Agenda

Date and TimeTitle
Mar 25, 2022
10:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
Affordable Learning Solutions for HBCUs: Get Started Through the Sharing of Practices, Strategies, Tools, and Resources | Workshop

Welcome to the 6th Annual Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) for HBCUs workshop where HBCU faculty, staff, and administrators share their practices for supporting faculty changing to no-cost and low-cost digital course materials, including OER, and saving students thousands of dollars. The preconference workshop will focus on helping HBCUs get started with their own AL$ programs.  Come start planning by learning from HBCUs that have made significant progress in their AL$ programs.  Come join us for this OPEN workshop at no additional cost!

***This workshop is free to all registered attendees of the OLC/MERLOT Innovate 2022 conference***

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Extended Abstract

Outline of Activities:   

  • Welcome from Robbie Melton and the TSU team 
  • What is Affordable Learning Solutions and what difference can it make at your campus?
  • HBCU showcases of AL$ programs 
    • How are they implementing their AL$ campus program? President/Provost communications, AL$ committee, funding, training, and professional development, etc.
    • What have they achieved so far?  # of faculty participating, amount of savings produced, program or policies supported by campus, etc.
    • What they wish they had planned and/or what important thing still needs to be done for their AL$ to be successful on their campus
  • Presentations by the HBCU AL$ Hub campuses
    • Central State University  
    • Morehouse College  
    • Southern University, Shreveport  
    • Bethune Cookman University 
    • Tennessee State University  
  • Participant assessment of the current status of their campus AL$ program
  • Closing Comments

 

Mar 25, 2022
1:00pm - 3:00pm (Central)
OLC Innovate 2022 Program Review and Networking Event | Other

With so many offerings, large conferences can be difficult to plan for (particularly during the current professional era, where many have to balance professional development alongside a regular work schedule). Join us for some classic OLC networking as we take time to meet new friends, share insider tips into how to get the most out of your online conference experience, and get started with mapping your OLC Innovate journey.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 28, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Central)
"Anytime" Asynchronous Engagement | Other

Not sure what to do between sessions? Consider checking out OLC Innovate's fully virtual and asynchronous engagement space. Each of the volunteer-driven engagement teams have prepared and carefully designed fun, engaging, and thought-provoking activities for you to take up on your own time. If nothing else, it is a great place to get new ideas for how to engage with others and build community. Plus, you'll get to learn more about OLC Innovate's 2022 Engagement Team (a group of dedicated volunteers from across the field who designed this year's engagement programming). Looking for the join link? Just visit any of the engagement team pages in Engagez (e.g. Speed Networking Lounge, Field Guides, OLC Live!, Innovation Studio, OLC Cafe & Mercantile, OLC Sanctuary).

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 28, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Central)
Custom Conference Consulting (Field Guide Base Station) | Other

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. "Stop by" anytime by visiting us in the Conference Canvas space or on Slack for help, guidance, recommendations, and custom consulting on making the most of your conference experience!

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 28, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Central)
Innovation Studio Asynchronous Design Challenges | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

The Innovation Studio has always been a hub for networking and a space to explore the pervasive challenges we face in the classroom and to craft innovative approaches for better reaching our unique populations of learners. Join us anytime (asynchronously) through the conference Canvas space or via Slack. We've prepared a series of challenges for you to improve your design thinking skills (which double as models for you to take with you into your own educational spaces).

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 28, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Central)
Join an Innovation Crew! | Other

Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action. Join a crew now at https://bit.ly/IN22Crews.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 28, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Virtual Field Guide "Power Hour" | Other

Join your volunteer Field Guides and other conference attendees for the synchronous Field Guide Power Hour, where they will help you plan your conference experiences based on your areas of interest, help you connect with a Crew, and create an OLC Innovate engagement plan. During this power hour, you’ll have the chance to organize your conference schedule and select presentations and activities you want to attend. The OLC Field Guides will be there to suggest interesting presentations and virtual social activities, train you on the use of the OLC Innovate Virtual conference venue and website, and point out Engagement Maps designed to help with your program planning. We will also discuss what sessions will be live streamed from the onsite conference in April, which all virtual attendees will have access to. Throughout the conference, you can access a collection of asynchronous informational videos and artifacts in PlayPosit, aimed at helping answer your conference going queries. We’ll also discuss the variety of ways to participate virtually - including Slack and Twitter! Meet old friends, make new acquaintances, and plan your schedule. We can't wait to see you there!

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Mar 28, 2022
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
OLC Live!: Conference Kick-Off and Major Themes of OLC Innovate 2022 | Other

Get ready for the #OLCInnovate 2022 virtual conference! Join OLC Live! host Dr. Kelvin Thompson for an opening conversation as we kick off the start of the conference with a preview of the sessions, themes, and experiences to come over the next several days.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 28, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
"Tell Me What you Want, What You Really, Really Want": Pop Culture, General Education Curriculum, and the Interests of Post-traditional Students | Education Session

Undergraduate programs are seeking innovative ways of inspiring student engagement in general education courses, including the incorporation of popular culture in curricular offerings. This session will lead to collaborative discussion surrounding survey results that suggest post-traditional students have higher preference for traditional general education course topics.

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Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance

General education courses are an important staple of undergraduate degree programs in the United States. While program-specific courses may offer the hard skills graduates will need in their specified careers, general education courses are designed to establish foundations for the development of the transferable skills needed for personal, social, and professional success. Problem-solving skills, the ability to work as a team, communication skills (both written and verbal), and leadership skills are among the top attributes sought by employers; they also are central themes in most general education programs (Finley, 2021; NACE Staff, 2020).     

Despite this, students often fail to recognize the relevance or importance of general education courses. A common perception of college students is to take general education classes early to “get them out of the way,” as if they are some hurdle holding students back. General education instructors and student advisors often receive questions from students about why they have to take general education classes. Studies on student attitudes and perceptions reveal that students have mixed feelings about the value and importance of general education courses (Johnson, 2010; Petrosko, 1992).

As a result, universities are exploring innovative ways to make general education courses more appealing to students. In addition to using varied pedagogical approaches, many universities have branched out from traditional general education course titles to include topics that are relatable and relevant to university students. Pop culture has become a notable theme among general education courses. In recent years, Glasgow’s University began offering a workshop based on the philosophical themes presented in the popular television series, “The Simpsons” (Ratner, 2018).  The University of California-Santa Cruz recently developed a course on the Harry Potter series, calling it “one of the most popular Humanities offerings of 2018, with nearly 400 students enrolling” (Garcia, 2018). Penn State drew inspiration from modern music and dance, developing a general education course studying the social and political influences of hip hop (Penn State News, 2019). Course topics like these are sure to stand out among traditional general education offerings like Introduction to Philosophy or Sociology.

This presentation will review results from an informal study conducted by general education faculty serving online, post-traditional students. Drawing inspiration from pop culture and the success of other universities, it explored social media and reality television as potential topics for updated general education courses. It sought the input of its students on the topics they would find most interesting, the topics they would find least interesting, and other course topics of interest. The findings were surprising, and suggested that post-traditional students are more interested in traditional general education course topics than topics related to pop culture. Students also reported a high value on courses related to developing life skills and maintaining mental, social, and emotional health regardless of the specific topic/subject area covered by a course.

Interactivity

This will be a highly-interactive presentation where participants will be asked to engage in discussion about the current successes and pitfalls experienced at their institutions when determining curricular offerings in General Education. Themes of discussion will surround participants’ perceptions of student interests and their preconceived notions of common general education course topics. In addition, the differences in the needs of traditional and post-traditional students will also be discussed, and whether these differences do (or should) impact the type of curriculum offered.

Takeaways

The takeaways from this presentation will be further developed through discussion. However, a key point of the research and presentation is that innovation in general education course design may not need to take the form of major curriculum overhauls to align with modern interests. Attendees of this discussion will have the opportunity to reflect upon their institution’s general education program, the needs and demands of modern society, and the needs and interests of its student base. While drawing from popular culture may entice some students, it may not be a cure-all for student engagement. Course designs should be done mindfully and in alignment with student needs.

References

Finley, A. (2021). How college contributes to workforce success: Employer views on what matters most. Association of American Colleges and Universities. https://www.aacu.org/sites/default/files/files/research/AACUEmployerRepo...

Garcia, M. E. (2018, June 5). Harry Potter course leaves students spellbound. UC Santa Cruz Newscenter. https://news.ucsc.edu/2018/06/harry-potter-class.html

Johnson, C. (2010). Attitudes and perceptions of general education requirements at career focused post-secondary institutions (3409271) [Doctoral dissertation, Capella University]. ProQuest Dissertations and Theses Global. https://aiuniv.idm.oclc.org/login?url=https://www.proquest.com/dissertat...

NACE Staff. (2020, January 13). Key attributes employers want to see on students’ resumes [Press release]. National Association of Colleges and Employers. https://www.naceweb.org/talent-acquisition/candidate-selection/key-attri...

Penn State News. (2019, April 24). New hip-hop course puts a fresh spin on learning: Course goes beyond rap to explore politics, history and culture. Penn State News. https://news.psu.edu/story/571062/2019/04/24/academics/new-hip-hop-cours...

Petrosko, J. M. (1992, November). Measuring first-year college students on attitudes toward general education outcomes [Conference session]. 1992 Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association, Knoxville, TN. http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED353310.pdf

Ratner, P. (2016, November 18). Why “The Simpsons” Is Now a Legit College-Level Philosophy Course. Big Think. https://bigthink.com/culture-religion/why-the-simpsons-is-now-a-legit-co...

Mar 28, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
50 Ways to Leave Your Computer: Holistic Self-Care for the Online Educator | Education Session

This interactive session provides a variety of holistic self-care techniques for online educators to help overcome unique challenges to wellbeing and prevent burnout.  Challenges include deficiencies in: work boundaries; social interaction; breaks; and movement/exercise.  Likewise excess: screen time; email/pingers; phone calls/texts; online meetings; and other distractions are barriers to self-care.

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Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance

The presenters are both experts in holistic nursing with Board Certification in Advanced Holistic Nursing (AHN-BC). Anyone who works online the majority of the time has faced challenges to self-care. This session will focus on holistic self-care for the online educator. Holistic self-care encompasses caring for the whole person; mind, body, and spirit. The mind-body connection within oneself is powerful; one affects the other. Challenges to caring for the whole self may be categorized into deficiencies and excesses. The deficiencies lead to excesses and vice-versa.

Lack of work boundaries for example, may lead to fragmented work, long or excessive work hours, and often wasted time. Online teachers often do not have a proper start and stop time, have no set workdays/work week, and no built-in breaks. How tempting is it for example, to pop online when the laptop is in the room and smartphone ever at hand? Working during one’s free-time such as family and leisure time is likewise a consequence. When working remotely, it is also easy to sit in one place for extended periods of time. Stagnation and excess screen time takes a toll on both the mind and body, with cognitive overload, eye-strain and lack of exercise as common consequences. Breaks and interactions tend to be regular when working in person, such as congregating in the break room, not so when working remotely. Interacting with people is natural and compulsory in the traditional workplace; as a juxtaposition, working online can be isolating. Commuting to work provides for preparation to set one’s mind in work-mode on the way to work, and from work equally important, a time to decompress. Walking to and from parking or public transit provides exercise. Remote workers may miss out on these “built in” benefits of their work-site counterparts.  Telecommuters lack rituals to move about and break up time.

Distractions for online educators are abundant. Anyone who works online knows the distraction of excessive email and message “pings”. Do you find yourself constantly flipping over to email each time you hear a ding, or when you are trying to concentrate on grading or crafting a document? Each time you click over, it diverts your focus and can cause lost productivity. No doubt the sheer volume of email and what to do with it is daunting. Phone calls and text messages also interrupt workflow and efficiency.  “Death by meeting”, with online meetings filling the majority of our days or work week, can be an issue as well, not leaving enough time for course development/improvement and actual teaching. Other distractions can be internet surfing, doorbells, outside noises, family members, easy access to food and snacks, and yes, even pets. All of these distractions can take away from completing important work, and extend our workdays, and cause us to neglect our holistic self-care.

Lack of holistic self-care as a result of lack of boundaries and overwork can cause chronic stress and result burnout. Burnout is not a disease, rather a disorder. The International Disease Classification-11 (World Health Organization, 2019) defines Burnout as the following:

"Burn-out is a syndrome conceptualized as resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. It is characterized by three dimensions:

  • feelings of energy depletion or exhaustion;
  • increased mental distance from one's job, or feelings of negativism or cynicism related to one's job; and
  • reduced professional efficacy.

Burn-out refers specifically to phenomena in the occupational context and should not be applied to describe experiences in other areas of life."

Interactivity

This lively session, therefore will provide 50 quick and easy to do techniques for the online educator to promote holistic self-care and wellbeing, and prevent chronic stress and burnout fallout. The presenters, who are both experts in holistic nursing and are Board Certified Advanced Holistic Nurses (AHN-BC), will share hands-on practice of complementary modalities. Attendees will be invited to practice select techniques during the presentation to foster interactivity, engagement and future integration into practice. Practical tips for managing work boundaries and distractions will also be discussed.

Session Goals

Participants will be able to

  • Explain why holistic self-care is important for the online educator.
  • Describe a variety of techniques and tips for self-care.
  • Practice select complementary modalities.

Reference

World Health Organization. (May, 2019).  Burn-out an "occupational phenomenon": International Classification of Diseases. Available from https://www.who.int/news/item/28-05-2019-burn-out-an-occupational-phenomenon-international-classification-of-diseases.

 

Mar 28, 2022
10:15am - 12:15pm (Central)
Academic Innovation -- be the change! | Workshop

As we cull through the lessons learned from the pandemic of 2020 and continue to weather continued disruptions to our digital learning and/or online education sector, it becomes increasingly important for institutions to create innovative and sustainable academic models that can be pivoted with ease and also meet the learning needs of students.  This session will focus on opening up space for design thinking towards new models aligned with institutionally-specific criteria to take back for possible implementation at each participant’s institution.

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Extended Abstract

As we cull through the lessons learned from the pandemic of 2020 and continue to weather continued disruptions to our sector, it becomes increasingly important for institutions to create innovative and sustainable instructional delivery models that can be pivoted with ease and also meet the learning needs of students.  As campuses around the globe continue to address the changing nature of COVID-19, many higher education leaders have started to recognize that sustainability and flexibility should be a key part of academic planning.  This session will take participants through exercises meant to free up their thinking from traditional academic delivery models into a space of creativity and open possibilities for organizational structures and development, as well as projects and programs that support online learning and delivery.  Leveraging design thinking, Blue Ocean Strategy, and drawing on fundamental concepts from entrepreneurship, participants will work on developing a rubric for academic innovation at their institutions, and think through a menu of new models that they can take back to their institutions to garner other stakeholder input into for possible implementation.  Participants will be challenged by the session facilitators, and peers -- both in small groups and as a larger group -- to think more boldly and broadly about models of academic delivery that meet the needs of the institution and its faculty, staff, and students and ones that are flexible and sustainable as well.  Participants will leave the session able to:

  1. Discuss innovation within the context of academic delivery models, 

  2. Identify core attributes of a future academic delivery models at their institutions, and

  3. Develop a set of possible innovations that can be implemented at their institutions.

Mar 28, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Neuromyths, Knowledge About The Brain, and Evidence-Based Practices: From Data To Action | Education Session

Research reveals a prevalence of believing neuromyths among educators worldwide. This session highlights findings from a 2021-study investigating awareness of neuromyths, general knowledge about the brain, and evidence-based practices within higher education among instructors, instructional designers, and administrators. Come test your knowledge and find out what factors can increase awareness.

 

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Extended Abstract

Prior research has indicated a relationship between an instructor’s beliefs and her/his instructional practices in general (Knapp, 2013, Stein & Wang, 1988; Youyan, Tan, Liau, Lau, & Chua, 2013). Therefore, it is important to understand the pedagogical beliefs of higher education instructors, instructional designers, and professional development administrators and their awareness of neuromyths, general information about the brain, and evidence-based practices that build upon the literature and advancements in the learning sciences. 

Neuromyths are false beliefs, which are often associated with education and learning, that stem from misconceptions or misunderstandings about brain function. Research on neuromyths dates back to 2002 with an international report published by the Organization of Economic Co-operation & Development (OECD). Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing research worldwide on the awareness of neuromyths in education and general information about the brain. The majority of research in this area has focused on K-12 education, but belief in neuromyths has also been found within segments of educators in higher education, including faculty, administrators, and instructional designers (Betts et al., 2019; Gleichgerrcht et al., 2015).

The purpose of this international survey study was to examine and compare awareness of neuromyths, general knowledge about the brain, and evidence-based practices in higher education among instructors, instructional designers, and professional development administrators in two- and four-year institutions of higher education (IHE) using data collected from the OLC 2018 study and this 2021 study. This study sought to learn more about the types of professional development attended by instructors, instructional designers, and professional development administrators during the pandemic and the relationship between using evidence-based practices with instructional design and teaching. Lastly, the study sought to examine the interest levels of instructors, instructional designers, and professional development administrators in scientific knowledge about the brain and how they perceive the higher education landscape post-pandemic.

This interactive session will share data and findings from the 2021 OLC international study and highlight neuromyths found within higher education that are also prevalent in K-12 education. Additionally, data and findings will highlight  awareness of evidence-based research from the neurosciences, cognitive sciences, and learning sciences. Panelists will discuss predictors of neuromyths and discuss the level of interest in learning more about the brain across instructors, instructional designers, and professional development administrators. Mind, Brain, and Learning Sciences strategies and resources will be shared that can be applied across disciplines and educational formats to support student engagement and transfer of learning across real-world contexts.

 

Mar 28, 2022
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
Virtual Speed Networking Lounge: Building Community Through Zoom Background Antics | Other

Join us for some Speed Networking fun! During this session, you will get to know each other through the use of Zoom's built in features. Get ready to change your background to something unique to you and share it with us all! It can be something meaningful, funny, or just something you love! Come join us for this fun space.

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

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Mar 28, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Helping Online Students Reach Their True Learning Potential Via Coaching | Education Session

Coaching is an effective learning tool for Students and Faculty. Coaching Sessions have provided Students with opportunities to focus on specific skills – as a compliment to the real-life application of the course material. Coaching results in a greater sense of community, and has improved Student persistence, retention, and affinity. 

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Extended Abstract

Coaching as a Service in Higher Education

Though often misunderstood for mentoring or advising in higher education, coaching is uniquely different by design.  To differentiate, Dr. Barry Butler, President of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, authorized the following definition of coaching to guide planning, implementation, and monitor efforts:

Coaching is a partnership that refers to those relationships that are performance or task driven and are started with a specific outcome in mind. Coaching relationships begin with the expectation that the relationship will end or transform once the challenge at hand has been successfully completed.

Coaching is a process of self-discovery that, through reflective questioning, allows Students to expand their thinking, stimulate growth, and acknowledge self-limiting behaviors.  Students initiate the process with an agenda – a goal, need, or challenge – in mind.  The Faculty Coach serves as a thinking partner to unlock possibility and solutions from within the Student.

Why Coaching?

Coaching is a means of advancing student success and has been shown to positively impact retention in higher education.  Bettinger & Baker (2014) conducted a study involving over 13,500 students enrolled at eight post-secondary institutions. They found that 66% of the students who were coached were still enrolled after 12 months, whereas only 51% retained from the non-coached group during that same period (Bettinger & Baker, 2014).  Another study found students that were coached had an 8% higher GPA than their non-coached peers, and were 11% more likely to persist into the second year of college (Linkow, Gamse, Unlu, Bumgarner, Didriksen, Furey, Meneses, Sami, & Nichols, 2017).

Beyond the institutions interests, the true benefit of offering coaching to post-secondary Students lies in the opportunity to help them realize their true potential and overcome obstacles during their academic journey and throughout life.     

Our Coaching History

The Worldwide College of Business at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University began offering Coaching Services in early 2018. The initiative was designed to help Students remove obstacles to success and achieve their goals – in effect, to prepare a more whole student.  Toward that end, thirty faculty were trained by the Coach Training Alliance (CTA). Faculty undertook this training commitment and were CTA certified following an immersive 22-week course.

The initial proposal offered pro-bono coaching to Students enrolled in the graduate and undergraduate Leadership programs.  The original idea was to require graduate Students to participate in Coaching as a required part of the curriculum. A similar Coaching service for undergraduate Students was started soon after. Today, the curriculum has evolved, and coaching is no longer mandated, but rather an optional service.  In addition, all Students in the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University - Worldwide campus are welcome to request coaching services.

The typical coaching engagement spans a period of three months with most sessions taking place via phone or video conference (Zoom) on a bi-weekly basis.  At the conclusion of the coaching relationship, 98% of Students reported that their coaching expectations were met and the majority - 83% (very likely) and 15% (likely) – would recommend coaching to other Students. 

While coaching conversations are private, common themes center on life and academic goals.  Feedback from Students suggest that Coaching has addressed diverse topics such as career progression, communication, relationships, professional growth, leadership development, interview preparation, time management, and skill development.

Given the diverse scope, an effort was undertaken to explore a targeted method of coaching designed to improve a specific skill.

A Coaching Pilot

In August 2021 a new form of our Coaching Program was piloted. The pilot involved an undergraduate leadership course. At the beginning of the semester Students were asked to introduce themselves to the class. Besides the routine introductory topics, the Students were also asked to identify a specific leadership skill they would like to work on during the semester. 

The latter point served as an opportunity to incorporate a coaching session to proactively address the student’s stated need.   In the August term two leadership courses were selected to participate in the pilot taught by a Faculty member, CTA Certified Coach, who had coached over 130 Students over the years.

The Faculty member made note of each Student’s specific leadership skill that needed work. The next step was to inform the Students that Coaching Sessions would be available, on a volunteer basis. More than 40% of the Students in the two courses registered for a Leadership Skills Coaching Session.

The Leadership Skills Coaching Sessions on averaged lasted an hour in length. A wide array of leadership skills were discussed to include: delegation, communications, trust, confidence, and empowerment. The one-on-one coaching sessions resulted in a lively discussion and interaction between the Faculty and Student.  As part of the Coaching process, the Certified Faculty Coach did not make any recommendations, but rather used reflective inquiry and shared personal experiences related to the leadership skill being discussed. 

Results of the Coaching Pilot

Following the Skills Coaching Session each Student was asked to email the Faculty member feedback. The comments from the Students reflected positive sediment. In addition, the many Students mentioned that they will begin implementing some of the leadership skill pointers as soon as possible.

At the end of the semester the Students that participated in the Coaching Sessions evaluated these sessions. The overall score was 96% as been very effective or effective. 

Next Steps for the Coaching Pilot

Curriculum content in an online course can be overwhelming (Fawaz, Al Nakhal, Itani, 2021). A proactive approach to identifying a skill-based need ensures that Faculty are not only addressing the learning outcomes of the course, but also being responsive to the individual student and providing them real-world skills they can utilize on the job. 

Following the original pilot, the Worldwide College of Business plans to expand the Skills Coaching Service to more courses.  Continuing the proactive approach, the initiative will target courses where Students can identify a specific skill they may wish to focus on.  Besides management and leadership courses, this includes the disciplines of project management, human resource management, engineering, and business analytics.

To support expansion of the Coaching effort, a pipeline of coaches must be established.  Opportunities include the utilization of current Certified Faculty Coaches, as well as volunteer groups of Peer Students, Adjunct Faculty, and Alumni to support instructors teaching the courses.  A training program is needed to highlight what coaching is all about, as well as the roles both Coach and Coachee play in the Coaching process.  Certified Teaching Faculty serve as a resource for developing coaching competencies through a train-the-trainer program. 

Achievement of skills obtained through Coaching could be documented through badging, another feature Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University is currently pursuing.

Conclusion

Coaching services are commonly used in business as a means of professional and personal growth.  Incorporating the use of coaching methodologies into the online curriculum provides multiple benefits to the Student, as well as the institution of higher education.  Students exposed to Skill-based Coaching walk away with a skillset customized to their individual self, as well as an expanded network of connections and sense of community.  Furthermore, coaching supports an enhanced learning experience from which retention, persistence, and affinity are positively impacted.

REFERENCES:

Bettinger, E. P., & Baker, R. (2014). The effects of student coaching: An evaluation of a randomized experiment in student mentoring. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis, 36(1), 3–19.

Fawaz, M., Al Nakhal, M., & Itani, M. (2021). COVID-19 quarantine stressors and management among Lebanese students: A qualitative study. Current Psychology, 1–8.

Linkow, T., Gamse, B., Unlu, F., Bumgarner, E., Didriksen, H., Furey, J., Meneses, M., Sami, M., Nichols, A., (2017). The power of coaching: Highlights from the interim report on the impact of success Boston's transition coaching on college success. Abt Associates.

Mar 28, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
The Value of Custom Educational Technology in Reading, Research, and Writing Across Disciplines | Education Session

Understanding how students experience the use of and interpret the value of tools intended for specific purposes is an important element of teaching with technology online. This session will present data from students on their perceptions of value and experiences implementing PowerNotes in their reading, research, and writing across disciplines.

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Extended Abstract

Students increasingly access their instructional materials in digital environments (Gierdowski, 2019; Seaman & Seaman, 2019; Smale & Regaldo, 2017). Similarly, most of the library resources they find and use for secondary research are also digital (e.g., PDFs and ebooks). Combine this with research (Howard, Serviss & Rodrigue, 2010) that suggests although students include paraphrasing and quoting from sources in their writing, they rarely synthesize or demonstrate that they are engaging with sources at a deeper level which suggests students may not be reading or understanding their sources. In short, the problem is that students need support for reading and understanding digital secondary research resources in their entirety. 

Citation management applications like Zotero (free), Mendelay (free), and RefWorks (our library subscription ended in February 2021) predominantly focus on resource tracking and citation generation. Some provide more robust note taking (like Zotero); however, none of them allow for highlighting and note taking that support students in digitally synthesizing across multiple sources. PowerNotes (https://powernotes.com/) allows for users to highlight text and images in digital sources, take notes on those sections, and then organize the notes in such a way to generate groupings of themed information and/or detailed outlines. PowerNotes also has a collaboration function that allows students to read and respond to one another’s work. Through peer commenting, students are “active agents in learning” who not only receive feedback but participate in knowledge construction (Nicol 502). PowerNotes is an application that can help most students who are conducting secondary research for papers or other projects. 

The core activity in PowerNotes is highlight, tag with a theme/keyword, and take a note. The learning curve for those actions is minimal. The learning curve for integrating and synthesizing the themed/grouped notes is a bit more difficult. As with any new technology, there are two predominate strategies for supporting new users: have them consume support materials (of which PowerNotes has: https://www.blog.powernotes.com/help) and design and assign scaffolded “learn the technology” assignments where the students complete low-stakes activities in the new technology before using it in higher stakes assignments. To support the scaffolded approach, we will  design and develop a quick video training guide and "a practice with the tool assignment" to be used in all of our classes. Having the uniform introductory assignment will help develop some alignment between the varied courses during the assessment process. 

In this education session, we will present data collected from an IRB approved assessment study, whose purpose is to assess the value of using PowerNotes as a reading, research, and writing tool for online students across disciplines. Research questions guiding this study:

  • What do online students perceive to be the value of PowerNotes to their reading, research, and/or writing processes?

  • How do students use PowerNotes as part of their reading, research, and/or writing processes? 

  • How do students in different disciplines and courses perceive the impact of PowerNotes? 

  • How do students experience the implementation of PowerNotes?

We will present data from students on their perceptions of value and experiences implementing PowerNotes.

In this session, we will show the data analysis while simultaneously asking the audience to: 

  • consider what the results might suggest about the courses that are being assessed;

  • reflect on how that information might be used;

  • consider how online programs might work to support reading, research, and writing;  

  • reflect on possible activities they can use to improve the student experience with reading, research and writing; and 

  • ask questions.

We will provide participants with copies of activity prompts different instructors used with PowerNotes as well as access to presentation materials and a reference list. 

 

References

Gierdowski, D. C. (2019). ECAR Study of Community College Students and Information Technology, 2019. Research report. EDUCAUSE. https://library.educause.edu/resources/2019/5/ecar-study-of-community-college-students-and-information-technology 

Howard, R. M., Serviss, T., & Rodrigue, T. K. (2010). Writing from sources, writing from sentences. Writing and Pedagogy, 02(2), 177-192. https://doi.org/10.1558/wap.v2i2.177 

Nicol, D. (2010). From Monologue to Dialogue: Improving Written Feedback in Mass Higher Education. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(5), 501–517. http://doi.org/10.1080/02602931003786559 

Seaman, J. E., & Seaman, J., (2019). Freeing the Textbook: Educational Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2018. Babson Survey Research Group. http://www.onlinelearningsurvey.com/reports/freeingthetextbook2018.pdf

Smale, M.  A., & Regalado, M. (2017). Digital technology as affordance and barrier in higher education. Palgrave Macmillan. 

