (usually referred to as collaborative learning). Collaborative learning has frequently been suggested as a way of helping disadvantaged students bridge the achievement gap as all of the usual advantages of active and collaborative learning (its more hands-on nature, focus on problem solving and critical thinking, etc.) are seen as particularly important to this group.  While asynchronous learning may make collaborative learning more challenging, it does not rule out the possibility. 

Join the lively team interaction of two seasoned online instructors who thrive on teamwork as they develop their team-based online activities and collaborate on delivery. In this session, they will review the benefits and perils of online team-based activities, offer reliable measurable learning outcomes, and share insights from their students. 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Why Race is Hard to Talk about? Insight & Strategies from Psychology | Workshop | Oceanic 4

There is currently intense debate around topics of race and racism. University administrators and leadership are concerned about the risk of tension around these charged social issues surfacing and causing division and conflict among their students. At the same time, they may be reluctant to engage in the conversations needed for healing because of the concerns about being viewed negatively. In this interactive discussion, we will identify the psychological forces responsible for inaction, and conclude with recommended strategies to better foster belonging and support students’ needs at critical junctures during their college enrollment. 

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Extended Abstract

Communication breaks down when assumptions about intentions and beliefs color the way that we hear and understand others. In this social-media and mis-information driven world, where social injustices and blatant inequities inform our understanding of the balance of equity are clear and consantly in our face, we must nonetheless understand when, and how, to engage in difficult conversations about race, racism, and equity in this country. More and more, students are demanding that they be heard, and yet faculty, administrations, and institutions may not always know how to do so effectively. In this presentation, we uncover the core forces responsible for our perceptions of social justice issues, while rooting the discussion in research from pscyhology to help us understand the underlying motivations and strategies for being able to engage in meaningful and productive conversatinos about race and racism. Participants should come prepared to share examples from their own work, and be willing to engage in an authentic conversation--willing to listen and contribute with equal respect. 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
60 Second Videos to Pique Students Interest | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere E3

It's no secret that students spend more time focused on social media than in the classroom. Join me in learning how to effectively teach on social media. Grasp the student's attention with a thought-provoking but simplistic approach for even the hardest of subjects. 

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Extended Abstract

60-second videos to pique your student's interest: COVID-19 forced all educators to reexamine practices that have been widely used within the past decade or more. This challenged us to innovate a new design in learning and retainment of knowledge. Specifically, students continuing to learn as if they were face-to-face would not translate completely to the online forum. As an educator working in higher education during the pandemic, I saw a lack of interest, participation, and passion for being present in the virtual classroom setting. To combat these difficult situations, I started teaching on social media, specifically through TikTok. Integrating bite-size objectives that are explained in 30-60 second videos became a new tool to keep my students focused and excited about the material. Instead of simply meeting twice a week via Zoom, students now have the option of looking into the videos that are posted on my page to enhance their retainment of the material. Accounting is a hard subject in general so transitioning online was not an easy feat for any of my students. While TikTok is not used for specifically teaching, it does have the capability to capture exciting moments in time, i.e., accounting knowledge.

Well, why TikTok? I found that about 95% of my students knew of it, had it downloaded, and used it regularly. This is an app that has the capability of taking the average student's attention for hours on end for aimless scrolling. My thought process then led me to believe that if my students are going to give up valuable time to scroll through videos, why not create videos where they can actually learn. I'm sure you're thinking, why not just use micro-lectures? Most micro-lectures tend to be 5-7 minutes in length which while it might seem that the time limit is extremely short, it is not short enough to hold the attention span of the average Gen Z student. This new type of condensed video prompts students to want to keep watching more since they are so short and straight to the point.  How is possible to make a video on objectives that take hours to talk about in a simple 30-second video? While I teach Accounting and it includes some difficult objectives, I have found that separating large objectives into smaller ones, allows students to grasp the concept better. For example, if I am talking about assets, this is a large topic to present, however, I have broken it down into, current assets, cash, accounts receivable, equipment, inventory, etc. For Math, a professor could simply do one part of the problem at a time making multiple parts or videos covering one topic. The idea is to stay within the 30-60 second time frame to give the most of the attention span from your student.  My plan is to challenge educators and design thinkers to write down one objective that is learned in their classroom or professional job. This one objective is key as it can be condensed down to even smaller objectives. I will then encourage the attendees to then break down that objective into at least three more segments while giving them an example of how accounting can be condensed. Using the tool of finding the roots of the objectives is key to keeping within the 30-60 second time frame. Additionally, the learning objectives for the attendees are as follows: LO 1: The attendees will break down objectives to their simplistic form. LO 2: The attendees will learn the basic elements of TikTok. LO 3: The attendees will realize the significance of transitioning to a social media platform as an additional resource for learning. LO 4: The attendees will understand the tools needed to create an effective TikTok video.
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
A Straight Line to Student Perception of Instruction: Challenges to Capturing the Student Voice | Education Session | Asia 5

This session presents UCF's research examining 1,527,119 student perception of instruction responses for the years 2017-2021. We found that 66% of students “straight-lined” the form, raising the question of the validity of these data for course evaluation purposes and resulting in our institution’s re-evaluation of this process.

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Extended Abstract

Few traditions in higher education evoke more controversy, ambivalence, criticism and, at the same time, support than student perception of instruction (SPI). Ostensibly, results from these end-of-course survey instruments serve two main functions: they provide instructors with formative input for improving their teaching and are the basis for summative profiles of professors’ effectiveness through the eyes of their students. In the academy, instructor evaluations also can play out in the high-stakes environments of tenure, promotion, and merit salary increases, making this information particularly important to the professional lives of faculty members. At the research level, the volume of the literature for student ratings impresses even the most casual observer with thousands of studies cited in sources such as Google Scholar ranging across all educational, psychological, psychometric, and discipline-related journals. The topic is important not only because of its high stakes implications, but because it addresses the growing importance of the student voice in the educational process.

Investigators at the University of Central Florida (UCF) working with the office of Academic Affairs, Faculty Senate, Student Government, Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, and other campus organizations have been studying the protocols and processes for how students evaluate their educational experiences for over thirty years. The process is complicated and nuanced and the contemporary research cannon cites several unacceptable sources of bias: gender, race, discipline, modality, level, and many others – leading to overwhelming criticism. This session will report on the most recent work conducted by the Research Initiative for Teaching Effectiveness at UCF over a five-year period. The current end-of-course evaluation protocol used at the university is:

 

UCF Student Perception of Instruction Form

 Please rate the instructor’s effectiveness in the following areas:

1. Organizing the course:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

2.Explaining course requirements, grading criteria, and expectations:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

3.Communicating ideas and/or information:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

4.Showing respect and concern for students:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

5.Stimulating interest in the course:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

6.Creating an environment that helps students learn:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

7.Giving useful feedback on course performance:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

8.Helping students achieve course objectives:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

9.Overall, the effectiveness of the instructor in this course was:

  1. Excellent           b) Very Good        c) Good         d) Fair         e) Poor

10.What did you like best about the course and/or how the instructor taught it?

11. What suggestions do you have for improving the course and/or how the instructor taught it?

 

Originally, this study sought to develop, using classification and regression trees, a set of robust decision rules for what elements predict whether an instructor received an overall excellent rating. A version of this research has been successfully completed several times at UCF over the past decades proving useful to faculty, administrators, instructional designers, and curriculum specialists. The results have been published with positive responses. A secondary objective was to investigate the impact of the COVID crises and its generation of so many, often ill-conceived, course modalities on the student evaluation process. However, just as complexity theory has taught us about unanticipated side effects, there were surprises in store. 

The Current Study

The study was conducted on 1,527,119 student end-of-course responses for the years 2017-2021 (pre and post pandemic), gauging the overall impact by college, course level, course modality, term, class size decile, and department. Researchers examined the pattern of student responses, and specifically how many students were assigning perfect scores to their courses. For instance, if a student assigned excellent ratings to every aspect of a course, the total score would be forty-five based on ratings of all fives. Should they assign a poor rating to every item, their total score would be nine based on ratings of all ones. We termed this the straight-line or zero variance effect, where students were bypassing the rating instrument, which is online, to get to their assignments or final examination. The results were surprising. Of the 1.5+ million end-of course responses examined, 1,008,774 (66%) of the students has straight lined their evaluations, raising the question of the validity of these data for course and instructor evaluation purposes. That result held for every comparison: college, course level, course modality, term, class size decile, and department. The phenomenon was not only true for the margins, all 5s = 45, all 1s = 9, but for the other less extreme possibilities. For instance, a total score of 36 might indicate all fours, but there are any number of response patterns that could add to that score, not just ratings of all fours. However, that was not the case: the average percentage of straight lining for each total score was 45 (all 5s) = 100%, 36 (all 4s) = 93%, 27(all 3s) = 92%, 18 (all 2s) = 91%, 6 (all 1s) = 100%. The students appear to straight lining the entire range of the end-of-course rating scale. That pattern of those zero variance responses was even more interesting for the total straight-line scores: 45=67%, 36=14%, 27=12%, 18=4%, and 9=3%. Overwhelmingly, if students straightlined, they responded with all fives – an interesting behavior for speculation that we are exploring now. Even more surprising and confusing were the measurement characteristics of the two sets of responses: zero variance and those that appeared to have been responded to the way the scales were intended: 66% vs 34%. Customarily, when properly responded to, SPIs, although criticized for bias and validity, exhibit excellent psychometric properties. When those indices for the two sets were compared in this study, the results were identical – excellent reliability, sampling adequacy, item discrimination, and small standard error. If one were to examine only these properties, there would be no way to distinguish between the two response sets. From the measurement “arm chair,” the straight-line responses should have blown up, yet they did not – another finding for which we are looking for an explanation.

These findings are of great concern to the UCF administration, faculty and students. The office of Academic Affairs has asked the Vice President of Faculty Excellence to initiate a campus-wide assessment of the impact and opportunity costs of proceeding with the SPI process currently in place. We presented these findings at our Faculty Center’s Summer Workshop and are soliciting feedback from faculty regarding the SPI process. We are also presenting at national conferences and publishing this research to encourage our colleagues to investigate if this is happening on their campuses as well. If so, it is a problem that must be addressed; however, from this problem comes a critically important opportunity: How can we effectively integrate the student voice into the educational process? We have not done this well, although that student voice is loud and clear on RateMyProfessors, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Meta, and many other outlets. The walls of classrooms have come down and students have a new sense of entitlement about how they evaluate their educational experience. We need to find an effective way to capture their voices in an official manner as well, to help faculty and the institution continue to focus on the quality of education and the needs of all students.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Evaluating Faculty Adoption of Digital Case Studies: Lessons Learned from a Federally-Funded Faculty Development Project | Education Session | Oceanic 1

Attendees will learn how to improve the adoption of digital teaching and eLearning instructional technologies in higher education by applying Rogers’ (2003) theory of the diffusion of innovations. A faculty development academy’s digital case studies will be used to illustrate how the theory can be applied to improve practice.

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Extended Abstract

Attendees will learn how to improve the adoption of digital teaching and eLearning instructional technologies in higher education by applying Rogers’ (2003) theory of the diffusion of innovations (DOI). Case studies based on a faculty development academy will be used to illustrate how the theory can be applied to improve practice. The presenters will share findings from a faculty survey of the perceptions of digital case studies and detail how those findings influenced their approach to improving teaching and learning through professional development programming.

 

The Preparing Organizational Leaders in Agriculture (POLA) project used innovative eLearning approaches to enhance curricula in higher education. The prevalence of severe weather events has been increasing and tomorrow’s college graduates in agriculture and natural resources will be on the front lines dealing with outcomes of these disasters. Disaster response and recovery for agriculture and natural resource organizations requires both technical and social solutions. However, most college majors in agriculture and natural resources focus exclusively on technical subject matter.

 

The POLA project was designed to address this deficiency by teaching technical faculty about leadership concepts necessary to lead organizations. Bolman and Deal’s (2017) leadership model was used as a framework to develop faculty capacity to identify and teach students how to address leadership, change management, and team building as recognized by Crawford et al. (2011). Bolman and Deal’s model served as a tool to identify: (a) structural and strategic opportunities, (b) human resources needs, (c) political impacts, and (d) the symbolic markers associated with the leadership, change management, and team building. POLA included: (a) an online faculty development academy for agricultural and natural resources social sciences faculty, (b) a field experience to an area impacted by a natural disaster, and (c) the creation of digital case studies to use in classes.

 

Digital case studies are an innovation that assist instructors to contextualize content, deliver content to students, and have the capability to improve student outcomes (Antonietti et al., 2022). Bozkurt et al. (2015) found digital case studies offered innovative strategies for open accessibility and increased reflection opportunities for student learning.

 

Project objectives included that faculty participants would: (a) increase their knowledge of Bolman and Deal’s (2017) leadership frames; (b) increase their knowledge of creating and teaching with case studies; (c) demonstrate the ability to develop case studies that integrate leadership frames with technical content; and (d) adopt digital case studies as an instructional tool for integrating leadership frames with technical content. Data presented here focuses on the last objective.

 

The presentation team utilized Rogers (2003) diffusion of innovations to identify ways to improve adoption of the case studies. Rogers (2003) proposed diffusion of innovations as the process in which an innovation is communicated across specified channels over time among members of a social structure. Rogers (2003) described the adoption-innovation decision process as the approach an individual undergoes when deciding to adopt or reject an innovation. The process involves five factors that lead to adoption or rejection of the innovation: (a) relative advantage, (b) compatibility, (c) complexity, (d) trialability, and (e) observability.

 

Relative advantage refers to the extent an innovation is perceived as more advantageous than the previous method (Rogers, 2003). Compatibility is the extent an innovation is consistent with existing values and needs of budding adopters. The more compatible an innovation is perceived to be, the higher the likelihood of adoption because the innovation is less of a change in behavior than the previous approach (Rogers, 2003). Complexity is the extent an innovation is perceived difficult to comprehend and implement (Rogers, 2003). The complexity of an innovation is negatively correlated with rate of adoption. Trialability is the extent an innovation may be experimented with for a limited time. Individual trials assist potential adopters in learning how an innovation works through their respective environment (Rogers, 2003). Observability is the extent outcomes of an innovation are observable to others (Rogers, 2003). An innovation that is highly observable is more likely to be adopted than an innovation not easily observed from potential adopters (Rogers, 2003).

 

Two cohorts of POLA Fellows (N = 31) provided their perceptions of the characteristics of digital case studies as an instructional technology for undergraduate instruction. A 2022 Qualtrics survey was used to collect Fellows’ feedback; 18 Fellows (58.06%) responded and shared their perceptions of the relative advantage, compatibility, trialability, and complexity of teaching with digital case studies. Fellows also indicated in which stage of the adoption-innovation decision process they were and provided open-ended responses describing their intentions to use or not use digital case studies.

 

Overall, Fellows tended to somewhat agree that digital case studies offered a relative advantage when teaching; were compatible with their courses, teaching styles, and values; and exhibited trialability. For relative advantage, Fellows tended to have the most positive perceptions of the statement: “Digital case studies are better for developing my students’ critical thinking skills than other teaching methods.” For compatibility, Fellows tended to have the most positive perceptions of the statement: “I can adapt digital case studies to suit my style of teaching.” Finally, for trialability, Fellows tended to have the most positive perceptions of the statement: “I can use a digital case study once to see if I like it without having to commit to using them permanently.”

 

However, Fellows expressed mixed views of the complexity of digital case studies. While the mean score for the complexity construct aligned with the neither agree nor disagree scale point, very few respondents chose that response option. Instead, the mean reflects a divergence of the Fellows into two distinct groups wherein one group found digital case studies to be somewhat to very complex and the other group tended to view digital case studies as having low or no complexity. For example, seven respondents strongly agreed or somewhat agreed with the statement “Writing an instructor’s guide for a digital case study is complicated” while eight respondents somewhat disagreed or strongly disagreed.

 

The Fellows tended to be in the mid– to late-stages of the innovation-decision process. Nine Fellows indicated they had not taught with their digital case study yet but had plans to do so. Six Fellows reported they had taught with their digital case studies and intended to do so again in the future. There were no Fellows who taught with their case studies decided against doing so in the future, but two Fellows indicated they had no plans to ever teach with their case studies. In the latter cases, the reasons for Fellows not to teach their digital case studies were related to courses not being taught and not related to the innovation itself.

 

Our findings suggest digital case studies adoption was due to academy participants’ positive responses to relative advantage, compatibility, and trialability respective to Rogers’ (2003) adoption-innovation decision process. More inquiry is needed to determine why almost half of the Fellows believed the digital case studies were difficult to develop since that perception can negatively impact faculty adoption of the innovation (Rogers, 2003). Despite this, the vast majority reported their adoption or intention to adopt the digital case studies.

 

Instructional designers and curricula developers can improve adoption of digital case studies by using the diffusion of innovations to frame their communications with faculty. Effective points to discuss may include the beliefs that digital case studies are better for enhancing students’ critical thinking than other teaching methods (relative advantage) and that they are adaptable to many teaching styles (compatibility). The ability to use or test a digital case study prior to adoption is advantageous and should be communicated to encourage faculty adoption. The application of theory and data to inform new directions in teaching and learning are necessary to develop faculty, achieve student outcomes, and for faculty to remain well-versed of contemporary digital instructional technologies.

 

Our presentation’s relevance to the conference is attendees will examine digital case studies produced from a faculty development academy to illustrate how theory can be applied to improve digital teaching and learning practices.

 

The main focus of our topic is on faculty adoption of the digital case studies. The outcomes are for attendees to learn and apply how theory can be employed to improve digital teaching and learning practices.

 

 

To ensure audience appeal, session participants will learn how our federally-funded blended faculty development academy was created, the digital learning outcome of the academy, the adoption attributes of our digital case studies, and how this project can be replicated in other contexts.