 

Mar 28, 2022
12:30pm - 1:45pm (Central)
Imaginative, Strategic, Sustainable: A Call for an Online Learning Future Designed for Students' Lived Experiences | Keynote Address

The impact of widespread remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed a lasting need for educators to assess the use of online learning technologies in their teaching and design practice critically. Yet starting conversations about critical and strategic technology usage in online learning can be a challenge to untangle from the now-inseparable pairing of remote learning experiences during the pandemic with trauma. As we move forward, we can recognize the trauma experienced during the pandemic, while also naming sustainable approaches that will continue to be care-oriented. Building this vision for online learning will require: 1. breaking down the long-existing false binary between "online" and "in-person" learning experiences, 2. designing activities that are increasingly attentive to students' embodied experiences of being online, and 3. empowering students to engage in reflective feedback about their experiences continuously. To engage with these three components of a sustainable and imaginative future for online learning, we will look to our past before engaging with our future. Participants will be invited to name and share how they imagine a future for online learning that is aligned with students' full lived experiences of pursuing an education. In the process, we'll consider instructional approaches that designers, instructors, and technologists can take to build courses that are clear, navigable, resilient, and accessible.
 

Prior to the start of the keynote, we will recognize our 2022 OLC Innovate Award winners.  Please also join us Tuesday, March 29 from 10:15am-11:15am US Central Daylight Time Zone (CDT) for our OLC & MERLOT Awards Gala & Social, where we will celebrate our award winners' achievements and have the opportunity to ask them questions.

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Mar 28, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
What Happens When the Masks Come Off? Moving Forward, What Tools and Practices Should Stay with Us from Remote Learning? | Education Session

Throughout the pandemic, educators have had to rely on remote learning and online tools. As COVID-19 cases decrease and students return to campuses, what online tools and practices should stay with us? What has been discovered that will support student learning as we go forward? 

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Extended Abstract

Throughout the pandemic, educators have had to rely on remote learning and online tools. As COVID-10 cases decrease and students return to campuses, what online tools and practices should stay with us? What has been discovered that will support student learning as we go forward? “Many of the technologies that helped us simply survive and sustain classroom continuity will become permanently embedded in our educational methods and play a pivotal role in the refinement of practices consistent with an ongoing shift to more student-centered learning” (Curtin, 2021, para. 3). This is relevant and important to current educators and their students.

 

“The post-COVID-19 period will be the time for higher education to build or reposition online learning to serve students better” (Nworie, 2021, para. 19). This presentation will include five approaches to learning that have thrived in the pandemic and highlight at least one tool or technology that should remain a part of instruction or instructional delivery from each category below as Education moves forward with teaching and learning. 

 

The categories include:

  • Audio feedback

  • Video presence

  • Text feedback

  • Design recommendations to meet learner needs 

  • Use of OER

After highlighting the selected tools, attendees will be able to select one of five breakout rooms in order to further discuss one of the five categories with a presenter from our team who will moderate that specific discussion. Additionally, attendees will be able to share tools and technologies they believe to be useful in post-pandemic instruction to a shared Google Doc, adding to the initially presented materials. This Google Doc is made available to all attendees.

Post-pandemic instruction offers challenges and possibilities for educators and students. As educators, it is critical that consideration be given to what worked and what did not work with online instruction and delivery. Those who will make a difference in the future are reflecting on this now. “They are rethinking their practice and reimagining learning experiences—stitching together inclusive elements of remote learning with the social benefits of being on campus and adding the immersive value of being in class” (Educause Publications, 2021, para. 13). This presentation offers a way for those who participate to begin reflecting and acting on what stays, what changes, and certainly, what improves with their instruction and their students’ learning in post-pandemic times.

 

References

Curtin, R. (2021). Reimagining higher education: The post-covid classroom. Educause, Teaching & Learning. https://er.educause.edu/articles/2021/4/reimagining-higher-education-the-post-covid-classroom  

 

Educause Publications. (2021). 2021 EDUCause horizon report: Teaching and learning edition. https://library.educause.edu/resources/2021/4/2021-educause-horizon-report-teaching-and-learning-edition  

 

Nworie, J. (.2021) Beyond COVID-19: What’s next for online teaching and learning in higher education?  Educause, Teaching & Learning. https://er.educause.edu/articles/2021/5/beyond-covid-19-whats-next-for-online-teaching-and-learning-in-higher-education

 

Mar 28, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Post-Pandemic Pivot: What a Year of Art E-Learning Revealed about Engaging Students Online | Education Session

E-Learning specialists from five art colleges came together to review positive impacts of the e-Learning "pandemic pivot." Historically, higher education has rarely offered art courses remotely. However, the forced transition online revealed actionable resources about fostering socially engaging and inclusive spaces to enhance student learning now and in the future.

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Extended Abstract

eLearning for art education requires a distinctive pedagogy. Artists as learners have a tendency to require a higher level of visual and kinesthetic modalities in their learning experiences, and their social engagement is a critical component in the learning processes for these students who are learning the socioemotional language of their discipline and developing a critical eye to assess their work and the work of their peers as a regular function of their discipline. Experts in learning design can attest to the challenges in developing social presence and engagement in online classes in general, and these challenges are exacerbated by developing courses that require a high level of visual and tactile instruction. For example, Anderson and Garrison’s community of inquiry framework has been used extensively to improve online course design by creating cognitive, social, and teacher presences in online learning environments (Anderson, Garrison & Archer, 2010), and this work is critical for art-based education happening in any modality.

Prior to the pandemic, faculty in art and design expressed these challenges as reasons that classes in the disciplines of painting, sculpture, wood and metal craft, ceramics, and printmaking might not be a good fit for eLearning environments. For example, “of the 36 schools listed in the AICAD (Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design) website, only six offer any online options, and only three offer programs that can be achieved fully online” (Matthews). Similarly, many of the experts in these disciplines are experts in the visual and tactile arts and perhaps have less time to devote to the technological skills necessary to be proficient eLearning instructors. According to a recent article by Araminta Matthews, research suggests there are possibly 89,000 placebound American adult learners who might pursue an art and design degree if one were offered in a modality flexible enough to meet their needs, suggesting that perhaps the need for art and design programs online has always been there and the pandemic helped us to acknowledge this reality. 

The pivot pushed people to move online before they were adequately prepared--everyone taught everything like a live Zoom demonstration, but that’s not always what a discipline needs. When art pedagogy moved online, it revealed some new things about what we thought were best practices in instructional design. For example, early research in instructional design suggested that lengthy Zoom sessions might contribute to Zoom-fatigue (Stanford), and this is how we advised our faculty. Unexpectedly, it turned out that our students felt these sessions fostered that connection they were missing in live classes--even live classes prior to the pandemic where students sometimes shied away from interpersonal interactions until some weeks had passed--and this is a critical component of eLearning for artists. We are all willing to admit that teaching is a lot of improvisation, which is not a model easily offered online, and through this process, we’ve learned as instructional designers how to be more organic in our development of courses. We improved our professional skills of creating and sustaining “planned spontaneity,” an instructional design foundational skill that came in handy during the pandemic pivot. Some faculty members evolved the process further by adapting new and existing tools to accommodate prolonged online student interaction. 

This session will describe how online art and design courses have unique needs and how to design to meet those needs. We will discuss the critical need for faculty to build spaces within their courses with forward-thought for their students to develop a cohort and social presence. We will demonstrate the unique challenges to art-based classes offered in web-facilitated formats and guide our participants through a learning design process to determine collaboratively how we might overcome those challenges to deliver effective, inspiring, engaging online classes for growing designers and emerging artists. 

By the end, our participants will have a clear framework for selecting meaningful, purposeful technology to integrate into their classes that will encourage student engagement and nurture social presence. Additionally, during the session, participants will create a shared “wiki” of useful resources for creating student social spaces, and the panel committee will maintain this wiki using principles of digital curation in order to ensure the resource lives beyond the conference session. The eLearning pandemic pivot forced us all to adapt quickly to new modalities of teaching and learning, but it is through these profound moments of purposeful implementation that we will carry forward the many lessons learned during this period in our history so that the next generation of learners can benefit from these shared experience.

 

Mar 28, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Towards Equitable Achievement: Helping Students Become Experts In Your Course | Education Session

As companies increasingly value competence over credentials, institutes of higher education must ensure achievement for all students. This discussion will help participants: a) define equitable achievement, b) explain the relationship between equitable achievement and expertise, and c) describe the role of instructors in supporting equitable achievement in their classes.

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Extended Abstract

We are in the midst of disruption.

Major companies, such as Google and Starbucks, that once required college degrees are now favoring competence over credentials (Forbes, 2017).

Demand was already shifting for higher education (Grawe, 2018), but at the tailwind of the COVID-19 pandemic's interruption of higher education, prospective students (and their parents/guardians) are increasingly questioning the value of traditional 4-year degrees.

Forces from both within higher education--cheaper and faster degree alternatives from reputable institutions--and outside it--widely accessible and insanely affordable job-ready certificate programs--are exerting often ignored but ultimately unstoppable forces and trends that will "snowball as more and more talented and motivated Millennials and Gen Z-ers opt out of a system that is unnecessarily lengthy and costly" (Craig, 2018).

The implications of these changes are many. But one specific area of concern--an area that institutes of higher education can lean into and leverage--is achievement.

Not that it was ever a preferable approach, but give the challenges to its core value proposition, institutes of higher education can no longer rely on a model that sorts students based on perceived aptitude determined by problematic assessments. That is, for their students and for the marketplace that might hire them, it is woefully insufficient for institutes of higher education to distribute grades from Cs to As as students matriculate through a curriculum and then ultimately to award them the same degree at the end--a degree representing a comprehensive?, majority?, partial?, limited? ability to demonstrate competence at any individual skill to say nothing of the curriculum as a whole.

What internal and external market forces are showing is that credentials count for something, but competency can count for a whole lot more. And what this means for institutes of higher education is that they need to focus on ensuring that all their students are able to demonstrate competence at all the skills the curriculum sets forth to develop.

And, what this means at a very fundamental level, is that institutes of higher education must retrain their focus on equitable achievement.

In this interactive conversation--where participants will share ideas, opinions, and experiences using a responsive discussion platform to help identify key themes and summarize emerging ideas--we will explore: a) what it means to aim for equitable achievement; b) how thinking about education through a lens of equitable achievement can help us understand more clearly our role as educators as helping students become experts in our courses, the curriculum, and eventually their field of study; and c) some practical strategies we can use to begin shifting our courses to support equitable achievement.

Mar 28, 2022
2:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Strategies for Using Badging and Micro-credentialing in Online Courses | Workshop

This best practices session will provide strategies and ideas for how you can structure micro-credential projects, find tools for designing badges, and how you can have your students display them in their e-portfolios. You will be provided with resources and guided on how to design your own badges.

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Extended Abstract

Badging and micro-credentialing are becoming more prevalent in the world of computer science and coding. They can also be used as a curriculum design model for online learning. With badges, students can identify the skills they have and provide evidence of them to their employers and instructors. Badging and micro-credentialing is an innovative curriculum model that spans across technology coaches, educators, and students. Coaches can design their own micro-credential and badging projects for professional development purposes. They can also share this design model with teachers who are looking for innovative uses of technology with project-based learning. As an educator, micro-credentialing is a creative way to remove the stress of grades from the classroom and help students in secondary and higher education, to focus on mastering skills versus earning a grade. The badge is actual evidence for each skill they have developed that can be placed on an e-portfolio for college, employers, and networking. 

 

During the session, the attendees will participate by completing a simple badge and earning a microcredential. They will also be placed into small groups to collaborate on creating and designing a badge and the microcredential requirements for it. This way, the attendees will be personally engaged in achieving a badge to help them experience the satisfaction and self-efficacy of accomplishing a new skill. The presentation will be scaffolded by beginning with an explanation of badging and microcredentialing and how they work together. Several examples will be shared for how to include badging and microcredentialing in an online or blended learning course. Next, the attendees will actively participate to complete a microcredential and earn a badge by using their web-enabled device. Finally, the attendees will be placed into groups of three to design, create, and share a microcredential and its badge. Each person in the group will have a specific task to complete. Once the group decides on what microcredential they want to create and what the requirements are, one person will complete a template with the credentials. Another person will use Accredible to design the badge, and the third person will create a slide to link the template and post their group’s badge. At the end of the workshop, each group will have the opportunity to share their badge and the microcredential requirements. 

 

The learning objectives for this workshop are:

 

  • Understand what micro-credentialing is and how it works together with badging. 

  • Design a skills-based project that would be represented by a badge. 

  • Create a digital badge using online tools. 

  • Model the badge on an e-portfolio.

  • Discuss the benefits of a skills-based approach to learning. 

 

The tools I will be using are all free. They are:

  • Accredible

  • Google Sites

  • Google Docs

 

I will also be providing resources for other sites that have badge templates or provide more information about badging:

  • Adobe Spark

  • Canva

  • Open Badges

  • UEN What is a microcredential?

 

Outline: 

  1. 3 mins. Introduction

  2. 17 mins. Overview of what micro-credentialing and badging are. 

  3. 5 mins. Audience activity: Interactive poll to check for understanding. 

  4. 15  mins. Model the e-portfolio and four micro-credential projects used in a recent graduate course.

  5. 25 mins. Group Activity: The attendees will be placed into groups of three. The presenter will visit each group to provide guidance. Each group will have three tasks to collaborate about and complete:

    1. Choose a technology skill for their badge and discuss how it will be earned. 

    2. Person 1: Complete the provided template (Google Doc) for the badge’s requirements, list and explain three simple technology skills that need to be completed to earn the badge. 

    3. Person 2: Use Accredible to design the badge that represents the mastered skill.

    4. Person 3: Access the Google Slide presentation, add a new slide, upload your badge and link your badge’s requirements. Include any additional links and a brief description of the badge.

  6. 15 mins. Group Presentation: Each group will present their microcredential and badge. They will be able to receive feedback and suggestions from the group about their work. 

  7. 10 mins. Reflection and end discussion. 

 

The Attendee Takeaways:

  • Be able to understand what micro-credentials are and the purpose of badging. 

  • Learn how to design a skills-based project for a badge. 

  • Learn about free resources to support badging and e-portfolios. 

  • Earn a badge by completing a brief micro-credential activity. 

  • Understand the value and pride that come with earning and displaying badges. 

  • Develop strategies and skills for using micro-credentials and badging in an online course. 

Mar 28, 2022
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Coffee Talk with the Canvascasters: All Things Canvas LMS | Networking Coffee Talk

Join Eddie and Marcus as they talk through their experiences as podcasters through the lens of Canvas LMS.

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Extended Abstract

Two professional educators navigate an exciting journey while gathering stories and best practice conversations over a common interest: Canvas LMS. Through 41 Episodes of “The Canvascaasters”, Marcus and Eddie share what they have learned from hundreds of educators across the globe, while always keeping it “100". With over 30 years of educational experience, there is something in this session for everyone.

Mar 28, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Fostering OER Awareness Through Partnerships and Innovation | Education Session

This session introduces the Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives of the Division of Digital Learning (DDL) at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The THECB is facilitating the use of OER through capacity building grants to encourage adoption of affordable, accessible, and flexible resources at scale.

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Extended Abstract

Online Learning Support funding for Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives will be used to enhance quality in online course offerings and reduce the costs of instructional materials for students. This will be accomplished by fostering awareness of the benefits and uses of OER among faculty and support staff at public and independent institutions, and by building and/or increasing institutional capacity for OER courses and programs.

This session will examine the successes that have been obtained by building and scaling OER initiatives in partnership with public and independent institutions and organizations across the state and nation. Several initiatives including the creation of an OER repository, the development of professional learning academies, and ongoing research projects will be discussed.

Levels of Participation:

There will be an interactive panel discussion regarding creating productive partnerships. Fundamental statewide OER projects will be highlighted, such as an OER Repository and framework grants for OER policy and program building at institutions. Innovations that have led to successful adoption of OER, the impact of the work on students and institutions, and lessons learned from the launching of the first OER grant program in 2018 to the present will be shared.

Session Goals:

Attendees will learn about building successful partnerships in OER and effectively creating and managing OER content. Participants will be encouraged to consider how initiatives could be adapted for their own OER advocacy. In addition, presenters will share pedagogical and curricular strategies for developing high-quality OER, engagement approaches, and strategies for effective collaboration.

 

 

Mar 28, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Inclusive and Flexible by Design: Open While Disrupted | Conversation, Not Presentation

Disruption! Not if, but when. This session will build on Daniel Stanford’s "Bandwidth/Immediacy Matrix" to construct a logic model faculty could use to quickly develop inclusive, equitable alternatives when faced with disruption.

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Extended Abstract

Context

Let’s face it, every semester has disruption. A student gets sick, you get sick, wildfires, floods, hurricanes, a pandemic - big or small, disruptions occur. While you can plan on disruption you rarely can plan on when or for how long.  After more than a year of disruption, most faculty have experience in delivering instruction in a virtual format. But we are also acutely aware of the potential inequity a pivot to virtual learning can create.  Accessibility, connectivity, and type of device represent some of the biggest barriers that impact all students’ ability to engage in a virtual learning environment. What can faculty do to ensure academic continuity that is also inclusive? 

Our Story to share:  Framing the Conversation

To support faculty’s return to both virtual and in-person teaching for the Fall 2021 term, we developed a template to help faculty devise a Disruption Plan. The template was not prescriptive, but rather provided topics to consider, which included the affordances and limitations of certain virtual platforms from an equity perspective. We included ​​Daniel Stanford’s, "Bandwidth Immediacy Matrix,” as a graphic to guide decision making.  The Matrix presents four Zones ranging from low immediacy and bandwidth to high immediacy and bandwidth with types of technology that fit the parameters of each zone. 

Conversation not Presentation Plan  

For this session, we will facilitate a conversation to generate specific actionable teaching and interaction strategies for each zone in the matrix. Participants will use Padlet to crowdsource strategies. Once strategies have been collected, participants will be invited to ask clarifying questions to further define each strategy, identify potential training and/or technological support faculty might need, and share resources to further support strategies in each zone. 

Then we will facilitate group discussion to consider how instructors might combine items from different zones to create high and low bandwidth and immediacy options to ensure students have inclusive options for learning and interacting with the same content. Ideas and combinations will be recorded on a Google Doc for easy sharing with participants. 

It is our goal, following this conversation, to construct a logic model based on participant contributions that would build on Stanford’s Matrix, providing specific examples and/or strategies for each zone. If successful, this logic model, shared with a Creative Commons License, could serve as a resource for faculty to reference when seeking to construct inclusive and flexible virtual alternatives when faced with disruption. 

 

Mar 28, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Peeling Back the Onion: A Multi-Layered Coaching and Mentoring Model for Faculty Development in Higher Education | Education Session

Investing in faculty development to address the challenges of teaching in hybrid environments can be achieved by building a teaching community of practice through a multi-layered model that incorporates coaching and peer mentoring. This model is transferable across institutions that have increased their online presence in an effort to ensure strong and ongoing faculty support.

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Extended Abstract

Peeling Back the Onion: A Multi-Layered Coaching and Mentoring Model for Faculty Development in Higher Education

With the ongoing expansion of online and blended learning, it has become increasingly critical that instructors are provided with initial and ongoing support to better understand the needs of their learners and enhance their teaching practice (Bloomberg, 2021; Golden, 2016). Investing in faculty development, specifically designed to address the challenges of teaching in the online environment, develops a culture of ongoing support, providing opportunities to enhance both individual and organizational capacity. While onboarding training can provide faculty with the required knowledge and pedagogical skills, faculty members require ongoing support networks to enhance professional development, and inspire continuous improvement as engaged members of the educational team. This can be achieved by building a strong online teaching community (Bloomberg, 2020, 2021). Building community through coaching and mentoring allows faculty an opportunity to more fully engage with each other, share experiences and resources, and model effective teaching practices to support their colleagues.  Apprenticeship relationships are key to sustaining robust communities, and the process by which new members become part of the community is a generative phenomenon, with learning becoming a naturally emerging outcome based on an evolving and continuously renewed set of relationships (Lave & Wenger, 1991). Learners become part of a community of practice through legitimate peripheral participation, and as newcomers develop understanding and knowledge they move from the periphery of the community to the core, ultimately becoming experienced members themselves (Lave & Wenger, 1991).  

 

The faculty development model that has been implemented in the School of Education at one online university aligns well with the community of practice construct in that learning is conceived of as a continuously evolving set of relationships situated within a social context. This university has implemented a holistic model which includes a central coaching and mentoring component, whereby faculty are provided with support and guidance to teach in graduate degree programs. Both coaching and mentoring include an essential reciprocal learning relationship that is characterized by trust, mutual respect, and commitment, in which a coach or mentor supports the professional and personal development of another (Zellers et al., 2008). As the first layer of support, all faculty are assigned a coach who serves essentially as a mentor to enhance their teaching practice, and meetings take place using synchronous collaboration tools. Coaches work to provide guidance regarding ways of ensuring teaching presence and effectively facilitating learning through a process of guided individual discovery which results in increased engagement, experiential learning and skill building, goal setting, accountability for goal achievement, and specific and measurable action planning. In addition to individual coaching, peer mentoring communities provide further informal opportunities for learning and development through colleagues sharing resources, expertise, and skills; thereby adding a further layer of faculty support. The mentoring community facilitators are comprised of experienced faculty members who are knowledgeable about the University’s culture, policies, and teaching resources and who have demonstrated an ongoing commitment to maintaining high academic standards. Community members work collaboratively, engaging in ongoing and regular dialogue groups to support each other as peers and colleagues, and sharing relevant information, resources, and materials.

 

Through this integrated faculty development model, the School strives to develop an organizational culture that supports and guides learning for continuous growth and performance improvement. This multilayered model, which is based upon both formal and informal support structures, is focused essentially on achieving three key goals; building a culture of learning and collaboration, fostering a growth mindset, and facilitating reflective practice. The model is potentially transferable across the range of online and hybrid contexts and at institutions that have increased their online presence since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in an effort to ensure strong and ongoing faculty support and development.

 

Research Findings:

 

From late 2019 till early 2020, two studies were conducted using open-ended surveys to assess how and to what extent our faculty development model provides a platform and resource for meaningful learning and ongoing support regarding pedagogical expectations and requirements.  The research purpose of both studies was to uncover insights and more comprehensively understand faculty experiences of coaching and mentoring as a means of support. Survey transcripts were manually analyzed through a qualitative process of open coding and thematic development. Overall, the findings illustrated how coaching and peer mentoring singly and in combination contribute to establishing and maintaining ongoing pathways to enhance online teaching practices for the purpose of continuous growth and performance improvement.

 

Study 1: A purposeful sample of faculty members was created based on the inclusion criterion that they had engaged in faculty coaching over the past year (N=18).  Research participants were each sent a survey that consisted of open-ended items. The findings shed light on faculty perceptions, perspectives, and insights regarding the School of Education’s faculty coaching, and were analyzed according to three categories with associated themes:

 

  1. Faculty Perceptions Regarding the Significance and Importance of Coaching

 

  • Faculty appreciated the learning and development opportunities provided by coaching
  • Coaching supports ongoing improved practice

 

  1. Faculty Perceptions Regarding the Specific Value of Coaching

 

  • Coaching has ultimately allowed faculty to better serve their students
  • Coaching provides the personalized support that is needed to be a successful instructor
  • Coaching enhances ongoing knowledge-building through collaborative learning opportunities
  • Faculty valued the reflective opportunities that are provided through coaching

 

  1. Conceptualization of Educator as “Reflective Practitioner”
  • Faculty valued reflective practice in that this facilitates ongoing improvement
  • Some faculty view reflective practice as an aspect of lifelong learning
  • Reflective practice facilitates the opportunity to think more deeply about one’s own thought processes (metacognition)

 

Study 2:  An open-ended survey was sent to the group of faculty in the School of Education that volunteered to serve as mentors for their peers (N=16).  This study yielded findings related to their motivation to serve as faculty mentors as well as their perceptions regarding the value of professional mentoring communities within the School. Key findings included the following:

 

  • Faculty motivation to serve as peer mentors was bound to their desire to support their colleagues.
  • Faculty appreciated the support and collegiality offered through the mentoring communities, and the value that mentoring adds to the organizational culture.

 

Findings illustrate that this faculty development model fosters opportunities for faculty to learn with and from their peers, and hence ongoing development is embedded within layers of support, multiple participation opportunities, voluntary levels of engagement, and continuously evolving working relationships with colleagues. At the same time, this model eases adjustment to the academic environment by promoting a culture of collegiality and collaboration thereby relieving feelings of isolation that many faculty members typically experience in the online environment. Investing in faculty development by adopting this multi-layered model specifically designed to address the challenges of teaching effectively in the online environment is an opportunity to build both individual and collective capacity. In addition to the connection with the Community of Practice theoretical framework that forms the basis of this model, the way that faculty perceive and experience faculty development also reflects the School’s core values and goals. Moreover, it is apparent that ongoing collaboration, reflection, and deepened relationships have evolved through membership of these communities of practice. The author proposes recommendations for further research to shed light on designing, developing, implementing creative and impactful ways to improve faculty development offerings in this ever-evolving education environment.

 

Conference attendees will be presented with the findings of the two research studies that were conducted at one institution to better understand how and to what extent this model provides a platform and resource for meaningful learning and ongoing support regarding pedagogical expectations and requirements, and how faculty engagement in communities of practice builds a culture of collegiality and support. Interaction will be a key component of this presentation so that attendees can “lock in new learning”. Toward this end, reflection checkpoints will be introduced at periodic points during the presentation so that participants will have opportunities to share insights and engage in discussion about the ways in which formal and informal faculty support structures can serve to address three key areas: (1) build a culture of learning and collaboration; (2) foster a growth mindset; and (3) and facilitate reflective practice. Furthermore, a reflection checkpoint will be built into the close of the session to discuss lessons learned, critique the model, articulate limitations of the study, and offer suggestions for further research in this area.

 

What will attendees learn from this presentation? By attending this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Gain insight into the value of a multi-layered model of faculty development in online and hybrid higher education contexts
  2. Identify intentional methods for engaging community members and bringing new members into the community
  3. Be aware of flexible and inclusive structures that can support the growth and evolutionary process of building communities of practice in online and hybrid contexts
  4. Understand the ways in which communities of practice in online and hybrid environments can offer a context for meaningful connections, support, and development
  5. Explore and articulate suggestions for further research around faculty development models in online and hybrid contexts.

 

References

 

 

Bloomberg, L. D. (2020). Coaching faculty to teach online: A single qualitative case study at an online university. International Journal of Online Graduate Education, 3(2), 1-22.

 

Bloomberg, L. D. (2021). Designing and Delivering Effective Online Instruction: How to engage adult learners. Teachers College Press, Columbia University.

 

Golden, J. (2016). Supporting online faculty through communities of practice: Finding the faculty voice. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 53(1), 84-93.

 

Lave, J. &Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge University Press.

 

Zellers, D. F., Howard, V. M., & Barcic, M. A. (2008). Faculty mentoring programs: Reenvisioning rather than reinventing the wheel. Review of Educational Research, 78(3), 552–588.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 28, 2022
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: What's Next for Online Learning | Other

We have all asked the question, "What's next?" Join Dr. Kelvin Thompson and special guest(s) for a discussion about what the future might hold for education and design.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 28, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
OLC Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force Findings and Recommendations: A Convening on the OLC Community’s Commitment to DEI | Featured Session

OLC Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force convened in Spring 2021, with a diverse group of colleagues gathered to plan for an equitable path for our community. Task Force leaders and participants will share findings, as well as invite you to be a part of the conversation as we operationalize this vital work for the OLC. 

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Extended Abstract

The Online Learning Consortium Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Task Force was convened in recognition of the need to center diversity, equity, and inclusion across organizational and community efforts. From the call to action from the Executive Committee to determine how OLC will take concrete steps to impact DEI in our field, a group of colleagues was brought to gather to talk and plan for a more equitable path for our community. Come join us in hearing from the Task Force leaders as they share the findings and recommendations of this task force. More importantly, we invite you to be part of the conversation as we operationalize this vital work for the OLC. 