 

Presenters will address participant interactivity through attendees onsite review of our published digital case studies and then presenters will facilitate an audience discussion of the positive and needs improvement attributes of the digital case studies. The session will include reflections and discussions to enhance engagement and provide an active learning environment for attendees.

 

Our presentation aligns with session specific criteria as an approach to professional development and support for faculty that help to improve teaching and learning, instructional strategies promoting engagement, and promoting broadly engaged participation and discussion. The presentation team will share practical applications of our work.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Evidence-based Inclusive Online Teaching Practices | Education Session | Oceanic 3

A lively discussion of evidence-based strategies for creating inclusive, accessible, engaging environments where all students can achieve their academic goals. Focus includes a) structuring the online course, b) presenting learning materials, c) engaging students, and d) assessing outcomes by following UDL principles and best practices for active learning, equitable assessment, and metacognition.

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Extended Abstract

Join us for a lively discussion of strategies you can implement in your online courses to create an inclusive, accessible, engaging environment in which all students can achieve their academic goals. 

Evidence-based practices we’re discussing focus on a) how to structure the online course, b) present the learning materials, c) engage your students, and d) assess learning outcome attainment by following Universal Design for Learning principles as well as best practices for active learning, equitable assessment, and metacognitive practices. Examples include:

  1. Course structure:

    1. Clearly designated course starting point

    2. Intuitive, accessible layout

    3. Repeated imagery and themes for consistency

    4. Integrating items such as, “About Module x” and “End of Module x” to provide a clear learning path

  2. Learning Materials

    1. Provide multiple means of representation of course content

    2. Implement inclusive materials created by diverse authors

    3. Include support resources for students with varied educational backgrounds

  3. Engaging Students

    1. Provide ways for students to get to know you and each other

    2. Include reflection activities for students to explore connections between the course content and their lived experiences and their future goals.

    3. Provide a diversity statement that recognizes differences as opportunities to enrich the educational environment for all learners

  4. Assessing Learning

    1. Incorporate equity-based assessments

    2. Consider alternative assessments - ungrading, labor-based grading, portfolio assessment, peer assessment

Participants will help drive the conversation by rating topics of interest in a polling app and by contributing to the conversation in a Jamboard. 

Follow-up will include ongoing participant access to the Jamboard and the presentation materials website, featuring an “idea input” section to contribute new strategies and ideas as they develop. 

 
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
The Incredible Flexible Hyflex! The Best Practices of the Ultra-Flexible Hyflex Course | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 11

Planning learning pathways for face-to-face synchronous, remote synchronous, and asynchronous students can be tricky. We will explore the learning map from course objective to gradebook with an in-depth how-to. Highlighted are the advantages and disadvantages of the modality, best practices, and a look inside a live Hyflex course.Planning learning pathways for face-to-face synchronous, remote synchronous, and asynchronous students can be tricky. We will explore the learning map from course objective to gradebook with an in-depth how-to. Highlighted are the advantages and disadvantages of the modality, best practices, and a look inside a live Hyflex course.

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic has forced us into adopting hybrid modalities in all areas of everyday life. In fact, the success behind transforming into a hybrid society has many questioning the value of ever returning completely to in-person interactions. Students have quickly adopted the convenience of online and hybrid options. At the same time, many are quite satisfied with attending classes from their dorm room while enjoying all the social benefits of a campus.

To be successful in this new world, institutions must take a student-centric approach while recognizing the changing preferences of their students and deliver the flexibility they want and need.

The Hyflex Learning Experience

HyFlex is a course design model that combines the common terms “hybrid” and “flexible”. Originally designed by Dr. Brian Beatty for his graduate courses at San Francisco State University, the primary feature of the HyFlex model is that students have choices. Students determine how they participate in the class and engage with the material in a mode that works best for them throughout the course and from session to session.

With the HyFlex Model, learners can choose one of three learning paths:

  1. Face-to-face synchronous classroom sessions, which may be supplemented by resources or activities in the learning management system (LMS).
  2. Student joins classroom sessions synchronously via a conference tool (e.g., WebEx, Zoom, Teams); resources or activities in the LMS may also supplement this path.
  3. Student participates asynchronously in the class via recorded video and content and learning experiences in the learning management system (LMS).

 

With the HyFlex Model, class meetings and materials are made available so that learners can access them in-person or online during or after the class sessions have met. This delivery mode aims to offer learners the maximum amount of choices possible and allow participants to change and adapt their learning path from one class meeting to another. Regardless of the learning path chosen, all learners will achieve the same learning objectives.

Advantages of Hyflex

  1. Hyflex allows students to choose the modality they would like day by day. As Colleges look to capture more markets, they will need to respond to the demands of students (“Online Leaders to Prioritize Online Flexibility Post Pandemic” – Chronicle of Higher Ed). Now, post-pandemic, most students have had some experience with remote learning … and they like it. 
  2. Hyflex scheduling allows schools to schedule just one section of a course rather than multiple sections. For example, University X would no longer have to schedule a Residential section of Psychology 100 AND an online section of Psychology 100. They can experience the instructional efficiency of filling Hyflex sections.
  3. Hyflex allows schools to avoid instructional interruption. Virtually all schools experienced some interruption during the pandemic. Currently, schools with Hyflex courses can continue during any external events: weather events, security events, or even another pandemic would be minimally intrusive on learning since schools could advise teachers and students to be remote “as needed.” 

This presentation will discuss best practices when building a Hyflex course and look inside a live class so attendees can see how it is constructed and how it operates.

By the end of the session, attendees will have a fundamental understanding of when Hyflex is beneficial, as well as the steps to take when building, including tips and tricks for the best Hyflex experience. 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Eastern)
Field Guide Base Station - Field Guide Consulting | Other | Convention Foyer - Field Guide Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, or even directions!

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Extended Abstract

          

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Engage Through Interaction: Unlock Your Jedi Skills With These Tools | Education Session | Americas Seminar

Whether you are new to creating classroom community or have an established relationship with your students, there are digital tools (free & paid) that you can use that make connecting with your students fun, lively, and may even give insight to other things that interest them.

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Extended Abstract

Classroom community building with the goal of creating a sense of belonging for your students can increase learning and put a very positive lens to your classroom.  It also makes teaching more enjoyable.  When students see your enthusiasm, it becomes contagious in the classroom.  Building this type of community experience does not happen without effort but that effort does not have to demand all your time.  Building this community can be a fun activity when you have the right tools and a playful mindset. In this session, you will learn about Polleverywhere.com, Mentimeter.com, and Kahoot.com as the tools I have used to build, engage, and energize my student classroom community while maintaining my own upbeat attitude.  Utilizing these tools and techniques has improved learning and maintained student retention in my online and resident instruction classes.  The talk will weave in comments from students and life examples that helped me stay motivated throughout teaching during the global pandemic.

Exploring these tools and using them with my students triggered my creativity in the classroom.  From polling to trivia to hands on activities, as a college professor of 22 years, I will share how I used these tools with specific techniques to connect with my students and foster community building. You will walk away from this session energized and ready to use what was discussed. It will allow you to engage your students in a whole way you may not have expected.  As a life long fan of Star Wars, I can say, you may even unlock your hidden jedi skills!

NOTE: You do not need any prior experience with these tools as they are easy to learn and fun to use.

The session will initially prompt the attendees with a Polleverywhere.com poll which is a lower end engagement tool that works great with simple text messaging in a world that only focuses on the smart device "app" and asks them a simple question.  We will review the poll results and discuss how to then use them to connect with your students.  This tool is great at introducing the concept of engagement and allows you to take a small step into classroom community building.

The talk then moves to a few points about building these prompts for engagement and then we begin to explore Mentimeter.com which allows for a more robust interaction with your students. Attendees will be provided with a URL and whether on their smartphone or computer notebook they will be prompted to respond to questions and see each other’s comments in a unique graphical way using data visualization.  This type of visualization can then create a teaching moment with conversations that add depth to the student engagement.

Lastly, we walk through my experience with Kahoot as a Kahoot Certified Educator. I will walk through how a Kahoot is built for my online and resident classrooms all throughout the global pandemic. The attendees will then be given an opportunity to play a short Kahoot and see how the quiz can be run synchronously or asynchronously as a weeklong challenge or quick in class experience as individuals or teams.  Before engaging in the Kahoot, I will walk them through how to structure a formative assessment using this tool and introduce them to the resources available in Kahoot.com.  The coverage of Kahoot.com will also illustrate the differences between free and subscription based Kahoot options.  Knowing this will allow for participants to know which model is more suitable for their budget situation.

Levels of Participation

As outlined here, attendees will be highly encouraged to interact with the polls and trivia I present and as such treated as students in a classroom setting.  The topics built into these engagement exercises are broad pop culture with a focus on Disney, Marvel, and Star Wars.  This fun interaction will lift the mystique of these tools so that teachers and trainers can start using them as soon as they return to their learning environments.  Each participant will be provided shared access codes to the various tools so they can interact with this presentation.  As they try each tool, they will get a sense of its interface and how it may fit into their classroom event with light discussion throughout the presentation. Additionally, afterwards, I will provide materials to help guide them through a setup process for each of the three tools covered.

Session Goals:

During the past two years during the global pandemic, I demonstrated some of these tools to fellow educators. As it turns out, even though some have seen these tools they never took the time to try them. Attending this focused session will be the motivation to try these out and take them into the classroom.

3 Goals of This Presentation

  1. Experience three of the top engagement tools available today in a fun way.
  2. Be able to select one tool and start using them to connect with your community. Don't overthink getting started. 
  3. Develop a positive mindset for exploring tools and content creation.

 

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Personalizing Digitized Assessments and Remediation using an Automated Micro-Credentialing Framework for Canvas LMS | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 3

An online assessment and remediation protocol with accompanying Python-based toolset is developed to engage undergraduate tutors who identify and fill knowledge gaps of at-risk learners. Digitized assessments, personalized tutoring, and automated micro-credentialing scripts for Canvas LMS are used to issue skill-specific badges which motivate the learner incrementally, while increasing self-efficacy.

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Extended Abstract

1.0 Introduction

The Building-the-Capacity Ecosystem (BC-Eco) developed by the project leverages digitized assessments that automate micro-credentialing of student skills to facilitate personalized tutoring, peer-mentorship, and internships. The Services Provided are listed on the left-hand side of Figure 1.1. The foundational level, referred to as micro-credentialing, utilizes digitized assessment data that is capturable from 29 STEM courses having assessments that were already digitized in the REDACTED UNIVERSITY curriculum from 2014 to 2019. 

Figure 1.1: Building-the-Capacity Ecosystem (BC-Eco). Starting at lower-left corner, students taking STEM courses follow along the gold-colored arrows as Student Mentees to Student Mentors to Interns. Students’ progress upwards through levels of Micro-CredentialingPeer-Tutoring, and Industry Internships. Learning activities span Culturally Relevant Instruction within gateway courses, Underrepresented Recruitment subsidized by tutoring stipends, and financially-supplemented opportunities for Career Training.

Based on the success of digitized assessments in the College of Engineering and Computer Science (CECS) and in the College of Sciences (COS) at REDACTED UNIVERSITY, their benefits to students, the multi-disciplinary BC-Eco Project has been initiated as shown Figure 1.1. One of the three levels of student-facing mechanisms  is generating digital micro-credentials from digitized assessment results. This is automated by developing micro-credentialing Python programming language computer scripts via a one-time tagging step of the questions within the digitized assessments in STEM courses.

Successfully earning digital micro-credentials constitutes the first step for student participants by becoming a tutoring candidate. For example, a student may earn a digital micro-credential in a topic such as Finite Element Modeling or Human Computer Interface Design. 

2.0 Micro-Credentialing Framework

Micro-credentialing is a subject of active research and offers more portability and flexibility to evaluate student skills beyond grades and test scores. In this NSF project, an open-source framework for awarding and managing badges is developed far beyond what already exists. Micro-credentials provide mechanisms for quantifying student skills, abilities, and knowledge beyond traditional grades and transcripts. In the context of this project, students are awarded through digital badges obtained through data mining of their digitized assessment data. 

Micro-credentialing is an emerging means to authenticate an achievement, accomplishment, or even readiness to advance [1]. It has been suggested that digital micro-credentials may increase equity and improve retention in higher education [2]. Students’ acceptance of the value of micro-credentialing is a key motivating factor for earning micro-credentials which in turn can increase motivation during learning [3]. The BC-Eco micro-credentialing process commences as students complete their assessments, via Python programming language scripts. Operationally, data mining and data-driven discovery approaches provide a bottom-up alternative to using contextual state information and interactive cues as in top-down reasoning approaches [4]. Specifically, the project reaches means to deliver and refine STEM micro-credentials through the annual cycle shown in Figure 1.1.

The inspiration for our Micro-credentialing process was based on the physical badges used by websites such as Stack Overflow, offering students the ability to share and display specific aspects of their achievements compared to the typical transcripts or grade-point averages. Moreover, micro-credentials can be used to represent student learning, to increase opportunities for students to achieve expertise through learning experiences spanning various contexts and to establish learner accomplishment more holistically [1,5]. For instance, since 2011, the Mozilla Foundation has provided open-source digital badges through the Open Badges Initiative (OBI) [1]. Moreover, micro-credentialing opportunities also offer new tangible incremental outcomes for HSI students’ resumes and LinkedIn profiles.

2.1 Tailoring Micro-Credentialing for STEM Assessments

In the first year of this four-year project, substantial progress towards a transportable micro-credentialing framework of the Building Capacity Ecosystem (BC-ECO) project was completed in accordance with the project plan. Activities completed include the following:

  • Initiated identification of subject matter areas and expertise in selected content areas while training research assistants in specialties of educational data mining,
  • Negotiated allocation of space for computer stations in tutoring room area,
  • Refined plan and materials for solicitation of participants in the project,
  • Programming language selection and database configuration for micro-credentialing software based on first-round targeted courses, and
  • Requirements analysis/prototyping to develop micro-credentialing software framework.

2.2 Foundational Micro-Credentialing Software Currently In-use

For this type of data mining, our NSF project has developed a Python script-based framework which outputs a CSV file listing student performance on a question-by-question basis. The Python script was developed to meet the requirement specification by first traversing all the questions in a quiz to classify each question into a specific category, e.g., Theoretical skill or Applied skill. Next, for each student and for each badging category, the software framework examines student responses to determine if student responses to those questions were correct up to the threshold set by the instructor. Thereby, the software identifies whether to award a badge in the specified category to each student. 

Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) were utilized since they enable user-level applications to communicate seamlessly with each other. It is not practical to download the data manually from Canvas. Nonetheless, a faster and more efficient way is to automatically export data to the micro-credentialing application by using APIs. By sending an API request, it can be possible to automatically obtain the required information as well as alter data on Canvas [6].

The Micro-Credentialing Framework for Canvas requires data extraction. The Python programming language was utilized since this language comprises of libraries that makes it easier to extract data and perform machine learning algorithms. First, the Script extracts the values of specific data fields residing within the Canvas Quiz data export format. Canvas has several APIs that help collect the information without downloading the data manually. Initially, we prototyped using free for teacher canvas website known as Canvas for Teachers. A sandbox course was created to start the implementation of the micro-credential software. 

As shown in Figure 3.1, upon the receipt of API request, a JSON data file is generated by the Canvas LMS using the API call. This API retrieves information about the questions for that specific quiz, including the unique ID for each quiz. This is a vital step since it is required in a subsequent step to drill down to each question text string and response text string. Parsing of the JSON data is conducted since each micro-credential requires only a few specific fields from the entire dataset. The JSON data that is received is being converted to a DataFrame via Panda’s DataFrame library in Python. The DataFrame allows us to store data in a table-like structure that comprise of rows and columns for easy classification. The data that comprised of IDs and names of the students were in a list format. Thus, the Python script acquires the data while performing some field remapping to generate a CSV file each time the script is invoked.

Figure 3.1. Flowchart of micro-credentialing script execution created in this project as a transportable framework for Canvas LMS.

 Later, capabilities will be added so that students can link their Micro-Credentials to their LinkedIn pages, which can advance their internship/hiring connections with potential employers.

3.0 Status and Conclusion

Micro-Credentialling is intertwined with BC-ECO segment such as remediation, where students may consult with tutors to discuss their assessments. Each part of the BC-ECO aims to help garner student learning, where the effects will be seen in the badges received by the students. The current phase of research in the project includes constructing a Python Dictionary data structure that will be used evaluate student skills to issue micro-credentials within each course. The Python programming language scripts developed are available upon request. 

4.0 Acknowledgments 

This research was supported by NSF HRD/EHR-REDACTED.  Authors would like to acknowledge support of REDACTED, REDACTED, and REDACTED contributing to its delivery.

5.0 References

  1. B. Fishman, S. Teasley, and S. Cederquist, "Micro-Credentials as Evidence of College Readiness: Report of an NSF Workshop," 2018.
  2. D. K. Mah, N. Bellin-Mularski, and D. Ifenthaler, Moving forward with digital badges in education, in Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials. Springer, 2016, pp. 511-517.
  3. D. Gibson, K. Coleman, and L. Irving, Learning journeys in higher education: Designing digital pathways badges for learning, motivation and assessment, in Foundation of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials. 2016, Springer. pp. 115-138.
  4. V. Hung, A. Gonzalez and R. DeMara, "Towards a Context-Based Dialog Management Layer for Expert Systems," 2009 International Conference on Information, Process, and Knowledge Management, 2009, pp. 60-65, doi: 10.1109/eKNOW.2009.10.
  5. National Science Board. (2010). “Preparing the next generation of STEM innovators: Identifying and developing our nation’s human capital,” NSF. [Online]. Available: https://www.nsf.gov/nsb/publications/2010/nsb1033.pdf[Accessed 23-Feb- 2018]
  6. Canvas LMS - REST API and extensions documentation. Canvas LMS REST API Documentation. [Online]. Available: https://mitt.uib.no/doc/api/all_resources.html [Accessed 28-Jan-2022].
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
WIIFM: Webinar Best Practices to Increase your Reach! | Workshop | Oceanic 2

This session will explore simple tips and tricks to promote interest and engagement in synchronous seminar/webinar events as well as tools to maximize those events for asynchronous use. We will focus on prompting the WIIFM (what’s in it for me) to help drive audience participation and engagement.  Attendees will develop, identify and produce a short asynchronous video commercial for later use in their seminar/webinar development.