 

Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Mar 28, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Vineyards and Villainy - Virtual Edition (An OLC Game Night) | Evening Event

Join us for this special version of "Vineyards and Villainy," Inspired by the picturesque landscapes of vineyards, join us for this OLC Innovate mystery game where we explore hidden messages, dive into collaborative storytelling, and explore the boundaries between hero and villain. This special virtual version will be an opportunity to explore the game through a "mini mystery." Onsite attendees will have a chance to dive deeper into the world of "Vineyards and Villainy," but you all have a chance to start the mystery virtually! Mystery solvers will be entered in for a chance to win a prize. The OLC is known for fun, low-stakes, and inviting evening events. Whether they are intense and gameful or entertaining and reflective, they are designed to make space for one of the greatest things about the OLC: our community.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 29, 2022
8:15am - 8:45am (Central)
Meditation And Mindfulness - A Guided Virtual Meditation Session | Other

Start your day with some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Innovate Virtual Conference in a healthy and present way together.  Whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned practitioner, all levels are welcome to join us for this session.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 29, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Cracking the Treasure “C-H-E-S-T” of Course Template Design | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

X marks the spot… but how do you get there? All value quality template design, but what makes that happen? Journey with your crew to unveil the secret treasures of the C-H-E-S-T approach. Follow my lead and imagine the possibilities for your own institutional course template.

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Extended Abstract

Participants can anticipate a high level of engagement when considering a mock course template design and an associated data-focused analysis process. Inspired in the winter of 2020 by the books Creative Confidence, Mismatch, and The Accidental Instructional Designer, a new approach to developing course template structure was envisioned. This approach blended a student-centered focus with effective teaching pedagogy. Methods for assessing user experience and usability were intentionally selected to ensure that both overt and hidden student motivations could guide the final state of the course template.

Reflective practice and collaborative questioning allowed for an innovative process that sought to identify existing pain-points within the student learning experience in the current state of the course template. Via this brainstorming process, the first iteration of the new template adaptation was produced. Using an A/B testing model, and organizing a future empathy analysis from qualitative research, the instructional design team continues the fine tuning of their institutional course template.    

Five key elements were incorporated into the development of this work. Instructional Design theory and methods to evaluate user experience lay the groundwork for each element.

C - Consistency… Through a student-initiated exploration of effective online course practices from the SGA President’s cabinet in academic year 2019-2020, the need for consistency in the student learning process was revealed. The recommendations of the student body representatives significantly supported the effort to reassess the online learning environment. UDL’s guidelines to communicate with clear language and to support executive function were proposed as consistent features within the course design template. To focus our work, our student demographics and special population groups were reviewed. Further, consideration of the online learning space itself was rooted in learner experience design postulating that by building a consistent experience students would find this space welcoming.            

H - Humanistic… Students are human and humans relate emotional responses, knowingly or unknowingly, to all experiences. Formulating an empathetic means to review qualitative responses into the prototype testing was essential. How are we to grasp the idiosyncrasies of our student respondents without inferring their motivations, worries, and expectations while learning online? Humans need support. Support needs may be expected or unexpected, critical or momentary, and disclosed or undisclosed. By placing the student (human) experience at the center of this effort, and ultimately our template, we follow inclusive design’s aim to be purposeful in our practice to avoid “unintentional harm” (Kat Holmes, Mismatch). To target this aspect, open-ended questions were thoughtfully written to unveil emotions that are linked to online learning for our students.

E - Engaging… as learner experience design has its foundation in visual arts, such as graphic design and game design, we found an opportunity to capitalize on considerations which originate in these fields as applied to our educational environment. Specifically, engaging visuals were incorporated and accessible practices were intentionally applied. When revising the design template, supported by UDL’s guideline to “foster collaboration and community,” clear opportunities for curriculum-focused engagement of several types were spotlighted by structural features, such as descriptive headings and a “Muddiest Point” forum.

S - Student Reviewed… Design Thinking champions that a solution cannot be identified as the right solution unless determined through end user evaluation. Learner experience design promotes that the set-up of a course must focus on the learner’s ability to meet an intended goal, while inclusive design stipulates that individuals on the fringe of the norm must be incorporated into the evaluation process. For all of these to occur, current students must be invited, and encouraged, to interact and respond to the proposed solution. 

T - Tested… Thus, several surveys were constructed to garnish both quantitative and qualitative data from students through an A/B Testing model. These surveys are posted at key points throughout the term - after the first week, following midterms, and the final week of the course. Additionally, our second phase of prototype’s testing will greatly increase our response pool allowing for effective empathy mapping.            

At OLC Innovate, the C-H-E-S-T approach outlined above becomes the focus of this Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge. Akin to the urgency of a treasure hunt, the facilitator will encourage quick idea generation, collaboration, and engagement. By answering a series of questions, attendees will be led near to the ultimate goal - X that marks the spot - of creating a prototype for a mock institutional course design template.

As attendees enter the Innovation Studio Design Thinking space for Cracking the Treasure “C-H-E-S-T” of Course Template Design, they will find several resources laid out near their working spaces (or provided through an open GoogleDrive folder). Embracing the pirate analogy within the title of the session, these items are: a treasure map including question prompts, a student persona sheet, and an information request form. Each item will serve to either lead attendees through their prototyping process or provide supplemental information to them post-conference.

To equalize the experiences of those in attendance, small groups of approximately five “crew members” will be asked to quickly form (or be randomly assigned in breakout rooms). Following this, a short introduction will be given for each crew to imagine that they represent the invented Lost Island University (LIU). A treasure map will be provided that presents key “how might we” questions related to the C-H-E-S-T approach as follows:

Question 1 - Consistency: How might you plan a consistent student experience in LIU’s design template?

Question 2 - Humanistic: How might you encourage inclusiveness that meets LIU’s student body’s learning needs? (Consider the LIU student personas presented at your workspace.)

Question 3 - Engaging: How might you create a visual learning space that encourages LIU students to return to it?

Question 4 - Student Reviewed: How might you invite LIU students to give input on your prototype?

Question 5 - Tested: How might you analyze your prototype to confirm or adjust your assumptions?

For the next 15 - 20 minutes of the session, these attendee crews will regulate their journey through these prompts. Each crew will quickly brainstorm, process, and record their initial ideas. Following this swift idea generation, crew members will hone in on one or two suggestions for each prompt that will carry forward as they repeat the process for the next “checkpoint” or question in their journey. Through this intense iteration, refinement, and selection process, crew members are exposed to a plethora of options to consider for their own future application. 

During their collaboration, the presenter will circulate from crew to crew to concisely address questions, provide insights, and prompt new investigations. Throughout the formulation phase, periodic prompts such as “have you arrived at the humanistic checkpoint?” will be asked, along with an audible cue, to continue the treasure hunt theme of this session.

A “call to destination” (the location of the X that marks the end of their treasure hunt) warns crews to get close to or arrive at their destination within the remaining time available, approximately 20 minutes prior to the end of the session, allowing crews 5 minutes to complete their collaboration.

Crews will then share corporately, or with a few other groups (possibly, in new breakout rooms), their prototype ideas. Sharing key points or learning moments briefly will be encouraged to allow most to share in the 10 minutes allotted. The presenter will conclude by concisely sharing her institution’s solution to addressing each element of the C-H-E-S-T approach as well as current data findings.

Additionally, facilitator will prepare a GoogleDrive resource packet that includes: an outline of the C-H-E-S-T approach (CC licensed), an explanation of each element (CC licensed), a summary of how these elements have been applied, as well as a recorded & captioned presentation that shares these features in a video format. By offering these resources, attendees can be in the present moment without concern for capturing the process through their own note-taking efforts. Attendees who desire this resource may log their name and email address on lists pre-arranged at session tables. These lists will be collected and the resources shared at the conclusion of the OLC Innovate 2022 conference.

By processing through these steps, attendees will have engaged with a similar sequence of design consideration analysis and testing planning that benefited the design of our college’s course template. Each attendee exits the session empowered to implement the C-H-E-S-T approach in their respective institutions.

Mar 29, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Discovery Time! | Education Session

Join us for a fun and interactive session centering on OLC Innovate’s Discovery Sessions! Starting with a little bit of orientation, some guided roadmapping, and most certainly lots of key reflection and collaborative learning, this session will get us thinking about the possibilities for asynchronous online engagement.

 

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Extended Abstract

A staple of OLC’s Innovate’s Conference is the asynchronously presented sessions. Whether these took the form historically of a poster or more recently, a pre-prepared digital presentation, these sessions afford presenters and participants alike a unique opportunity for sustained engagement because they were designed with the asynchronous in mind. But taking the time to orient to these types of sessions in a conference setting, as well as meaningfully engage with them is not always easy, particularly given all of the other opportunities presented to us. As such, this interactive session was designed to address those two considerations specifically. We’ll start off making sure you know how to access the sessions, as well as a brief orientation to the presentation platform (PlayPosit). We’ll then spend time collaboratively engaging with the sessions themselves, with dedicated space and time to share lessons learned, things we noticed or thought were cool, and strategies we picked up along the way. Our work will be guided by an intentionally designed Discovery Session Roadmap, which will help us identify which sessions to start with and those we want to intentionally plan to get to in the future. Best of all, along the way, we’ll have a chance to talk about the many amazing and exciting possibilities for asynchronous engagement in online, digital, and blended learning environments, as well as walk away with new ideas for how to design with the asynchronous in mind. Even better, we’ll be experiencing this session in a synchronous, online format (while referencing and engaging in asynchronous content), affording us the opportunity to further reflect on these types of learning experiences.

 

Mar 29, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Digital Innovation Moving Texas Forward | Education Session

This session introduces the Division of Digital Learning (DDL) at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB). The mission of the DDL is to provide leadership and advocacy for digital learning in higher education and promote, sustain, and advance a quality digital learner experience positioning Texas as a world leader.

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Extended Abstract

Providing a holistic digital learning ecosystem is of growing importance in an increasingly digital world. Digital learning has become common place in higher education over the past several decades. Notwithstanding the advancements in digital learning, definitions and standards vary greatly making it difficult for educators and institutions to effectively discuss and implement effective policies and best practices.

Over the past two years the COVID-19 pandemic has brought digital learning to the forefront of higher education. Multiple research methods are being employed to better understand the effects of the pandemic, including state-wide surveys and a design research engagement. These initiatives inform effective resources for educators and students, including a digital clearinghouse. This digital clearinghouse will serve as a primary means to enhance pedagogical innovation, stimulate digital transformation, promote digital solutions, connect communities, encourage scholarship, share resources, and make possible holistic, quality digital learning experiences.

Levels of Participation:

This session will provide an interactive forum for conversation regarding the state of digital learning today and innovations coming in the near future. Attendees will participate in a discussion regarding the scaling of best practices, creating programs for institutional capacity building, and promoting sustainable partnerships.

Session Goals:

Targeted research initiatives demonstrate the importance of creating a diverse digital ecosystem which supports students, educators, and administrators. Digital Learning provides the opportunity to create equitable and inclusive spaces. The presenters will discuss ways in which they are driving innovation, change, and equity through partnerships and networking.

Mar 29, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Fostering a Culture of OER Development for STEM Classes | Education Session

Textbooks often price students out of courses. This is particularly notable in STEM courses where there is a noted lack of diversity. Our office worked to build a culture of utilizing OER materials in courses, particularly in STEM, which resulted in developing OERs locally for a fully no-textbook biology course.

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Extended Abstract

While the issue of diversity and access in higher education is often focused purely on admissions data, that is not the whole story. There are many factors that play a role in access, including a student’s socioeconomic background. To help bridge that difference, college courses purport they create an “even playing field” for all students to promote student success. However, this false ideal of an inherent even playing field fails to take into account the factors that impede student success beyond simple admission. One of those factors is often the high price of college textbook costs. OER (Open Education Resources) is a concept focused on substituting exorbitantly priced textbooks and resources for works that are open and free for student use. At other institutions, there are reports of faculty getting kickbacks from publishers for having their students order specific textbooks. As a result, students often spend thousands of dollars on textbooks they might not even open. 

By contrast, our institution's faculty often encourage students to save money on textbooks, including resources about second hand swap sites, rental programs, and popular textbook resale campus Facebook groups in their course and syllabus. As we are a public institution whose student population has a large portion of low income, first generation students this is a constant source of concern for faculty and students alike. As part of our mission is to increase diversity and access for our students, all facets that enhance that mission are used. 

 

When our Instructional Technologists and Designers collaborate with faculty, we encourage them to use low cost (or no cost to the student) resources whenever possible. This is often based in an overall discussion of equity and access including ensuring all course design and policies are accessible and inclusive. For example, we have a fund to secure Journal licenses for faculty to post relevant materials on the library eReserve system and the course LMS. We have also hosted OER development workshops for faculty to learn how to find, embed, and develop OERs for their courses as well.

We noticed a major problem arose particularly when it came to our STEM classes. Unlike other subjects in which used editions were more or less identical (and available for much cheaper), STEM textbooks contained problems and homework that differed from edition to edition. While the content remained the same, one could only participate fully in the course if they could afford the $200 cost of the textbook per class.

STEM is a particularly skewed field in terms of population representation, with the profession disproportionately having low numbers of minorities and women. As cost is often a major factor, by having yet another roadblock (in this case, exorbitantly priced textbooks and resources), it further skews the population who can seek this path towards the already privileged. 

Seeing this as a problem, CTL worked with the Biology department to change this. The biology department was at the forefront of this change, specifically for their Introductory Biology courses.

The first course in the successive series is Biology 105, which not only has the highest DFWI rates on campus, but is also the largest course on campus. This course serves as the gateway to many courses in the premed and STEM track. One project focused on improving success rates, particularly for minority students is a learning collective based peer mentor/tutoring process. However, we noticed that one of the major challenges in the course is not just learning the content knowledge but the textbook costs for both lecture and lab on top of the tuition. Oftentimes, lower income students hold off on buying textbooks until they know they will not drop the class, or ensure that their limited funds go towards books they know will need. This created a barrier and somewhat unfair advantage for students who were able to purchase the textbooks in the first couple of weeks of class. In order to ameliorate this, several Biology faculty worked together in developing an OER for students to use.

The Biology OER Team was led by one faculty in Biology who also worked at the Center for Teaching and Learning. They led development by collaborating with other Biology faculty on different aspects of the OER/Biology course materials development.

The Biology 105 OER was comprised of four main components: 

  • Histology Atlas
  • Histology Checklist
  • Lecture Study Guides
  • Lab Manuals 

The Biology OER Team collaborated on these developments by looking not just what was essential for success in this course, but longitudinally what would be needed as resources and knowledge for later in the course series as well. For example, a major component of many biology textbooks and courses is the visualization and identification of key aspects of tissue. The histology atlas detailed essential components that students needed to know, geared towards the larger context of the system. 

Another major reason that an OER was deemed more impactful than having students use older edition textbooks, is in textbooks often the only major change is the problem sets used. While this may seem a minor part of the cost, this alone forces students to pay for the new textbook to ensure they are on the same page as their classmates. The OER Biology development team built the lab manual and lecture study guides to update with the material as well as ensure that no student would fail as a result of insufficient funds. 

Not wanting to limit these resources to students at our campus, in true OER fashion, we published many of the resources on our university's online Academic Commons Resource Center. Since it’s publishing, we have seen it downloaded over 1000 times by other entities at our university. Since the Academic Commons is for faculty use, we can extrapolate a significant ultimate student impact. 

Since the launch of the resources, students responded positively to each resource in our end of semester survey. They reported that it dealt directly with the course content as opposed to the more generic textbooks, as well as the immediate financial concerns. Another advantage of developing this OER over using a standard textbook was incorporating student feedback on iteratively improving and growing key areas that needed clarity or improvement. We hope to grow this project by developing similar OER resources for later courses in the series, as well as other STEM courses offered at our institution. 

Level of Participation: 

This is a highly participatory session. Rather than lecture at the audience for 45 minutes, the presenters will frame the session around conversations key components of developing OERs, how factors such as textbook cost can impact access and equity, and how to launch similar initiatives with your faculty/campus. Throughout the session, the presenters will engage the audience through tools such as Mentimeter and the Zoom chat, and frame the conversation around that.

A large chunk of the session will also be spent in scaffolded engagement breakout rooms. Essentially, after presenting the problem to a large audience members will have the option of moving into a breakout room guided by a presenter focused on topics that the audience seemed most interested in earlier in the presentation.

To support and engage our audience at all levels, engagement during the session will be scaffolded. During the breakout rooms participants can also choose to engage: 

  • Discussing with the other members of the session via audio/video in Zoom 
  • By sharing resources and ideas in a shared collaborative resource page.

Session Goals: 

  • Understand the process for developing OERs.
  • Understand why OER helps mitigate related equity issues.
  • Learn how to start such an intuitive at your campus, including having conversations with faculty about using OER’s and developing your own. 

 

Mar 29, 2022
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
Neuroscience + Learning Design + Education Technology = Education 3.0 | Networking Coffee Talk

From game changers based on cognitive science to best practices found in education psychology and support for it all through technology platforms and frameworks, session attendees will gain a better understanding of how to make tomorrow's learning start happening today as we build Education 3.0.

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Extended Abstract

Neuroscience suggests that for some, learning should not be attempted before 10am while for others, learning should conclude by noon. Learning research shows that listening to a lecture is the brain-equivalent of watching televised fishing. Education technologists have produced social learning assets that not only cross over the walls of classrooms, but even the borders of countries for deeper, more engaging learning while others shun the modality as “second best” learning.

We know more about the brain and about learning than ever before in our history. While what we do know about the brain is still relatively little, it is significant that so little research makes its way into the classroom. At the same time the skills, aptitudes, and abilities to critically think and problem solve have shifted dramatically in the past several decades, yet these paradigm shifts are also absent from many teaching and learning experiences. (Never before has a catch phrase been interjected into educational mission statements around the world with so little understanding of what it means as, "21st Century Learning.") From competency-based models to gamification to retention devices, this session hopes to start changing paradigms and filters specific to learning.

This highly interactive session will "Do, Show, Tell, Review, and Ask" as participants engage in pattern recognition, craft problems prior to solving them, collaborate in real-time to promote social learning, and employ other, immediately usable techniques for the classroom – both online and in person. This presentation will focus on ways to create multi-nodal and multi-modal connections based on effective practices from practitioners around the globe, all of which could be categorized as Education 3.0. Participants will be shown many examples of web assets and learning experiences (both in-person and eLearning) that promote social learning, transformative learning, game-based learning, and learning based on cognitive science. The audience will see and hear about how to create better (more authentic) MOOCs, simulation, curriculum integration events, authentic assessment, and problem-based learning experiences within an eLearning framework. Be sure to bring your devices as the session will encourage feedback, web-based experiences, and interaction. Finally, participants will leave this presentation with multiple resources (learning games, web tools, apps, illustrations, etc) and opportunities for application immediately from this seasoned presenter.

Join a researcher, innovator, university administrator, and 20 year college professor to unpack what neo-millennial learning and assessment can and should be, as well as a some old procedures, embedded deeply in the educational DNA that need to go. From game changers based on cognitive science to best practices found in education psychology and support for it all through technology platforms and frameworks, attendees will have a better understanding of how to make tomorrow's learning start happening today as we build Education 3.0.

Mar 29, 2022
10:15am - 11:15am (Central)
OLC-MERLOT Innovate 2022 Awards Gala | Featured Session

The OLC-MERLOT Awards Gala marks a time of ceremony and celebration as we spotlight the achievements, elevate the innovations, and honor the commitments of this year’s award recipients. We are privileged to have these leaders join us on the virtual stage as we thank them for their dedication to quality online, digital, and blended learning, and engage them in dialogue on their perspectives on what’s to come. In line with the celebratory nature of the session, we invite you to select your most festive Zoom background and join us for an enlightening session filled with accolades and new ideas, featuring some of the amazing individuals in our field!

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Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Mar 29, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
From Grassroots To The Highly-Orchestrated: Online Leaders Share Their Stories Of The Evolving Online Organizational Landscape In Higher Ed | Conversation, Not Presentation

Join us for an inspiration session led by forward-thinking leaders in online education! In this inspiration session, professionals in roles ranging from those leading online programs and campuses to those researching, teaching, and designing online learning will share their most innovative ideas generated from challenges that inspired action.

 

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Extended Abstract

As research concluded on a year-long study into the evolving nature of online organizations at institutions of higher education, it became clear to the CORAL research collaborative that the “who”, “what”, “when”, and “where” of online education is a textured and organic space largely dependent on the institution’s history and culture, as well as perceptions of faculty, staff, administrators, and the needs of the student body and other institutional stakeholders. As such, online organizational structures often do not align with established organizational behavior/organizational development frameworks, instead online organizational structures at HEIs are nontraditional, diverse, and distinct from institution to institution. 

As online education units within higher education institutions (HEIs) continue to expand and evolve, it is important to not only research their nature and organizational structures, but to make sense of them through sharing histories, pain points, evolutions, and practices of peer 

Join us for a campfire gathering of forward-thinking leaders in online education that will be sharing their full stories in new book published by Online Learning Consortium and edited by Bettyjo Bouchey (National Louis University), Erin Gratz (Orange Coast College), Shelley Kurland (County College of Morris) entitled: From Grassroots to the Highly Orchestrated: Online Leaders Share Their Stories of the Evolving Online Organizational Landscape in Higher Ed.  These inspiring professionals ranging in roles from those leading online programs and campuses to those researching, teaching, and designing online learning will share their most innovative ideas generated from challenges that inspired action.  Serving as a preview of the book, but also an opportunity to have a more intimate conversation about their stories, session attendees can expect to leave the session with feelings of validation that we all have shared challenges and triumphs.  Furthermore, session attendees can expect to leave the session with tested and practical solutions to common challenges and a renewed sense of energy to elevate the work of online programming at their institutions.

Mar 29, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Critically Evaluating Our Learning Designs: What Research Tells Us | Education Session

As instructional designers, we are well-positioned to advocate for more balanced, respectful, values-driven learning designs when developing new courses, but how can we effect change in existing courses in our portfolios? We will discuss what critical learning sciences research can tell us about evaluating existing learning designs.

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Extended Abstract

As Costanza-Chock (2020) points out in the concluding chapter of Design Justice, “we urgently need more critical analysis in every design domain.” What critical analysis might look like for an instructional design, however, is unclear at present. While existing scholarship in this area offers a variety of approaches and considerations, the literature does not point to a single ideal framework or list of steps for assessing instructional design in terms of inclusivity, power, equity, or justice.

It’s not unusual for an instructional designer to inherit at least a few existing courses as part of their scope, whether it’s due to taking on a new role or helping out when a teammate leaves. Critical design strategies are best implemented when these goals are prioritized from the beginning of the design process, but what does that mean for those courses that were developed in the past? This session will bring practitioners together to think about how we might critically analyze existing instructional designs in an effort to develop a more robust framework for implementing critical instructional design principles in our courses. 

During this session, we will discuss themes from critical learning sciences research and collaborate via virtual whiteboards such as MiroBoards and note-taking apps like Google Docs to brainstorm ways we can effect course design changes in our existing curriculums.

References

Costanza-Chock, S. (2020). Design Justice: Community-led practices to build the worlds we need. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Mar 29, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Discussion Board Labs: Innovative Strategy to Increase FYE Student Engagement Through Active Faculty Reflection | Education Session

First Year Experience (FYE) faculty seek opportunities to increase student engagement in discussion board threads. FYE students hesitate to participate due to different classroom fears. This session shares the active faculty reflection process that resulted in the implementation of innovative strategies, which demonstrated increased discussion board engagement in FYE courses. 

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Extended Abstract

Faculty, especially those teaching FYE courses, observe lower discussion board engagement in their classes. Student participation is sparse and sporadic, as reflected by incomplete posts. In the process, different students tend to emerge, posing a threat to student success:

  • The invisible student – non-contributor
  • The copycat student – plagiarizer
  • The purposeless student – off-topic writer
  • The nickel-and-dime student – shallow writer
     

Unfortunately, these emerging students contribute to low student engagement if the issue is not addressed. Student engagement within the first year is important and essential to the first year experience. Universities with large first-year class sizes are challenged with maintaining student engagement (Ahlfeldt, Mehta, & Sellnow, 2005), and research further links a lack of engagement to students who feel disconnected and without a true purpose (Lizzio, 2006).  Carini, Kuh & Klein (2006) suggest that there is a definite linkage between student achievement and student engagement as well as a lower percentage of students completing their course studies (Laird, Chen & Kuh, 2008).  Furthermore, students who are not fully engaged are more inclined to withdraw from their university (Kuh et al., 2008). 

How can faculty get ahead of this curve and affect a greater level of engagement? Studies reveal that pedagogical methods that support engagement are critical to a first year student’s overall level of success (Kift & Field, 2009).  Discussion board threads can provide faculty with an opportunity to assess the needs of their students and adapt pedagogical methods that would effectively meet this need, thus increasing both engagement and academic progress (Waheed, 2017).

However, faculty members are challenged with student engagement in discussion board threads because students bring to the classroom different challenges and fears about writing.  Bandura’s Self-efficacy theory suggests that a person’s level of motivation is often indirectly tied into self-constructed beliefs about their ability to perform a specific task or reach a specific goal (Seifert & Sutton, 2012). Based on this theory, we can infer that a lack of confidence causes fear and constraint. Therefore, if a student believes he can’t, then he won’t; but if he believes he can, then he will.

What faculty strategies can alleviate the fear factor and drive student success?  Increased faculty activity in the classroom is assumed to correlate with high student engagement, regardless if quality proved futile. In order to achieve increased success, faculty must have the flexibility to think outside the box and be empowered to innovate where needed. When faculty are focused on meeting items on a list, this pushes the focus away from student success. Essentially, faculty members are less able to meet the students where they are nor are they effectively able to determine which students need the most attention. This only leads to a downward spiral where some students are left behind. How can we alter our approach for the benefit of our students?

Our institution determined that a different direction was needed to have a greater impact on our students’ success. What did we do, and how did our institution drive student success? Our university shifted away from the traditional (prescriptive) faculty expectations where faculty were responsible for specific number of actions over specific timeframes to a model that was more student-centered and provided greater autonomy.

Through the implementation of an Instructional Tenets Model, our university discovered that faculty had a greater opportunity of providing pedagogical methods that would help students thrive in the online classroom. The impact of this model equated to better engagement and a greater measure of student success through a sincere focus on the following five tenets:

  • Being Present (Engage)
  • Facilitate Learning (Teach)
  • Connect with Students (Communication)
  • Instructional Agility (Adapt)
  • Innovate (Create)

The introduction of the instructional tenets challenged the faculty as they prepared for classes.  The tenets encouraged faculty to reflect on the student experience and consider a classroom challenge that could be addressed through tenet application.

A FYE faculty member leveraged student surveys and outcomes to draw conclusions on the poor discussion board engagement and determined that this was a reflection of student fears and uncertainty.  After conducting an intentional classroom assessment, the faculty member brainstormed ways to address students’ hesitation and fears through the creation of Discussion Board Labs.

Using a proactive approach, Discussion Board Labs were created to develop a sense of community, provide a low risk of engagement, a safe environment, and to provide real-time guidance, feedback, and encouragement to the students. Within the first week of the course, the faculty hosted three different lab sessions. The grading rubric components provided the framework and the outline for each session. This provided student guidance regarding the key elements of each deliverable, while creating interactivity in the session through just-in-time pedagogical methods. 

The labs were designed to assist students with learning the art of Discussion Board writing, while adapting a modeling approach through specific examples. The goal was to scaffold student skills and to build a strong foundation that students could apply in future units and courses. Observable outcomes were increased engagement, consistent and stable discussion board participation throughout the course, improved quality of posts, improved partnership with faculty, increased review and integration of feedback. Utilizing pre, post and ongoing assessments of these outcomes, allowed the faculty member to reflect upon the level of effectiveness and to determine if there were any improvements needed to the process.

 

Session Goals:

In this education session, attendees will gain knowledge on engagement strategies in the discussion board. Attendees will also be able to describe and apply the active faculty reflection process on other classroom components.  Implementing these strategies will increase student engagement, boost student confidence, improve assignment quality and support student success.

 

Activities:

Attendees will be asked to apply the active faculty reflection process to a common classroom challenge (i.e. low live session attendance). Presenters will facilitate the activity and encourage discussion based on the following questions:

  1. What do you see in the classroom? What indicators point to the challenge? (Be Present)
  2. What intervention should occur? (Innovate)
  3. When will the intervention be introduced? (Facilitate Learning, Instructional Agility, Connect with Students)
  4. How (methodology)? (Facilitate Learning, Instructional Agility, Connect with Students)
  5. What measurement outcomes will determine the impact of the strategy?
  6. What is the reflective process? (Innovate)

 

References:

Ahlfeldt, S., Mehta, S. & Sellnow, T. (2005). Measurement and analysis of student engagement in university
     classes where varying levels of PBL methods are in use. Higher Education Research and Development, 24
     (1), 5-20. doi: 10.1080/0729436052000318541

Carini, R., Kuh, G., & Klein, S. 2006. Student engagement and student learning: Testing the linkages. Research i
     in Higher Education, 47, 1-32. doi: 10.1007/s11162-005-8150- 9

Kift, S. M. & Field, R. M. (2009) Intentional first year curriculum design as a means of facilitating student
     engagement: some exemplars. In 12th Pacific Rim First Year in Higher Education Conference: Preparing for
     Tomorrow Today: The First Year Experience as Foundation
, 2009-06-29 - 2009-07-01.         
     https://eprints.qut.edu.au/30044/1/c30044.pdf

Kuh, G., Cruce, T., Shoup, R., Kinzie, J. & Gonyea, R. (2008). Unmasking the effects of student engagement on
     first-year college grades and persistence. The Journal of Higher Education, 79(5), 540-563. doi:
     10.1353/jhe.0.0019

Laird, T., Chen, D., & Kuh, G. (2008). Classroom practices at institutions with higher-thanexpected persistence
     rates: What student engagement data tell us. New Directions in Teaching and Learning, 115, 85-99. doi:
     10.1002/tl.327

Lizzio, A. (2006). Fives Senses of Success: Designing effective orientation and engagement processes.
     Unpublished manuscript, Griffith University.

Lodge, J. (2012). Implementing a Principal Tutor to increase student engagement and retention within the first
     year of a professional program. The International Journal of the First Year in Higher Education, 3(1). 9-20.
     doi: 10.5204/intjfyhe.v3i1.101

Seifert, K., & Sutton, R. (2012). Educational Psychology (Vol. 3). Saylor Foundation.

Waheed, N. (2017). Effects of an online discussion forum on student engagement and learning in a first year
     undergraduate nursing unit. 5th Annual Worldwide Nursing Conference. doi: 10.5176/2315-4330_WNC17.35

Willans, J., & Seary, K. (2018). “Why did we lose them and what could we have done”? Student Success, 9(1),
     47-60. http://dx.doi.org/10.5204/ssj.v9i1.432

Mar 29, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Inspiring Engagement and Inclusion in a HyFlex Environment: Allowing All Learners to Have a Voice in the Classroom | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

As institutions adopt HyFlex learning options, educators must innovate and adapt to meet students where they are with creative instructional solutions. During this presentation, you will learn how multiple-solution platforms allow professors to create interactive lessons and improve engagement across in-person, online, and asynchronous settings to maintain classroom continuity.

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Extended Abstract

HyFlex classrooms - a combination of in-person instruction and online learning - are becoming increasingly popular in higher education, not only for pandemic-related safety measures, but also as an opportunity to promote access by meeting students where they are. This shift in learning environments requires educators to innovate and adapt teaching practices and technologies across several modalities while not sacrificing learner performance. 

Regardless of participation mode, maintaining consistent pedagogies, supporting equivalent learning outcomes, and hearing from all students are often top of mind for educators promoting equity and inclusion in the classroom. Implementing multiple-solution engagement tools enable instructors to both reach their students and ensure their voices are heard through interactive slides, dynamic media, formative assessments, and more. 

During this interactive and hands-on session, presenters will demonstrate and model a successful HyFlex instructional experience using a proven multiple-solution platform and discuss their engagement and collaboration findings. A professor will also share their real-world classroom examples and best practices cultivated during the pandemic and how to utilize these skills moving forward in online, in-person, and asynchronous settings. 

By the end of this presentation, attendees will know how to engage learners to elevate instruction and contribute to inclusive learning outcomes in a HyFlex environment. Participants will also be able to build upon the session learnings to design their courses and instruction for improved participation, academic effectiveness, and learner connectedness with widely used higher education multiple-solution technology.

 

Mar 29, 2022
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
Networking Design Sprint (Design for Social Impact) - Part 1 | Other

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the first of a series of OLC Innovate Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of three days. This year the sprints focus on designing for social impact.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 29, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
ShapingEDU: Creating Diverse Communities of Practice | Featured Session

Want to create a community that energizes and inspires its members? Join us as we explore the formation and growth of ShapingEDU at Arizona State University, a global community of practice known for its inclusion of voices from around the world, and fostering emergent thinking around the art of the possible.

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Extended Abstract

ShapingEDU was founded in 2018 at Arizona State University, ranked #1 in the US for innovation, and #1 in the U.S. and #9 in the world for global impact, in research, outreach and stewardship. This global community of practice is known for its inclusion of - and respect for - voices from around the world, and its unique events, programs and content. In this session, we’ll explore how we established and continue to grow a diverse community that fosters emergent thinking around the art of the possible, tackles challenges surfaced by its members, and builds constellations of changemakers striving to make a meaningful impact on education futures - all while embracing the good kind of shenanigans.

Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Mar 29, 2022
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Virtual Speed Networking Lounge: What is the story of your name? | Other

Join us for more Speed Networking fun! Come share your name and the history behind it! We want to know all about you, why they named you like that, and anecdotes with your name!

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

D2L logo

InSpace Proximity logo

PlayPosit logo

     

Mar 29, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Active Learning and Meta-Cognition: Helping Students Develop Lifelong Learning Skills in Large Online STEM Courses | Education Session

How do we help students develop lifelong learning skills? In this session we will showcase active learning and meta-cogintion exercises that were thoughtfully incorporated into high enrollment first year mathematics courses to support student learning. Bring your creativity and leave with actionable ideas that can scale for your course(s).

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Extended Abstract

Many students enter a first year mathematics course with the mindset of “I just need to get the right answer.” In this session we introduce three activities thoughtfully incorporated into high enrollment courses that help students adjust their learning practices with low instructor effort and high student impact. 

  • Homework Feedback Loop - Meta-Cognitive reflection coupled with annotated solutions.

  • A math photo hunt - bringing active learning to the online classroom, enhancing the student’s engagement with course content.

  • Exam Wrappers - A simple way to make summative assessments also formative assessments and give you valuable feedback about the exam experience your students have.

Come prepared to use your creativity to find ways to create engaging activities in your own courses.  Participants will learn how to design scalable activities that help their students connect their course content with the world around them.

 

Mar 29, 2022
2:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Closing the Gap: Strategies for Research to Practice in Online Undergraduate STEM General Education | Workshop

Many universities have struggled to close the theory to practice gap in STEM education. This workshop will outline the process of developing, implementing, and assessing a philosophical framework for course development. Participants will practice developing a philosophical framework, creating inventories to assess implementation, and planning for stakeholder response.

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Extended Abstract

For many years, there has been a documented gap between the knowledge shared within the scholarly community and the instructional practices observed in learning environments (Biesta, 2007). This gap has been especially prevalent in STEM fields, which have been the focus of recent education research (Labov, Singer, George, Schweingruber, & Hilton, 2009); yet this research has not led to enough improvement in student outcomes to impact the national need of a skilled and abundant STEM workforce (Borrego, Froyd, & Hall, 2010).  

 

It is challenging for an institution to select an educational theory and determine how to implement its associated strategies. To start, defining a philosophy for learning, can be helpful (Elrod & Kezar, 2016). This philosophy outlines what an institution, or individual, defines as knowledge, learning, and assessment. It outlines what a learning environment should look, sound, and feel like for students and instructors. Additionally, it discusses the roles of the student and the faculty in the learning process. This philosophy will also support an institution in developing consistent strategies for instruction and assessment.  By defining its philosophy for learning, an institution can focus on seminal works in education theory and support institutional stakeholders, including faculty, to adopt a consistent practice.

 

Research has advanced pedagogical theory in recent decades, and many of these theories are now well-studied and/or well-accepted. We sought such modern, acknowledged theories in our effort to close the theory to practice gap in undergraduate STEM courses. Below are the 7 theories used to develop our philosophy for learning, along with associated seminal works. They were selected not only because they are seminal but also because they are in alignment with the mission and vision of the University.

  • Metacognition and Affect (Dole & Sinatra, 1998; Mayer, 1998; Moons & Mackie, 2007; Sinatra, 2005) 
  • Conceptual Change (Strike & Posner, 1992; Carey, 2000; Chinn & Brewer, 1993; Chi, 2008) 
  • Social Constructivism (Vygotsky, 1986) 
  • Academic Self-concept (Marsh, & Shavelson, 1985; Bong & Skaalvik, 2003) 
  • Holism (Dewey, 1986; Mahmoudi, Jafari, Nasrabadi, Liaghatdar, 2012) 
  • Systemic Functional Linguistics (Halliday, 1992; Holliday, Yore, & Alvermann, 1994) 
  • 21st Century Knowledge Framework (Kereluik, Mishra, Fahnoe, & Terry, 2013; Mishra, Anbar, Scragg, & Ragan, 2019) 

Implementation of the philosophical framework, made up of the above theories, improved student outcomes in and changed the way we talk about undergraduate STEM education at our institution.

Our institution serves non-traditional, online adult learners. Sixteen undergraduate STEM education courses were revised using the philosophical framework, either fully or partially implemented. The course content areas included math, nutrition science, oceanography, chemistry, environmental science, and biology. Nine course features including advisory language, remediation strategy, discussion questions, content resources, assignments, assessments, iterative opportunity, feedback speed, and perception of academic learning were considered during each course revision. In each course feature, best practices from the philosophical framework were implemented. To confirm alignment of course features to the philosophical framework, an inventory was created to assess how fully the philosophical framework was applied to each of the nine course features.

 

Following course revision, student outcomes were measured. When data from all sixteen revised courses was examined together, student attrition was reduced from 12.5% (N=14,366) to 6.7% (N=14,998). Courses were then separated into two categories: full philosophical implementation and partial philosophical implementation. Full implementation courses were those where best practice from all seven theories in the philosophical framework were present in all nine course features. Partial implementation courses were those in which a subset of the theories was applied to course features or not all course features were able to be revised to be consistent with the framework.  Student attrition in full implementation courses was reduced from 11.5% (N=12,435) to 6.0% (N=13,352). Student attrition in partial implementation courses was reduced from 18.1% (N=1,931) to 12.4% (N=1,646). Additional course level data will be shared in the workshop as well as rationale for determining whether courses received full or partial implementation.

 

The purpose of this workshop is to support participants with developing scalable and sustainable strategies for closing the theory to practice gap in STEM education for undergraduate courses. The participant learning outcomes are:

  • Define and describe a philosophical framework of learning theories
  • Develop an inventory to describe how a philosophical framework translates to specific course features
  • Practice assessing alignment of course features with a philosophical framework
  • Articulate an action plan for using philosophical frameworks to close the theory to practice gap in course design

This workshop will feature different scenarios for discussion within small groups. Participants will be able to practice identifying course features to be targeted during course revision, building components of a philosophical framework, applying those components to identified course features, and evaluating the effectiveness and impact of the implementation. Following this practice, participants will prepare communication strategies that will support shifting the paradigm for STEM education in their institutions. Small groups will have opportunities to discuss their thinking, problem-solve potential challenges, and share their findings. Facilitators of this session will support attendees with developing action items to implement at their institutions. Approximately 20 minutes will be spent presenting, 45 minutes in interactive/facilitated/structured groupwork, 15 minutes in sharing and coming to consensus, and 10 minutes for Q&A and reflection.

The primary audience types for this workshop are administrative leaders, course designers, and faculty. Leaders will learn how to have discussions about brining theory-based strategies into the classroom environment. They will learn to use tools to assess the consistency of these practices and how to communicate to multiple stakeholders. Faculty and course designers will be provided with tools to help implement theory-based practice as well as improve efficacy of those interventions. Required materials are the ability to conduct breakout rooms, virtually. This is aligned to Teaching and Learning Practice as it will show participants how to implement scalable and sustainable research based decisions in their courses and within their institutions.

References

Biesta, G. (2007). Bridging the gap between educational research and educational practice: The need for critical distance.

Bong, M., & Skaalvik, E.M. (2003). Academic Self-Concept and Self-Efficacy: How Different Are They Really? Educational Psychology Review 15(1).

Borrego, M., Froyd, J. E., & Hall, T. S. (2010). Diffusion of engineering education innovations: A survey of awareness and adoption rates in US engineering departments. Journal of Engineering Education, 99(3), 185-207.

Carey, S. (2000). Science education as conceptual change. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 21(1), 13-19.

Chi, M.T.H. (2008). Three types of conceptual change: Belief revision, mental model transformation, and categorical shift. In S. Vosniadou (Ed.), Handbook of research on conceptual change (pp. 61-82). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Chinn, C. A., & Brewer, W. F. (1993). The role of anomalous data in knowledge acquisition: A theoretical framework and implications for science instruction. Review of Educational Research, 63, 1-49.

Dewey, J. (1986, September). Experience and education. In The educational forum (Vol. 50, No. 3, pp. 241-252). Taylor & Francis Group.

Dole, J. A., & Sinatra, G. M. (1998). "Reconceptualizing change in the cognitive construction of knowledge." Educational Psychologist 33(2-3): 109-128.

Elrod, S., & Kezar, A. (2016). Increasing student success in STEM: A guide to systemic institutional change. Association of American Colleges and Universities. 1818 R Street NW, Washington, DC 20009.

Halliday, M. K. (1992). Towards probabilistic interpretations. In E. Ventola (Ed.), Functional and systematic linguistics (pp. 39-63). Mouton.

Holliday, W. G., Yore, L. D., & Alvermann, D. E. (1994). The reading–science learning–writing connection: breakthroughs, barriers, and promises.  Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 31, 877-893.

Kereluik, K., Mishra, P., Fahnoe, C., & Terry, L. (2013). What knowledge is of most worth: Teacher knowledge for 21st century learning. Journal of digital learning in teacher education, 29(4), 127-140.

Labov, J. B., Singer, S. R., George, M. D., Schweingruber, H. A., & Hilton, M. L. (2009). Effective practices in undergraduate STEM education part 1: examining the evidence. CBE—Life Sciences Education, 8(3), 157-161.

Mahmoudi, S., Jafari, E., Nasrabadi, H.A., Liaghatdar, M.J. (2012).  Holistic Education: An Approach for 21 Century. International Education Studies, 5(2).

Marsh, H.W., & Shavelson, R. J. (1985). Self-concept: Its multifaceted, hierarchical structure. Educ. Psychol. 20: 107–123.

Mayer, R. E. (1998). "Cognitive, metacognitive, and motivational aspects of problem solving." Instructional Science 26(1-2): 49-63.

Mishra, P., Anbar, A., Scragg, B., & Ragan, L. (2019). "Developing the future substance of STEM Education: A Concept Paper". Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College, Arizona State University. https://education.asu.edu/sites/default/files/substance-of-stem-educatio...

Moons, W. G., & Mackie, D. M. (2007). "Thinking straight while seeing red: The influence of anger on information processing." Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 33(5): 706-720.

Sinatra, G. M. (2005). "The "Warming Trend" in Conceptual Change Research: The Legacy of Paul R. Pintrich." Educational Psychologist 40(2): 107-115.

Strike, K. A., & Posner, G. J. (1992). A revisionist theory of conceptual change. In R. Duschl & R. Hamilton (Eds.), Philosophy of Science, Cognitive Psychology and Educational Theory and Practice (pp. 147-176). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1986). Thought and language-Revised edition. Cambridge, MA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Mar 29, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Cooking with Open Educational Practices: Capturing Pedagogical Strategies and Outcomes in ePortfolios to Serve Up Educational Success | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

Open Educational Resources are like the ingredients for cooking but without a good recipe, without Open Educational Practices (OEP), you will not produce the educational transformations at the desired speed and scale.   This session will review how to institutionalize open educational practices with ePortfolios and help participants develop their own strategies.

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Extended Abstract

MERLOT (www.merlot.org) has recently created a portal showcasing open educational practices for redesigning courses with technology, adopting OER, innovating career and technical education programs, using virtual labs, and moving online at https://oep.merlot.org.   The collection of over 1,000 eportfolios captured faculty's "know how" to adopt and adapt a wide range of technologies in transforming their teaching and their students' learning.   The ePortfolios are OERs that can be reused, revised, remix, retained and redistributed within the process of scaling the innovative practices.   The workshop will briefly review the IDEATE virtual event strategy designed by MERLOT and the Online Learning Consortium to openly share practices for teaching STEM Labs online.  

The workshop will guide participants through the extensive collection that covers many academic and CTE disciplines as well as explain and discuss strategies for leveraging the portal for their local use.  The workshop will include the presentation and discussion of institutional implementation strategies which have been successful in engaging faculty in open educational practices and adopted in multiple institutions.  The workshop will also demonstrate the use MERLOT's Content Builder application to create OER ePortfolios for capturing open educational practices at their own institution.   MERLOT provides templates for ePortfolios with scaffolding questions that guide users through the comprehensive reflection and documentation of their educational practices as they create OER that are hosted for free within MERLOT.

After a few introductory PPT slides providing the context for Open Educational Practices and MERLOT,   the workshop will involve a number of screen sharing activities, directed tasks, and use of chat to share reflections on their learning.  After each of the major sections, discussion via chat and video conference will be used to engage participants in the learning activities.   The workshop will end with people sharing their learning outcomes in the chat and verbally as well.

OER without Open Educational Practices will not produce the educational transformations at the speed and scale that is possible.   This session will provide models of how to institutionalize open educational practices with ePortfolio and should help participants develop their own local strategies for supporting OEP.

MERLOT's OER/Affordable Learning Solutions strategy and OEP services have been implemented as part of the HBCU Affordable Learning Solutions initiative.   See http://hbcuals.org to explore the HBCU AL$ Community Portal.   The workshop will showcase how a number of HBCUs have adapted the Affordable Learning Solutions "practice" into their own institutions.   The California State University System is composed of 20 HSIs and 16 ANAPIs and has been implementing the Affordable Learning Solutions Initiative successfully for the past 10 years with over $70 million in student savings for course materials in 2019-20 due to campus activities focused on the adoption of OER and library resources.

Participants will acquire the knowledge and skills to:

1. Explore MERLOT's portal showcasing over 1,000 eportfolios capturing open educational practices for redesigning courses with technology, adopting OER, innovating career and technical education programs, using virtual labs, and moving online,

2. Use the open educational practices captured in OERs to support their own initiatives and professional development programs

3. Use MERLOT's Content Builder to create their own OEP templates

 

Mar 29, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
From Coursework to Community: The Journey of the UAGC Honors Program | Education Session

UAGC is a fully online university. The Honors Program promotes active student engagement. Students take courses culminating in service learning, participate in a virtual learning community, and contribute meaningfully to the university with synchronous seminars. Along the way, they develop knowledge and skills in leadership, innovation, global perspective, and civic responsibility.

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Extended Abstract

UAGC is a fully online university. Our students tend to be working adults whose focus is on career and professional development. All undergraduate courses at UAGC are five weeks in length, with new sessions starting each week. The majority of the courses are worth three credits and comprised of weekly readings, discussions, assignments, journals, and quizzes. The university prioritizes the foundation for student success and adopts best practices of persistence, completion, student satisfaction, and academic gains of all the students we serve.

Our presentation chronicles the university’s ongoing work revising its Honors Program. These changes are intended to provide students with a more engaging community experience, better enabling the program to achieve its vision of challenging and empowering highly motivated undergraduate scholars to become global community leaders.

The previous design consisted solely of academic enrichment courses focused on fostering leadership, innovation, global perspective, and civic responsibility. The redesign has maintained these focus areas while integrating the high-impact practices (HIPs) of service learning and a virtual learning community and adding a required academic event participation and leadership component, to craft a more cohesive common intellectual experience. These practices take many different forms, depending on learner characteristics and institutional priorities and contexts (Kuh, 2008).  

This presentation will offer participants a case study of this academic transition, including how it was carried out, major milestones, challenges encountered, and initial observations of improved students’ investment and engagement since the revised program was first implemented in July of 2021. It will explore the structure and content of the revised Honors courses, with the more cohesive student experience and enhanced opportunities for student service learning. It will also cover the process of developing a virtual Honors Learning Community space in Canvas (the same LMS where the program courses are offered) and how the space has been used thus far to foster a greater sense of community among Honors students.  Additionally, it will report on the implementation of a program requirement that students in the program participate in and/or lead 15 hours’ worth of academic events (e.g., student roundtables, live learning discussions, clubs such as a science book club and a university’s chapter of Toastmasters, and the university’s student peer mentoring program).

Takeaways from this presentation will include opportunities for participants to

  • Develop an understanding of the processes, challenges, and institutional support when integrating HIPs into an academic program within a fully online university setting.
  • Learn how HIPs such as service-learning and a virtual learning community might help foster meaningful and engaging learning experiences for adult learners.
  • Explore strategies to create an integrated program by extending beyond a traditional course curriculum to include co-curricular learning experiences.

Kuh, G. D. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. AAC&U, Washington, D.C.

Mar 29, 2022
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Innovation Crew Meet-Up | Other

Join your crew during this designated synchronous Crew Meet-Up or connect with them via Slack. Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 29, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Mischief Managed: Using LMS Clickstream Data for Pedagogical Allyship | Education Session

Recent stories about LMS clickstream data describe how information is weaponized against students (e.g., ‘catching’ cheating), but it can be a powerful tool for pedagogical allyship. In this session, participants examine what clickstream data does and doesn’t reveal about student engagement and how faculty can leverage this resource for student success.

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Extended Abstract

Introduction

Academic Technologists and Learning Management System Administrators have long known about a relatively gray area in online learning management: Like any database, an LMS records streams of entries about user clicks, page views, and basic interaction with the online content. Technically speaking, these data are quite simple to interpret because they log objective information, such as time markers, elapsed time, mouse clicks, etc. 

In practice, however, this clickstream information is made available in various forms to users with different permissions to view the data; and then, those users who do make use of this available data read and interpret it in vastly subjective ways. For example, some instructors will view user logs as indicators of attendance, while others will interpret elapsed time as evidence of effort (or lack thereof). 

One problem is that the data is not meant to be used to track attendance or catch cheating attempts, but few institutions have education or policy protections in place to help users correct this behavior. It is not uncommon for Academic Technology specialists to receive occasional requests for quiz logs or login data to determine the date of last ‘attendance.’ 

During AY 2020-21, stories like the Dartmouth cheating scandal amplified this issue from a problem to a moral panic, fueled in part by pandemic teaching and learning that sent most higher education courses online in some form with varying levels of online teaching preparation.

There are many ways to unpack the Dartmouth story and others like it—what LMS data is designed to do and not do (limitations); problems of academic integrity and surveillance; the need for stakeholder education around LMS data and learning analytics; the role of policy and procedures for handling user data logged by our systems; the concept of trusting our students or creating an environment that reduces the will to cheat, etc.

In this session, participants will examine what clickstream data does and does not reveal about student engagement and how faculty can leverage this resource for student success. The presenters bring their expertise with academic technology, systems administration, quantitative theory & research, and higher education pedagogy to guide participants through the kinds of stories that clickstream data are meant to convey, as well as ways to bring more context to incomplete understandings of the data. 

Session Overview

In this interactive session, an Academic Technology Administrator and Higher Education Faculty member will share the types of clickstream data commonly available to different user types in an LMS (our focus and examples are in Canvas, but there are commonalities across others, including Moodle and Blackboard). We situate the interpretation of this data within social science research literature, including confirmation bias and troublesome knowledge. We also draw from the collective expertise of OLC attendees to brainstorm strategies for using available clickstream data as an instructional tool that can better serve students, positioning instructors as pedagogical allies.

Many OLC attendees, including instructional technologists and designers, administrators, faculty, and educational developers will relate to this session. Some will relate to stories about requests for user log information that fell outside of any policy protection, but relied on individual moral judgement and decision-making. Others may wish to better understand what LMS clickstream data does or does not communicate about student engagement with online content. All will benefit from a new way of thinking about and sharing ways to make use of the available data for student success. We believe this will be a high-interest topic to attendees.

Session Goals

By participating in this session, participants will: 

  • Identify what kind of user data is commonly available to users with ‘instructor’ and ‘student’ roles in a Learning Management System.
  • Understand and explain what information the LMS logs do and do not communicate about student engagement.
  • List ways to use clickstream data to help students be successful in academic classes.

These goals are relevant to both instructors and professionals responsible for educational development and instructional support.

Session Plan
  1. Welcome / Anonymous poll about dispositions toward cheating.
  2. Some research on cheating during the pandemic
    • Participants relate or react to findings.
  3. Theory - Confirmation Bias
    • Demonstration of data - solicit possible ‘stories’/explanations from participants
  4. What does it mean to be a pedagogical ally?
    • Presenters front load with ~2-3 examples
    • Participants - Brainstorm instructional moves
  5. Presenter - tour of Canvas logs; what they do and do not tell us
  6. Returning to allyship - Case Study #1: Share screenshot of Canvas login activity
    • Illustrative story - What instructors see / being transparent
    • Student’s story - working with others; low appearance of engagement
  7. Case #2: Share screenshot of Canvas Quiz log
  8. Presenter Recommendations for pedagogical allyship using clickstream data
  9. What questions does this raise for you? What ah-has? What strategies for using clickstream data for allyship in addition to the ones we shared here?
Level of Participation

This session includes moments for audience participation throughout:

  • An initial poll will reveal collective dispositions toward academic honesty
  • An open discussion (in chat or unmuted audio; raised hand) will invite stories and reactions to pandemic research.
  • Participants will share expertise and ideas about instructional moves on a common Padlet that they will continue to have access to following the session.
  • Participants will participate in an exercise that asks them to analyze example data and share possible explanations for the implied information.
Mar 29, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Student Perceptions of Feedback from Teachers in Online Courses: An Integrative Review | Education Session

Teacher online feedback to students is an integral aspect of teaching/learning. In this presentation, researchers share study results of student perceptions about teacher online feedback in higher education. The researchers explain student perceptions, preferred feedback format, support for teacher social presence, research appraisals, and Scholarship of Teaching and Learning implications.

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Extended Abstract

Introduction of Topic and Background: Feedback from teachers to students in higher education is a core feature of the student educational experience. Effective formative and summative teacher online feedback enhances the development of students. Well-crafted and valuable feedback can make a lasting impression on the development of a student. Student perspectives about teacher online feedback inform educators about best teaching practices from the student viewpoint. 

Research Objective: The objective of the present research study aims to explore student perceptions of teacher online feedback in higher education.

The Research Questions were:

1). What are student perceptions of teacher online feedback to students in higher education?

2). What are student perceptions of typed, handwritten, audio, and video feedback in higher education? 

3). What are student perceptions related to feedback about teacher online social presence in higher education? 

4). What are the qualities of the study methods and designs in the integrative review?

Study Design: The research design was an integrative review of evidence about teacher online feedback using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines adjusted for integrative reviews.

Data Sources: Seven research databases, Academic Search Premier, CINAHL, Education, Education Research Complete, ERIC, OVID, and ProQuest, were searched for the latest research about teacher online feedback from 2014 to 2020. 

Study Eligibility Criteria Process:  After three rounds of article reviews were conducted by applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria; the researchers chose 12 articles for deep analysis and evaluation. 

Results: Specific teacher behaviors, such as timely, detailed, and clear online feedback, were consistent. Some students reported a lack of understanding that they should use feedback to improve future performance. A variety of student preferences were related to the format (written, typed, audio, video). Support for the theoretical framework of Community of Inquiry and conceptual framework of teacher online social presence was present in the research findings. A higher rigor of further research with designs that include control and intervention groups will allow for causality. Larger research sample sizes would improve rigor. 

Conclusions: Consistently, students reported that they prefer timely, detailed, and clear online feedback from teachers. A variance of the preferred feedback format was present from the student's perspective. The study findings support teacher social presence in the online courseroom and Community of Inquiry framework. Increased research rigor, including experimental designs in the future, is warranted to examine causality. Larger sample sizes would improve confidence in study findings.

Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Implications: Providing online feedback to students is a complex and advanced skill for online teachers to develop. The researchers recommend framing feedback with comments such as "Please use this feedback to help you improve for the next paper and beyond!" Teachers may also include specific details, such as "Please use this feedback to help improve ____ (fill in the area to improve) for your next assignment." SoTL implications include asking students what format of online feedback (written, typed, audio, video) they prefer. Interacting with students in the online courseroom by announcements, videos, helpful tips about muddy areas, intelligent agent emails, and the discussion forum are ways to promote teacher online social presence. Online educators can use the evidence findings to inform their practice of providing timely, clear, detailed, and supportive feedback framed to help students improve their performance. Empirically-based knowledge of student perceptions about online teacher feedback in higher education is critical for application by faculty to advance the scholarship of teaching and learning. 