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Extended Abstract

In today’s world use of multimedia is a required element in any educational platform. Often professionals will spend a great deal of time and effort in developing and hosting a seminar or webinar only to have less attendees than anticipated. Further, many live events are limited in their usage once the event has taken place. This session will walk participants through the planning, development, marketing and post session usage of a live webinar or seminar event. Whether for a small group of students, or a large meetin,  attendees will learn to maximize their work and use what they have created to its full capacity.

  • Participants of this workshop will plan and brainstorm a webinar session specific to their field and institution.
  • Participants will brainstorm a title that incorporates the WIIFM for the intended audience.
  • Participants of this workshop will create a 3-5 minute mini commercial session for their brainstormed session.
  • Participants will create a 30 second “mic drop” moment from their mini-commercial for immediate use.

This session is primarily collaborative and interactive. Each participant will identify their unique topic for development. Participants will collaborate and work with other participants at the table for feedback and suggestions. However the final product will be specific to the participant and for their use within their specific institution.

The instructor will help with technology, brainstorm, planning and feedback. Participants will create multiple titles and scripts with the purpose of engaging their specific audience in their institution. Theinstructor needs a projector and screen as well as a wireless microphone. The presenter would also love to use OLC swag/flash drives in the session for participants to save and share the materials. 

Participants will need a laptop that is video enabled, a microphone/headset as well as screen recording programs such as WebEx, Zoom, Screencast-o- matic. Participants will also be introduced to free versions of various resources such as  Playposit, Free Cam 8 and Certify’em. Participants will be encouraged to use whatever current technology they are comfortable with  (Jam Board, Padlet, ect…).

 

This can be either a workshop or express workshop. The proposed timelines are as follows:

Workshop Timeline:

Introduction:                                                                                         5 minutes

What’s in a name brainstorm:                                                              10 minutes

Developing a webinar planning:                                                          10 minutes

You Try -Participants will develop and record a 3-5 minute session: 45 minutes

        Make sure it is accessible

        Make it interactive add PlayPosIt

        Don’t like it - Edit it with Free Cam 8

Data and Metric - what do you need to know?                                     5 minutes

Make it a Mic Drop Moment; create a 30 second clip:                        10 minutes        

Questions and Wrap up:                                                                        10 Minutes

 

Total Time                                                                                              90 Minutes

 

 

Express Workshop (45 minutes)

 

Introduction:                                                                                                        5 minutes

What’s in a name brainstorm:                                                                             5 minutes

Developing a webinar planning:                                                                          5 minutes

You Try -Participants will develop a 3-5 minute session to be recorded later:  15 minutes

        Make sure it is accessible

        Make it interactive add PlayPosIt (takeaway)

        Don’t like it - Edit it with Free Cam 8 (takeaway)

Data and Metric - what do you need to know?  (follow up takeaway)                               

                     

Make it a Mic Drop Moment; create a 30 second clip and record:                   10 Minutes                               

Questions and Wrap up:                                                                                      5  Minutes

 

Total time                                                                                                            45 Minutes

 

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Designing High-Quality Surveys for Online Education in The Digital Age | Express Workshop | Asia 1

This hands-on workshop will cover the ins and outs of survey design for online education programs, including question types, response formats, layouts, pilot testing procedures, methods of delivery (social media/smartphones/other digital devices), and sampling methods with specific examples. The workshop will also introduce various survey development platforms and free resources.

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Extended Abstract

Surveys or questionnaires have been used for some time in all spectrums of online education from course development to program evaluation, including research purposes on many diverse topics. Recently, we have witnessed the rapid spread of surveys delivered through social media, smartphones, and numerous other digital devices that enabled us to collect/process data about human behaviors on visual scales or multi-channel formats that have never been imaginable before. Online surveys are usually structured questionnaires that students/target audience complete over a Web platform generally by a filling out a form. The main benefit of online surveys for online educators and researchers is that they increase productivity by saving time. Data is instantly available and can easily be transferred into specialized statistical software or spreadsheets when more detailed analysis is needed. While the length and format of online surveys can vary based on the purpose, developing questions that accurately assess respondents' opinions, experiences, and behaviors is a critical aspect of survey methodology.

Online survey tools have even increased their value further because online courses have shown significant growth with multiple applications to aid learning since the coronavirus outbreak. However, applying effective design principles in the survey development process is often overlooked by the online faculty although the key to a good survey is its design. Poorly designed surveys confuse respondents and yield inaccurate information, unreliable feedback, and low response rates. At this point, online educators/faculty should be cognizant of the multistage survey development process and effective design principles. Careful planning at the start of survey development will help them create accurate measures and improve data quality that will contribute to all levels of evaluation efforts of online education from teaching to research. This hands-on workshop will cover how to design and develop online surveys tailored to specific objectives for online education programs, including question types, response formats, layout, pilot testing, and sampling with specific examples. The workshop will cover the ins and outs of survey design and the best practices of survey question development with question types, response formats, layouts, pilot testing procedures, and sampling methods. In small groups, participants will be asked to critique sample surveys. They will also discuss the merits and flaws of questions and methods of delivery, e.g., social media, smartphones, and other digital devices. The workshop will also introduce various survey development platforms and free resources.

Level of Participation:

This workshop is structured to be a mutual learning experience with a combination of interactive lectures, and small group activities along with a thought-provoking discussion. The workshop will be a great refresher for an experienced faculty in survey development and for those who have little or no previous survey development experience will gain tremendous knowledge of the best approach to survey development with hands-on practice in small group activities.  

Session Goal:

The goal of this workshop is to introduce the best design principles for writing survey items that accurately represent what the online educators want to measure or capture data for their program needs.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the best design principles for the development of surveys tailored to specific objectives for online education programs, including question types, response formats, layout, pilot testing, and sampling

  2. Discuss techniques that optimize questionnaire design, the merits and flaws inherent in different types of questions, and additional considerations for surveys delivered through social media, smartphones, and numerous other digital devices

  3. Locate survey development platforms and free resources.

Workshop Agenda, Topics/Activities (90 Minutes)

Step 1 (5 minutes): Opening

Introduction (agenda review)

Step 2 (10 minutes): Icebreaker

  • Participants are invited to share three facts about surveys

Step 3 (20 minutes): Introduction to Survey Methods (Interactive lecture with questions and answers, and small group activity)

·What is an online survey? How are surveys used in online programs?

  • Surveys delivered through social media, smartphones, and numerous other digital devices

·Small Group Activity: Stage of development for survey questions

  • Question structure and wording

  • Sequencing of questions

  • Survey question design

  • Evaluation of survey questions

Step 3 (25 minutes): Survey question design

  • Best design principles with specific examples
  • Types of survey questions (Small Group Activity: Survey critique - Poor question vs. better question and discussion)

    • Multiple-choice questions
    • Rating scale questions
    • Likert scale questions
    • Matrix questions
    • Dropdown questions
    • Open-ended questions
    • Demographic questions
    • Ranking questions
    • Image choice questions
    • Click map questions
    • Slider questions
    • Closed-ended vs open-ended questions
  • Merits and flaws inherent in questions

Step 4 (15 minutes): How to test your survey questions to avoid common problems

  • Pilot testing
  • Sampling

  • Reliability of survey data

  • The survey response process

Step 4 (15 minutes): Summary & Key Takeaways

  • Take-home message and intended application after the workshop

  • Questions & Answers
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Why "Simple" Works to Engage Every Student: Use Risk Mitigation and Debriefs to Deepen Learning and Critical Analysis | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 13

Increase participation in learning by facilitating students to teach one another and learn together! When you stay focused and keep things simple, it decreases identity-based concerns that block students.  Utilizing easily applied techniques, you can help students think more deeply and critically while teaching your most complex topics!

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Extended Abstract

Advancing student learning in all venues is often seen as an exercise in increasing complexity and sometimes even obscurity of the material being taught.  Educational strategies are too often focused on expected and tested outcomes while ignoring the processes associated with good instruction and successful learning.  As a result, concepts that are essential for both the immediate moment and that point toward learning that will need to occur moving forward become a singular focus without adequate consideration being given to either the methodology or the possible processes that could produce that outcome. 

In this brief workshop session, Why “Simple” Works to Engage Every Student:  Using Risk Mitigation and Debriefs to Deepen Learning and Critical Analysis, we will focus on two elements that facilitate (and sometimes even just make possible) changing our individual perceptual lens to include valuable input from others, and what that experience ultimately is like.  Particularly when participating in learning that is connected in any way with a chosen discipline or profession, remaining open to new information is often thwarted by our concerns about how others perceive us, shutting down the value of the shared information and the experience itself.

Central to becoming a member of a high-functioning team is the need to jettison culturally common beliefs related to competition, replacing such assumptions with an awareness of what happens when team mates work together.  When approaching tasks from the standpoint of perceptions and problem-solving, each of us compares the current situation to similar ones we may have experienced in the past or knowledge that we may have acquired either actively or passively.  The downside to working alone is that one can generally only see what one perceives or believes to be true.  In other words, we retain and act out of information that we believe in some manner has veracity for us.  Why would we function from a place of known error?  In our brains, one thought causes a cascade of others.  When we think we are right about something, we build entire realities around that perception. It appears to be instinctive, causing us to make decisions with information which is perhaps proved out to us by some prior circumstance or condition. We are familiar with the phenomenon where there are multiple witnesses to the same event who then remember and relate the details differently. Why would they relate different information unless their perceptual experiences caused them to believe it true?

One of the primary values in working on a team is to learn to share and to receive input from others, recognizing that how they see or experience or even describe what is going on may be different or contrary to what we have believed is true.  In teams, we should expect collegial members to be different than we are, and ideally, we will welcome those differences as an advantage.  It is out of those differences that we have the best opportunity to learn new insights or other means of seeing or understanding an issue.

Stepping away from the exclusive certainty of our perceptions requires opportunities to experience and receive information from others that ultimately proves to be in alignment with our paradigmatic understanding. While that doesn’t assure a learner’s readiness to challenge and potentially change their own thinking around larger or more complex issues, it is possible to demonstrate in relative safety the advantages that emerge when multiple participants look at and discuss the same stimulus.  For learning readiness to occur, the personal and professional stakes of the participants must be low enough to allow engagement with information where they can reduce their guardedness.  Simpler tasks based on common experiences that do not tax our perceptive or cognitive powers opens the opportunity for experience to shift our attachment to our own perceptions.

A simple, perceptual challenge in this workshop opens the possibilities of comparing what we see and what we believe to be true.  A facilitated discussion both brings forth the imagery perceived as well diving into the experiences of seeing what others see and changing and challenging our own conclusions.  While the imagery may vary from lesson to lesson, the insights gathered are similar regardless of the stimulus.  What parts did you see first?  How many people had an “aha” moment when someone, who saw something different, revealed their perception?  What is it like when we realize that we do not see the world the same as other people but that neither of us needs to be either wrong or right?  How does this relate to insights you have gained on teams?  What internal narrative did you identify when your perceptions were challenged by those of other people.

As part of this workshop, we will discuss the importance in debriefing of utilizing open-ended questions (as opposed to those that suggest a binary of right or wrong).  We will formulate together the possibilities for questions related to this image as well as other imagery that might have been utilized. Ultimately, each participant will walk away with a framework for doing this kind of activity, applying it directly to the subject matter or the composition of teams with which they are working.

As a result of fully participating in this workshop, the learner should be able to:

  1. Formulate a context for an experience such as offered in this workshop for their own groups of learners, simultaneously providing relevancy while mitigating risk in participation.
  2. Construct a framework of debriefing questions that fit the experience as well as the educational context for learners.

This brief express workshop will let you walk away with approaches and ideas that you can implement immediately in the context where you work.  The value in this group experience will be the opportunity to learn with others, learn from others, and learn about others and how they see the world!

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
The Disruption to the Practice of Instructional Design During COVID-19 | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere A3/A4

A thematic analysis of interviews conducted with 33 instructional designers revealed impacts to instructional design practice during COVID-19 including: differentiating emergency remote teaching from well-designed instruction, the increasing visibility of the ID role, challenges with social connections, increasing workloads, and additional challenges related to time, access, resources, and remote learning.

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Extended Abstract

With the vast changes the pandemic has had on the role and practice of Instructional Designers, it is important to examine the perspectives of instructional designers working in the field. The presentation explores Instructional Designers’ perceptions of the impacts to and changes in the practice of instructional design in a time where practitioners found themselves rapidly moving content online in suddenly very visible roles in their organizations.

Practicing instructional designers were asked to reflect on the following question related to their experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic:
How do instructional designers perceive the instructional design process has been disrupted by COVID-19?

The 33 instructional designers interviewed, selected through a convenience sampling method, worked in many types of organizations, including higher education, K-12, private industry, military, healthcare, and software companies. Interviewees consent to the interview with the understanding that a meta-analysis of themes from these interviews may be used for research purposes, and as part of the interview process, interviewees sign an interview consent form acknowledging that their responses may be used for research purposes. The 33 instructional designers interviewed represent multiple sectors of practice.  While the majority (56%) are practicing in educational settings (higher education public, private, and community colleges), another 28% work in private industry in settings ranging from manufacturing to consulting firms, with representation from the healthcare industry and the military as well.

As this research is grounded in interview data, we applied a qualitative research approach to analyze the interviewees’ experiences as instructional designers practicing in a pandemic and used inductive reasoning from the interview components. We specifically examined the interviewees’ responses to the pandemic-related questions.  Dividing into two teams, the authors read through the interview components relevant to pandemic-related questions to ensure we had a shared understanding of the themes and observations emerging from the interview data and developed our codes collectively. An analysis template was created in Google Sheets, with participant types and data coded during a first pass of analyzing the data with each author primarily responsible for part of one semester’s dataset, and all authors responsible for double-checking themes and codes that emerged.

In analyzing the responses, clear impacts were noted for the ID profession, challenges were documented that arose during the crisis, and opportunities were also observed.

The interviews revealed a number of immediate impacts to the way training and instruction were designed, delivered, and supported in an emergency remote instructional situation, the role of the ID, disruptions to social connections, and the workload of instructional designers during the pandemic.

  • The most obvious instructional impact during the pandemic was the rapid and unexpected shift in modalities from in-person to fully online instruction, both synchronously and asynchronously, in both educational and business/training environments.  

  •  Instructional designers mentioned there was a large shift in their role during COVID-19. They had to approach their role differently under challenging time constraints, with a sudden and vast shift in the amount of ID work needing to be completed.

  • Some negative impacts to social connections were mentioned around the lack of being able to read body language and interpret tone of voice, both in designing and delivering instruction. 

  • As with social connections, workload was discussed by participants in both a positive and negative light. Some participants mentioned using the time they would have taken traveling back and forth to work each day as extra time they could dedicate to getting work done. With travel halted, they “actually had more time to focus on instructional design work.” Some negative things mentioned were around increased workload such as helping with increased training needs. 

The interviews revealed a number of challenges faced by instructional designers that flowed from the impacts of instructional delivery changes under extreme time pressures and increasing workloads.  Instructional designers found themselves overwhelmed with support requests with a lack of time to design instruction carefully, challenges for both themselves and their learners in accessing technology, resource and staffing challenges, and the challenges of both IDs and SMEs and instructors and students only being able to meet from a distance.

  • Clearly, the instructional design professionals in this study saw challenges around time to be some of the most impactful, with one participant noting that “my time would be the thing most disrupted by the pandemic, meeting the needs quickly to get online."

  • Instructional designers, especially those involved in education, often had frustrating issues with access and instructional equity for their learners. 

  • During the pandemic, access to adequate resources came up as a challenge with instructional designers.  Some institutions and businesses were ready when the crisis hit and had all of the technological tools needed in place for employees to do their jobs even with the pandemic shifting instruction online.  Others had to acquire tools (software and hardware) and sometimes knowledge (requiring financial resources for training) to do their work at a distance, often competing with other needs. 

  • The needs brought on by the pandemic were so swift that there wasn't enough time to get people in place to do the work.  

  • Businesses that continued work during the pandemic saw massive increases in training needs. 

The findings of this study suggested that COVID-19 significantly impacted the current work of instructional designers. During the pandemic, interviews with IDs revealed a number of immediate impacts to the way training and instruction was designed, delivered and supported while recognizing the increasingly visible role of the instructional designer.  Challenges such as increasing workloads, the need to leverage more technology and the need to design at scale for flexible and online instruction were recognized during the pandemic. The pandemic also presented IDs with opportunities that can positively shape the future of this now very visible profession; opportunities to collaborate with stakeholders to design truly engaging instruction in a variety of settings, from higher education to corporate environments. 