 

 

Mar 29, 2022
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Supporting Staff Resilience: Field of Counseling Lessons To Manage Pandemic and Post-Pandemic Burnout | Workshop

The abrupt switch to online during the pandemic represented challenges to our students, faculty --and also to our staff on whom we rely to support the success of our students. The complexity imposed on by the pandemic has led, at some institutions, to loss of faculty and/ or staff, with some leaving the industry altogether. This adds to the challenges of maintaining a quality experience for students. In this workshop participants share their experiences and lessons learned, as well as explore the application of concepts from the fields of counseling and leadership to support staff success and satisfaction.

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Extended Abstract

Among the roles of organizational leaders during turbulent times is to facilitate change and adaptation (Daft, 2018). The impact of the pandemic is a strong example of turbulence and the impacted have included students, faculty, and staff at all levels. Challenges associated with the pandemic had to be met at a time when many of our institutions were embarked on important programs, such as improvement of diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility that required essential updates to our processes and systems (e.g., something as simple as incorporating student-selected pronouns for college communications may require significant process and systems rework.) 

At the same time, the turbulence caused by the pandemic can represent a shared traumatic event causing unprecedented workplace stressors, exacerbating the exit of individuals from education altogether. This contributes to disruption and workload challenges to staff on whom we rely for the positive experience of our students. For educational leaders,  that equates to managing staff burnout risk and to an urgent priority of supporting staff motivation, empowerment, and satisfaction. There are institution-specific factors to consider in developing a plan to support staff in building resilience, developing coping strategies, and post-traumatic growth (Finstad et al., 2021) to help mitigate burn out and improve workload management, etc. 

This workshop summarizes select concepts from the fields of counseling and leadership as a starting point to then explore and share participants’ experiences and lessons learned at their own institutions. 

 

Level of participation:

Session facilitators will engage the audience extensively throughout the session, mixing short presentations with activities, polling, and discussion. Participants will engage in exercises to explore burnout management concepts as they share their experiences and lessons learned.

 

Session goals:

Individuals attending this education session will be able to share their institution’s lessons learned supporting the well-being of organizational members during turbulence. Participants will look at the challenges and solutions from the perspectives of the staff member, students, and faculty in their institutions.

SPEAKERS

 

Stacey Carrillo, Ph.D., NCC, is the Dean for Graduate Studies and faculty in the Master of Science Counseling Program at Prescott College. Stacey has utilized her counseling background working in higher education for over two decades cutting across academics, student affairs, and finance and business functions. She has significant experience working in human resources management with a focus on training and development, employee relations, and organizational change. As a program director and faculty member in online academic programs, Stacey has focused on building engaging and meaningful learning communities that enhance the student experience. Areas of research interest are professional identity development, best practices in online and blended learning formats, using technology in clinical supervision, and counselor self-care.

 

William Prado, D.B.A., is the Program Director of the Sustainable MBA and Sustainability Management BA programs, and Sustainable Business Professor at Prescott College. Prior to this role, Bill served as the Dean of Graduate and Online Programs at Prescott College, leading teaching and learning support. With 20 years of experience in higher education, curriculum and course design, and educational consulting, Bill has also taught courses in leadership, strategy, international business, finance and accounting. Bill has served as a consultant for publishers and universities in the development of online academic programs and courses. His research interests are in the area of ​​cross-cultural factors in organizational management and sustainable management.

 

Mar 29, 2022
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: Equitable Design Frameworks | Other

Ever the pursuit of educators, designers, and institutions alike, equity in educational experiences presents unique challenges and numerous opportunities. Joined by special guest(s), OLC Live host Brandon Poulliot will dive into a conversation around equitable design frameworks and incorporating diversity, equity, and inclusion into education.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 29, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
We've All Got Problems (Of Practice)

Brief Abstract:

Let’s face it: we’ve all got problems...of practice, at least! In this session, participants will work together to creatively and effectively frame their problems of practice, explore their causes and complexities, and explore different options and experiences from the OLC community for addressing them. Join us for this Conversation Not Presentation format session.

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Extended Abstract:

Let’s face it: we’ve all got problems...of practice! From scaling innovative solutions to navigating institutional bureaucracy to supporting faculty in a way that doesn’t encroach on their sense of freedom, the challenges for driving and supporting online and digital challenges abound. In this session, OLC community engagement and strategic partnerships staff will lead participants through methods for framing problems of practice for meaningful action, as well as share stories from the community of creative collaboration models across the field. 

Join us for an engaging, collaborative session to surface and story your challenges, engage with others facing similar challenges, and begin to explore possibilities for navigating toward solutions!

(Strategic Partnerships & Grants -- Networking and Business Exploration Opportunities (not a formal title)

  • Opportunity to connect with members, generate strategic partnership, consulting opportunities, and potential grant/network partners
    • Communities of Practice
    • Narratives in Digital Learning
    • SquadGoals Network
    • IELOL
  • Creative collaboration models -- with CoP pitch...problems of practice…design consultancy -- could be the workshop)

 

Mar 29, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Teachers as Architects of Learning | Education Session

In this session, attendees will explore how their beliefs and experiences impact their instructional design and discover the implications of this to their impact as educators. They will learn how twelve practical, evidence-based learning constructs can become the catalyst for identifying their instructional "growth edge," increasing their students' learning.

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Extended Abstract

Developing teaching practice sits at the center of most school improvement plans and as part of this so is the need for utilizing an approach that is respectful, professional and ultimately impactful on learning. Teachers as Architects of Learning spans the last ten years of research and application and is an international collaboration. 

In an education age where neuro-science and effect-size rules supreme it is more important than ever that we don’t view or treat teaching as an exact science. It isn’t and never will be. Why? Because the transactional process of learning and teaching is between human beings. As Dr. Robert Marzano highlights in his important research on instruction there is both a science and art to it.   

The goals of Teachers as Architects is three-fold. We advocate for teaching decisions to first and foremost be based on the impact it will have on learning (both for the student and the teacher). Secondly, we want teachers to be the chief decision makers in the development of their own practice, embracing the emerging research and thinking from our field and combining it with the contextual fabric of their professional lives. Lastly, we support teachers to be researchers of their teaching identity. Self-exploration of who they are as teachers, not just what skills and strategies might be best for their students and themselves.   

Teachers as Architects provide teachers with the opportunity to dig deeper into who they are as teachers and gain greater clarity about what approaches to learning might assist their growth. We take the position that all teachers are essentially architects of the learning experience. Regardless of what context teachers work in (including the virtual one), they share the common responsibility for ensuring they create a learning experience where learning can thrive. Learning architects are aware of the constructs required to create this successful learning experience for students. They deliberately apply specific teaching approaches to their evolving teaching architecture. Specifically, we introduce twelve constructs and associated strategies teachers consider as they decide what’s best for their instructional context.  

Participant Engagement 

Attendees will be taken through a process of self reflection.  As part of the process they will be asked to consider their instructional design practices and how they relate to their identity as a teacher.  This will involve the use of a ‘Metaphorical Mirror’ to connect their identity as an educator to the content of the session.  They will explicitly identify through this active process the possibilities for their professional practice.  

The Take-aways 

  • Understanding of how their beliefs about learning can strengthen their practice

  • A focus for deliberate practice through examining 12 learning constructs

  • Increased self-awareness on how learning theory influences how we teach 

  • Practical, evidence-based strategies for immediate use with learners in the virtual environment

Mar 29, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Business Process Redesign (BPR) to Improve Operational Efficiencies through a Systematic Redesign and Centralization of Systems and Processes | Education Session

UAGC’s Academic Operations teams have spearheaded a Business Process Redesign (BPR) of the institution’s work, centralizing many of the 3rd party systems into a Faculty management portal. This presentation will outline the approaches taken in the design and migration of services over to the system and the successes and challenges from that migration. In addition, the presenter will outline how the teams implemented a focus on continuous improvement through the application of Active Learning Theory and Total Quality Management practices.

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Extended Abstract

Over the last 18 months, the University of Arizona Global Campus’s (UAGC) Academic Operations teams have spearheaded a complete Business Process Redesign (BPR) of the institution’s work, centralizing many of the 3rd party systems and processes into one, centralized faculty management portal/system supported through APL nextED. The objective with a redesign of a business process is ideally to reduce the time required, decrease the cost of executing the business process, improve the quality of the service delivered, and improve the ability of the business process to react to variation. The Academic Operations department, through the migration of multiple functions and processes across multiple systems and locations, over to one centralized system. This was an undertaking designed to complete a full overhaul of all business processes related to the faculty experience in all aspects of the faculty lifecycle at UAGC.

The Academic Operations teams, led by the Faculty Systems & Data team, has successfully launched multiple phases for rolling out the new faculty portal that is eliminating reliance on numerous third party systems that support a number of processes, including Faculty profiles and recording of professional experience, teaching, and activity reporting, distribution and execution of faculty contracts, Peer Review reporting (Instructional Quality Report IQR), and Professional Development and training. This presentation will outline the successes and challenges experienced with the initial migration of processes from numerous 3rd party products, as well as our internally supported academic operations systems and services, to a centralized faculty management portal/system supported by APL nextED. This will include the initial project plan, challenges encountered, and future projection and planning for next phases. The presenters will outline the approaches taken in the design and migration of services over to the system as well as our communication strategy with Full Time and Associate Faculty.

In addition, the presenters will outline how the Academic Operations teams have implemented a focus on continuous improvement through the application of Active Learning Theory. “Active learning approaches often embrace the use of cooperative learning groups, a constructivist-based practice that places particular emphasis on the contribution that social interaction can make (Brame, 2016).  The Academic Operations team, and the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) department have embraced Active Learning for the initial development and migration of processes as well as the overall quality and changes within the new system working with key stakeholders across the institution. Through a collective approach focused on process improvement and improved operational efficiencies in all functions and processes, the teams are seeing immense efficiency increases that are now managed through the new faculty management portal/system. The Academic Operations Department is committed to creating a Community of Support and engaged employees in the overall growth and development of the Faculty Portal System.

Mar 29, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Team-Based Virtual Pictionary (An OLC Game Night) | Evening Event

Tonight, join us for a "Pictionary" inspired virtual team-based game designed for artists of all levels of expertise! The OLC is known for fun, low-stakes, and inviting evening events. Whether they are intense and gameful or entertaining and reflective, they are designed to make space for one of the greatest things about the OLC: our community.

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Mar 30, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Building Your Institution's Blended Future | Featured Session

Join authors of the recent publication, The Blended Institution of Higher Education: A Model for a Sustainable Institution, as they discuss internal and external factors that drive a blended university, key elements of this transformative model, and concrete actions you can take today toward building your institution’s blended future.  

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Extended Abstract

Informed by research and analyses, the Blended Institution of Higher Education moves beyond the proven blended course and program practices to an institutional level model that puts students and their success at the center--not just in courses or programs, but throughout the institution. In doing this, leaders across the institution work together to prioritize equity to ensure success for all students and combine an array of purposefully selected technologies and carefully cultivated processes to integrate instruction, learning, support, and services to meet students where they are.  Published in December 2021, The Blended Institution of Higher Education: A Model for Sustainable Institution provides the vision for this model, as well as essential elements (i.e., centering student needs and success, ensuring equitable and inclusive experiences, and integrating modalities across the institution) and next steps that support collaboration across the institution to drive vision, strategy, and goal-setting.  During this session you will engage with the authors of this publication, digging deeper into these vision, element, and next step pieces that will enable you to take concrete steps towards your institution’s blended future. 

 

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Mar 30, 2022
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
OLC Live!: Strategies for Managing Burnout | Other

Burnout is real! Take a minute (or thirty) and discuss options and strategies for self-care as we face our more-than-occasionally overwhelming pursuit of innovation, best practices, and better educational experiences. Join our guest and Dr. Kelvin Thompson for this opportunity to take care of yourself!

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Mar 30, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Implementing Specifications Grading: What, Why, How? | Education Session

In this interactive session, participants will learn about specifications grading, what it is, why it is beneficial, and how it was implemented in an online undergraduate research course. The presenter will share student perceptions of the change. Participants will leave with tools to apply specifications grading to their online courses.

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Extended Abstract

Is there a better way of assessing students? Does a grade actually indicate a level of competency or the attainment of specific skills? What is the difference between 87% and 91% on an assignment? How do we get students to focus on learning and not the number of points they receive? In this session, we will explore specifications grading as an effective method of addressing questions such as these.

For many students, grades are the most stressful part of a course and for many instructors, grades are the least favorite part of teaching. There is growing discussion of the need for reforms in grading practices related to students focusing on points instead of learning, grade curving forcing competition and pushing out students from marginalized groups, and students’ perceptions that a grade is bestowed upon them by the instructor instead of the student earning the grade (Nilson, 2015; Schinske & Tanner, 2014 ).

In this session, we will explore specifications grading. We will review what it is and why making this change in student assessment can be beneficial to both students and faculty. The presenter will share how specifications grading was designed and implemented in an online undergraduate research course as well as how students reacted to the assessment change. 

This session will provide participants with knowledge and practical ideas for using specifications grading including:

  1. How to clearly educate students on specifications grading and obtain student buy-in

  2. The process of developing “specifications” aligned to student learning outcomes

  3. How to create new assignments or tweak current assignments to work with specifications grading.

  4. Strategies for LMS course design when using specifications grading  

  5. Language to include in the syllabus

  6. Final course grading approaches

Agenda:

Introductions

Overview of specifications grading

Reflection on issues with grading

Overview of the development and implementation of specifications grading

Workshop an assignment using specifications grading

Conclusion and wrap-up

Come to the session with a course in mind that you might consider transitioning to specifications grading. Bring an assignment of your own that you would like to explore transitioning to specifications grading or an idea of an assignment you would like to create.  Participants will be provided with resources and templates shared during the session and can expect to leave this interactive presentation with a broad understanding of specifications grading and practical strategies for implementing in their own online courses.

 

Nilson, L. B. (2015). Specifications grading: Restoring rigor, motivating students, and saving faculty time. Stylus Publishing, LLC.

Schinske, J., & Tanner, K. (2014). Teaching more by grading less (or differently). CBE Life Sciences Education, 13(2), 159-166. https://doi.org/10.1187/cbe.CBE-14-03-0054

 

Mar 30, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
The Three Projected Futures For Open Educational Resources | Education Session

What is the future for Open Educational Resources (OER) in higher education? This presentation examines three different scenarios, noting how the future trajectory for OER has been changed: first by actions of the commercial publishers, and most recently by the global COVID-19 pandemic.

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Extended Abstract

Bay View Analytics has been tracking the awareness and adoption of Open Educational Resources in higher education since 2009, with three more surveys planned through 2023. Supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the Online Learning Consortium. The project has also examined the changing factors driving OER awareness and adoption. All reports use responses from nationally representative samples of higher education administrators and faculty members from all fifty states. In total, our results incorporate answers from over 26,000 respondents across ten surveys.

This presentation will examine three different projections for the future of OER, taking note of what we will need to track going forward to understand which one will prevail.

Projected Future #1: 

Our studies have shown a steady — albeit slow — growth in OER awareness and adoption. This trend was driven by increased OER options, most notably from OpenStax, and growing faculty awareness of the negative impact of high textbook costs for their students. These factors, coupled with faculty resentment for the marketing practices of the major commercial publishers, predict an increased rate of growth in both awareness and adoption of OER in the future.

Projected Future #2:

The last Bay View Analytics OER report before the COVID-19 pandemic noted that commercial publishers were quickly moving to digital-first or digital-only distribution. This switch in mediums was driven by a move to subscription-based marketing, often called Inclusive Access, where students pay a fee (usually included in tuition) for access to a suite of online digital resources. These changes in market dynamics suggest an accelerated conversion from print to digital, and present an opportunity for publishers to claim considerable market share with wide-ranging subscription arrangements that could potentially freeze out OER alternatives.

Projected Future #3:

The COVID-19 pandemic has completely rewritten the script. Institutions and their faculty had to rapidly switch to remote instruction, forcing most faculty to adopt digital resources. The pandemic also exposed faculty to a wide variety of teaching techniques that were new to them, many of which they now intend to continue using post-pandemic. The need to be agile and move quickly during the changing circumstances meant that most faculty put all decisions about new curriculum materials and textbooks on hold, putting all their attention into the immediate needs for their classes.

Institutions also scrambled to procure the required materials for these new courses, often taking advantage of offers from commercial publishers to bundle large suites of materials in digital form. Institutions also introduced faculty to OER materials, but these efforts were nowhere near as extensive as those with commercial publishers.

Predicting the outcome

Each of these futures contains elements of truth. But, what factors will have the most significant impact in determining which of these futures is the most likely? The presentation will speculate based on the patterns found in the most recent faculty and administrative survey data.

Mar 30, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Empowering Collaboration in Asynchronous Problem-Based Learning | Education Session

This presentation will focus on a pilot in which instructional designers and technologists worked together to develop effective strategies to support collaboration and reflective practice in two new asynchronous Master’s programs at the Columbia University School of Professional Studies. The pedagogical framework for both programs is Problem-Based Learning (PBL).

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Extended Abstract

This presentation will focus on a pilot in which instructional designers and technologists worked together to develop effective strategies that support group work, collaboration and reflective practice in two new asynchronous Master’s programs at the Columbia University School of Professional Studies. The pedagogical framework for both programs is Problem-Based Learning (PBL). 

We will share how we leveraged design, technology, and student data iteratively to improve the PBL experience, empower collaboration, optimize group dynamics, and facilitate peer-to-peer as well as individual reflection. The strategies initially developed were ultimately customized to accommodate each program with respect to faculty, student and administrative preferences.

We will be exploring this topic from three different interconnected perspectives: instructional design, educational technology, and student feedback. We will share the strategies we developed to enable our students to engage effectively in collaborative group work, with regard to two key skill sets: 1) providing and receiving constructive feedback; and 2) engaging in personal and group reflection. The strategies include reflective rubrics and a suite of peer review tools that the School is currently piloting. 

Students have found the rubric-based reflections helpful in becoming more self-aware about the collaboration process itself, as well as their own experience participating in various group-based PBL projects. Faculty have benefited from gaining insights into the health of group dynamics, and being able to discern the quality and extent of individual contributions more easily. This has enabled them to provide more effective feedback to students. 

Topics covered in the presentation will include:
1) How we at Columbia SPS design Problem-Based Learning in asynchronous Master’s level programs; 2) How we address the challenges of asynchronous group work, collaboration, and reflective practice; 3) How we leverage student data insights to facilitate iterative teaching practice, instructional design, and educational technology implementation.

The session will include a presentation, a hands-on group activity, and an open discussion.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the challenges of Problem-based Learning in asynchronous environments. 

  2. Explore various methods for facilitating a range of group and peer-to-peer interactions. 

  3. Discuss how to facilitate effective collaboration in online learning environments.

Mar 30, 2022
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
Virtual Speed Networking Lounge: Virtual Scavenger Hunt | Other

Join us for more Speed Networking fun! During this session you will join others in competing in a virtual scavenger hunt designed to support community building. We'll ask you to look around in your home or workplace for an item. One person at the time will describe to the audience. The audience will guess if this item is “real” or completely made up!

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Mar 30, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
We Hyflexed, and Here Is What We Learned | Education Session

A cross-functional team at a private, non-profit, Hispanic-Serving Institution responded to emerging needs from the required shutdowns for COVID-19, as well as the potential need for longer-term, remote-based teaching, to design and pilot Hyflex delivery. Pilot results will be presented, as well as lessons learned in Hyflex design and implementation.

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Extended Abstract

Session Title: We Hyflexed, and Here Is What We Learned

Presenters and Authors: Bettyjo Bouchey (OLC email: [email protected]); Joseph Levy (OLC email: [email protected]); Craig Mealman ([email protected])

Session Type, Conference Track, Institutional Level, and Audience Level

Session Type: Education Session 

Conference Track: Teaching & Learning Practice 

Institutional Level: Higher Ed

Audience Level: All

Keywords: Hyflex, flexible course design, student agency, adult returning students

 

Extended Abstract

A cross-functional team at a private, non-profit, Hispanic-Serving Institution in the midwest responded to the need that presented itself through the shutdowns required during the COVID-19 outbreak in the United States, as well as the potential need for longer-term, remote-based teaching and learning by designing a phased, mixed methods study that will incorporate student and faculty input into the design of a Hyflex course (pilot delivery model) and to examine the impacts of the model on student agency, satisfaction, and learning achievement. The study was conducted in the Summer term of 2021 in an undergraduate degree program largely serving adult learners. The guiding research questions were:

  1. Student Agency: Research Question 1 (RQ1): What factors influenced students' sense of agency when making learning choices within the pilot delivery model?

  2. Student Satisfaction: Research Question 2 (RQ2): What factors influenced students’ sense of satisfaction within the pilot delivery model?

  3. Learning Achievement:

    1. Research Question 3 (RQ3) (a): How does student agency influence learning achievement?

    2. Research Question 3 (RQ3) (b):  How does student satisfaction influence learning achievement? 

With COVID-19 interrupting operations at higher education institutions throughout the United States, attendees stand to benefit from exposure to one institution’s approach, implementation, and lessons learned in relation to piloting a Hyflex model (Garrett et al., 2020). Moreover, an increasing demand in flexible modalities beyond face-to-face instruction - even pre-pandemic - makes the conversation with presenters relevant in exploring key student and faculty input guiding the creation of a pilot delivery model. Given the growing necessity and priority of doing more to incorporate diversity, equity, and inclusion into higher education practices (Montenegro & Jankowski, 2020), the presentation’s focus on student agency as part of this pilot is a case study example for embedding equity and inclusion into existing institutional processes like course design.  

Session speakers will give a brief overview of the tenets of Hyflex used in the pilot at the institution, the pre-study activities that were completed to contribute to a robust pilot, and then benefit from the results and findings of the study (data is currently being compiled and analyzed since the pilot ended on September 19, 2021). Beyond audience polls throughout the session, participants will have the opportunity to engage in a Questions and Answers Forum (synchronously and asynchronously during the session). Time will also be allotted for participants to actively ideate with session speakers and peers on how tenets of Hyflex could be incorporated at their institutions to increase instructional flexibility, as well as how to better leverage student agency theory for success.  

Learning outcomes for the session include:

  1. Attendees will be able to describe at least two tenets of Hyflex as implemented by presenters.

  2. Attendees will be able to explain how student agency can be factored into course design and instructional methods.

  3. Attendees will be able to summarize the results of the pilot study.

  4. Attendees will be able to identify relevant components of the pilot study which could be implemented at their institution or in their practice.

  5. Attendees will identify one issue or challenge related to considering implementing a Hyflex design at their institution

References

Mar 30, 2022
11:30am - 1:30pm (Central)
OER 101: Easily Reducing Costs in Education | Workshop

Whether you are new to OER or experienced, this workshop will demonstrate how to easily incorporate Open Educational Resources (OER) into your teaching practice. Participants will discover the secret sauce to help them easily create a derivative OER material.

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Extended Abstract

Whether you are new to OER or experienced, this workshop will demonstrate how to easily incorporate Open Educational Resources (OER) into your teaching practice. Participants will discover the secret sauce to help them easily create a derivative OER material. This interactive workshop will review strategies on how to find, revise, reuse and remix OER that participants can be easily applied to reduce costs. Participants will also explore examples of how others are reducing costs in their courses with OER from the simple to the complex. This is OER 101!

Mar 30, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Mark Your +1: How Adding Assignment Options Can Lead to Active and Meaningful Learning | Conversation, Not Presentation

You may have brought a plus-one to a wedding, but what about bringing a plus-one to your classroom? In this conversation, participants will be challenged to add 'plus-one' options to each assignment in a current class they teach - that is, to include one other way students can meet the learning objectives.

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Extended Abstract

You may have brought a plus-one to a wedding, but what about bringing a plus-one to your classroom? As many of us may have learned from experience, learning is not a spectator sport and neither is teaching. While the image of a college classroom is often of a large lecture hall with the instructor regaling the students with his or her knowledge, we know that our students learn best when they write, relate, apply, and experience. All of these often cannot be done simply and easily.

This is where the idea of plus-one assignments come in. We create our courses with a set number of assignments that, while meeting our course learning objectives, may not necessarily meet the learning needs of all our students nor provide active learning opportunities. While some students do best expressing their learning via a written paper or creating a PowerPoint presentation, this only meets the needs of some learners. Therefore, creating assignment options opens your class to meeting these needs while also enabling your students to participate in active learning no matter the assignment.

In this conversation, participants will be briefly introduced to the idea of what a ‘plus-one’ assignment is, how it can meet your students’ learning needs, and how it can incorporate the principles of active learning and multiple types of learning activity interactions (learner-to-learner, learner-to-instructor, learner-to-content). The majority of the time will be dedicated to having participants take a current course they are teaching and coming up with ‘plus-one’ assignments for as many current assignments as possible. Some assignment examples will be provided with active learning alternatives listed for inspiration. Finally, we will end the discussion with some possible challenges to this approach and participants will brainstorm ways to avoid or overcome these challenges.

Mar 30, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Iterating with Ungrading | Education Session

How can we support student success with alternative assessment methods? We will share how we transformed the student experience in our master’s program by implementing an ungrading philosophy as an act of social justice. In this session, you will learn about the triumphs, challenges, and discoveries of our journey.

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Extended Abstract

In this interactive session, we (online master’s program directors and instructors) will share our journey and experiences with transitioning our program from traditional grading structures to an ungrading philosophy. We will share challenges, lessons we learned, triumphs, impact on students and instructors, and how we have iterated our approach from our Fall 2020 pilot through today. We will explain our philosophy, practice, and favorite resources to help you prepare to engage in this work. We frame all of this in an iterative mindset.

This work is important as we consider the experience of adult learners and try to create learning environments that are focused on supporting individual growth. This philosophy and approach challenges the norms of what assessment and feedback looks like and encourages all of us to continually re-examine our teaching practices with a critical lens. Above all, our shift to ungrading is a human-centered act of social justice and the implementation of this philosophy is meant to reduce bias in assessment, which is an area of critical concern at all levels of education.

Participants will leave this session with

  • an increased understanding of what ungrading is, 

  • ideas of how ungrading can work in both fully online and face-to-face courses, 

  • ideas about how to work as an instructional team to have a shared vision of ungrading,

  • an understanding of the implications ungrading has for social justice, inclusivity, and accessibility

  • strategies for soliciting feedback from instructors and learners to support evaluation and iteration 

  • how to prepare for your own journey into ungrading. 

Throughout the presentation, we will welcome questions, create opportunities for  self-reflection, and engage in small group discussions about ungrading. We don’t promise to have all the answers, but we promise to share what we have learned and support your journey.

 

Mar 30, 2022
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
Networking Design Sprint (Design for Social Impact) - Part 2 | Other

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the first of a series of OLC Innovate Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of three days. This year the sprints focus on designing for social impact.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 30, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Frontiers in Online Education Research: The Role of Instructional Designers | Education Session

With their knowledge and skills, Instructional Designers (IDs) can positively impact research in online teaching and learning.  Yet few ID job descriptions include research activities. In this panel session, ID supervisors and IDs at a top research and online education institution will offer pathways for IDs to engage in research.

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Extended Abstract

As a part of their course design work, Instructional Designers (IDs) are “avid consumers of research” (pp. 1), playing a critical role in putting research into action through the application of theory and findings to course design (Cherrez, 2021). IDs apply a set of research skills in a variety of ways, from conducting literature reviews to inform the development of a new course, to conducting iterative testing of tools to improve students’ and subject matter experts’ (SMEs) experience in developed courses.  In essence, engagement in research is a core component of a broader constellation of skills that IDs bring to course design (Cherrez, 2021).

In addition, IDs are arguably at the forefront of innovation in the scholarship of teaching and learning online.  Because IDs cyclically respond to the needs of a range of stakeholders (e.g., students, SMEs, ID supervisors, and e-learning institutions), IDs have their “finger on the pulse” of the timeliest questions in course design that could be addressed with research.

However, engagement in research is often not included in the job descriptions of instructional designers. In a national survey study of IDs conducted by Linder and Dello Stritto (2017), only 25% of respondents indicated that engagement in research activities was in included in their job descriptions and only 22% indicated that research was included in the evaluation of their work as an instructional designer. ID respondents also expressed variation in their confidence with a range of research related tasks.  For example, only 53% percent of the IDs surveyed in this report indicated that they had a high level of confidence in completing literature reviews and only 35% indicated a high level of confidence in creating a survey instrument for research purposes.