 

Implications for Practice 1:  

  • Considering the Flexibility of Instructional Design Models

  • The Increasing Visibility of the Instructional Design Profession

  •  Clearly Differentiating Emergency Remote Teaching (ERT) from Online Instruction

Recommendations for Future Research:

  • Reworking Instructional Design Models

  • Creating Standardized Intake Forms for ID Assistance for Instructors

  • Understanding and Creating Resilience Ready IDs

While what instructional designers do each day may not have been understood pre-pandemic, those interviewed for this study agreed that the rapid shift to online teaching and training during the pandemic made the importance of good instructional design very visible which aligns with extant research (Pilbeam, 2020; Prusko & Kilgore, 2020). Moving forward, interviewees believed that more job opportunities will exist for instructional designers across many different organizations as the value of well-designed education and training became increasingly understood during the pandemic. Clearly, the rapid shift to online learning made the importance of carefully designed instruction visible and the role of the instructional designer valued.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Behind the Scenes: Partnering with Hollywood to Engage Learners through VR Storytelling in Biology | Education Session | Asia 2

In 2020, a large public research university located in the Southwest partnered with Dreamscape Immersive, co-founded by Film Producer Walter Parkes (Men in Black III), to design highly-engaging learning experiences for introductory biology courses. Utilizing the expertise of storytelling, this collaboration developed multiple VR labs for in-person and online learners.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance: 

Successfully engaging today's learners with introductory biology curriculum can be a challenging undertaking. Many factors, such as social media or everyday needs, compete for the attention of undergraduates which are diverse in demographics and backgrounds. As a result, "traditional presentation of information may leave students longing for something more engaging to do" (Lysne, Miller, & Eitel, 2013, p. 1; Rissanen, 2018), which often leads to disengagement, low performance, and general disinterests in the sciences.

A fundamental element of successful learning experiences is the need for learners to engage with the subject matter concepts and skills, which are to-be-acquired. In the field of education, for example, Gagne (1985) indicated that gaining learners' attention is the first step of effective teaching. Similarly, in the popular ARCS model (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, Satisfaction) by Keller (1987), attention is a key component for motivating learners. Keller (1987) describes that attention could be obtained by various means, including emotions, real world examples, or variety. One popular method to capture audiences has been the use of storytelling, which has  - as long as humans have lived - gained attention, raised questions, connected emotionally, and provided the motivation to engage with subject matter concepts and skills (Hung, Hwang & Huang, 2012).

In 2020, to utilize the power of storytelling in engaging its diverse learner population with the sciences, a large public research university located in the southwest of the United States partnered with Dreamscape Immersive, co-founded by Hollywood Film Producer Walter Parkes (Men in Black III, War Games), to design highly-engaging learning experiences in introductory biology courses. Utilizing the expertise of storytelling combined with the affordances of Virtual Reality (VR), the collaboration between faculty, designers and technologists, as well as Tinseltown's finest led to the development of six story arcs for biology labs for blended and (coming soon) online courses.

Specifically, Dreamscape adds avatar-driven VR experiences to introductory biology labs where learners take on the role of fictional characters in virtual and invented worlds. Each lab has three acts that build upon each other and form the overarching storyline. In between each act, learners partake in carefully designed active learning activities that align with the the elements in the story as well as require action to move from the beginning, to the middle, and the end. For example, in Act I, learners are presented with the context of the story and encounter some kind of anomaly that needs further investigation. Taking data collected during Act I, learners need to collaboratively manipulate and analyze that data to form a hypothesis of what might have happened. This leads to Act II, where this hypothesis is tested and more story elements are presented. After additional learning and reflection activities, and development of the story, the solution and ending is presented in Act III. As learners engage with the story in Dreamscape and the learning materials provided in-class or online (via the Learning Management System), the scope and sequence of the design effectively scaffolds the concepts and skills indicated in the learning objectives.

To create, develop, and test the new story and technology, a team of faculty and designers followed a product design process that incorporated a small-scale proof of concept, a prototype in an authentic environment, and implementation of two large enrollment introductory biology courses for majors and non-majors this spring. At this time, over 800+ learners have experienced and provided data to further improve the learning, engagement, and technology of this unique partnership.

 

Audience Takeaways:

In this session, the presenters will share insights into the collaboration between Hollywood and higher education, provide samples of learning experiences utilizing Dreamscape Learn, share an overview of the creative design processes and faculty engagement strategies, and learner reactions from implementation in two introductory biology courses (800+ learners). Furthermore, strategies for collaborating with vendors to develop scalable and user-friendly products will be highlighted.

 

Plan for Interactivity: 

To engage the audience in meaningful and effective ways - as well as to address the immersive spirit of the topic - the session includes multiple opportunities to experience the storytelling elements (in 2D to ensure access for everyone), gauge interests, share experiences, and customize the content of the presentation as needed. In general, the engagement occurs in three formats: (1) in-person (presentation, small/large group activities); (2) exploration of sample media; and (3) utilizing a polling system.

References:

Gagné, R. M. (1985). The conditions of learning and theory of instruction (4th ed.). New York, NY: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.

Hung, C. M., Hwang, G. J., & Huang, I. (2012). A project-based digital storytelling approach for improving students' learning motivation, problem-solving competence and learning achievement. Journal of Educational Technology & Society, 15(4), 368-379.

Keller, J. M. (1987). Development and use of the ARCS model of instructional design. Journal of instructional development, 10(3), 2-10.

Lysne, S. J., Miller, B. G., & Eitel, K. B. (2013). Exploring student engagement in an introductory biology course. Journal of College Science Teaching, 43(2), 14-19.

Rissanen, A. (2018). Student engagement in large classroom: the effect on grades, attendance and student experiences in an undergraduate biology course. Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education, 18(2), 136-153.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Specifications Grading Structures Implemented in an Online Undergraduate Research Course | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 5

A specifications grading system was implemented in an online undergraduate research course. The presenter will share three different formats used and data on how students responded and performed under each specifications grading structure. Participants will receive handouts detailing the specifications grading structures used and templates to incorporate into their courses.

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Extended Abstract

Educators and universities have used assessments to evaluate student learning since the establishment of formal education. Traditional methods of grading using a standard grading system such as A - F have left much to be desired in terms of enhancing education, encouraging student engagement, differences in the interpretation of grades, and establishing accountability for learning. Specifications grading is a fairly new concept first introduced by Linda B. Nelson that seeks to merge three forms of assessment to restore the rigor of classroom coursework, motivate students to take control of their learning, and save teachers time by simplifying the process of grading (Tsoi et al., 2019). The three forms of assessment Nelson suggest are mastery learning, repeated attempts, and student control of grades (Tsoi et al., 2019). Specifications grading provides meaningful student assessment by connecting grades to specific course outcomes.

Across academic programs, universities and professors, there exist variations in traditional point-based grading practices and the accompanied meaning of A through F letter-based grades (Norton et al., 2021). The variations in interpretations of standardized grades, coupled with common educator practices of curving grades and grade inflation, have led to significant difficulties in assessing the true quality of teaching and learning for universities, educators, and students alike (Tsoi et al., 2019). What is an A for one professor or university, could be a B or C elsewhere. Specifications grading is a proposed suggestion that has the potential to restore the rigor of academic grading systems, motivate students to take ownership of their learning, and save teaching faculty time in the grading process (Nilson, 2015). Unlike letter grades which leave room for interpretation, the research suggests that specifications grading enhances the learning environment, provides students with accountability and control over their grades and provides decisive measurements for the attainment of course learning outcomes in either a pass or fail format. Despite small scale implementation of specifications grading to date, the research suggests overall favorable perceptions of specifications grading from students and faculty alike.

A specifications grading system was implemented in an online undergraduate research course Winter 2022 semester and revised Spring 2022 and Summer 2022 semesters. The presenter will share the three different formats used and the data on how students responded and performed under each specifications grading structure. A mixed-methods design was used to gather data from the three student cohorts. We will examine the Mid-term and end-of-semester student responses to this new form of student assessment. The presenter will also illustrate how each specifications structure impacted instructor satisfaction with the grading method and time requirements. Based on the data, we will discuss the pros and cons of specifications grading and brainstorm how it can be used in your specific course and which structure might work best for you. Participants in this session will receive handouts detailing the specifications grading structures used and templates that can be incorporated into their own courses.

Navigating away from traditional grading practices may seem like a daunting experience for educators and students alike. However, when designed and implemented correctly, specifications grading will directly measure the quality of student achievement of learning outcomes. This is largely because specifications grading course models are built on various evaluation strategies and transparent grading practices. Participants will leave this session with a clearer understanding of specifications grading and practical tools that can be used to implement specifications grading in their courses. 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Eastern)
OLC Cafe and Mercantile | Other | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - OLC Cafe and Mercantile

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Scaling Up with Cengage: How the University of the Cumberlands is scaling up its online courses utilizing the Master Course model and textbook partner Cengage | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 4

University of the Cumberlands and Cengage Publishing has developed a course design model that promotes faculty development, instructional design integrity, student success, and administrative
collaboration. In this presentation, we will share our design model, decision-making process, benefits for faculty and students, how the University of the Cumberlands and Cengage Publishing work together, and textbook management across course sections.

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Extended Abstract

 

A small, private, non-profit institution in rural Kentucky that has a large online presence and high usage of Cengage textbooks has developed a course design model that promotes faculty development, instructional design integrity, student success, and administrative collaboration.  In this presentation, we will share our design model, decision-making process, benefits for faculty and students, strategy for textbook management across course sections, and how Cengage and the University of the Cumberlands work together.  This model includes utilizing all aspects of the institution with the goal of student success including enrollment management, instructional design, academic affairs, department leadership, faculty, adjunct faculty, student success, and the bookstore.  

In the Fall of 2021, the online business program converted all courses to be through one single textbook publisher.  This conversion required changes to faculty preference of textbooks, course redesign, marketing to students of the change in textbooks, and the ability to promote the Cengage subscription model to decrease cost in a major way.  Furthermore, we found that utilizing Cengage has contributed to a more standardized and user-friendly platform for online courses.  Using Cengage to standardize courses means that students aren’t subjected to learning multiple publisher platforms during each bi-term. Students become familiar with the Cengage platform which serves to decrease anxiety about dealing with multiple publisher platforms every term. When students know what to expect, they tend to complete the assignments on a timelier basis with fewer questions about navigating each course. 

So how did we do it?
Course Design

When designing courses for online programs, considerations are made for the textbook costs, the number of sections and faculty to utilize the master course that is being built, the proportion of publisher content versus homegrown content, and academic integrity concerns.  The Director of Online, in collaboration with the Instructional Design team, has built a standard template for all courses to ensure consistency in and across sections to equalize the student experience.  Additionally, when a course is utilizing content, there is also a set of standards and expectations put forward that SMEs and the Instructional Design team must meet before the course goes live.  

Course Launch and Faculty Development

The University of the Cumberlands begins courses every 8 weeks, and it is not uncommon that courses will have multiple sections running at a time.  The master course model provides consistency in assessment, academic quality, and student experience.  Each course includes a Faculty Resources folder that provides guidance and resources for setting up their course in both Blackboard and Cengage.  It is recommended that each faculty member works with the Cengage team to properly set up and customize their course as appropriate.  Throughout the year, the University of the Cumberlands works with the Cengage team to offer both mandatory and optional training to both students and faculty for use of the platform.

Publisher and Institution Partnership

The Cengage team and the Director of Online are in regular contact to discuss the current course and student concerns, faculty development opportunities, textbook updates, textbook testing, pilot programs, and planning for course launches every 8 weeks.  

The presentation will include:

  • Data from the usage of Cengage content across the platform
  • Insights from the roles of Academic Affairs, Chair, Instructional Design, and Cengage team members
  • Demonstration of Master Course Templates on both the LMS and Cengage platforms

Key Takeaways from the Presentation:

  • Cengage and Institutional Relationship
  • Sales vs. Service vs. Partner
  • Scaling up capabilities
  • Instructional Design and Academic Affairs Partnership Strategies
  • Budget Consciousness for students
  • Finding support at all levels: administrative, faculty, and student for quality, clean, and cost-efficient solution

 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Designing for Change: An IELOL Design Sprint Challenge | Workshop | Southern Hemisphere V

Staples of the Online Learning Consortium’s professional development offerings, IELOL-USA and IELOL Global, provide our community unique opportunities to grow in their leadership skills and experience. Each feature a distinctly different design challenge, situating leaders in action and addressing real-world problems through their solutions. In this session, we invite participants to join us for mini versions of these design challenges through the OLC IELOL Design Sprints! Come join us in collaboratively contributing to change-oriented assets / resources. Learn more about how to develop a design sprint learning activity as well as more about the IELOL-USA and IELOL-Global programs along the way. And most importantly, develop some leadership skills within the span of this workshop.

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Extended Abstract

You have probably been to some sort of leadership training in the past. Perhaps you’ve even participated in a sustained program that took place over multiple months. Could you tell the story of that program or help others understand what the experience was like in 15-20 minutes? We’ve challenged ourselves to do exactly that. Staples of the Online Learning Consortium’s professional development offerings, IELOL USA and IELOL Global, provide our community unique opportunities to grow in their leadership skills and experience. Each feature a distinctly different design challenge, situating leaders in action and addressing real-world problems through their solutions. 

In this session, we invite participants to join us for mini versions of these design challenges through the OLC IELOL Design Sprints! Design sprints are short, time-constrained activities that use design thinking to generate solutions to complex challenges. Come join us in collaboratively contributing to change-oriented assets / resources. Learn more about how to develop a design sprint learning activity as well as more about the IELOL-USA and IELOL-Global programs along the way. And most importantly, develop some leadership skills within the span of this workshop.

About the Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (USA & Global) Programs:

IELOL USA is a unique leadership development program that was originally launched in 2009 as a way to support the professional growth and preparation of the next cadre of digital learning leaders. IELOL participants collaborate with colleagues from around the globe to explore and understand both the opportunities and barriers to advancing local and global digital learning. The IELOL USA program now has over 600 graduates who have joined a network of leaders in digital and online education. Focused on improving and advancing the impact of digital learning in all aspects and formats of education, IELOL USA alumni form personal and professional bonds that extend beyond the IELOL USA experience.    

Inspired by the collective need for the field of online, blended and digital learning to address ubiquitous issues of access to education more broadly, OLC gathered the first cohort of IELOL Global in 2020. This new offering focused on the transformative power of global collaborations in enacting change work in digital learning at the local and global levels. Now in its third year, IELOL Global is designed to build global communities of practice around transformative and sustainable digital transformation that collect and amplify international perspectives. Through the program, participants engage with exemplars of impactful cross-institutional/regional collaboration through global coalitions by iterating with and learning from partners from around the world. They also contribute to the curation and dissemination of participant-created artifacts, use cases, and other resources that contribute to connected and aligned global change work. Its ultimate goal is to support the growth of a community of leaders dedicated to collaborative global change efforts.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Eastern)
Engagement Boulevard | Other | Atlantic Exhibit Hall - Engagement Boulevard

Looking for a place to meet others, try new technologies, relax, have fun, or engage in new models and pedagogies? If this is you, you'll want to be sure to stop by the Engagement Boulevard on your OLC Accelerate 2022 Conference journey. Open throughout the conference during regular Exhibit Hall hours, the Engagement Boulevard will be your main hub for interacting with this year's engagement team and their dynamic programming.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Experience the new way to manage academic operations: APL nextED | Industry Showcase - Demonstration | Oceanic 8

The world of higher education has changed... learn why your approach to managing academic operations should too.

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Extended Abstract

Come participate in an interactive demo of the APL nexted, Academic Operations Platform.

Experience why the largest and fastest growing schools have implemented the only comprehensive academic operations platform, APL nextED.

See how APL works with your LMS, SIS, & HRIS to connect courses , student information & faculty data & workflows.

Learn how adopting one academic operations platform ,instead of multiple point solutions, can put millions of dollars back into your academic budgets.
 

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Fusion Summit - Part 1: Institutional Strategies for Affordable Learning Solutions at Florida's HBCUs: Adopting Free and Open Educational Resources that Improve Student Success | Summit | Southern Hemisphere III

Bethune Cookman University and Edward Waters University have been HBCU leaders in implementing institutional programs to significantly reduce the cost of course materials, improving affordability of education and student success.  Lessons learned, success strategies, and tangible as well as intangible outcomes will be presented. Presenters will also share tips for securing faculty buy-in and highlight artifacts that demonstrate OER infusion.

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Extended Abstract

For the past 6 years, the HBCU Affordable Learning Community has been building the organizational, programmatic, and technical foundation for their Affordable Learning Solutions program for all HBCUs.  Tennessee State University (TSU) has been successfully incubating AL$ projects at various HBCUs by leveraging the Hewlett grants in partnership with the California State University Long Beach MERLOT-SkillsCommons programs.  Bethune Cookman University and, more recently, Edward Waters University have been leading Florida’s HBCU institutions by customizing AL$ programs for their faculty, staff, and students.

Bethune Cookman University has focused on the transformation of their general education curriculum with free and open educational resources as well as on its graduate programs.   Their custom portal for AL$ (http://becool4ed.org/), integration of OER within Canvas, and OER libguides created by librarians provide a foundation of resources for their faculty to adopt free and open educational resources.   The presentation by Bethune Cookman University will focus on strategies for optimizing faculty buy-in to redesign their courses with OER.

Edward Waters University has focused on establishing an administrative foundation for their AL$ program so the growth of faculty adopting free and open educational resources will be supported by the institution (see their portal at https://projects.merlot.org/ewu/) . The presentation by Edward Waters University will focus on the communication and engagement strategies for obtaining administrative buy-in to support AL$. Several faculty members have demonstrated how efficient OER materials can be in helping them make their classes more engaging for their students. They have also demonstrated their eagerness to contribute to the enrichment of the OER repertoire by ensuring that all subject matters are represented.

Finally,  Tennessee State University will showcase all the resources and services that the HBCU AL$ community has developed (http://hbcuals.org) and how their institution has become a national leader for HBCU and other minority serving institutions in significantly reducing the cost of course materials for their students and transform the ways faculty choose content for their teaching.

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Blend-It Bootcamp: Accelerate Active And Collaborative Learning In Blended Courses | Featured Workshop | Asia 4

In this "bootcamp," participants will use tools and techniques for blending a course or course session to accelerate active and collaborative learning which better emulates real-world situations for students and leads to higher levels of learning. Particular emphasis is placed on selecting technologies aligned with pedagogical objectives and strategies to overcome common obstacles to implementing active or collaborative blended learning strategies.