Part of the variation in confidence expressed by IDs might be due to some of the challenges or barriers in engaging in research activities. In the same national survey conducted by Linder and Dello Stritto (2017), ID respondents endorsed time and collaboration barriers as the top two challenges in engagement with research activities.  Nevertheless, IDs in this survey also expressed a desire to continue honing their research skills, citing the following as the top five reasons for ongoing engagement in research activities: 1) opportunities for professional development; 2) understanding student needs: 3) understanding SME needs; 4) opportunities for collaboration with SMEs; and 5) opportunities for discipline innovation.

Given the critical role IDs play in online education (Cherrez, 2021) and their desire to improve their research skills (Linder & Dello Stritto, 2017), providing pathways for IDs to innovate through engagement in research is a natural next step in the evolution of higher education online.  Therefore, the purpose of this panel is to:

  1. Describe how IDs currently engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning online based on the national survey conducted by Linder and Dello Stritto (2017)
  2. Situate IDs as collaborative innovators who can advance research in online teaching and learning
  3. Suggest pathways for IDs to engage in research at a variety of levels
  4. Discuss challenges to ID engagement in research, and how these challenges can be addressed within ID units, as well as within an e-learning institution

Learning objectives

By attending this session, attendees will be able to: 

  1. Describe how IDs currently engage in research
  2. Describe at least one way in which IDs can positively impact the future scholarship of teaching and learning online
  3. Describe at least 3 ways in which IDs can engage in research at their institution at 3 different levels (entry level, mid-level, and senior level)
  4. Identify how barriers for IDs to engage in research can be addressed within units and/or at the leadership level

Panel Overview and Audience Engagement Plan

This panel will consist of four speakers who will present in five short presentations (5 -7 minutes each), followed by 3 minutes of questions and/or discussion with attendees after each presentation.

Presentation 1

The first presenter will be an Assistant Director of Research, who leads a program that pairs IDs with faculty members to work on funded research projects in online teaching and learning.  This first presenter will begin the panel presentation by describing key findings from the national survey of IDs by Linder and Dello Stritto (2017), including IDs current engagement in research activities, their confidence in pursuing different aspects of research, and current barriers for research engagement. This presenter will then describe how IDs are well situated to innovate research in online teaching and learning, and make the case for expanding opportunities for research engagement. After this presentation, the speaker will ask attendees to consider how barriers affect IDs’ ability to engage in research at their respective institutions.

Presentation 2

The second presenter will be an Assistant Director of Instructional Design, who directs and supervises IDs at a top institution of higher education online. The presenter will describe a range of research activities that ID can engage in, based on their confidence and skill levels. This presenter will also discuss how their institution has addressed barriers in providing opportunities for interested IDs to hone their research skills, focusing specifically on: 1) creating new opportunities within the institution; and 2) allocating additional time for IDs to engage in specific research projects, such as collaboration with faculty on funded research projects. Following this presentation, the presenter will ask the audience to think about and discuss how their intuitions are currently/or can expand opportunities for IDs to engage in research.

Presentation 3

In the next presentation, the first presenter (the Assistant Director of Research) will describe a funding program at their institution that partners IDs with faculty members to work collaboratively on funded research projects in online teaching and learning.  This presenter will first provide a brief overview of this program, focusing on program goals, the review process, and timelines. The presenter will then describe how IDs can become involved in the program, and how they are paired with faculty members to work on the research projects that have been selected for funding. The presenter will then describe successful outcomes of these funded projects for IDs, such as the opportunities to present at conferences and become authors on peer reviewed publications.  Following this presentation, the presenter will ask attendees to consider why it might be beneficial for IDs to have more opportunities to present at conferences and author peer-reviewed publications.

Presentation 4

The fourth presentation will be given by an ID who is currently/or has participated in the funding program described by the Assistant Director in Presentation 3. This ID will describe their research background, how they learned about this research opportunity, what interested them in pursuing this opportunity, and what their experience is/was like collaborating with faculty members on a research project. This presenter will describe both successes as well as challenges, and how challenges are currently/or were addressed. This presenter will then describe how their participation in this program has impacted their research confidence and/or skills. Following this presentation, the presenter will ask attendees to consider why collaboration with faculty on research is an important experience for both IDs and faculty alike.

Presentation 5

In the final presentation, a Senior ID will describe a new role they have accepted as a specialist in research and evaluation at their institution. This presenter will begin by describing their current role, and the proportion of their time that is allocated to research and evaluation. They will then describe their interest in pursuing this role, and how their work currently differs from the work they performed as a general ID. The presenter will then briefly describe the projects they are working on, what their experiences have been like so far, and what they are looking forward to contributing as their work as a specialist evolves. Following this presentation, the Senior ID will ask attendees to consider the ways in which roles like this can provide pathways for innovative research in higher education online.

Following the 5th presentation, the Assistant Director of Research will conclude the panel, summarizing the need for IDs to engage further in research, the ways in which IDs can and do participate in research activities, and how the panel provides examples of ways in which ID roles in research can expand.  Attendees will be invited to address any follow-up questions to this Assistant Director, who will provide contact information.

References

Jaramillo Cherrez, N. (2021). Instructional Designers Leading Through Research. In J. E. Stefaniak, S. Conklin, B. Oyarzun, & R. M. Reese (Eds.), A Practitioner's Guide to Instructional Design in Higher Education. EdTech Books. https://edtechbooks.org/id_highered/instructional_designV

Linder, K. & Dello Stritto, M.E. (2017). Research Preparation and Engagement of Instructional Designers in U.S. Higher Education. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit. https://ecampus.oregonstate.edu/research/study/research-instructional-designers/

Mar 30, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Active Learning in the Online Classroom: Building Your Innovative Online Teaching Toolbox | Education Session

Come join this session to learn a variety of sample teaching strategies that can be used to enhance active learning in online environments. You'll learn how to create engaging course content using innovative tools and techniques that are sure to keep your students engaged throughout the entire semester!

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Extended Abstract

Are you an educator looking to engage your students in the online classroom?

Engaging students in online courses can be challenging. Developing course assignments that accomplish learning objectives and provide students with an opportunity to meaningfully connect with new concepts also presents difficulties to educators. Developing a style of teaching that can be adapted to a variety of topics and disciplines is essential for educators teaching in these changing times.

This session will present a variety of sample teaching strategies that can be used to enhance active learning in online environments. You’ll learn how to create engaging course content using innovative tools and techniques that are sure to keep your students engaged throughout the entire semester! By attending this session, you’ll walk away with new ideas for creating interactive courses that are more fun than ever before! Attendees should leave this session with a greater understanding of how they can incorporate student engagement into their own courses through various methods including virtual field trips, digital escape rooms, engaging debate activities and many more. Attendees should also come away with a deeper understanding of how they can use technology within their courses so that it enhances rather than distracts from the material being presented. Finally, attendees should leave this session with a greater sense of confidence about incorporating these types of instructional materials into their own classes because they now have access to all kinds of great resources designed specifically for instructors who want to make their classes more interesting by adding some form or another type of active learning components.

Session Engagement

This is not just another boring lecture where everyone falls asleep after five minutes. This session will begin with a fun, interactive game to demonstrate the impact of engaging learning activities.  We will then look at diverse strategies that can be used to enhance active learning. All attendees will be provided with access to an active online learning "toolbox" that can be used to assist in the development of online activities geared toward your unique learning objectives.

This toolbox will be a “go to” resource for developing activities that can be implemented in online courses to encourage active learning. The toolbox will include links to demonstrations, guides and activities that can be implemented in the online environment. Participants will have the opportunity to select from the strategies and examples provided to develop their own unique toolbox. Participants will also be provided with a blank template to begin building their own toolboxes. You will be challenged to begin building your toolbox during the presentation once you learn a teaching strategy that appeals to you.

Learning Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the benefits of engaging online learners
  • Identify various active learning strategies that can be implemented in the online classroom
  • Create an individualized innovative online teaching toolbox
Mar 30, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Neuro, Cognitive and Learning Sciences: Global Professional "Neural" Networking Event | Conversation, Not Presentation

Alumni and future participants of the Neuro, Cognitive and Learning Sciences Workshop Series are invited to join Dr. Kristen Betts, Dr. Michelle Miller, Dr. Mariette Fourie, and Dr. Elisabeth Strucklen onsite or online via Zoom as part of a global meet and greet event. We invite all alumni from the three Neuro, Cognitive and Learning Sciences workshops to join us so you can meet your peers from around the world. If you are interested in enrolling in one of the workshops, come and learn more about the series.

 

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 30, 2022
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Innovation Crew Meet-Up | Other

Join your crew during this designated synchronous Crew Meet-Up or connect with them via Slack. Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 30, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
How to Escape Online Learning Pitfalls: A Virtual Escape Room on Asynchronous Engagement | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

A presentation with a custom-made, editable virtual escape room about the effectiveness of engagement and available tools in higher education.  After a brief discussion on the pedagogy behind engagement, attendees will participate in an escape room with the expectation to complete the activities provided, which explore different aspects and methods common in asynchronous online learning.

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Extended Abstract

If you’ve ever participated in an escape room, you know the feeling of engagement when solving puzzles and fulfillment upon completing each one. Your students feel the same way! In this session, we want you to come ready to engage with a custom virtual escape room. This virtual escape room will give you a medium to digitally enhance case studies, discussion board, group work, video lectures and other course resources. This session will take aspects of common asynchronous class design with information on engagement, place them in an escape room, then have them as distributables at the end of the session for editing and re-use. Question and answer throughout and at the end of session for other uses and design considerations.

Expect to takeaway anything and everything you see today. In addition to an understanding of interactives, engagement and their application in the virtual classroom, you can expect to walk away with a copy of the templated escape room.

 

Mar 30, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Developing an Internal Online Teaching Training and Certification Model | Education Session

Realizing that current online teaching certifications were insufficient about skills/knowledge essential for our population, our office developed one that took into account pedagogical, technological, and equitable practices. Come hear about our process and the steps you can take to launch your own.

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Extended Abstract

External online teaching certificate organizations have long been considered one of the only ways of confirming online teaching quality. However, for many reasons these programs are not as impactful as we want them to be.  Quality Matters(QM) for example, has faced increased criticism. These trainings tend to be extremely broad, which means their utility to non-traditional institutions is more limited. Further, the cost of the Quality Matters programs is often prohibitive, meaning it is out of reach for many publicly funded institutions. 

As a result of both of these problems, Our institution built an alternative mechanism of assessment and certification specifically geared towards our faculty population and ultimate student audience. Our university is a non-traditional campus in several ways. The student population contains an extremely high percentage of first generation college students; students who do not have the same family resources and guidance that many other college students do in the same situation. The vast majority of our students are commuters, many of whom live with their family. These considerations mean classroom practices which may be normalized in other online/remote institutions can be actively harmful, even to the point of causing them to fail the class. 

For example, a common practice in online courses is such as requiring synchronous course participation and cameras to be on. While students from all over the country have reported the practice to be unnerving, since many of our students share internet bandwidth and physical space with others, it directly impedes their ability to participate in the course at all.

.It became clear that we needed a training and certification process that didn’t just cover general online best practices and pedagogy. We needed to develop one that took into account the nuances and multifaceted nature of teaching online for our students. This project iteratively evolved out of our “Strategies for Teaching Online”  cohort training process. The college Center for Teaching and Learning collaborated with an interdisciplinary group of faculty to focus on both essential online pedagogy, as well as the necessary factors that must be taken into account when teaching our students. The first pilot started with a group of faculty who had been highly effective teachers, but had not taught an online course. Guided by the team, the faculty designed the online version of the course over the course of one semester and launched it the following semester. Over several iterations of this process, the team continually refined the process and assessments. 

Once the emergency shift to online course delivery happened in Spring 2020, we combined the workshop training series with the campus specific assessment to create an internal certification model and process. The training and certification process contains five modules which encompass a wide spectrum of online pedagogical best practices. As part of the process, faculty must develop a fully online course in collaboration with one of our Instructional Designers.

Taking into account the many levels of skills that faculty have and desire to learn, in addition to the “full certification”, we developed a “remote emergency teaching certificate.” Many faculty reported that they found the full training (ours as well as those offered by other entities)to be overwhelming and would result in them not attempting the training at all. To scaffold to meet all of our faculty needs, we built the remote emergency training to contain the basics of effective teaching remotely, as well as growing resources. As faculty acclimated themselves to the concept of teaching remotely, many returned and received the full online certification, as opposed to before when they were planning on forgoing any training at all. 

Workshop Modules: 

Bearing in mind that technology is ever changing, the modules focus on the theory and practice of online courses over specific technologies. Mechanisms such as curating engagement with one's online course, equitable and holistic assessment practices, and the research backed-pedagogical reasoning behind all of them. Modules were comprised of four main sections: applicable resources, applied technology, discussions, and course implementation. 

The discussion boards had faculty participants both actively practice mechanisms of asynchronous engagement as well as compare and contrast their experiences and how the new skills could be applied in the future. Unlike traditional course discussion boards which tend to be boring and unengaging, these discussion boards had clear guidelines and mechanisms for engagement within. It ensured faculty discussed content and applications with each other instead of simply summarizing the reading. 

As part of the module, the faculty implements the relevant concepts from the module into their course. We believe in active agile development, so we encourage faculty to develop the course they will use in the future, not just a “sample” course to practice the ideas in general. At each stage, the CTL team gives detailed and dedicated feedback as to what can be improved, paired with data and resources as to why that is the case. 

Finally, at the end of the process, the course is reviewed by a senior member of the team to confirm that it meets the QC specific standards online course development. We don’t limit faculty to submitting their course for review, as we see this process as more of a conversation and collaboration than a one-time assessment of work. Learning, like most things, is iteratively done. Thus, as faculty learn and grow, we encourage them to do so with us as well. 

Alongside the direct workshop activities, virtual drop-in hours were available to all faculty participating in the workshop. They could seek support for any aspect of the workshop modules, general edtech questions, or revamping their courses for online instruction. Faculty could come in, share their screen and be guided by experienced CTL staff in accomplishing their goals. By having encompassing “one-stop-shop” help available during designated times throughout the week, this enabled instructors from various disciplines to try new things, and get support before they hit a wall of frustration. Faculty could continue to utilize drop-in hours even after completion of the workshop, ensuring that support was always available for them. This model was so popular and praised by the faculty, that several other faculty-facing departments (such as ITS), began hosting their own. 

Level of Participation: 

This is a highly participatory session. Rather than lecture at the audience for 45 minute, the presenters will frame the session around conversations related to assessing online courses and developing internal training and certification processes. Throughout the session, the presenters will engage the audience through tools such as Mentimeter and the Zoom chat, and frame the conversation around that.

A large chunk of the session will also be spent in scaffolded engagement breakout rooms. Essentially, after presenting the problem to a large audience members will have the option of moving into a breakout room guided by a presenter focused on topics that the audience seemed most interested in earlier in the presentation.

To support and engage our audience at all levels, engagement during the session will be scaffolded. During the breakout rooms participants can also choose to engage: 

  • Discussing with the other members of the session via audio/video in Zoom 
  • By sharing resources and ideas in a shared collaborative resource page.

Session Goals: 

Participants who attend this session will understand the process for setting up an internal training and certification for online teaching. They will also learn about the many non-pedagogical aspects that are essential for online course development as well as the other department stakeholders that must be involved for a successful deployment of this type.

Mar 30, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Supporting Regular and Substantive Interaction: OSCQR 4.0 is Here! | Education Session

OSCQR has been updated to assist campuses, instructional designers (IDs), and faculty ensure that online courses can demonstrate designs comply with the new US Department of Education regulation requiring Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI) between online learners and their instructor(s). You will be provided with an overview of OSCQR and the tools and information to improve the instructional design (including RSI) and accessibility in online courses.

 

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Extended Abstract

SUNY Online and the Online Learning Consortium (OLC) are very pleased to announce the release of OSCQR 4.0!

OSCQR 4.0 has updated standards and documentation to reflect the new US Federal Department of Education regulation regarding requirements for Regular and Substantive Interaction (RSI) in all online/distance education courses for financial aid purposes that went into effect on July 1, 2021.

OSCQR has been updated with the RSI lens to assist campuses, instructional designers (IDs), and faculty ensure that online courses can demonstrate designs that support regular and substantive interaction between online learners and their instructor(s).

Working with a volunteer campus-based workgroup, OSCQR standards were reviewed and updated, and OSCQR supporting materials, resources, and documentation were refreshed. The intention is to make sure that Regular and Substantive Interaction is clearly visible, articulated, and highlighted in specific OSCQR standards, and in all related OSCQR support materials.

In addition to the use of OSCQR, other activities are essential to fully ensure RSI compliance, such as faculty/ID training and awareness building, online teaching skills, institutional/departmental policy and monitoring, but the new version of OSCQR is one tool that can be used to support RSI in the instructional design of any online course.

The .PDF of the new OSCQR 4.0 rubric is available for use/download now. The online interactive OSCQR rubric and dashboards will be available before the new year.

In this session you will:

  1. Receive an overview of the new OSCQR 4.0 self-assessment rubric and discuss how to apply the standards.
  2. See how the OSCQR rubric address Regular and Substantive Interaction, Instructional design and Accessibility, and how it can be used to create an online course action plan for the continuous improvement of an online course.
  3. Leave the session prepared to conduct an online course review with the OSCQR rubric.
  4. Become a SUNY Online Fellow in the "Friend of SUNY" role, so we can continue the conversation started in the session.
  5. Introduction to OSCQR (self-assessment) badge
  6. Take home the OSCQR Self-Assessment Rubric.
  7. Be invited to join the OSCQR usergroup.

Additional Resources to Explore:

Mar 30, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Impact of Cross-Institutional Collaborations in Digital Learning | Education Session

The Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (IELOL) programs (USA and Global) center the opportunities / barriers to advancing local-global online learning. Explore the impact of building networks through leadership development and borderless collaborations across the digital learning landscape. Share your own story and hear how IELOL communities have transformed professional growth, the impact of leadership, and locally-contextualized global change work.

 

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Extended Abstract

The Online Learning Consortium features two core leadership development programs: The Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (USA) and The Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (Global). Designed to speak into each other in important ways, both programs offer the OLC community an opportunity to develop not only an in depth understanding of what leadership looks like in our local contexts, as well as in global collaborations, but also the skills required to engage in leadership across these contexts (including the critical development of professional networks which help to sustain this work). 

IELOL-USA is a unique leadership development program that was originally launched in 2009 as a way to support the professional growth and preparation of the next cadre of digital learning leaders.  IELOL participants collaborate with colleagues from around the globe to explore and understand both the opportunities and barriers to advancing local and global digital learning.  In its 13th year, the IELOL-USA program now has over 390 graduates who have joined a network of leaders in digital and online education.  Focused on improving and advancing the impact of digital learning in all aspects and formats of education, IELOL-USA graduates form personal and professional bonds with fellow graduates that extend beyond the IELOL-USA experience.    

Inspired by the collective need for the field of online, blended and digital learning to address ubiquitous issues of access to education more broadly, OLC gathered the first cohort of IELOL-Global in 2020. This new offering was focused on the transformative power of global collaborations in enacting change work in digital learning at the local and global levels. Now in its third year, IELOL-Global is designed to build global communities of practice around transformative and sustainable digital transformation that collect and amplify international perspectives. Through the program, participants engage with exemplars of impactful cross-institutional/regional collaboration through global coalitions by iterating with and learning from partners from around the world. They also contribute to the curation and dissemination of participant-created artifacts, use cases, and other resources that contribute to connected and aligned global change work. Its ultimate goal is to support the growth of a community of leaders dedicated to collaborative global change efforts.

This session welcomes back graduates from both programs to story the impact of intentional networking building with leaders across the world. We invite participants to share in their own experiences of local / global change work. Together, we will explore the impact of leadership-focused and change-oriented professional development, as well as the opportunities borne out of borderless collaborations.


     

Mar 30, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Leveraging Data Dashboards to Inform Online Learning Strategies | Education Session

To improve student outcomes in online classes, Georgia State University combined SIS and LMS data into dashboards that enable analyses from aggregate DFW grades down to specific course section and instructor, and course site data to identify problem areas. These data inform student engagement activities and assignment scaffolding efforts. It can guide decisions about academic advising and coaching and student resources for success in online courses. Participants will walk through the dashboards and discuss applications. 

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Extended Abstract

During COVID, with the rapid transition to remote and online instruction, DFW rates hit all-time highs at many institutions. To better understand contributing factors of course, instructor, and student characteristics, Georgia State University developed two sets of data dashboards. The first set of dashboards includes data on historical course outcomes by faculty, instructional modalities, and course levels. The dashboards allow university leadership to ask precise questions of the data to surface valuable insights into course outcomes. The second set of dashboards complements historical course outcomes by leveraging LMS data to understand how student learning occurred during the semester. The dashboards provide a view into course engagement, assignment grading, and assessment grading from the entire course to an individual student. In combination, the dashboards enable leadership to move from a very high level of aggregate DFW grades down to a specific course section and instructor where student outcomes are concerning, and then to examine student and instructor data from the LMS course site to identify where problems surfaced. These data can inform targeted improvement efforts such as adding student engagement activities at the beginning of the class, improved scaffolding from assignment to assignment, or increased instructor visibility. In combination with other institutional data, it can guide decisions about academic advising and coaching and additional resources needed to help students succeed in online courses. The presentation will provide an overview of the dashboards and participant discussion of how the data might be used most effectively at an institution.

Mar 30, 2022
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Designing Psychological Safety Into Your Online Course | Workshop

Courses designed within the framework of psychological safety help students perform better and implement what they learned on the job in creative ways to solve complex issues.  Come learn how to design psychological safety into your online classes.

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Extended Abstract

When you design a course from the framework of psychological safety, students are more willing and able to apply what they learn on the job in creative ways to solve complex problems. Psychological safety within organizations is the most important ingredient for creating high-performing and innovative teams. Just as in the workplace, creating an environment of psychological safety within the online learning environment is more important now than ever. Psychological safety is defined as "rewarded vulnerability." Many people have good ideas in the workplace or the online classroom but do not feel safe sharing them. They fear embarrassment, rejection, or punishment for speaking up. This fear directly affects student performance. Modeling and using strategies to create a psychologically safe learning environment gives your students the greatest chance to succeed and grow both within and outside your classroom.  

As the professor, teacher, or instructor, you are the leader in the classroom. Your leadership creates the learning environment. Learn how to create psychological safety in your online classroom using strategies to design and utilize the four stages of psychological safety.  

The four stages of psychological safety, as stated in Timothy Clark's book of the same name, are:

  • Inclusion safety
  • Learner safety
  • Contributor safety
  • Challenger safety

In this interactive session, you will apply specific strategies in your course and design psychological safety into your course. The strategies are evidence-based and focused on behaviors with the online course. If the courses are self-paced or instructor-led, you have the obligation and opportunity to create courses where student performance and well-being are the primary focus.  

During the session, we will be creating a Miro board to capture the behaviors and strategies you use in your classes and the behaviors we highlight during the session. You will then have access to the board with the multiple perspectives of the panel and attendees on strategies to facilitate a psychologically safe online learning environment. You can bring your course, and we can discuss the strategies to implement within your course.

We look forward to meeting and collaborating with you. 

Mar 30, 2022
3:15pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Memories Don't Leave Like People Do: Supporting Enduring Course Design Approaches With Reflective Practice | Conversation, Not Presentation

Faculty development programs seek to identify and manage process approaches that support the design of quality online programs. This paper reviews the policy of reflective practice for supporting memory that sustains the training long after faculty has designed their first online course.

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Extended Abstract

Faculty sometimes systematically go through online faculty development programs because their departments mandate them, or training and development is a clause of their hiring contract. However, they are often unable to implement the strategies learned outside of the structure of the program. The reflective process aims to help faculty use reflective/reflective practice approaches within the program as an exploratory pathway to course design.

The guided discovery approach of asking leading questions using a reflective lens will help faculty use the structure to draw conclusions and select the best strategies in their course design practices. Reflective practice allows faculty to review their courses and ask what, why, how, and when as they check their course elements and think of the students and level of the system where they need to teach. Course objectives guide the curriculum, but the faculty determines the strategic selection of teaching and learning approaches and questions for effective teaching. 

The aim is to have faculty implement these same practices in their course delivery and later design courses using the principles of discovery and exploration. Students stand on dual sides of a coin that is a love-hate relationship with learning. Faculty who can flip the coin to engage students in the process, have them come back, and make connections with real-world situations are already ahead of the game.

The reflective approach reduces follow-up faculty questions regarding course design since the system provides faculty a framework guided by their curriculum and teaching plan. Further, student success is positively affected when students see the connections within the curriculum. 

Mar 30, 2022
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: Blended Learning Discussion with the Experts | Other

Following the largest-scale live experiment with novel solutions for learning, maybe it's time to speak with the experts and examine blended learning after taking a step back. Join OLC Live! host Dr. Kelvin Thompson and guest(s) for a conversation around key components of success in blended learning models.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 30, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
We Could Be Heroes: Ensuring Accessibility in Online Courses | Education Session

This session will focus on one’s institution’s process for ensuring accessibility in online courses. From exploring proactive approaches like UDL in course design to creating reactive strategies for current course remediation, participants will learn about establishing a process, or improving an existing process, for identifying and resolving student accessibility issues.

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Extended Abstract

While online courses may increase the availability of education for many, the accessibility of these learning experiences is often an unfortunate afterthought. This session will focus on one’s institution’s process for ensuring accessibility in online courses. From exploring proactive approaches like Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in course design to creating reactive strategies for current online course remediation, participants will learn more about how to establish a process, or improve their existing process, for identifying and resolving student accessibility issues.

Takeaway:

As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

  • Identify common accessibility errors 

  • Use Canvas integrations to check for course accessibility

  • Recognize an effective system for remediation 

  • Discuss challenges and opportunities for improvement

Mar 30, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Sustaining a National Strategy for Career and Technical Education: Leveraging Past Programs to Create Future Successes | Education Session

The U.S. Department of Labor invested about $2B over 12 years in two major community college initiatives to strengthen their capacities to improve the pipelines to sustainable employment. The presentation will review TAACCCT and SCC programs, the resources still being leveraged from SkillsCommons, and lessons learned relevant for future programs.

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Extended Abstract

From aviation manufacturing in urban Seattle to health care in rural Montana, many community colleges have used their U.S. Department of Labor’s Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training (TAACCCT) grants to develop work-based learning (WBL) opportunities and build the capacity of their institution to prepare their students for 21st century employment. After TAACCCT was completed in 2018, The Department of Labor implemented another program titled, Strengthen Community Colleges.  While TAACCCT engaged 256 grant projects with over $1.9B, SCC was significantly smaller with 11 projects receiving $40M.  For both grant programs, the WBL activities provides alternative learning environments, subject matter experts, and assignments as compared to classroom learning that can accelerate the students’ readiness for successful employment is high skilled jobs.  With the COVID pandemic, how will Career and Technical Education programs prepare the workforce with the significant restrictions on hands-on, work-based learning?   Blending online learning with Open Educational Resources and Practices with work-based experiences will help balance the learning needs and the social distancing restriction during COVID.  With the current recession we still need to place thousands of adults into well-paying jobs and ensure American firms’ competitiveness in the global marketplace.

This presentation will review and demonstrate a variety of WBL programs of study that are freely available SkillsCommons, an OER repository developed for TAACCCT grantees across multiple sectors to store all their instructional and program support materials.  The presentation will have participants explore these resources on their own devices and select materials that could be applicable to their own institutions.  The review/demonstration will cover a wealth of teaching and learning OER that can be used to scale and sustain apprenticeship programs, strategies for designing apprenticeship programs, and detailed tactics for implementing apprenticeship programs. 

The presentation will also showcase how SkillsCommons can design, deliver, and sustain a customized OER portal with MERLOT’s Content Builder tool to provide higher education, industry partners, and 3rd party intermediaries with the following:

  • Learning content for apprentices in Work-Based Learning Training Programs for On-the-Job Training and Related Technical Instruction (classroom delivery), including content focused on workplace safety that can be delivered online.
  • Online teaching content for mentors in Work-Based Learning Training Programs for On-the-Job Training and Related Technical Instruction (classroom delivery), including an online/hybrid training program to help mentors become better teachers (Jumpstart to Successful Instruction) developed by SkillsCommons that can be delivered online.
  • Exemplary innovations in apprenticeship and support services for program design, management, and evaluation resources produced by TAACCCT grantees and curated by SkillsCommons. Program evaluations of TAACCCT projects provided evidence of effective apprentice programs improving retention and employment.