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Extended Abstract

 

In this BLEND-IT "bootcamp," participants will use tools and techniques for blending a course or course session to promote active and collaborative learning which better emulates real-world situations for students and can lead to higher levels of learning. Active and collaborative learning techniques can promote higher levels of learning and skill development when purposefully designed into blended and online courses (McDonald et al., 2020). Blended learning holds promise as an approach that effectively facilitates active and collaborative learning in higher education (McDonald et al., 2020; McDonald et al. 2021).

To capitalize on this potential, we developed a structured process to help faculty blend courses using pedagogically-driven active and collaborative learning strategies. While COVID-19 necessitated “just in time” online and blended learning, our structured approach encourages purposive selection of pedagogical techniques aligned to course objectives and learning outcomes. Our process has been developed and tested through work with Physician Assistant (PA) and Physical Therapy (PT) courses at The George Washington University, programs traditionally heavily reliant upon face-to-face delivery models. With this process we are seeking to help faculty encourage active engagement in the process of learning by leveraging the unique benefits of the blended delivery model and thereby promote higher levels of learning.

In this workshop we will guide participants through our clear and user friendly process for helping faculty blend or enhance a course to to support active and collaborative learning, emphasizing how to select technology that aligns with their learning objectives. We will provide examples from courses we have revised, some which were blended, reducing seat time, and others that were enhanced with asynchronous activities but did not reduce seat time. We will share a worksheet we developed that faculty can use for their own courses or that others can use when working with faculty to implement blended or enhanced courses to support active learning. We will also share tools to assist with choosing online tools to support the chosen active and collaborative learning strategies.

Participants will form small groups based on their role and needs. The small groups will work through our process for blending a course session and selecting appropriate tools to use, while strategizing ways to overcome challenges to adopting active and collaborative pedagogies (such as class size, time constraints, and student resistance). Participants will leave the "bootcamp" with tools and techniques to promote active and collaborative learning in blended courses or course sessions.

Session Objectives:

  • Discuss how blended active and collaborative learning leads to course designs that better emulate real-world situations for students and to higher levels of learning

  • Apply tools for blending a course session that are focused on pedagogical goals for active and collaborative learning

  • Strategize ways to overcome common obstacles to implementing active and collaborative learning strategies in blended courses

References:

McDonald PL, Weaver, GC, Barnett, JS, Straker, HO. C4 Tech: Virtual Connections between the Classrooms, Clinicians and Community Clinics to Bridge the Gap between Research and Practice. Medical Teacher. 2021 Aug. doi: 10.1080/0142159X.2021.1951692 +Ranked Q1 for Education and Educational Research by Journal Citation Reports.

McDonald PL, Straker HO, Weaver GC. Connecting Classrooms, Clinicians and Community Clinics through Technology (C4Tech) for Active and Collaborative Learning. Journal of Physician Assistant Education. 2020 Sept; 31(3),133-139. doi: 10.1097/JPA.0000000000000310 +Though not ranked in Journal Citation Reports the journal is distributed nationally to Physician Assistant (PA) educators in 238 PA programs.

 

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Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
But I hate online course discussions. Why do we have to do this again? Creating Reinvigorating Student to Student and Faculty Member Conversations | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 1

Have you ever had a class that hates contributing to the digital course discussion boards held within varying learning management systems? Have you ever just raked your brain and could not figure out meaningful ways for interactivity? Look no further; this session will provide student engagement within academic courses. 

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Extended Abstract

Have you ever had a class that hates the course discussion boards held within varying learning management systems? Have you ever just raked your brain and could not figure out meaningful ways for interactivity? Look no further; this session will provide ways to foster student interactions (Sorensen & Baylen, 2011). The importance is placed upon understanding social connectedness to avoid isolation amongst all student participants. First, each session participant will be asked to examine their thoughts about collaborative learning environments connected to virtual interpersonal engagement experiences.

 The later conversation will have participants build better interactivity using the Media Synchronicity Theory (Dennis et al., 2008) with group lead sample conversations. The presenter will be using multiple network analyses to strengthen one’s core knowledge of interactive patterns amongst online course discussions. Each group will use two fundamental communication processes: conveyance and convergence, to provide a mutual understanding amongst all parties. The goal is to construct a groupthink conversation to create a concept map to measure behavioral, emotional, and cognitive engagement. For example, each attendee will examine the operation (sharing information), wayfinding (student elaboration process), sense-making (analyzing and evaluating), and innovation (creating and reflecting). Each attendee will come away with strategies and gain technical skills to complete a social sharing function that allows students to implement positive and personalized interaction that builds commendatory for all participants. After the session, each attendee will be given a digital Flipboard link to continue the conversation after the concluded session. 

Level of Participation

The session has participants construct a digital Flipboard to help understand the re-structuring of online discussions and help develop a community of inquiry amongst all participants. Each group will share their digital Flipboard creations in the room to ensure comradery amongst all conference attendees. Additionally, each attendee will be given a  separate digital link to continue sharing and building examples of meaningful message board interactions with each other after the concluded presentation.

Session Goals: 

  • Each participant  will construct and develop the  analytical and interpretive skills necessary for critical and literary engagement
  • Each participant will construct a community of engaged learners through classroom discussions through creating digital Flipboard experiences.
  • Each participant will incorporate the Media Synchronicity Theory to apply within all digital message board experiences. 
Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Eastern)
Flipping the Virtual Classroom: A Multimodal Approach to Telehealth Competency Development | Education Session | Southern Hemisphere IV

As the “typical” classroom shifts from physical to virtual, how can we optimize time apart and together? Learn how one program blends self-directed eLearning, interactive webinars and virtual simulations to develop nurse practitioner students’ telehealth competency. Discuss strategies for moving away from lecture-style webinars to maximize interaction and experiential learning.

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Extended Abstract

Does blended learning require a physical classroom component? Upon posing this question to attendees who’ve lived through the COVID-19 pandemic, we predict a resounding “no.” Although blended learning has historically been defined as education that includes both online and traditional face-to-face classroom components, as the “typical” classroom has shifted from physical to virtual, our definitions of blended learning must also shift. Rather than focusing on place, it is time to focus on learning.

A central premise of the flipped classroom is that lecture is not the best use of in-person time. This concept guided the design of an innovative educational program through which nurse practitioner (NP) students are learning to use telehealth technologies and consider social determinants of health (SDOH) to optimize care for people who may have chronic health issues or lack access to care due to location or other barriers. The term “telehealth” encompasses the use of videoconferencing, mobile health and remote monitoring technologies in healthcare delivery (HealthIT.gov, 2019). SDOH refers to the “conditions in the places where people live, learn, work, and play that affect a wide range of health and quality-of life-risks and outcomes” (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2021). Using telehealth technologies to deliver care remotely and consider SDOH while addressing a wide range of health issues is a complex competency that is best supported by a multimodal approach.

The educational program includes three types of complementary learning experiences to support students’ competency development. Like a traditional flipped classroom, students first complete self-directed eLearning “primers” that provide foundational knowledge related to SDOH in rural and urban communities, conducting an effective telehealth visit and integrating mobile health and remote patient monitoring data into the care process. After completing each eLearning primer, students participate in a synchronous, experiential learning webinar designed to enable faculty-student and student-student interaction and guide application of new knowledge. For example, students view and critique expert role plays and videos of telehealth encounters; practice introducing themselves as if conducting a telehealth visit; share experiences using mobile health applications; and present and discuss cases from their clinical experiences.

The eLearning primers and experiential learning webinars prepare students for participation in simulated telehealth encounters. During these real-time virtual visits, students meet with Standardized Patients (SPs) representing patients from urban and rural underserved communities with varied SDOH and chronic and/or behavioral health conditions. The SPs are carefully trained to portray patients’ characteristics in an authentic and consistent way. Following each encounter, the SPs provide students with feedback from the patient perspective, and faculty observers engage students in a reflective debriefing. Each student participates in two or three telehealth simulations, allowing them to practice and develop their telehealth competency over time.

Evaluation findings indicate the program is achieving positive results. Scores on the eLearning primer quizzes indicate most students achieved the necessary foundational knowledge, with an overall average quiz score of 82%. Students’ evaluations indicate they value each type of learning activity. Ninety-two percent of students who completed the end of program survey strongly agreed the learning modules increased their knowledge and 89% strongly agreed they would be able to apply their learning in clinical practice. Comments from the student evaluations indicate they enjoyed the interactive, experiential nature of the synchronous webinar sessions, in particular the peer-to-peer clinical case discussions. Ninety-four percent of respondents strongly agreed that the simulations helped to prepare them to deliver telehealth in the future, and 100% believed the SP and faculty feedback was valuable.

Starting with our opening question, this session will engage participants in an interactive discussion of best practices for combining self-directed eLearning and person-to-person experiential learning to support learner achievement of complex competencies. We will use a variety of creative polling strategies (e.g., think-pair-share, quiz questions, word clouds) to glean audience knowledge and insights and prompt active, ongoing participation. Using the educational program as an example, we will discuss approaches for moving away from lecture-style webinars to maximize interaction and experiential learning. Participants will leave the session with an expanded view of blended learning, an understanding of how different teaching approaches contribute to the learning process, and concrete strategies that can be adapted to optimize learning in asynchronous and synchronous online environments.

References

Nov 15, 2022
1:15pm - 4:45pm (Eastern)
The OLC Drive-In | Other | Northern Hemisphere Foyer

New to OLC Accelerate is the OLC Drive-In, a physical location where you can join with other colleagues, tune into a live streamed session, and engage in discussion as the session takes place. Whether you're looking for dynamic conversation or simply couldn't make it to the main session room in time, this new offering is designed to make our streamed sessions more accessible and engaging.

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Forging Identity in an Academic Setting | Industry Showcase - Presentation | Oceanic 8

Can remote proctoring be a tool to promote diversity, equity and inclusion in education? Identity verification is key to making online learning a valid alternative to in-person teaching. What happens when your identity is in transition or is non-conforming? Representatives from higher education as well as the government and corporate worlds will gather to answer these questions and hopefully spark new ones. Join us for a panel discussion about the history of LGBTQ representation in education, the challenges faced and the technological advances that allow for the doors to higher ed to remain open to everyone.

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Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Playing Together or Parallel Play: How to design and implement a collaborative student assignment | Education Session | Oceanic 1

Group projects are one way students can promote collaborative learning.  How can we incorporate effective teaching techniques to provide students with skills that promote valuable team work? Join us to learn more about how we’ve developed assignments that promote collaborative learning and explore creating one of your own.

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Extended Abstract

Group projects are one way we can promote collaborative learning. However, some group projects turn into examples of parallel play; where students divide the work and conquer the project without any forms of collaboration.  They are cooperating, not collaborating. According to Laal and Laal (2012), “Collaborative learning (CL) is an educational approach to teaching and learning that involves groups of learners working together to solve a problem, complete a task, or create a product. … The term CL refers to an instruction method in which learners at various performance levels work together in small groups toward a common goal.” 

 

Well-developed collaborative learning assignments are designed to engage all members of a group to work together to collectively process information, come to consensus to construct a knowledge base, and actively engage in completing assignments.  Collaborative assignments can successfully be incorporated into all modes of course structures, face-to-face and blended and online.  Although some feel teamwork is not conducive in an online environment, research suggests that incorporating collaborative assignments in online courses adds to overall student success. (Barkley,15-17) 

 

Collaborative learning in an online course incorporates the three main elements of the Community of Inquiry Model: social, teaching and cognitive presence that are necessary for a quality online course. The instructor's presence is evident as they set the stage for collaborative learning, stepping away from the role of a subject matter expert to a facilitator of collaboration. Students engage in social constructivism using cognitive skills to complete group tasks through discourse and applied activities. (Garrison, 107)

 

How can effective collaborative teaching techniques be incorporated into various disciplines in Higher Education to provide students with skills that promote valuable team work skills? How do facilitators design a well-structured collaborative assignment?  What critical aspects should be considered when selecting collaborative online tools to support collective learning? With so many different online tools available how can instructors select appropriate tools that support collaboration and learning activities?

 

This session will explore how to design a good collaborative assignment, how to build teams in advance of the group project work, how to coordinate the assignment of teams, and what to consider when choosing tools for students to use in team assignments.

 

Level of Participation: Presenters will share their experiences from different courses and different group situations including graduate level education students and undergraduate students with virtual exchange partners from international universities.  They will also share changes in pedagogy from lessons learned through years of trial and error. Participants will then design an online collaborative assignment and work through issues in small groups. Each group will then share their ideas.

Session Goals: Key takeaways from this presentation will include aligning online tools for collaboration with learning goals and objectives and the ability to create a collaborative assignment using online tool(s). Participants will leave with the experience of working in a small group to create a collaborative assignment. 

 

Barkley, Elizabeth F, et al. Collaborative Learning Techniques : A Handbook for College Faculty. San Francisco, Ca, Jossey-Bass, A Wiley Brand, 2014.

‌Garrison, Randy, and Michael Grahame Moore, editors. “The Community of Inquiry Theoretical Framework.” Handbook of Distance Education, United Kingdom, Taylor and Francis, 2013, pp. 104–20.

Laal, Marjan, and Mozhgan Laal. “Collaborative Learning: What Is It?” Procedia - Social and Behavioral Sciences, vol. 31, 2012, pp. 491–495, www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1877042811030217, 10.1016/j.sbspro.2011.12.092.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Beyond the Bean Counting: Creating a Faculty Resource that Optimizes Learning | Industry Showcase - Presentation | Oceanic 6

The goal of the NLU Online Faculty Playbook was to re-envision a traditional faculty resource into a one-stop hub for all things course logistics, policy, and evidence-based practice. Learn how we built and use this Playbook to benefit our faculty and students.

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Extended Abstract

It is common for online programs to have a set of faculty expectations that guide minimum course requirements and delivery, including course set-up requirements, engagement requirements, and course policies. But what if these sometimes punitive and mundane documents could be better leveraged to truly engage and support faculty at various stages of their online teaching experience? The goal of the NLU Online Faculty Playbook was to re-envision a traditional faculty resource into a one-stop hub for all things course logistics, policy, and evidence-based practice, with an eye on optimizing the use of D2L features. As such, this tool serves multiple operational capacities as an evergreen resource integrated into new faculty onboarding, ongoing instructional support, faculty observations, and more. Learn how we built and use this Playbook to benefit our faculty and students.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Fusion Summit - Part 2: Strategically Building Community: A Conversation with Minority Serving Institutions on Centering Belonging and Community | Summit | Southern Hemisphere III

Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) have historically been hubs for strategically building community across the lifespan of the institution and the student lifecycle. Regardless of one’s institutional type, learning about these critical engagement and community building strategies can help to deepen and strengthen how institutions build belongingness and community in  digital spaces. Join us for this must-attend panel conversation with some of the top leaders from Minority Serving Institutions to learn more about critical community building and student engagement strategies. 

 

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Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Learning to L.E.A.R.N.: A Strategy for Fostering Active Learning Online | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere E1/E2

Active learning is a student-centered approach intended to engage students through new information, ideas, experiences, and reflective dialogue. In this session, we will L.E.A.R.N how to implement active learning by Leveraging prior knowledge, Explaining new concepts, Activating using activities, Reflecting on learning, and Nurturing new strategies.

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Extended Abstract

Anyone who has ever taught online has probably wondered how they can engage students when they cannot physically see them.  The reality is that student engagement continues to be one of the primary concerns for online instructors, especially as more classes are offered online as a result of COVID-19. Students and faculty alike may face online burnout if the primary class structure consists of lecture videos, textbook chapters, and multiple-choice tests. Even in a 21st-century society with multiple forms of technology available, the question still remains, “How do we engage students who may be a country or a world away?”

Student engagement is not a new concept and keeping students involved in the learning process is not a new problem.  The student sitting in the one-room schoolhouse staring out the window is not fundamentally different from the student staring at their cellphone today.  In attempting to find a solution to this problem, educators and researchers are increasingly reaping the benefits of active learning strategies. Active learning is a student-centered approach in which the instructor creates the environment and students engage and collaborate within it.  The cycle of active learning involves students taking in new information and ideas, engaging in an experience related to those new ideas, and then critically reflecting on those experiences through reflective dialogue with themselves and their peers. Contrary to passive learning in which the students are not critical to their own learning, active learning gives students opportunities to restructure information into true knowledge. Active learning has been shown to have many positive outcomes including higher levels of independent and creative thinking as well as opportunities for social learning. It is important to understand, however, that face-to-face active learning strategies do not automatically translate to online environments.  A recent study by Reilly and Reeves (2022) examined active learning in online classes and found that courses with low ranges of active learning provided minimal avenues for students to relate academic content to real-world contexts and did not maximize the power of collaboration. In contrast, courses with high active learning ranges carefully aligned technology to pedagogical needs and featured a self-directed, creative, collaborative process.

In this session, we will explore how to foster active learning online through the L.E.A.R.N. strategy.  This strategy focuses on Leveraging prior knowledge, Explaining new concepts, Activating using activities, Reflecting on learning, and Nurturing new strategies.  Each step in the L.E.A.R.N. process is designed so that participants will be able to utilize this strategy when teaching their own online classes, when helping faculty with best practices for online learning, and when designing online courses. The session itself will be structured to model best practices for active learning and will utilize Slido software to facilitate interaction. The primary goal of the session is for participants to walk away with confidence related to their ability to create a meaningful online course that truly engages students with the content, the instructor, and with each other.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
SESSION CANCELED - Digital Transformation of curriculum | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 12

SESSION CANCELLED - Our iCoN Apple Distinguished School initiative has expanded far beyond what we could have imagined when it began in 2012. Students now engage in active learning strategies using Apple devices and apps to create capstone projects and receive real-time feedback on assignments and tests. Faculty members continue to find innovative ways to flip the classroom and more fully engage students. The college’s support and commitment to transforming the delivery of nursing education in the classroom, simulation laboratory and clinical settings, in addition to our sustainable model for fostering technology and innovation, 

Extended Abstract

When the COVID-19 pandemic led to the cancellation of in-person instruction in March 2020, the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing relied on its established technology infrastructure and expertise leveraging technology in instruction to rapidly transition to an online-only learning format that included virtual courses, testing, clinical experiences and meetings. As early adopters of technology in teaching and learning, the college’s robust technology ecosystem and skilled faculty, who are comfortable embedding technology in pedagogy, enabled the quick and seamless switch.

In a short time, 15 clinical courses with 700 students were converted to virtual clinical experiences, 1,000+ computer-based exams were proctored and academic advisers found new ways to effectively communicate with students and offer support. The delivery of live, or synchronous, classes benefitted students by offering a chance to ask questions of faculty before and after each session.

The college also leveraged technology to remotely teach certain hands- on fundamental nursing skills by creating, printing and distributing 3-D models of nasal passages, perinea and wounds. Students first learn to analyze several patient scenarios and the thought processes behind skills in a virtual setting. Then, they use the 3-D models to learn and practice skills such as inserting a nasogastric tube or indwelling urinary catheter. This innovative solution for virtual, hands-on learning is protected by a provisional patent and will be commercialized outside of UC. 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Freshening Up: Bringing a Fresh Perspective to Online and Blended Faculty Development | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere D

The global pandemic has had various impacts on the higher educational landscape including faculty development needs. In this presentation learn how one institution applied a fresh perspective to redesign an online and blended faculty development program that adapted to the changing needs of faculty.

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Extended Abstract

In Fall 2020, instructional designers at a large public university set out to redesign its flagship online/blended faculty development program that had been in place for over 20 years. While this faculty development program had previously undergone a major redesign in 2013, the need to make major updates to this program resurfaced to help increase its effectiveness for faculty, reduce the associated administrative burden on the instructional design team, and address stakeholder feedback.

Through the collection of various data points and stakeholder feedback from leadership, faculty, instructional designers, and students before this project began pre-pandemic, several changes related to faculty experience and professional development needs were identified. However, at the onset of the program redesign efforts, the global pandemic highlighted additional faculty needs. As a result, the instructional designers tasked with this project had to revise the goals of the redesign to address these changing needs and adopted a creative design approach to apply new ideas and solutions to this well-established faculty development program.

Join us to learn about this redesign project, the feedback-driven design approach taken, and how stakeholders were engaged throughout the entire process. In addition, updating and streamlining a faculty development program during a pandemic while continuing to offer it was a challenging feat from which the instructional design team was able to garner numerous lessons learned that may be useful to other institutions.

Engagement Strategy

The presentation will include interactive audience polls. Participants will also be able to ask questions, interact with the presenters and reflect on how the strategies and concepts learned can be applied at their own institutions.

Session Takeaways

By the end of the session participants will be able to:

  • Explore ways to apply a fresh perspective to the design of an online/blended faculty development that combines multiple best practice strategies for effective faculty development.
  • Infer how faculty and key stakeholder feedback can influence the design of a faculty development program that both meets the varied needs of online/blended faculty and aligns with the leadership’s strategic goals and vision.
  • Discover how undergoing a major redesign during a pandemic can have a positive influence on faculty development program design.

Session Outline

  • Introduction (5 minutes)
  • Setting the Stage: Purpose and Goals of the Redesign (5 minutes)
  • Exploring a Feedback-Driven Design Approach: How key stakeholder feedback influenced the program design (10 minutes)
  • Program Design at a Glance: A brief look into the redesigned faculty development program and key design elements (5 minutes)
  • Lessons learned from underdoing a major program redesign during a Pandemic & Next Steps (10 minutes)
  • Additional Q/A (10 minutes)
Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Collaborating with and Empowering Teachers to Apply a Canvas Course Template | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 8

Increasing the ability of institutions and faculty to facilitate online student success by implementing a common navigation course template using the Canvas LMS; combined with a video training program to enable faculty in applying the template to both new and existing course content.

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Extended Abstract

Collaborating with and Empowering Teachers to Apply a Canvas Course Template

Student success ranks highly as a driving force behind a broad scope of initiatives across education. In order to facilitate online student success, we developed a standard course template that can be applied to any Canvas LMS course, using html and css.  The Common Navigation template utilizes the Modules as the default layout, course orientation materials (syllabus, instructor page and schedule), weekly modules which contain an overview and a list of the activities. Each page has a corresponding title which describes the activity such as Read, Submit, Discuss or Watch. Each academic department has the option to select their own “branding” elements such as heading colors, logos and images to market their programs. 

The first stage of implementation with this strategy focused on development of the template itself. Uniform course design structures were welcomed by students but lacked broad adoption due to the technical skills required to implement the template formatting. Our department was responsible for applying this course template via two different processes. Instructional designers would use templated pages and then they or the teacher would add in the content. The second “track” was that instructional support technologists would work with individual teachers to add in the template elements to existing course content. This process worked quite well and students enjoyed the template since multiple classes utilized the same means of navigation, making it easier to find the information they needed. However, COVID made it clear that the number of online classes went up damatically! We needed to find a better way scale our deployment of the course template since our staff was insuffienet to apply the tempalte for a univfresity wide deployment. We needed to enlist faculty who could apply the template in their own courses. The question was – how can we enable non tech savvy teachers to apply the template int their own courses-both for new content and for existing content?  

Our solution, detailed in this presentation took two forms: the development of “institutional templates” which was available to all faculty and training materials to show them to how apply the template themselves. We used an existing tool we already had called Design Tools by Cidilabs. This tool adds a great deal of additional functionally to the rich content editor in Canvas. We embedded various elements of the template in Design Tools in the form of “institutional templates” which are entire pages such as the schedule and the syllabus and as “HTML snippets” which are the headings such as Read and Submit. 

Our training strategy revolved around two main criteria. We wanted to present the templates and the methods of using them in manageable blocks of information. Second, we wanted to present the training in a way that would not overload faculty with too much information. This led us to determine that 30-minute sessions would provide the optimal time necessary to present part of the template, demonstrate its uses, and answer questions that faculty and staff might have. Using these criteria as gauges, we also determined that we would need three sessions and an introductory video to present the training.  

As mentioned previously, we wanted to emphasize explanations as well as demonstrations so that faculty and staff could have visual examples they could reference when working with the template infrastructure. This decision informed our strategy by making a Canvas LMS sandbox shell a necessary part of our presentation and demonstration strategy. 

Before explaining our primary deployment choices in more depth, it is relevant to point out that our organization had previously established a series of webinars focused on making online content accessible for students who rely on alternative technology for accessing web pages. The choice to train through webinars was partially informed by this past success. Another practical advantage of choosing webinars as our chosen mode is that the accessibility training series could be used to drive traffic to our new training initiative. 

The primary deployment and presentation methodology we chose was through webinars. This mode of presentation readily accommodated faculty with concerns related to COVID-19. The choice of presentation mode also removed limitations usually associated with physical facility occupancy caps. Presentations were set up as three-person teams. One person took responsibility for presenting the content and demonstrating techniques in the video conference while the other two team members moderated the video conference chat room. This made it possible to field questions in real time without interrupting the presentation or leaving faculty inquiries unaddressed. 

We capitalized on the MS Teams webinars by recording them. This opened the door to secondary deployment and presentation mode. The videos from our presentations were hosted on a public-facing university website. The videos and the website had the added advantage of providing contact information for getting in touch with support representatives in our department. This opened up additional opportunities to provide follow up, support and additional mentoring. 

We feel that this strategy differs from other initiatives in a few ways. We did not try to present the training in a single session. The training was split up over four sessions. We leveraged multiple modes of presentation to communicate the training. This included live video conferencing, video recordings, and additional mentoring. The training was supplemented with a website that instructors can reference. The live video conferencing mode is still ongoing. We continue to present and update live training every Spring and Fall. This training initiative was not isolated but incorporated into a bigger plan to impact student success. 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Advanced LMS Skills for Teachers | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere C

For those teachers comfortable with navigating their LMS who are looking to jazz up your courses, set yourself up for further success by creating amazing, engaging content.  Learn from a Canvas expert how to create sophisticated interactions, utilize dynamic html code, and integrate technology to bring your course content to life. 

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Extended Abstract

In my dual roles as both professor and Senior Director of Teaching and Learning, I have been contacted throughout the years by faculty looking to improve the look, feel, and functionality of their Canvas experience.  Many would like to do more with their LMS content pages than simply display text and pictures on a screen.  Although content is king and curriculum alignment depends on effective pedagogy, there is still a lot that we can do in the design process to engage students and facilitate more meaningful interaction with the content. 

In this session, we will explore various ways to style and enhance your course content, including how to: embed ed tech content into your pages, create an interactive table of contents using simple code, design banners and section separations, and how to effectively use images (including understanding margins, padding, and borders). Throughout the session, participants will have access to a live Canvas page in a public course as we will take a bland content page and make it interactive, engaging, and aesthetically appealing.

Come explore some dos and don’ts as you design amazing LMS pages.  Follow along with this session as we discover techniques together or listen and take notes (and review the recording once the dust has settled).  This session will be fast paced and engaging.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Online Teaching Motivations of Pre-Service Teachers: Identifying Constructs Towards New Directions in Teacher Preparation | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 14

This session explores the processes of assessing motivations of pre-service teachers to teach online as they enter a field that increasingly requires them to teach in technology-based learning spaces. The PST-OTMS instrument and pilot study results will be discussed. Additionally, feedback will be solicited for future development of the PST-OTMS. 

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Extended Abstract

Nation-wide K-12 trends tend towards the addition of some sort of blended/online learning experience even in traditional brick and mortar environments. Teachers are now required to build out and provide instruction within learning management systems for blended and online delivery. Severe weather days were once simply school days canceled. Now, such days have shifted to online learning days. In addition, many districts now have specific online instruction days during the school year regardless of weather conditions. Therefore, teachers now must develop the skill to be as inspirational within technology-based learning environments as they are within the face-to-face classroom, hence, expanding their reach well beyond the physical classroom space. Widespread use of online and blended teaching modalities for emergency remote learning in K-12 during the COVID-19 pandemic exposed gaps in preparedness to teach within technology-based learning environments. Post-pandemic, K-12 teachers have generally returned to face-to-face instruction. However, school districts continue to require blended and online teaching components (Smart et al., 2021). Given that research demonstrates strong connections between motivation and teaching effectiveness and persistence through challenging circumstances (Smart & Linder, 2018; DiPerna, Volpe, & Elliott, 2005; DiPerna & Elliott, 1999; Whang & Hancock, 1994), colleges of education should prepare their students to teach within the technology-based learning spaces and work to foster strong motivation for online and blended teaching. As such, it has become increasingly critical to evaluate motivational constructs related to online teaching to better understand pre-service teachers’ responses to teaching and learning within online spaces using reliable, valid measures. Our research team developed the Pre Service Teachers Online Teaching Motivation Scale (PST-OTMS) in response to a need to measure and support K-12 pre-service teachers’ motivation for online teaching, as they move into classrooms where teaching in the blended and online modalities will likely be a requirement. Our previous research with in-service teachers has shown that when teachers have positive beliefs and perceptions about online learning, their confidence in teaching online is higher (Smart et al., 2021). Additionally, when teachers feel they have administrative support, they tend to report higher confidence levels for teaching online. The findings highlight the need for building teachers’ knowledge and understanding of online teaching and learning, as well as a need to explore the factors that influence perceptions of online teaching motivation constructs. Similar construct associations have presented for pre-service teachers enrolled in colleges of education. However,  the needs and influences might be vastly different for them and the PST-OTMS constructs need to be further explored. This session will cover the development and initial pilot study results of the PST-OTMS and describe its use as a valuable assessment tool to determine the motivational needs of pre-service teachers and evaluate the impact of the degree programs on pre-service teacher motivation for online teaching and learning. Additionally, presenters will seek to acquire feedback about the constructs of the current tool from attendees and  seek input about the possible additional constructs that might be connected to the motivations to teach online of pre-service teachers. To engage participants, their feedback will be logged through a response system and real-time results will be displayed. Additionally, the session format will provide a rich environment for discussion between attendees and the presenters that will ultimately support the development of future K-12 teachers as they learn to teach in blended and online learning spaces. 

 

Session Objectives:

  • Describe the need for assessing online teaching motivations of pre-service teachers 

  • Explain the process of development of the PST-OTMS instrument

  • Examine the results from the initial pilot study

  • Solicit feedback about the constructs of the PST-OTMS for future development of the instrument

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Microteaching as a Method to Develop Healthcare Professionals’ Teaching Skills | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere E3

This session introduces participants to how to develop specific teaching skills for prospective educators using microteaching practices in online/blended courses. The session shares examples of the applied framework of the microteaching design, implementation, and evaluation, including students’ technical experiences and challenges in recording their microteaching lessons during the pandemic time.

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Extended Abstract

Microteaching, a teacher training and faculty development technique, has long been used to develop crucial knowledge, teaching skills, and professional attitudes of prospective teachers or educators (Allen et al, 1972; Cooper & Allen, 1970; Gajjar, 2012). The application of this method is a great way to evaluate a teacher’s strengths as well as to propose ideas for improving the art of teaching skills. This teaching method is also applicable to online and/or blended courses to generate interest in a subject and transform learning activities into hands-on experiences. Through action-oriented course assignments, we can have our students involved in the teaching process that can foster learning engagement and skill development of online students in specific areas.

A 15-week graduate master level course, Teaching Healthcare Professionals has been using an assignment model of microteaching to develop healthcare educators’ content presentation, and teaching skills, including reflective critical-thinking skills for the last seven years. The implementation of microteaching usually involves six stages: 1) plan/design, 2) teach, 3) observe, 4) re-plan, 5) re-teach, and 6) re-observe (Remesh, 2013; Bajaj et al., 2014), but the Teaching Healthcare Professionals course has adopted the first three steps, plus peer and self-evaluation as the fourth step. Students (healthcare professionals) are assigned three 10-minute microteaching presentations throughout the semester. Each presentation is recorded and followed by self-assessment and peer evaluations, including questions and answers. The recordings are posted on the course site for further reflections. Also, during the COVID-19 pandemic time, students pre-recorded their microteaching practice using various technologies in a very innovative and creative format. Microteaching assignments have turned out to be an effective and engaging technique for supporting healthcare professionals’ learning and developing their teaching competencies in a meaningful context. Those microteaching sessions have provided students with opportunities to practice their teaching skills, engage more extensively with the course content, and learn from each other within an online classroom setting.

This education session will introduce participants to how to develop prospective educators’ specific teaching skills using the microteaching method that promotes a learner-centered pedagogy for interactive learning practices in online/blended courses. The session will share some examples of the applied framework of the microteaching design, implementation, and evaluation using a step-by-step approach. The presenter will share a summary of students’ responses to the following questions and their reflections on microteaching assignments:

  1. As a result of your three micro-teaching sessions, what are the three most important skills you gained in doing those assignments?
  2. What are the practical values of the microteaching sessions for your professional development as a medical educator?
  3. Why is it important to design the microteaching session before the actual teaching?
  4. How did you feel about the peer and self-evaluations of your sessions?
  5. What was your impression of the recording of your microteaching?
  6. What would you share with future students in this course about your experience in microteaching?
  7. What changes, if any, would you recommend for the application of the microteaching method in an online course?

Finally, the session will address students’ experiences with technology, technical challenges, and limitations of recording microteaching practices/lessons during the COVID-19 pandemic time. Participants will leave this session with a wealth of knowledge about this innovative and creative pedagogy of microteaching along with sample tools for peer and self-assessment.

 Learning Objectives

By the end of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe how to develop prospective educators’ specific teaching skills using the microteaching method in online/blended courses
  • Analyze the implementation stages of microteaching, including the application of self-assessment and peer-evaluation approaches
  • Discuss the benefits of microteaching practices, technology-related challenges, and limitations during recording microteaching lessons

Level of Participation:

This 45-minute information session is structured to create a mutual learning experience with a combination of interactive presentation (25 minutes), large group discussion (10 minutes), and participants’ questions (5 minutes). Both experienced faculty instructors and instructors who have no experience will gain crucial pedagogical knowledge and learn the benefits of microteaching practices to develop prospective educators’ teaching skills and related competencies, including increasing online students’ learning engagement within an online course.

References:

Allen, D. W., Poliakoff, L., & Cooper, J. M. (1972). Microteaching. Washington: U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare/ Office of Education, National.

Bajaj, P., Patil, M. S., & Almale, B. (2014). Microteaching in Medical Education. MVP Journal of Medical Sciences, 1(2), 84. https://doi.org/10.18311/mvpjms/2014/v1/i2/822

Cooper, J. M., & Allen, D. W. (1970). Microteaching: History and present status. Washington, D.C.: ERIC Clearinghouse on Teacher Education.

Gajjar, N.B. (2012). Microteaching A Gateway For Become a Teacher. Lap Lambert Academic Publishing

Remesh, A. (2013). Microteaching, an efficient technique for learning effective teaching. Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, 18(2), 158-163.

 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Leveraging Interactive Video in PlayPosit for Active Learning and Assessment | Education Session | Northern Hemisphere E4

Are students getting the most out of your video lectures? Do you ever wish you could ask students questions and get answers like in a live lecture? This presentation will illustrate the use of PlayPosit to engage students, structure their learning experience and increase real-time interactivity with video lectures.

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Extended Abstract

When using video content in an asynchronous or flipped teaching modality, the space between you and your students can result in feeling disconnected. Even the most well-designed lecture videos can fail to capture student attention and leave the instructor wondering if the students truly learned anything from their presentation. PlayPosit is an interactive video overlay tool with many options for student engagement, including multiple-choice, true/false, short answer questions, pauses for resources or additional information, a table of contents, embedded websites, and polls. In this session, a group of instructional designers will describe several use cases for PlayPosit and how it can enhance both active learning and assessment in the online classroom environment. Throughout the presentation, presenters will use Broadcast, a PlayPosit tool used in live sessions, to survey and elicit audience participation. 