Finally, the presentation will end with a group discussion (via chat in Zoom)  on the institutional and industry sector barriers for implementing successful and sustainable apprenticeship programs and how the resources reviewed during the workshop can be used to overcome these barriers.

What are the explicit participant learning outcomes for the workshop?

  1. Participants will be able to find, download, and retain digital workforce development training resources that they will be able to reuse, revise, remix, retain, and redistribute for the curriculum in moving their CTE programs online
  2. Participants will be able to identify and reuse the OER designed to support industry experts to become better instructors within CTE programs
  3. Participants will be able to reuse, revise, and remix a MERLOT OER portal for their own institution that aggregates OER resources to help their faculty and students move online.
  4. Participants will be able to reuse, revise, and remix the SkillsCommons resources on apprenticeship programs for their own institution to help their faculty design a quality, hybrid work-based learning experience.
  5. Within the online session, participants will learn from other participants in the session about the challenges they are facing and strategies for addressing these challenges.
Mar 30, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Teaching Art Online: A Conversation on Creativity for All | Conversation, Not Presentation

What techniques have shaped pandemic teaching? Creativity is encouraged in our students and was undoubtedly needed from us to teach in this challenging time. Join us in conversation about teaching arts online and how we keep our practice alive learning at a distance.

 

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Extended Abstract

What tools and techniques have shaped our teaching during the pandemic? Creativity is encouraged in our students and was certainly needed from us to keep them learning through this challenging time. Come to a conversation to share your experiences teaching the arts online and discuss how we keep our own practice alive while teaching at a distance. What tools and tips can you share? What worked and what didn’t? What techniques will we all continue in the post-pandemic world? How did arts education offered by remote learning differ from quality online education in your experience? How were the concerns of mental health and equity impacted by this experience? We each learned about ourselves as teachers and practitioners in this time - Let join to share our knowledge in an open discussion. 

 

Mar 30, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Mocktails & Trivia (An OLC Game Night) | Evening Event

Join us for some "mocktail" inspried fun, collaboratively generating OLC-themed "mocktails" and sharing your favorite recipes. Along the way, have some fun with a themed music-based trivia game (and maybe even win some prizes). If you want to create live with us, just be sure to gather your supplies to mix along with us, or grab your own favorite beverage! The OLC is known for fun, low-stakes, and inviting evening events. Whether they are intense and gameful or entertaining and reflective, they are designed to make space for one of the greatest things about the OLC: our community.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 31, 2022
8:15am - 8:45am (Central)
Meditation And Mindfulness - A Guided Virtual Meditation Session | Other

Start your day with some quiet time to decompress, reconnect mind and body, and practice some self-care as we turn our focus inward for a short while.  Mindfulness has been defined as a practice of "bringing one's attention to the internal and external experiences occuring in the present moment" (Baer, 2003).  Clark Shah-Nelson will lead this guided mindful meditation session geared toward centering ourselves on higher levels of consciousness so that we can experience OLC Innovate Virtual Conference in a healthy and present way together.  Whether you are new to meditation or a seasoned practitioner, all levels are welcome to join us for this session.

Baer, R.A.  (2003).  Mindfulness training as a clinical intervention:  A conceptual and empirical review.  Clinical psychology:  Science and practice, 10(2), 125-143.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 31, 2022
9:00am - 11:00am (Central)
Designing, Implementing, and Scaling An Online Course Quality Review and Refresh Process With OSCQR | Workshop

This workshop is intended to assist institutional leaders develop an implementation plan for online course quality review and refresh using OSCQR, OLC’s online course quality scorecard. You will be provided with the tools and information to plan an institution-level initiative to systematically improve the instructional design and accessibility of online courses and programs.

 

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Extended Abstract

In this workshop, institutional leaders will be provided with all the information and tools necessary to create an implementation plan for their larger-scale online course/program quality initiative. Campus leaders will be guided in the creation of an implementation plan to systematically review and refresh the instructional design and accessibility of online courses and programs. Workshop participants will leave with an implementation plan template and all the information, resources, and understanding necessary to tailor it to their institutional context, and the scope and scale of their online quality initiative. Access to the tools and resources needed to implement their project are provided, and best practices in implementing a larger scale online course quality review and refresh initiative will be reviewed and discussed.

This workshop is designed to address 3 key objectives:

  • Provide an overview and orientation to an implementation planning framework that can be customized and used to develop a comprehensive institutional, or program level online quality assurance implementation plan. 
  • Provide an opportunity to think about and discuss individual institutional contexts. Key questions will include: What model of course review will work best for the scope, scale, and context of your initiative? What is your timeline? Who are your stakeholders? What policies and institutional organizational structures, or procedures have to be considered for any aspect of your initiative?
  • Provide access to and overview of the OSCQR tools and resources that can be used to implement and track larger-scale online course quality initiatives. These include the OSCQR dashboard, the OSCQR rubric, and the OSCQR resource site.

Workshop participants will:

  • Receive an implementation plan template to create their own individualized plan.
  • Gain access to OSCQR online interactive rubric for use in team reviews.
  • Gain access to OSCQR online dashboard to manage larger scale online course quality review initiatives.
  • Receive an overview and orientation to the tools, resources, process, and best practices for creating a larger scale online quality review and refresh initiative.

Participants will earn the Designing an OSCQR Implementation Plan badge. This workshop assumes a familiarity with online course reviews, and/or OSCQR, and is not intended to dive deeply into OSCQR standards, how to use OSCQR, or how conduct online course quality reviews. This workshop is intended for institutional leaders at campus and program levels, to assist them with strategies to build, scale and improve their online course- or program-level quality, and will complement the efforts of those beginning their institutional Quality Review journey.

 

Mar 31, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
User Experience (UX) in Course Design: How Empathizing with Our Student Users Can Improve Course Design | Education Session

Despite our best efforts, do we understand how our student users actually experience the courses we create? In this interactive presentation, we will define User Experience (UX) in instructional design; and utilize personas, empathy maps, and user journeys to identify pain points and create solutions to improve our users’ experience.  

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Extended Abstract

Quality Matters. Universal Design. Community of Inquiry.

As instructional designers and teachers we use lots of frameworks to help us create effective learning experiences.

While these frameworks are based on the premise of and commitment to developing and delivering courses that help students meet learning aims, they do not fully account for the actual individual experience of the student users.

So, while we should continue to use these sorts of frameworks as foundations for good course design, it is important to also consider the user experience of the actual people who are engaging with the courses and content we develop.

Looking at course design through a lens of User Experience (UX), can help us create courses that more naturally and effectively work to support students throughout their learning journeys. By considering the personas of the users in our courses, empathizing with those users, and mapping their journeys throughout a course we can identify potential pain points and create solutions that work for our users.

In this interactive conversation--where participants will share ideas, opinions, and experiences using a responsive discussion platform to help identify key themes and summarize emerging ideas--we will explore what UX looks like in the context of instructional design. From here we will examine several key UX design principles that can help inform course design. Finally, we will utilize these frameworks to help us identify potential pain points and create solutions for them that will benefit our student users.

Mar 31, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Roots and Branches: The Growth and Support of Instructional Design Professionals | Education Session

How can we build communities for instructional design professionals to promote learning, mentoring, and collaboration? This session will review strategies and approaches of the Instructional Design Working Group at the University of Pennsylvania to inform a discussion of how to identify and meet the evolving needs of instructional design professionals. 

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Extended Abstract

Instructional design professionals work in a wide variety of departments and structures across higher education (and are referred to by a wide variety of titles and roles). Within these structures and roles, instructional design professionals often face unique challenges and must regularly develop new skills and strategies to adapt to changes whether those are related to technology, our institutions, student expectations or needs, or larger trends or developments in higher education. At the same time, instructional design positions are new enough within some institutional structures that professionals in these roles are put in positions where they must define their scopes and demonstrate their value to the projects, courses, and programs they support. Lastly, instructional design professionals engage in partnerships that require empathy, care, and patience. For all of these goals and challenges, it is helpful to have communities of support. 

At the University of Pennsylvania, this method of support is the Instructional Design Working Group, which meets monthly to discuss emerging and ongoing issues related to instructional design and online teaching and learning. This group provides a forum for sharing, questioning, and learning that benefits from the diversity of experiences and expertise that its members bring to the group. As a result of the group, successes and lessons learned are more effectively shared across the institution and community members can benefit from strategies and approaches used across programs and disciplines. In addition to monthly meetings focused on specific topics in the field, members are further supported through a mentoring initiative, professional development cohorts, and an online forum for sharing resources, seeking answers to questions, and troubleshooting issues. 

In this session, the convener of this group will share the structures and strategies that have helped this group grow in membership and adapt to changing needs. Our experiences will also serve as a foundation for a larger conversation with session participants about the ways that different institutions foster growth, development, and communication among their instructional design professions. 

Together, we will end by considering the types of knowledge, skills sets, and experiences that instructional design professionals will need in the future to continue to support their institutions and stakeholders and the structures that can be put in place to support the growth and development of these professionals.  

Mar 31, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Most Wanted: Top Tech Tips for Canvas, Google, and Apple | Education Session

With so much technology available to educators, it can be difficult to determine which to use. In this session, attendees will explore some of the most wanted technology tips from across the Google, Canvas, and Apple (iOS and macOS) platforms. These tips can help maximize your daily productivity and create more effective and efficient teaching and working routines.

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Extended Abstract

With so much technology available to educators, it can be difficult to determine which to use. In this session, attendees will explore some of the most wanted technology tips from across the Google, Canvas, and Apple (iOS and macOS) platforms. These tips can help maximize your daily productivity and create more effective and efficient teaching and working routines.

Takeaways

As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

  • Use Google tips like Google Keep and explore features of Gmail and Google Calendar

  • Locate and utilize Canvas tips such as bulk edit assignment dates in Canvas Calendar

  • Sync Canvas and Google Calendars for scheduling management

  • Identify Apple Ecosystem tips, including how to use Airdrop to transfer files easily from one device to another and how to copy/paste between devices using Universal Clipboard

Mar 31, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Three-pronged VoiceThread Discussion Strategy: Providing Rigor, Differentiation, and Sense of Community During the Pandemic | Education Session

In an online graduate course, VoiceThread was utilized to reflect on course readings. The strategy used is made up of digital powerups (Thurston, 2019), a guided self-connection section, and expressing what they learned from their peers.
A qualitative content analysis of student reflections using this strategy supports these claims: 1) The digital powerup strategy provided an opportunity for rigor and differentiation. 2) The guided approach of the ‘connect to self’ section balanced and complemented the open-ended nature of the digital powerup section. 3) Structured peer takeaways led to a sense of community. 4) The graduate students preferred the three-pronged discussion strategy to other models they have used before.

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Extended Abstract

Presentation sections:
 

A. Showcasing the VoiceThread discussion (10 -12 min)

  1. Digital Powerups: What they are and how I designed the three related to the online curriculum leadership course.

  2. Connect to self: Why it is important and how I connected each of the weekly learning objectives to this changing question.

  3. Peer takeaways: What it is and how it made the discussion more authentic.

  4. Student creations

 

B. Student perspective of VT discussion  (10 -12 min)

  1. Two survey questions 

  2. Rigor and differentiation student quotes

  3. Balance between DPUs and ‘connect to self’ student quotes

  4. Confirmed learning, perspective taking, and sense of community student quotes

 

C. Participants practice using VoiceThread (10-15min)

  1. How to comment on slides

  2. Brainstorm ways to use DPUs in their context

  3. Brainstorm ways to build in course objectives to discussion questions

  4. Share experiences of how to get students to read what their peers post 

Mar 31, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Virtual Escape Rooms -- Where Adult Learners Can Play! | Education Session

When the first in-person escape room was created in 2007, who would have envisioned its conversion into the virtual classroom of today? This presentation explores the multitude of applications and benefits that virtual escape rooms offer in higher education and gives a glimpse into how easily they can be implemented.  

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Extended Abstract

The goal of the presentation is to introduce virtual escape rooms as a learning and teaching methodology in order to create engagement and collaboration between students and faculty. As modalities such as distant and blended learning (e.g. HyFlex), have multiplied across the higher education landscape, creating ways to foster social learning, community building, and engagement within the classroom has become a higher priority in today’s environment.  

During the presentation we will explain the key components of using Google forms to create virtual escape rooms. This form of gamification, while being low-tech with the guise of complexity, allows for opportunities of interaction, enjoyment, and connection through turning a basic worksheet or lecture into a virtual experiential learning activity.   

We will also discuss the benefits of using virtual escape rooms in the classroom, specifically inquiry-based learning, diversified instruction, transferable skill development, and immediate feedback assessment techniques. 

Inquiry-based Learning 

Through the design of a virtual escape room students are presented with strategically designed questions, scenarios, case studies, and/or problems that require the students to analyze, evaluate, interpret, and discover concepts/competencies 

Diversified Instruction 
This method of instruction allows faculty to use various teaching strategies where the instructor may deliver the content in multiple ways (e.g. presentation or case study) or provide multiple ways to process the course content. In addition, offering various avenues to process information in different learning environments.  

Due to the nature of virtual escape room’s utilization of browser-based technology many socioeconomic barriers are removed/limited, thus allowing increased and equitable access to these academic activities via common and affordable devices such as a cell phone or Chromebook. 

In the end, a demonstration on how to use a virtual escape room in an educational learning environment will be provided.  

 
Transferrable Skills/General Education Skills
Escape rooms are innovative learning tools that bridge the physical and online learning environments. Their unique nature eliminates certain learning barriers while building transferable skills and promoting interaction within the group. We will highlight how the transferable skills of Communication, Critical Thinking, Digital Fluency, Information Literacy, and Diversity and Teamwork are promoted and constructed.  

Immediate Feedback Assessment Techniques 
These engaging academic activities can be used as informal assessments and evaluations. Instructors can turn their worksheets, quizzes, case studies, and more into informal/formative assessment tools that also provide immediate feedback to the learner. Immediate feedback is employed through the multiple attempts that are afforded to the student and the need to correct errors in order to “escape”.  Depending upon how the activity is built, one can embed evaluation questions and utilize the data analytics that Google Forms provides.  

 

Mar 31, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Virtual Leadership Support Mechanisms Beyond the Academy of the Arts | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

This leadership workshop is for arts professionals, researchers, and students interested in brainstorming strategies for self-efficacy in artistic leadership, and in so doing add their viewpoints, inform the research, and contribute to the body of knowledge on women, and African American women in particular, in cinematic leadership.

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Extended Abstract

Virtual Leadership Support Mechanisms Beyond the Academy of the Arts is designed to facilitate the exploration of virtual support mechanisms in the traditional academy that can extend to industry and reinforce the development and professional leadership success of women, and particularly African American women, in the academy of the arts. A qualitative study of African American female progress in the cinematic arts led to the development of a grounded theory elucidating the circumstance of African American female filmmakers in particular and the prospects and strategies for exceling as leaders in the industry. Increasing the participation of women of color as an active, vocal, and visible presence in arts and entertainment is the only solution to the lack of women of color engagement. To do this requires early support and training, beginning with educational resources and artistic and professional development, along with advocacy to fill the vacuum created by the absence of an ethnic female vision, the wealth and diversity of talent by women of color artists can be exposed to the general public, the business community, and the entire arts collective.

It is too easy to place insufficient progress by people of color squarely on the shoulders of mainstream society. The history of African Americans in the United States is imbued with instances of oppression, depression, segregation, and discrimination that clearly form a basis for why conditions might prevent one from being successful. All of this notwithstanding, African Americans have succeeded where others have failed, and succeeded when the odds for success were not in their favor. Historically, African Americans have created their own opportunities in the absence of mainstream allowances, such as establishing institutes of higher education when admission to mainstream colleges was not available, creating insular, affluent communities by, for, and among African Americans, and pooling their resources to produce motion pictures that told their stories.

The Virtual Leadership Support Mechanisms Beyond the Academy of the Arts workshop is intended for design thinkers, particularly those who are arts students, researchers, and professionals. The primary goal is to present, discuss, and effectuate the efficacy theory for cinematic leadership (Worley, 2014) through an interactive platform of discourse and creativity about institutionally-based virtual resources, professional development, and advocacy for women of color pursuing careers in the arts, particularly in the motion picture and television industries. Secondarily, the goal of the workshop is to explore the transferability of efficacy theory to other artistic disciplines.

The workshop will begin with a 5-minute facilitated, quick-start conversation on the topic of addressing disparity in the academy of the arts. They will be asked to respond to the questions: 1) What are the leadership challenges for women in your artistic discipline? and 2) What are the challenges to women, and women of color in particular, being equitably engaged in leadership roles (director, producer) in major box office cinema? This initial conversation will be followed by a facilitated, 10-minute divergent brainstorm session to generate new ideas and solutions for addressing gender disparity in the academy of the arts. Brainstorm activities will include rapid ideation before open discussion. The open discussion will be a round-robin, allowing every participant to contribute ideas to the brainstorm.

For the next 5 minutes of the workshop, the facilitator will introduce the Efficacy Theory of Cinema Leadership, which contextualizes the interaction of obstacles faced by women of color through the lenses of gender, ethnicity, and culture that result in consequences perpetuating the problem. Theoretically, the lenses, when used as drivers for self-determination and self-efficacy, interact with the strategies for overcoming the obstacles, and trigger potentially constructive and productive outcomes. Ethnicity, gender, and culture, then, become the engines that drive women of color, especially African American women, to achieve success by creating their own leadership opportunities.

The workshop will conclude with a small group prototyping of the grounded theory, debriefing, and wrap-up. In the breakouts, participants will spend 10 minutes using the starburst technique to work toward a virtual solution to address gender disparity in leadership in the academy of the arts. The virtual solutions can be real or imagined, and they will create them by starting with a central idea or solution and then creating a six-point star around it, with each point representing a question: who, what, when, where, why, and how. This breakout will be followed by a 10-minutes debriefing with all participants on the mechanisms or solutions they conceptualized.

In the final 5 minutes of the workshop, participants will consider how they might apply one or more of the prototype concepts in their own professional or instructional arts context, whether it is motion pictures or some other art form experiencing the same kind of gender disparity.

As a result of this workshop, attendees will: 1) gain a clearer understanding of the barriers faced by women, particularly women of color, in the arts; 2) identify and address threats and opportunities that affect a woman’s ability to achieve success in her artistic discipline; and 3) establish a potential plan of action for virtually addressing disparity in the academy of the arts. The Virtual Leadership Support Mechanisms Beyond the Academy of the Arts workshop will help participants whose profession or research interest is in the arts find each other and interact at an intellectual level to address the problems of access and opportunities. It will also allow all participants to brainstorm virtual strategies for self-efficacy specific to their artistic disciplines and connect around issues of mutual concern.

Mar 31, 2022
11:00am - 11:30am (Central)
OLC Live!: The State of Instructional Design | Other

Instructional design has seen a boom over the last two years, both in demand for talent and in importance for the continuity of instruction. So what is the state of instructional design? Join Brandon Poulliot and guest for an examination of the current state of ID and challenges faced moving forward.

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 31, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Student Perspectives on Evidence-Based Teaching Practices | Featured Session

Gain insights on students’ perspectives of evidence-based teaching practices highlighted in the OLC’s 2022 book on quality online teaching featuring the Quality Course Teaching and Instructional Practices (QCTIP) Scorecard.  This panel discussion, composed of QCTIP book co-authors and students will unpack best practices around course design, inclusivity, community, engagement, and assessment  informed by research and students’ experiences.

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Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Mar 31, 2022
12:15pm - 12:45pm (Central)
Networking Design Sprint - Part 3 | Other

Grab a snack or lunch, and join us for the first of a series of OLC Innovate Design Sprints! The Design Sprints will take place over the course of three days. This year the sprints focus on designing for social impact.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 31, 2022
12:45pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Game On! Teaching Students to Harness the Power of Games to Enhance Their Own Learning Experience | Workshop

Instead of teaching faculty how to gamify courses, what if we teach students to gamify their own learning? This workshop helps attendees gamify their conference experience to reap learning benefits associated with play in a format that can then be shared with students in their own classrooms.

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Extended Abstract

Gaming the System

What is an effective way to embrace a game culture to enhance learning, engagement and motivation in online higher education classrooms? Teaching students to gamify their own learning experiences so they can apply those strategies and techniques in every class they take throughout their education.

Why it works

America's 227 million video gamers (averaging 31 years of age) are well represented on today's college campuses by both traditional and non-traditional age students. When asked why they play, gamers say its because playing brings them joy. Neurobiologists concur that playing (all kinds of play, not just video games) does indeed result in joyful emotions. Joy is a positive emotion indicating an evolutionary advantage to playing that may be related to prepping the brain for learning by releasing dopamine.  Dopamine is a feel good,  learning enhancing neurotransmitter which assists in focusing attention, facilitating memory and learning; shunting information to the higher reasoning centers of the brain; building self-efficacy and increasing persistence in the face of challenge and failure. 

Play to Learn

What's a great way to learn to teach students to harness the learning power of play by gamifying their classes? Learn to gamify your own educational experiences and practice playing in an online environment like the OLC conference!

Game Plan

In this workshop I share sources, resources and strategies for teaching students to intentionally activate the motivating power of games to enhance learning and engagement. I'll start with a 10 minute introduction to research connecting play and learning and see examples of students responses to learning to play their classes. Next, I'll introduce 5 specific, age appropriate,  game strategies that can be taught to post-secondary students. I'll spend a few minutes introducing the science behind each strategy and modeling how these strategies can be introduced to students. As each strategy is presented, participants will apply what they are learning to create an individualized learning game to play the conference. We'll spend 10-12 minutes on each strategy. During the last 5-10 minutes of the session, participants will share their ideas for implementing this instruction into their own courses as we debrief the experience. 

Materials Neeeded

During this session, I will use share slides and video clips of student presentations. Attendees need something to write on and something to write with to create a 'game plan' for playing the conference to enhance learning and engagement.

Session Goals

This is an immersive experiential learning session. Individuals attending this workshop will leave with resources and practical strategies for teaching students how to gamify their own learning. They will be able to describe the science behind each strategy and apply the techniques to personal experience.  They will have created an individualized plan to gamify the remainder of their conference experience so they can put activities learned in the workshop into practice before sharing techniques with students.

Mar 31, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Creating Inclusivity and Responsiveness with Microinstruction in the Delivery and Design of Blended and Online Learning | Education Session

Do you want to learn how to create a more inclusive hybrid and blended learning experience for all learners? In this session, you will experience asynchronous and synchronous microinstruction learning modules as a learner and receive practical best practices for your own implementation in this interactive session.

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Extended Abstract

In simple terms, microinstruction can be defined as the overall practice of instructing, assessing, and organizing key instructional pieces is small chunks to allow for a more inclusive, responsive, and effective learning experience.  Philosophically, microinstruction is an instructional approach that seeks to create a more inclusive learning experience by simplifying the learning process and design insomuch that learners have an increased access to instruction and content.

 

Microinstruction encompasses other known terms such as: as microteaching, micro-assessments, and micro project-based learning. These terms are gaining popularity in professional development for organizations to ensure that their members understand and can apply critical information. In particular, microteaching is becoming more prevalent within secondary institutions due to the effectiveness of its approach and its ability to be used alongside other instructional styles.

 

Microinstruction, and its associated terms listed above has shown to be successful for both the learner and instructor. There is a great reduction in reteaching and learners can progress to more challenging material in an efficient manner. Microinstructional learning modules and content design are characterized by highly condensed presentations, concise assessment approaches, immediate opportunity for feedback, and are designed to be easily accessed. This last factor, which will be further explained in the presentation, means that the content can be easily viewed or used on a wide range of technological tools. The design of the instruction itself, which will also be explained, ensures that a wide variety of learners can process and understand the material. These combined factors make the instruction inclusive to learners who may face technological limitations and those who need modifications in the structure of content itself. Together, all of these factors help to bring a more successful experience for both instructor and learner.

 

The overarching goal of this presentation is to have the attendee experience microinstruction themselves by taking the role of a learner in asynchronous and synchronous learning opportunities. In this highly interactive presentation, attendees will receive a practical explanation of microinstruction, discover key characteristics, and best practices for their own application of microinstruction. Most importantly, attendees will explore and take part in example microinstruction learning modules to gain an understanding of the learner experience. This session is appropriate for the facilitators, administrators, and designers of both professional development and educational institutions. 

 

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will be able to define micoinstruction and explain when it is appropriate.

  2. Attendees will be able to identify 2 characteristics of microinstruction.

  3. Attendees will be able to identify at least 1 best practice that they can implement in their own practice.

Mar 31, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Stronger Together: How Virtual Learning Communities Encourage Peer Support, Improve Outcomes, and Save Time in Online Classes | Education Session

Online students require unique strategies for engagement and support. Students want on-demand help, but faculty can’t be available 24/7. This session will discuss how virtual learning communities offer a unique opportunity to build peer-to-peer connections, deliver just-in-time support, and help faculty scale their time when teaching online.

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Extended Abstract

As a flagship research institution, Indiana University (IU) has roughly 40 thousand undergraduates, and the STEM program has especially large class sizes. Dr. Meghan Porter, lecturer at IU’s Department of Chemistry, had specific challenges when it came to teaching online courses. She found herself answering the same questions multiple times, sometimes after traditional office hours. With such large classes, it was difficult to find a way to bring students together and help them build a community that would allow them to help one another. 

Dr. Porter envisioned a way for students to communicate with each other in an open and approachable environment. She wanted to bring technology into the classroom in a way that felt seamless and connected and could help her and her students. In response, IU integrated a virtual community platform, which creates a flexible, on-demand space where students connect with classmates and instructors to ask questions, share ideas, and support each other. 

After the first semester, Dr. Porter found that the virtual learning community offered significant advantages for her and her students. This virtual space simplified communication, improved access to resources, and allowed students to work together to answer common questions about the curriculum and course logistics. In addition, by centralizing Q&A in a shared space, Dr. Porter found she had fewer emails to juggle, and having the ability to quickly respond to students’ questions and concerns has saved her much-needed time. 

This presentation will focus on best practices for incorporating learning communities into the online classroom and the positive outcomes faculty and institutions can expect on belonging, engagement, and student success. Attendees will be asked to reflect on their own student support approaches, and to discuss how community-based and other virtual support systems are working for their online students. 

Mar 31, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Implementation of Team-based Learning in an Accelerated, Online, Asynchronous Graduate Nursing Course to Assess Competency-based Outcomes | Conversation, Not Presentation

Competency-based educational models require students to apply their knowledge, skills, and abilities to create solutions to contemporary, professional issues. Team-based learning creates an exciting environment that feels realistic and lifelike and allows students the opportunity to demonstrate competency of weekly, course, and program goals within any educational program.

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Extended Abstract

Traditional educational models, both on-ground and online, for students of all levels include lecture, some contributory discussion from students, occasional team assignments, assessment via examinations, and timely completion of assignments.  Students complete the assignments, submit the assignments within a required period of time, receive their grades, and move through the course successfully meeting or failing to meet the course objectives. Faculty use course and program objectives as the outcome measurement tools and generally communicate with students in a one-way fashion. 

In contrast, team-based learning models include several active components which require both individual and team-based responses. Components can include items such as an open, team pre-test to assess understanding of assigned pre-class work, a team response to a professional topic which might include rapid organization and adoption of roles, presentation of a response, solicitation of contributions from peers, and final collation of the assignment response.  Assessment of each student’s contributions and the team’s cumulative final response to the assignment by the faculty are components of the final assignment grade. Throughout the process the faculty role is to continuously assess student response to team leadership requirements, peer contributions to the team, guidance as needed to problem solve, and grading of the final submission.

Unlike traditional course design which lists course and programmatic outcomes, competency-based educational models include 3 to 6 learning “competencies” per credit hour in each course similar to course objectives.  Learning competencies are main ideas or skills generally described by the industry the student is pursuing.  Students should master a learning competency weekly, at course completion, woven throughout the program curriculum, and integrated at program completion. The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) have defined 7 core competencies that define career readiness:  Critical Work Thinking/Problem Solving, Oral/ Written Communications, Teamwork/Collaboration/ Information Technology Application, Leadership, Professionalism and Ethic. Professional organizations including the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) have identified core competencies specifically related to their profession.