The presentation will begin with a brief overview of PlayPosit and its capabilities. In the first case, the presenters will discuss how interactions were used in a course about amusement parks to increase student engagement. In this course, these quick assessment checks used the most basic interaction types but still met the goal of providing students with knowledge checkpoints in each lecture. 

In the next use case, the presenters will show more complex interactions within PlayPosit used in a plant resource protection course, including a table of contents and embedding resources. This course used a table of contents feature to chunk the content of the lecture videos into manageable 10-15 minute increments. The table of contents also allowed students to see a roadmap or outline of the lecture video and navigate to various sections. The tool for embedding resources complimented this course well, as the lectures introduced students to many plant resource policies and procedures. The resource embedding feature enhanced the delivery of these policies and procedures as students could immediately access the materials mentioned in the lecture videos. 

In the third use case, the presenters will describe how PlayPosit interactions can serve as formative and summative assessment tools within the same lecture. In this use case, the presenters will show how the interactions were formatted to assess student knowledge at the beginning and end of each lecture in a plant pest management course. In this way, the course instructor was able to monitor the efficacy of their lectures on student knowledge, and students could actively track their learning progress. 

The presentation will conclude with a reflection on the presenters’ collective experience using PlayPosit in the presented use cases. Presenters will also share what they learned from day-to-day use cases in other courses. At the end of the session, time will be set aside for verbal questions and questions using PlayPosit’s interactive Broadcast tool.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Integrating 21st Century Skills Development and Assessment into Online Education | Express Workshop | Northern Hemisphere A3/A4

Preparing college and career ready students extends beyond content knowledge. Students need to build communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity skills. And they need a way to showcase their skills in applications and interviews. Come learn how micro-credentials can be used to integrate 21st Century skills into online courses.

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Extended Abstract

Does learning content knowledge alone provide a guarantee that a student will succeed? Employers and higher education institutions look for evidence of ability to communicate, collaborate, use critical thinking, and be creative. But how can entry level applicants show they have garnered these skills through their educational experiences?

In today’s world of education, it is not enough to simply teach content knowledge. We must look at the student in their entirety, as the whole child. This means that every course designed or taught must address skills that will better equip students to thrive in college and careers, along with solid content. Whole child learning is required in many states along with meeting state content standards. It is now an essential piece of course design!

Teaching the 21st Century skills of communication, collaboration, critical thinking, and creativity in a traditional brick and mortar setting is not necessarily easy but has an advantage over an online setting. Traditional classroom teaching can provide opportunities for class discussion and other interactive activities that allow educators to dive into these topics and mentor students as they practice these skills. However, this is more challenging to accomplish in an online setting, especially when students are asynchronous. Measuring and evaluating these skills is another challenge. And then, how can students prove they have gained these skills?

This session will cover how a group of instructional designers for a private online high school have worked to develop model courses designed to integrate not only solid content learning, but also teach our students character attributes and 21st Century skills. We will share with you how we developed this integration model that seamlessly provides whole child education into asynchronous online learning courses of any content area. We will also share the micro-credentials we developed which allow students to provide proof of the skills they have gained. These micro-credentials can be shared in job interviews and on college applications.

During our session we will spend the first half presenting skill integration strategies in a variety of course content areas, interspersed with small group discussions and think-pair-share activities. Participants will be provided templates and examples of not only the various skills we have developed, but also how we have templatized the integration to create consistency in courses. Attendees will then engage with colleagues of similar content areas to discuss the strategies presented. During this portion, presenters will engage with groups allowing for time to ask questions. The remaining time will allow participants to practice implementing these integration strategies in their own content or design courses. It is the goal of the session that all attendees will take with them a list of skills as well as an example lesson that can be a resource for future design and course building.

Session Learning Outcomes:

  • Identify a 21st Century skill that students are likely to gain in a course you teach, facilitate, or design.
  • Select two or more assignments or assessments where student proficiency in the chosen 21st Century skill can easily be measured.

Session activities will include:

  • Small group discussion of possible 21st Century skills that integrate well within a subject.
  • Individual and group brainstorming session about assignments that measure 21st Century skills.
Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Advancing Culturally Responsive and Social Justice Education: An Equity Minded Approach to Digital Teaching and Learning | Education Session | Asia 5

This session examines how digital learning aligned with culturally responsive and social justice teaching strategies can address disparities within higher education. We will explore how digital tools and courseware features grounded in culturally affirming and sustaining pedagogy can be operationalized to dismantle persistent inequities inherent in traditional teaching practices.

 

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Extended Abstract

To transform teaching, instructors need to be supported to learn how to leverage cultural knowledge in their pedagogy in ways that not only engage their students but also strengthen their discipline-based learning. The role culture plays in cognitive development is a significant element that continues to be dismissed or overlooked in the analysis of instructional disparities in college classrooms. When our instructional practices acknowledge, invite, and integrate nondominant cultural norms, practices, assumptions, priorities, and beliefs we can disrupt and dismantle persistent and profound inequities. This session will identify how digital instructional technologies can be employed to support equity-minded teaching and learning approaches, such as culturally responsive, anti-racist teaching, and open pedagogy. By breaking down specific instructional strategies within each pedagogical approach we provide targeted guidance on which digital learning tools, courseware and LMS features can be employed to build on students’ sociocultural identities, culturally-bound prior knowledge and lived experiences. Our societies learnings from the dual pandemics of COVID-19 and systemic racism forced academia to rely on digital tools to address the gross inequities that could no longer be ignored. Much has been revealed and recognized since March 2020 that changed the way the academia views the role that our structures, policies and practices serve the inequitable status quo of institutions of higher education.  During the rapid transition to remote instruction, many faculty were afforded an opportunity to build different relationships with not only technology and their disciplinary content, but also with the students and the communities they serve. At the same time our community of leaders and innovators struggled to keep up with the demands from faculty to bridge the gap between theory and practice with equity-minded teaching and learning practices that serve the students that were disproportionately impacted by the interaction of the public health crisis and systemic racism. This session will provide actionable guidance for culturally responsive, impactful, and equity-minded digital teaching and learning strategies that facilitate student engagement and equitable learning outcomes.  

As higher education continues to grapple with diversity, inclusion, and persistent inequitable outcomes, we must be committed to asset-based, student-centered, and equity-minded approaches to learning. Culturally responsive teaching is a multidimensional equitable approach that encompasses discipline-based content, learning environment, student-faculty relationships, and assessment. It requires upholding and embracing a wide range of cultural knowledge, experiences, contributions, and perspectives within educational experiences. Through culturally responsive teaching there are direct connections made to discipline-based academic content, students' culture, and their lived individual and communal experiences. Through culturally responsive teaching students are empowered intellectually, socially, emotionally, and politically by the instructor’s use of cultural referents to impart knowledge, skills, and attitudes. This approach provides college students with relevant and liberating educational experiences that impact learning and performance. Culturally responsive instructional strategies include:    

  • Assess and activate prior knowledge  
  • Create opportunities for students to analyze and research topics from a social-cultural perspective 
  • Differentiate instruction 

There are a wide array of interactive web-based polling or game-based assessment tools, LMS blog and discussion board features that assess and activate prior knowledge. The more flexible tools allow instructors to add or revise question items in ways that provide opportunities for culturally-bound and general prior knowledge to be engaged. Faculty can align their culturally responsive teaching practices with digital tools like Voki and VoiceThread in ways that illuminate the global connections revealed in their research of course content from diverse context and culturally informed points of view.  Adaptive courseware’s use of personalized learning pathways and individualized feedback loops provide a comprehensive mechanism to efficiently facilitate a key culturally responsive teaching strategy: differentiated instruction.   

Digital learning technologies can also be used to enable social justice education strategies like anti-racist teaching.  Borrowing from Kendi’s (2019, p. 18) definition of anti-racist policy, the staff and faculty engaged in this work at Brown University define “anti-racist teaching” as intentional syllabus design, class content, or pedagogy that creates or develops racial equity, with applications for face-to-face and remote/hybrid teaching environments. Digital learning tools can be used to enact anti-racist strategies including confronting racist perspectives in discipline, authentically representing history, incorporating conversations about race in relation to course content and developing service-learning projects to connect student learning to transformative social action.  

Open pedagogy’s use of learner-generated content and participatory technologies afford many opportunities to invite and center cultural knowledge.  Through socially constructed media such as blogs, wikis students engage in reflective practice and work collectively to produce artifacts that they share, reconfigure, and redeploy. Open pedagogy is a form of experiential learning that can be intentionally designed to increase equitable access to education by reducing economic, technical, social, cultural, and political barriers to education. To some, open pedagogy, is a movement to promote social justice. It entails far more than the types or cost of instructional materials. Open pedagogy encourages a connected community with enhanced access to high-quality, peer-reviewed online resources, with the ability to participate in the technology. Open pedagogy supports faculty-student collaboration, adding voices and perspectives that are reflective of the diverse student body in college courses. Open pedagogy is based on the belief that academic progress is generated by collaboration, that the playing field for empirical research should be leveled globally, and that work conducted in a democratic environment, with the use of innovative technologies, should be made available to every student.     

During the session, attendees will have the opportunity to engage with the intersection of equity-minded practice and digital learning by working together in triads to discuss how to center cultural knowledge and students’ lived experiences. Each triad will be given a specific instructional strategy and the name and description of a digital tool, LMS or courseware feature to consider. Together they will identify how the digital and instructional element can be aligned to invite, validate, and/or affirm students’ cultural knowledge.  

Participants will be able to: 

  • Identify digital tools that integrate with equity-minded instructional approaches: culturally responsive teaching, anti-racist teaching and open pedagogy. 
  • Recognize the benefits of culturally responsive teaching and social justice education and identify potential digital teaching and learning strategies that support the equity-minded approaches.   
  • Take steps to create course elements that validate, affirm, and embrace the diverse perspectives, lived experiences, and cultures of the student they serve. 
  • Engage in culturally responsive practice to advance equity minded teaching and learning. 

The call for educators to examine equity requires implementing inclusive, innovative, and student-centered instructional approaches that require the thoughtful and purposeful use of digital technologies. This session not only amplifies an equity-minded approach to teaching and learning but offers actionable steps to operationalize the equitable use of digital learning technologies.  

 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
America’s Reading Crisis; An Online Learning Solution | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 5

Third-grade reading proficiency is an indicator of future student success; however 47% of students in one state are not meeting this goal. This mixed methodology study investigated the extent to which virtual school in second grade prepared students for third grade reading achievement using pre and post COVID data.

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Extended Abstract

At this very moment, America is facing a reading crisis. Seventy percent of incarcerated adults cannot read above a fourth grade reading level. More than 80 percent of students who fail to earn a high school diploma were struggling readers in third grade. We know that third grade is a critical academic indicator for a student’s future success in middle school and ninth grade, on-time graduation rates, and career success; however 47% of third grade students in one state are not meeting this goal. Without proper reading skills, our workforce is less robust, job opportunities are more limited and people's lives are held hostage as their own self-worth becomes diminished. We need to explore ways to improve reading proficiency in third grade students now.

The purpose of my study, An Evaluation of Virtual School’s Preparation of Second Grade Students for Third Grade Reading Proficiency, was to investigate the extent to which virtual school in second grade prepared students for third grade reading achievement. I used a mixed-methodology to compare extant data from a state database, teacher surveys, and follow-up interviews. The data from my study demonstrated that third-grade students in virtual school outperformed third-grade students in face-to-face learning environments in reading proficiency by seven percentage points on the State Standards Assessments between the years of 2015-2019. These data were in direct contradiction with the data from the teacher surveys and interviews. 

This study concludes with several research-based online learning solutions using Michael G. Moore’s Theory of Transactional Distance to improve teacher effectiveness in online instruction to increase student reading achievement. A policy proposal requiring all teachers to have online teaching and learning training is recommended for educational leaders. Teachers will maximize success in the classroom by learning how to implement the Theory of Transactional Distance. Parents are given tangible ways to support readers and online learners. The session will conclude with all attendees learning how to make these online classroom changes happen. 

Level of Participation:  

The lecture plan for interactivity will be twofold. First, attendees will take a poll upon entering the room. They will select if they are attending this conference with the mindset of an educational leader, teacher, or parent. This will help direct my lecture and give the audience more information about who they are in a room with. 

Then, attendees will simulate a third-grade Florida classroom of students and their future based on the current reading proficiencies. Each attendee would be a “student” and receive a number which would correlate with their academic indicator to predict their future success. Throughout the lecture, I would refer back to the academic indicator for discussion. For instance, if there were 50 people in attendance, 24 random numbers would stand and be told that they are not reading on grade level (which would be approximately 47%). One out of those six “students” will not graduate high-school, so four of those 24 “students” will be chosen to be high school dropouts and earn half as much as their peers. 90% of the four “students” will be on welfare. This will help attendees identify with third-grade students in a current classroom and their predicted futures based on the current reading level proficiencies and critical academic indicators.

Session Goals:

Attendees will walk away with an appreciation for the seriousness of third grade reading proficiency academic indicators and the urgency to implement change using online education. They will be able to describe the plans needed for education leaders, teachers, and parents to lead, shape, and inspire change.

     

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Planning Blended Learning: Using a “magical” course template | Education Session | Europe 1

In this session we share blended course templates and planning tools. Participants will walk through a mixed map activity guiding them to consider levels of blending. We will discuss quality assurance for blended courses that fosters successful learning environments. Participants will determine the characteristics of a template for their context.

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Extended Abstract

The combination of the face-to-face and online environments in blended learning presents both opportunities and challenges in the course design process. Before beginning to decide on the content or technology you want to incorporate in your blended course you must decide what you want the ultimate outcome to look like. A course template provides a framework for designing, building, and delivering a blended course.

During this session, we will be discussing how each of us has experience in using course templates to create blended learning. We will share our reasons and methods for planning for and preparing a template that ultimately results in the final learning product.

During this session, we will introduce participants to the use of a mixmap to assist in the organization of what the mix of a course will be between online, in person, or some combination for each course element. Participants will be asked to think about each course element including instruction, content materials, interactions (student-student, instructor-student, and student-content), activities, and assessments, and map these elements as to how they will occur in the blended course. We will provide a blank template modified from the UCF Blended Toolkit and utilized in planning Blended Learning with Penn State faculty.  

We will also share examples of completed Mixmaps. The Mixmap is then used as a foundation to create an extended curriculum map which includes for each module of instruction, the learning objectives, resources, activities, and assessments, and how those occur, either during in-person learning or asynchronous learning. 

When planning the instructional “blended” of a course it is important to consider the planned rhythm or cadence of instructional methods. With careful planning, similar instructional approaches and methods can be planned in a systematic way that helps keep students organized and improves course success. For example, if a course meets every M-W-F, perhaps asynchronous learning occurs every Friday, with some type of assignment or assessment. We will share examples of visuals used to convey course rhythm in course syllabi.

During the session we will be asking participants to think through the following questions with us:

  1. What do we want students to be able to do/be competent in at the end of the semester?” How will they show that?
  2. What are the goals of the course?
  3. What technology will promote those goals?

We will encourage thinking backward from the final course goal and making the focus on the actual technology last. We will conduct a brief review of the creation of objectives and the need for their alignment when blended activities are selected. We will take participants through filling out a Blended Course Integration chart. Participants will do an exercise to determine the best way to integrate synchronous and asynchronous content/methods... keywords will be defined and example activities will be shared.

Using the mix map and integration chart we will work together to brainstorm how the participant's LMS can assist with integrating the plan and mix they have decided is right for them. We will discuss:

  1. What isn’t working in my current course? 
  2. Is there a way to move that piece online that would improve the outcome? 
  3. Can my LMS facilitate that specific improvement?

We will draw on some research about how using an LMS to manage blended learning will improve and streamline the learning process. Research will be shared that confirms the LMS use to be of benefit to students.

Research shows that continuous quality assurance for blended learning is an important aspect of implementing and maintaining successful blended courses and programs. Many tools are available for use as self-applied standards to help create and maintain high-quality blended learning. We will share two rubrics participants can implement: the Commonwealth of Learning (COL) Quality Assurance Rubric for Blended Learning which recognizes factors associated with high quality blended learning courses, and the Quality Matters Rubric intended for assessing course quality and assisting the course design of online and blended courses for higher education. We will also share a checklist for quality adapted from BlendKit.

With the idea in mind that certain elements are required for Quality Blended, learning participants will review three examples of a strong development template, and work in small groups to discuss and outline their own development template based on their institution's needs. The following elements in the examples will be featured:

  • Home Page
  • Syllabus
  • Orientation
  • Content
  • Discussions
  • Assignments
  • Activities

A folder of resources and template examples will be curated and shared in the OLC conference system for download. 

 

 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Developing Professional Dispositions Among Generation Z’s in the Online Environment: Student Wants vs. Professional Needs | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 11

The expectations of Gen Z students in online courses do not always align with the dispositions instructors in professional preparation programs know they need. Explore practical ways of supporting today’s online learners as they grow in their understanding of what it means to be a professional in their discipline. 

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Extended Abstract

     What matters to today’s students in the online environment? Flexibility and less stress! Students want their professors to understand that they have lives outside of school. They expect understanding when they need extra time to complete an assignment. If an assignment doesn’t meet their needs, they appreciate having the opportunity to make changes to how they complete the work. In response, on one side of the continuum is the professor who says, “No way! In the real world, you will need to learn to meet deadlines and do what you have to do.” On the other side of the continuum, is the professor who says, “Sure! No problem.”

     We would argue that neither response helps the Gen Z student develop much-needed professional dispositions. And therein lies the key—Gen Z needs the opportunity to develop professional dispositions. So how do we support such development? Specifically, how do we support the development of dispositions in the online environment?

     Unlike times past, when many assumed that coursework was the main priority for students, current university students tend to juggle an array of family and work responsibilities as they pursue higher education. In addition, they do not always have the soft skills that promote success in the classroom--or in their profession.

     One place to begin is in reflecting on our own expectations as professors of Gen Z students. How well do we know them? How well do we understand why they approach their coursework in ways that may be so different from the way we approached our own professional preparation? Additionally, we can strengthen the way we link targeted professional dispositions to learning outcomes. Rather than assume and expect, how can we improve strategies to support and guide?

Session outline
1. Students’ wants of online instructors (from author’s research): flexibility; connections and engagement; sense of belonging; and faculty who genuinely understand that the student have a life outside of school which brings lowered stress and fewer negative feelings.

2. Faculty wants: academic rigor; established learning outcomes; and typically  unwritten expectations of development of professionalism such as managing projects, short timelines, competing priorities, and collaboration with peers.       

3. Brief reference to Sanford’s theory of support and challenge.       

4. Examine participants’ intended learning outcomes: with a specific course in mind, review defined learning outcomes and if they address the sometimes-unwritten expectations that are aligned with dispositions. Provide an example to facilitate the activity.

5. Conversation starters: presenters will share the four categories below, organized according to students’ wants in online courses, and strategies designed to balance student wants and redefined learning outcomes/dispositions. The session participants will pick which category to discuss first.

a. Choice and flexibility: due dates, format, number of assignments

b. Connections: type of group work compared to specific learning outcomes, connections to networks

c. Belonging: individual strengths, instructor facilitate connections to student interests, student announcements in the course

d. Course design: more assignments with lower points, grading time turnaround, due dates scheduled within macrosystem; due dates prior to drop add deadline

Level of Participation:

In this small group discussion session, attendees will first be introduced to the topic and identify some of the tensions experienced between student expectations and the professional dispositions (1-3 in the above outline). Presenters will then facilitate a short reflection activity asking the participants to utilize one of their own courses as a reference. Finally, the presenters will start and facilitate a discussion on one of the four categories (#5 a-d in the outline above) according to participants’ preference. Other categories can be discussed according to the participants’ level of interest. Via a link, participants will take away a tip sheet that includes a short reflection guide to strengthen intended learning outcomes (#4 in the outline) and an expanded list of specific strategies (#5 in the outline above) designed to assist faculty in meeting student needs while strengthening their expectations and course learning outcomes.

Session Goals:

Individuals attending this session will gain a better understanding of the disconnect that often occurs between Gen Z student expectations and expectations within professional preparation programs. Additionally, attendees will gain practical strategies for supporting the development of professional dispositions in the online learning environment.

 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Conversation Cafe: Designing an online Third Place to Foster Student Community, Creativity, Joy, and Deep Learning | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 10

Designing an intentional “third place” in online programs seems promising to address student-voice, student-led learning, connection, and critical dialogue. Third places may also help students make connections between courses and show up as their “real selves”. This session aims to engage participants in exploring how third places could be structured.

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Extended Abstract

A “third place” is a term first provided by sociologist Ray Oldenburg (2013) to describe social spaces in communities such as community centers, coffee shops, restaurants, churches, and other businesses. Oldenburg notes that a third place is separate from a first space, typically a person’s home, and a second space, a place of work. Oldenburg (2013) provides insights into the potential and value of third places. At its core, third places are places to socialize, gather, collaborate and build relationships. While third places exist as physical spaces in communities, how might a third-place be leveraged to support online courses and communities? 

Elements of third places include the leveling of power structures where people can feel welcome regardless of their socio or cultural background. Third places also embody a playful atmosphere and where people can be creative, participating without worrying about a structured agenda. Oldenburg points out that third places are important because they provide space for leveraging the power of the community where people can accomplish things that are difficult to do alone. Ultimately, third spaces help members establish a sense of place and community. Oldenburg (2013) goes so far as to state that, “nothing contributes as much to one’s sense of belonging to a community as much as membership in a third place” (p. xxiii).  Therefore, it seems worthwhile to explore the potential of building online third place options that can capture these benefits. Additionally, there appears to be possible connections with the elements of third places and Garrison’s (2016) Community of Inquiry Framework, particularly the social presence component.

Online courses can sometimes feel too formal and structured for students and faculty alike. For example, there may be a real or perceived lack of organic and spontaneous opportunities for discussion and collaboration. Typical required discussion and assignments may seem fixed and inflexible, hindering student-led learning and social constructivist learning pedagogies. These course structures may inhibit social presence and the ability of online students to participate as their authentic selves, and to see others as “real people” (Garrison, 2016). In addition, students in an online program may lack opportunities to experience the program wholistically with other students, participating in siloed courses without opportunities to bridge the learning experience from one course to another. Other barriers to building community and opportunities to make deep connections to learning may be difficult outside of the course. Could the implementation of a third space help address these challenges as well? 

The planning for an intentional “third place” in online learning programs seems promising to address student-voice, student-led learning, connection, and critical dialogue. In 2022, in a new online doctoral program, the program director created and implemented optional weekly Zoom sessions (a possible third place) called “Conversation Cafe.” All of the program students and faculty were invited to these optional weekly online drop-in sessions. Some Conversation Cafe sessions included topics for discussion, skill-level tutorials, or program information, but most sessions were open-ended. Students were invited to share topics for discussion or just drop in to check in. Anecdotal feedback, observations, and reflection from the weekly Conversation 

Cafe sessions revealed several unintended benefits and surprising opportunities for students and faculty. For instance, students were often engaged in informal conversations about their work and family life. Conversations often focused on students’ projects or content from multiple courses.  Students were able to ask questions, provide support for each other, and suggest Conversation Cafe topics.  As a result of this positive experience with weekly Zoom Conversation Cafe sessions, the program director wondered what other elements of building community and deep learning could be realized in creating an online third place. Can an online third place provide additional possibilities for learners to expand their ways of knowing and increase student engagement? This session aims to provide an opportunity to explore the idea of a third place.

 

Third place theory has been adopted in education by reframing the first place as a person’s home and community and the second place as a formal educational space. The third place in this paradigm is another educational place and opportunity for students to embrace other ways of knowing and connecting without the formal structured curriculum. In online learning, it may be important to provide a virtual gathering place to help foster a third place. 

The online Conversation Cafe sessions in this example, appear to support the educational third place, prompting questions to frame further exploration.

 

  • How might the intentional design and implementation of a “third place”  in online programs strengthen the opportunities for students and faculty to build collaborative, inclusive relationships and engage in student-led critical dialogue?  

  • Could implementing a third place also help create environments to support and strengthen social presence and address inclusive learning environments? 

  • Can we capture the idea and benefits of social engagement in third places in the online spaces? 

  • How can we best design online third places to level power structures and inclusion?

  • Who should lead or facilitate online third places? Should it be faculty, students or both?

  • Are there opportunities to further utilize the third place to embrace social constructivist learning theory? 

  • Should third places be synchronous or asynchronous, or both? What technological tools would be beneficial to supporting online third places?

  • What other strategies have programs implemented that might have potential to support a third place?

Level of Participation

This discovery and dialogue session will implement a design thinking strategy called “unhurried conversations,” created by Johnnie Moore, a visiting tutor at Saiid Business School at Oxford University. Participants will be able to choose from questions and ideas about online third places to share ideas and engage in an active listening session in small groups.  The session will conclude with a collaborative closure discussion to help further the ideas of implementing effective online third places. The benefits of unhurried conversations provide opportunities for all to be involved and empowered to share. 

An asynchronous option for those who would like to continue the discussion on online third places will be provided, hoping that a collaborative group could be established for those who would like to continue exploring the implementation of an online third place.

Session Goals:

Individuals attending this session will be able to discuss and contribute their ideas for implementing a third place. They will provide new ideas for consideration on effective third places addressing potential challenges, barriers, and opportunities. Finally, participants will provide insights and share their experiences in online programs that may provide new ideas for exploration. 

 

References

Garrison, D. R. (2016). E-learning in the 21st century: A community of inquiry framework for research and practice. Taylor & Francis.

Oldenburg, R. (2013). The Café as a Third Place. In: Tjora, A., Scambler, G. (eds) Café Society. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137275936_2

   

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Supporting Regular and Substantive Interaction with OSCQR 4.0 | Education Session | Southern Hemisphere II

OSCQR has been updated to assist campuses, instructional designers (IDs), and faculty ensure that online courses can demonstrate designs comply with the new US Department of Education regulation requiring Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI) between online learners and their instructor(s). You will be provided with an overview of OSCQR and the tools and information to improve the instructional design (including RSI) and accessibility in online courses.

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Extended Abstract

OSCQR 4.0 has updated standards and documentation to reflect the new US Federal Department of Education regulation regarding requirements for Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI) in all online/distance education courses for financial aid purposes that went into effect on July 1, 2021.

OSCQR has been updated with the RSI lens to assist campuses, instructional designers (IDs), and faculty ensure that online courses can demonstrate designs that support regular and substantive interaction between online learners and their instructor(s).

Working with a volunteer campus-based workgroup, OSCQR standards were reviewed and updated, and OSCQR supporting materials, resources, and documentation were refreshed. The intention is to make sure that Regular and Substantive Interaction is clearly visible, articulated, and highlighted in specific OSCQR standards, and in all related OSCQR support materials.

In addition to the use of OSCQR, other activities are essential to fully ensure RSI compliance, such as faculty/ID training and awareness building, online teaching skills, institutional/departmental policy and monitoring, but the new version of OSCQR is one tool that can be used to support RSI in the instructional design of any online course.

The .PDF of the new OSCQR 4.0 rubric is available for use/download now. The online interactive OSCQR rubric and dashboards will be available before the new year.

In this session you will:

  1. Receive an overview of the new OSCQR 4.0 self-assessment rubric and discuss how to apply the standards.
  2. See how the OSCQR rubric address Regular and Substantive Interaction, Instructional design and Accessibility, and how it can be used to create an online course action plan for the continuous improvement of an online course.
  3. Leave the session prepared to conduct an online course review with the OSCQR rubric.
  4. Become a SUNY Online Fellow in the "Friend of SUNY" role, so we can continue the conversation started in the session.
  5. Introduction to OSCQR (self-assessment) badge
  6. Take home the OSCQR Self-Assessment Rubric.
  7. Be invited to join the OSCQR usergroup.

Additional Resources to Explore:

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Completion and success of community college developmental students enrolled in an online gateway mathematics course. | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I | Position 9

Improving successful outcomes for students within an online modality can assist higher education to create pathways for students to succeed within an online course. With the growth and popularity of online learning, postsecondary institutions must continue to develop best practices in areas of online teaching pedagogies to promote student success (Garrison et al., 2000; Lawson, T.M., 2019; Swan et al., 2009; Swan, 2002).

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Extended Abstract

As online education gains popularity among both learners and postsecondary institutions, there is a movement toward identifying ways to promote student success. Over half of all higher education institutions offer online classes, due in part to the ease of offering and scheduling (Hoffman, 2006); educators seek ways to identify any demographic or academic characteristics that lead to success (Jaggars & Bailey, 2010). With the growth and popularity of online learning, postsecondary institutions must continue to develop best practices in the areas of online teaching pedagogies to promote student success. Within community colleges there is a growing acceptance of online courses and given that over 60% of incoming students test into developmental math coursework (Chen, 2016), answers must be sought to assist these developmental math learners toward online success.

This study investigated the role of various student characteristics concerning student success in online developmental math course completion. The sample used was students enrolled in a specific identified gateway mathematic course offered fully online in at a large suburban, public community college located in the northeastern part of the United States. Utilizing a mixed methods explanatory sequential design, the research explored course completion rates of developmental students enrolled in online college-level mathematics courses, the study analyzed the role of demographic and academic characteristics for developmental students enrolled in a college-level mathematics course offered fully online from the fall 2017 through fall 2019 academic year. A second phase of semi-structured interviews was conducted to explore aspects of student success from individuals identified in the first phase.

The questions guiding this research were:

RQ1.   What is the predictive influence of demographic characteristics of age, gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on successful course completion of developmental students enrolled in a college-level online mathematics course?

RQ2.   What is the predictive influence of academic characteristics of successful credit hours attempted, number of developmental courses taken, and number of credit hours awarded on successful course completion of developmental students enrolled in a college-level online mathematics course?

RQ3.   How do students enrolled in a fully online mathematics course describe their participation and engagement within this course?

My research findings indicate the online modality for learning although still being analyzed for its effectiveness, has become a viable source for education. Community colleges must continue to gauge whether the modality of online learning is a fit for the student and the institutions that offer it and must create pathways for success. Research has shown, community college students select online courses for many reasons (Jaggars, 2014; Swan et al., 2009), and as such it is imperative that leaders of these institutions continue to provide pathways for these students’ success. The quantitative portion identified that community college students that had completed a significant portion of their needed coursework were more apt to advance and complete an online course. A further outcome discovered from the qualitative portion of this study elaborated students’ need for collaboration, as they described the necessity and the ability to create a community of learners within the online classroom (Garrison et al., 2000; Lawson, T.M., 2019; Swan et al., 2009; Swan, 2002). A community of learners has the potential to address the isolation and the disconnect experienced by both student and instructor.

Comparing online learning to traditional face-to-face coursework for the presence of engagement of both the student and the instructor, the research points to formation of engagement being created through components of the learning management system that are rooted in Harasim's (2017) Online Collaborative Learning (OCL) theory. Thereby validating that social presence affects not only results for students but possibly an instructor’s fulfillment derived from teaching a course (Swan, K., 2002). Improving the successful outcomes for students within an online modality can assist higher educational to create pathways for developmental students to succeed within an online course. 

The results of this mixed methods explanatory research can be potentially used to forecast and improve community college student success of previously enrolled developmental mathematics learners that enroll to take their first college-level mathematics course in an online modality. 

References

Chen, X. (2016). Remedial course taking at US public 2-and 4-year institutions: Scope, experiences, and outcomes. Statistical analysis report (NCES 2016-405). National Center for Education Statistics.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education2(2–3), 87–105.

Harasim, L. (2017). Learning theory and online technologies. Routledge.

Hoffman, P. (2006, August 23). Virtual teams in education. http://ezinearticles. com/?Virtual-Teams-in-Education&id=279703

Jaggars, S., & Bailey, T. R. (2010). Effectiveness of fully online courses for college students: Response to a Department of Education meta-analysis. Community College Research Center, Teachers College, Columbia University. http://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/media/k2/attachments/effectiveness-online-re...

Jaggars, S. S. (2014) Choosing between online and face-to-face courses: Community college student voices. American Journal of Distance Education, 28(1), 27–38, https://doi.org/10.1080/08923647.2014.867697

Lawson, T. M. (2019). Community of inquiry: Measuring online learners’ emotional presence, self- efficacy, and perceived quality of online learning (Doctoral dissertation, Grand Canyon University).

Swan, K. (2002). Building communities in online courses: the importance of interaction. Education, Communication and Information, 2 (1), 23–49. https://doi.org/10.1080/1463631022000005016

Swan, K., Garrison, D. R., & Richardson, J. C. (2009). A constructivist approach to online learning: Community of Inquiry framework. In C. R. Payne (Ed.), Information technology and constructivism in higher education: Progressive learning frameworks (pp. 48–87). IGI Global.

 

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
A Student-Centered Model to Support Success Throughout the Doctoral Journey | Discovery Session | Southern Hemisphere I Position 3

Interested in an integrated strategy to provide a diverse community of adult learners the knowledge, skills, and credentials to enact positive social change in their communities? Our inclusive and student-centered approach to support services works to set expectations, ready skills, proactively guide, and support doctoral students through completion.

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Extended Abstract

Distance learning has helped to reshape access to high-quality education for working adult learners. A shift in graduate education toward broad inclusive support was evident at the recent Council of Graduate Schools conference (2021) with a focus on students at the center. As an online, broad-access admissions institution, it became critical to reimagine co-curricular instructional support to help doctoral students develop skills for academic success and make timely progress to graduation. By focusing on the entire doctoral journey, we are taking a more integrated approach with initiatives, services, and practices that support doctoral student progress. Intentional inclusivity and placing students at the center were key themes in this integrated approach.

In this session, we will engage with attendees to gather their experiences with the various points along the doctoral journey, and in particular, those in which there are opportunities to set expectations, ready skills, proactively guide, and support completion of the doctoral capstone. With the life cycle of the journey represented across the room, participants will add their thoughts and ideas to it, so we can examine together the many points touching the student experience and how institutions might work to integrate support.

Next, we will provide some background on the data-informed approach to doctoral support services that has evolved over the past few years at our institution. We will describe current and future initiatives in delivering co-curricular support to be inclusive of more students and to recognize their various learning needs at different points in their programs. As part of this session, information used to inform scaling to support a diverse and expanding population of doctoral students, including innovative and more effective modalities and access, will be discussed. We will include specific information on the holistic doctoral journey approach to integrate curricular and co-curricular support for all levels of readiness.

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
APLU Institution Community Break | Other | Asia 1

The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) is proud to host a community break for educators working at APLU institutions (See List of Institutions: https://www.aplu.org/members/our-members/). Join this informal and lively event to engage in networking, ideation, and planning for collaborations across the APLU and OLC communities. Coffee, tea and beverages will be served. For more information about the event or to RSVP, contact Dr. Karen Vignare at [email protected].

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Extended Abstract

     

Nov 15, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Eastern)
Two Strategies for Improving Online Student Experience | Industry Showcase - Demonstration | Oceanic 5

Student experience is the factor that often determines online enrollment and persistence. Schools can communicate that they care by measuring learner readiness and providing resources for support. Taking a proctored exam may be a frustrating student experience. Schools can improve the proctoring experience by providing multiple proctoring options.

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Extended A