Enrollment in online educational programs at all levels and types of programs, including nursing, has grown over the last 10 years at an astonishing pace and enrollment was pushed higher by the onset of the pandemic. The adoption by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) of competency based educational models for all nursing programs, along with other major professional organizations, makes examination of traditional delivery of education a priority. It is essential for educational programs and faculty to examine methods that increase students’ ability to think critically and apply their knowledge in a collaborative manner to novel situations to demonstrate proficiency in expected professional competencies. Team-based learning has been shown to improve student learning and application of knowledge to complex questions across settings. Team-based assignment activities provide observable and measurable opportunities for faculty assessment purposes.

In an online, asynchronous, accelerated educational program it can be difficult via the traditional question and answer discussion format for faculty to truly determine competency in assignment and course objectives.  Additionally, the question of students accessing external, unapproved resources to complete a traditional assignment is omnipresent, even more so in online, asynchronous programs. Team-based learning in the traditional, face to face, on-ground classroom has been noted to improve two-way communication between students and faculty and increase demonstration of competency in problem solving and consensus.  Team- based learning with the requirement of rapid responses to the problem of the week and integration of all team members’ participation, along with frequently changing the subject of the assignment while keeping the same competencies essentially eliminates the ability of students to access unapproved resources to complete an assignment.

Competency based education applied across integrated experiences over time and through each course in a program produces a reflective, competent graduate.  Team-based learning is one effective means to present competency expectations and observe and measure student developmental progress towards practice competency.

Session Description and Planning for Interactivity (45 minutes)

Participants in this session will be exposed to 15 minutes of introduction to competency- based education, team-based learning, and how to implement team-based learning to assess competency in an online, asynchronous, accelerated course (5 minutes each topic).

Following this discussion participants will be quickly and randomly assigned to teams and given a problem to respond to with these competencies required:  Critical Work Thinking/Problem Solving, Oral/ Written Communications, Teamwork/Collaboration, and Leadership. The problem will be finding “at least three things in common” which is a quick means of determining commonality with each other through question and answers between individuals who do not know anything about each other. During this time they will be exposed to a brief, one question pre-test and then have five minutes to discuss and prepare a brief response.  A verbal post-test will then take place to assess competency.

Participants will have to appoint roles, organize their questioning, and determine categories. The participants will then present a quick summary of findings.  The team with the most responses wins (15 minutes).  The remainder of the session will be devoted to lessons learned by the speaker when initially introducing and implementing team-based learning in asynchronous, online accelerated graduate nursing courses.  Finally, questions and feedback from participants will be solicited.

Session Goals

This session goals are to introduce the process, usefulness and appropriateness of team-based learning to assess competencies in an online, asynchronous course setting as well as “lessons learned” from one program.  Participants will leave the session with the application skills and knowledge to explore the use of team-based learning in the pursuit of competency-based education and assessment.  Fundamental knowledge of competency-based education is also briefly discussed.

 

Mar 31, 2022
1:30pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Innovation Crew Meet-Up | Other

Join your crew during this designated synchronous Crew Meet-Up or connect with them via Slack. Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action.

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Extended Abstract

     

Mar 31, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
The Humanizing Online STEM Academy: a Pathway to Equity | Education Session

Learn how to adopt the openly-shared Humanizing Online STEM Academy curriculum (designed for Canvas) at your institution. We will explore the impact of this online faculty development program, designed to prepare STEM professors with the knowledge and digital fluency to teach inclusive, culturally relevant and responsive online courses.

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Extended Abstract

By the end of this session, participants will:

  1. Identify the link between instructor-student relationships and achieving educational equity in STEM.
  2. Examine the model of humanized online teaching to scale systemic change in STEM.
  3. Explore the Humanizing Online STEM Academy, a 6-week online faculty development program, as a mechanism to influence institutional change.
  4. Receive access to adopt an openly shared and free version of the Humanizing Online STEM Academy, designed for Canvas.

This presentation will examine the impact of a 6-week asynchronous online faculty development program, The Humanizing Online STEM Academy, on faculty perceptions of teaching online and student experiences. The Academy was designed as part of a three year California Education Learning Lab grant to prepare STEM faculty to teach humanized online courses and prepare instructional designers to support the ongoing adoption of humanizing across the California Community College and California State University systems. With a focus on fostering trust, positive instructor-student relationships, and warm demander pedagogy (Kleinfeld, 1975), the Academy provides faculty with the knowledge and digital fluency to teach inclusive, culturally relevant and responsive online courses, suited to support the needs of Black, Latina/o/x, Indigenous students and women in STEM. In the session, you will be oriented to the program, consider participant feedback, preliminary research findings, and learn how you can adopt the openly-shared curriculum at your own institution (for free!).

In humanized online courses, positive instructor-student relationships are prioritized and serve "as the connective tissue between students, engagement, and rigor" (Pacansky-Brock et al., 2020, p. 2). In any learning modality, human connection is the antidote for the emotional disruption that prevents many students from performing to their full potential and in online courses, creating that connection is even more important (Jaggars & Xu, 2016). Humanizing leverages learning science and culturally responsive teaching to create an inclusive, equitable online class climate anchored in trust and connection. A humanized online course is intentionally designed and taught to center positive faculty-student relationships. Through small and frequent cues of social inclusion, faculty create identity safety and foster growth mindset to mitigate stereotype threat (Steele & Aronson, 1995; Cohen & Steele, 2002) and belongingness uncertainty (Walton & Cohen, 2007), cognitive underminers that block a student's ability to achieve their full potential (Verschelden, 2017). 

In the Academy, faculty engage in a facilitated online professional development experience in which they are in the role of a "student." Being immersed in a humanzed asynchronous online course fosters self-awareness of the ways validation (Rendón, 1994; Wood, Harris & White, 2015), care, and push (Kleinfeld, 1975) can operate together to motivate, encourage, and challenge a learner. As faculty increase their knowledge about diversity, equity, and inclusion in STEM and research about the social psychology of learning and culturally responsive teaching, they create eight humanizing elements for their online course. Through interactions with peers that include VoiceThread/Flipgrid discussions and peer review using video feedback, STEM faculty advance their professional learning and, ultimately, develop a digital ePortfolio of their eight humanizing elements. These include a Liquid Syllabus (Pacansky-Brock, 2014, 2017, 2020, 2021); humanized course card and homepage; a getting to know you survey; warm, wise feedback; self-affirming ice breaker; wisdom wall; bumper video; and a microlecture. The elements employ the use of an array of free and low cost digital technologies including Google Sites, Screencast-o-matic, Flipgrid or VoiceThread, and Adobe Spark.

The Humanizing Online STEM Academy will be shared publicly with an open license in the Spring of 2022. The related website, which includes a Humanizing STEM Toolkit, will be shared with participants.

References:

Cohen, G. L., & Steele, C. M. (2002). A barrier of mistrust: How stereotypes affect cross-race mentoring. In J. Aronson (Ed.), Improving academic achievement: Impact of psychological factors on education (pp. 205-331). Academic Press.

Jaggars, S. S. & Xu, D. (2016). How do online course design features influence student performance? Computers & Education, (95), 270-284.

Kleinfeld, J. (1975). Effective teachers of Eskimo and Indian students. School Review, 83, 301–344.

Pacansky-Brock, M. (2021). The Liquid Syllabus: An anti-racist teaching element. Colleague 2 Colleague Magazine, 1(15).

Pacansky-Brock, M., Smedshammer, M., & Vincent-Layton, K. (2020). Humanizing Online Teaching to Equitize Higher Education. Current Issues in Education, 21(2 ), 1-21.

Pacansky-Brock, M. (2017). Best practices for teaching with emerging technologies, (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.

Pacansky-Brock, M. (2014, August 13). The Liquid Syllabus: Are you ready? [blog post].  

Rendón, L. (1994). Validating culturally diverse students: Toward a new model of learning and student development. Innovative Higher Education, 19, 33-51.

Steele, C. M., & Aronson, J. (1995). Stereotype threat and intellectual test performance of African Americans. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 69, 797-811.

Verschelden, C. (2017). Bandwidth recovery: Helping students reclaim cognitive resources lost to poverty, racism, and social marginalization. Stylus & AACU.

Walton, G. M., & Cohen, G. L. (2007). A question of belonging: Race, social fit, and achievement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92(1), 82.

Wood, J. L., Harris, F. III, & White, K. (2015). Teaching men of color in the community college: A guidebook. Lawndale Hill. 

Mar 31, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Remixing OER for Customized Courses and Student Impact | Education Session

Join Instructional Designer Stephanie Korslund and Scholarly Communications Librarian Crissy Ross for a session about revising open education resources (OER) to customize your courses. We will discuss copyright, licensing, fair use, and ethically creating custom resources that impact students by removing access barriers and contribute to student success. 

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Extended Abstract

Overnight, the Covid19 pandemic turned college campuses into virtual learning spaces and many faculty scrambled to connect their students to resources they traditionally had physical access to. While this experience continues to prove stressful for faculty and students today, it has renewed interest in the ideas of open education, including open education resources.  

Open Education Resources (OER) are resources that remove access barriers for all, including financial and disability barriers. OER provide faculty unique opportunity to customize their course content while simultaneously prioritizing the diversification of course content. A growing body of evidence supports research that OER contribute directly to student retention rates and sense of belonging through early resource access and inclusive and diverse representation in scholarly content.

Please join Instructional Designer Stephanie Korslund and Scholarly Communications Librarian Crissy Ross for a discussion about customizing your course content through OER selection and revision. Our session will focus on OER adaptation through the lens of copyright, licensing and fair use and how OER course re-design impacts student learning.

Mar 31, 2022
2:00pm - 2:45pm (Central)
Leading Active+Adaptive Learning Innovation in Math Pathways for Student Success, Engagement, and Equity | Education Session

We successfully redesigned a college Math Pathway in Statistics targeted at social science students with the goal of making learning more relevant to students' lives and areas of study. We describe curricular and structural changes implemented with active learning and adaptive systems and share results on student impact.

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Extended Abstract

Challenges of College Math
Successful completion of math gateway courses is essential to undergraduate students’ progress towards graduation. Common challenges in gateway courses include a lack of alignment to student interests and needs; the narrow focus on procedures and notations rather than practical application and examples; and the lack of personalization or remediation of lessons. An additional challenge is whether math courses in sequence are truly related to student success: for example, does a College Algebra prerequisite actually prepare students for statistics courses or does it merely lengthen time to degree?  All of these challenges have led to trends in high failure rates and equity gaps.

Transformation of Statistics as a Math Pathway for Social Science Students
In an effort to make math gateway courses more relevant and improve student success rates, the Math Pathways approach expands options for college students, enabling different paths through their math curriculum, depending on a students' course of study. We aimed to redesign a two-course math pathway sequence in Statistics targeted at social science students with the goal of making content more relevant to students’ lives and areas of study. We also removed the College Algebra requirement.  Therefore, several curricular and structural changes were implemented.

We outline our process in three phases:

Phase 1: CoDesign for strategic visioning among stakeholders
Large curriculum redesign projects involve a broad set of collaborators and stakeholders. A key approach explored was “co-design”, referring to the collective effort of designers and non-designers working together to address a specific design problem -- in this case, a curriculum redesign for a Statistics pathway for social science majors. A cornerstone of co-design partnerships is to involve diverse groups of stakeholders from different fields early as productive contributors to the course design process.

A 3-day in-person strategy and design workshop was held, bringing together 37 participants (internal and external stakeholders) comprising faculty members from Math and Social Science departments, instructional designers, librarians, academic administrators, adaptive learning vendor representatives, and design workshop facilitators to reimagine how to teach Statistics to non-math majors. The workshop resulted not only in a unified design strategy between the Math and Social Science departments on common outcomes, core concepts, assessments, but also ensured diverse ideas and perspectives were incorporated early into the project.

Phase 2: Development and implementation of an "Active+Adaptive" blended curriculum
A key curriculum reform required shifting lecture-based pedagogy into what we refer to as an "Active+Adaptive" blended curriculum model, which emphasizes active learning for deep classroom engagement with adaptive learning for mass personalization at scale. The design and development of the new Active+Adaptive Statistics courses required a huge collaborative effort among faculty teams, instructional design teams, and vendor teams that ranged over two years. In implementing the project, additional support was required from the other departments and the undergraduate education office such as preceptors, academic advisors, and the registrar.

Some of the strategies implemented include:
Embedding personalized support for course preparation and remediation through adaptive learning systems
Personalization of formative assessments by social science discipline
Replacing lectures with active learning application projects and examples contextualized to social science disciplines and real-world problems
Replacing exclusively procedural assessments with assessments focused on conceptual understanding
Remixing and enhancing content from open educational resources (OER) to reduce textbook costs
Providing learner supports through adaptive learning course orientation, classroom preceptors, and academic advisors
Providing faculty development programming on active learning pedagogy and adaptive learning systems

Phase 3: Evaluation results and impact on students
We compared preliminary outcomes among two cohorts of students enrolled in the redesigned Statistics I Active+Adaptive course and in the traditional Statistics I course in Fall 2020 and Spring 2021. Survey results show that students who engaged in the Active+Adaptive format had an increased growth mindset, sense of belonging, and motivation. Between Fall 2020 and Spring 2021, there was no statistical difference between the final grades in the traditional Statistics I course, requiring the College Algebra prerequisite vs. Active/Adaptive Stats not requiring the College Algebra prerequisite. This implies that students remained as successful in Statistics I without a full semester of College Algebra, indicating that it can be removed as a prerequisite barrier. We also found that in Fall 2020, the Active+Adaptive Statistics I course design decreased equity gaps between white students and minority students. Additionally, in Spring 2021 the equity gap was reversed with minority students performing better than white students.

Student feedback on the redesigned course was positive. Their comments highlight a regained interest in math and statistics:

  • "F​​or the first time in my life, I was excited about mathematical coursework."
  • "As a person who really struggles with math, I have had the best experience so far in this stats class."
  • "I loved this Stats class. I feel that the way this class was designed helped me learn a lot better."
  • "I am so glad I picked the right statistics class ... I am going [to] use what I am learning in this class with other classes I am taking this semester."

Session Goals
This presentation will:

  1. Identify curricular and structural reform strategies for redesigning Statistics for non-math majors
  2. Share strategies on designing, developing, and implementing the "Active+Adaptive" blended learning model
  3. Describe preliminary evaluation outcomes among two cohorts of students enrolled in the redesigned Statistics I Active+Adaptive course
  4. Brainstorm how similar strategies can be implemented at scale at other institutions
Mar 31, 2022
2:45pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Virtual Speed Networking Lounge: Recharge through Slow Networking | Other

Come enjoy a reflective and collaborative space while you recharge by sharing. We will have general questions for you about your experience so far and there will be new opportunities for “slow networking” to engage in while you chat and get to know people (old and new).

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Mar 31, 2022
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Scaling the Impact of the Affordable Learning Solutions: HBCU Leadership and Strategies for Faculty, Students, and Administrators | Workshop

Reducing higher education costs by providing no-low cost course materials has proven to be an important institutional strategy. We will review the leadership and strategies of HBCUs to deliver Affordable Learning Solutions programs that engage faculty, students, and campus staff in significant actions to adopt and adapt OER.

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Extended Abstract

For the past 6 years, the HBCU Affordable Learning Community has been building the organizational, programmatic, and technical foundation for their Affordable Learning Solutions program for all HBCUs.  Nine (9) HBCUs have been institutionalizing the Affordable Learning Solutions strategies, modelled after the programs develop by the California State University, MERLOT, and Skills Commons which are internationally recognized for  providing access to free and open educational resources to millions of faculty, staff, students, and the broader education and workforce communities. Another eight (8) have initiated some elements of an AL$ project on their campus.  The leaders of HBCU institutions such as Tennessee State University, Southern University, Bethune Cookman University, Central State University, Edward Waters University, Morehouse College, and others within the HBCU AL$ community, in partnership with MERLOT-SkillsCommons have designed an open porta (http://hbcuals.org) l that provides easy access to:

  • the largest aggregate collection of  free and open e-textbooks, open courseware, open access journals, open learning objects, and more
  • over 50 general education course with multiple free and open e-textbooks aligned with the course curriculum
  • free and open collections of virtual labs in STEM and workforce development curriculum
  • over 100 free and open teaching ePortfolios that showcase faculty’s adoption of OER across a broad range of disciplines
  • a free and open library of planning tools, guidelines, and professional development resources to support HBCUs developing and implementing their own AL$ programs
  • free and open methods for sharing their use, reuse, revision, remixing, redistribution, and retention of OER that they have adopted and authored

 

Tennessee State University (TSU) has successfully institutionalized the Affordable Learning Solutions (AL$) strategy and has been recognized as outstanding and exemplary by Berkeley project.   TSU have been successfully incubating AL$ projects at various HBCUs by leveraging the Hewlett grants to the California State University – MERLOT. Along with other vanguard HBCU institutions, we now have a community of nine (9) HBCUs that have implemented AL$ and has successfully enabled HBCU faculty to redesign their courses and adopt OER to reduce if not eliminate the cost of course materials for their students.   MERLOT-SkillsCommons closely collaborated with the HBCU leadership group to design and maintain the HBCU AL$ Community Portal that showcases the individually customized, institutional AL$ portals, and all the open educational services that all HBCUs can use.

Although a foundation of expertise and resources are available to the other HBCUs, the already challenging higher ed economic environment compounded with the COVID-19 pandemic placed almost unsurmountable barriers for other HBUCs to adopt and institutionalize AL$ on their own.  Yet strategies for reducing the cost of education through the adoption of OER (AL$) can be a critical strategy to help HBCUs survive the current economic crisis. Based on the five (5) years of participating and facilitating the HBCU AL$ Summits and programs with MERLOT, we have recognized many significant barriers for HBCUs being able to translate their good intentions into institutionalized practices.

  • HBCU administrators, faculty, librarians, academic technology directors, faculty development directors, and mid-level managers have extraordinary responsibilities on their campuses which can create overwhelming circumstances. Most HBCUs have enrollments under 5,000 students, which creates a very challenging business environment for HBCUs to survive.  A small number of employees have to perform a complex array of jobs and consequently, innovations and institutional changes are difficult to develop and implement.
  • Moving all courses online due to the pandemic has created an overwhelming demand for quality online curriculum.   However, the culturally contextualized online curriculum for the African American community of learners and faculty, which is a critical component of HBCUs institutional identify, is very difficult to discover and adopt.   The OER collections are still sparsely populated with culturally contextualized curriculum for the African American communities.  Consequently, HBCUs could lose their distinct educational identity. 

The presentation will review the HBCU AL$ Communities’ strategy for scaling AL$ program across more HBCUs and strengthening the capacities of existing members of the HBCU AL$ community.  The HBCU AL$ strategy is focusing on supporting departments developing their capacities for adopting OER (vs. just individuals),  facilitating campus leadership in advocating for OER adoptions, and expanding the collection of OER for the African American communities.

 

Mar 31, 2022
3:15pm - 5:15pm (Central)
AnnotatED: Making Reading Active, Visible and Social With Collaborative Annotation | Workshop

In collaboration with the Online Learning Consortium and AnnotatED, the community for annotation in education, Hypothesis is convening a free virtual workshop on social annotation at OLC Innovate 2022.  

To participate in this free virtual workshop, please register online.

Note: You do not need to be a registered attendee of OLC Innovate 2022 to participate in this workshop. Hypothesis will send registrants virtual connection information prior to the workshop.  Registered OLC Innovate attendees will, however, also be able to access the workshop through the workshop session link through the OLC Innovate 2022 conference platform.

 

 

 

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Extended Abstract

 

The workshop will start with a quick orientation to collaborative annotation for social reading: What is it, and how are people using it to enrich online, face-to-face, and hybrid learning?

Then we’ll shift to a hands-on activity to explore, discuss, and augment readings selected by our special guest educator, Dr. Jenae Cohn, Director of Academic Technology at California State University, Sacramento, focused on topics related to her OLC Innovate 2022 keynote: Imaginative, Strategic, Sustainable: A Call for an Online Learning Future Designed for Students’ Lived Experiences.

We’ll practice reading together to see firsthand how social annotation can build understanding, connections, and community. Our conversation will be anchored in text — literally — and spread out to engage other texts, ideas, and people beyond the workshop itself.

Selected readings

For our collaborative annotation before, during, and after the workshop, Dr. Cohn has selected an excerpt from her book, Skim, Dive, Surface: Teaching Digital Reading. Workshop participants will be able to read the excerpt from Dr. Cohn’s book and annotations already added to its margins, and join the conversation by creating a free Hypothesis account and reply to annotations or post their own.

Mar 31, 2022
4:00pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: OLC Innovate Virtual Conference Wrap-Up | Other

That's a wrap! As we rapidly approach the closing ceremonies for the virtual portion of #OLCInnovate 2022, OLC Live! host Brandon Poulliot provides a retrospective of the conference and a look forward to the upcoming in-person experience for those joining us in Dallas. We welcome you to join us and participate as we chat with guest(s).

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Extended Abstract

          

Mar 31, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
Rethinking Course Design for All Terms: Mastering the Calendar | Education Session

In this session, Lead Instructional Designers and Faculty showcase how they are using innovative Instructional Design models and creative solutions to tackle the challenges created when running online courses in shortened terms. 

 

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Extended Abstract

As higher education moves into the future, it is important to consider how changing economic and social trends shift student priorities in education. Degree-seekers and students aiming to add workforce value often need to complete courses in a variety of timeframes. As our institution helps to support students in their goals of achieving their degrees faster, the department has been tasked with designing courses that can run in both a traditional term and a short term. As the COVID 19 pandemic brought all students to the online modality, the team dedicated itself to finding new technologies and adapted 

pedagogies to maintain high levels of academic achievement across all terms that focuses on being student-centered when delivering dynamic online courses.

Throughout this process, we have learned that designing courses to meet learning objectives as opposed to focusing on seat time has proven to result in a higher quality student experience overall.  By using instructional design models to re-think our approach to our catalog of Master Courses, we started designing for a 7-Module course as opposed to a 15-Module course. This gives students the opportunity to earn their degrees faster without being overwhelmed and it gives the traditional college student the opportunity to take the same course at a slower pace. Using this process benefits both our students and our faculty.

In our new process, Using Blooms, Backward Design, and more—we approached the learning objectives of the course and design assessments that touch upon the levels of cognition needed to meet those objectives. Our new courses are highly interactive, engaging, remix OER and utilize the elements of Universal Design for Learning. It has also led to strong partnerships between SMEs and Instructional Designers. This presentation will share how we began transforming our big, bulky courses into manageable learning experiences that give students a differentiated approach to achieving their learning goals.

Conference attendees will have opportunities to share their own questions and concerns in delivering courses in shorter terms, and try their hand at re-evaluating a module to meet learning objectives, academic standards, and student engagement. By considering a topic and all of the possible areas of content that relate to that topic, participants will have the opportunity to share with others and receive feedback on how they might approach determining which content specifically addresses the learning needs of mastering that objective associated with the topic at hand.

The Lead Instructional Designers and Faculty will present real-life examples of re-thinking modules and with input from our talented faculty, we will share our experiences with conference attendees, providing a roadmap for success to meet the changing needs of students when designing for success. 

Mar 31, 2022
4:30pm - 5:15pm (Central)
The Impact of Digital Accessibility on Teaching and Learning: Why Does It Matter That You Consider Alt Text and other Tools for Inclusivity? | Education Session

This Education session will present the audience with knowledge about the importance of Digital Accessibility, the legislation concerning accessible computer output, and a demonstration of the experiences of computer users with disabilities. Computer strategies for accessibility will be described and the audience will have a takeaway to practice on their own devices.

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Extended Abstract

Why does it matter if computer output contains accessible content? More importantly, why does it matter if computer output does NOT contain accessible content?   This 45-minute "classic presentation" Education session will demonstrate why it matters when computer output is created with accessibility in mind. In addition, the audience will gain knowledge about the experiences of computer users with disabilities, the legislation regarding accessible computing, and what to do about making computer content accessible.

To the normally seeing, hearing, or physically functioning computer user, computer content is fairly accessible; that is, content that is to be read by sight is mere text or visually-interpreted images that the reader with no visual disability can easily understand. Content that contains audio information, such as a video, is easily interpreted by the listener with no hearing disability. A computer user who can easily manipulate a mouse around a computer screen will not think twice about being able to scan down a given webpage to locate something. But consider the computer user whose visual abilities interfere with a seamless understanding of a computer document, or the user with a hearing disability that prevents easy listening to content, or a user with a physical disability that prevents use of the mouse. This is where accessible computing becomes important:  there are computer tools and strategies that eliminate those obstacles to understanding and interpreting the content in a computer document, whether the document is a word-processing document or a webpage.

In the United States, the impetus for making computer output accessible is the legislation that followed the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990. The ADA created protections against discrimination for individuals with disabilities, such as the requirement that wheelchair-accessible entrances be provided in buildings.  With the development of computers came legislation to prevent similar discrimination in digital content, as developers provided tools for making computer output accessible. Before this legislation, individuals with disabilities were not able to realize the full benefits of computers. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 provided guidelines for the creation of computer output. For computer users with visual disabilities, there is the screen reader, a program that works with a computer to interpret text content so the blind user, for instance, can listen to the content of the document that otherwise could not be seen. Together with the screen reader, tools such as alternative text ("alt text") can interpret otherwise visual content of a computer document, so that the blind user will have the description of an image read out. Similarly, for the computer user with hearing disabilities, aural content of a computer document, whether a word-processing document with audio files, or a web page with a video in it, must be described in a form that the user can access. A sound file should be accompanied with a transcript; a video should have a transcript and/or closed captions. In the case of a user who cannot use a mouse, the content should be structured such that assistive technology can interpret the content as the user desires. So, for instance, when links are included in a document, each link should be "meaningful"; that is, rather than the common term "click here" to send the user to the target link, a given link should be descriptive of the target. Assistive technology such as a screen reader interprets meaningful links in a way that the user can quickly scan through a document, choosing which links to follow, instead of being left wondering where the "click here" link would go.  The main guideline to creating accessible computer content is to provide "alternative" means of delivering the content.

With over 61 million individuals with disabilities in the United States alone, ensuring accessible computer output is not only the equitable and right thing to do, but considering the economic aspect of computer use, including all individuals in the benefits of computing just makes sense. This presentation will demonstrate several basic methods and guidelines for the everyday computer user to implement in order to "keep accessibility in mind" (https://webaim.org/). These guidelines include: accessible headings, alt text, meaningful links, accessible tables, and best practices for applications such as PowerPoint. The audience will be invited to practice the methods on their own devices, and will be surveyed before and after the demonstration with a live polling app to get an idea of what they may have learned.

Mar 31, 2022
5:30pm - 6:15pm (Central)
Where in the world are we? (An OLC Game Night) | Evening Event

For this game night, we're bringing back GeoGuessr, a maps and location-based virtual guessing game. We'll break up into teams and use our collective knowledge to guess as many correct locations as we can while racing against the clock. The team with the highest number of correct guesses will be awarded prizes. The OLC is known for fun, low-stakes, and inviting evening events. Whether they are intense and gameful or entertaining and reflective, they are designed to make space for one of the greatest things about the OLC: our community. Mark your calendars now and plan to end your day engaging in volunteer-led shenanigans through the OLC Innovate evening events!

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Extended Abstract

          

Apr 1, 2022
9:00am - 9:45am (Central)
Designing for Change: An IELOL Design Sprint Challenge | Featured Session

Staples of the Online Learning Consortium’s professional development offerings, IELOL-USA and IELOL Global, provide our community unique opportunities to grow in their leadership skills and experience. Each feature a distinctly different design challenge, situating leaders in action and addressing real-world problems through their solutions. In this session, we invite participants to join us for mini versions of these design challenges through the OLC IELOL Design Sprints! Come join us in collaboratively contributing to change-oriented assets / resources. Learn more about IELOL-USA and IELOL-Global along the way. And most importantly, develop some leadership skills within the span of this featured session.

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Extended Abstract

You have probably been to some sort of leadership training in the past. Perhaps you’ve even participated in a sustained program that took place over multiple months. Could you tell the story of that program or help others understand what the experience was like in 15-20 minutes? We’ve challenged ourselves to do exactly that. Staples of the Online Learning Consortium’s professional development offerings, IELOL USA and IELOL Global, provide our community unique opportunities to grow in their leadership skills and experience. Each feature a distinctly different design challenge, situating leaders in action and addressing real-world problems through their solutions. 

In this session, we invite participants to join us for mini versions of these design challenges through the OLC IELOL Design Sprints! Design sprints are short, time-constrained activities that use design thinking to generate solutions to complex challenges. Come join us in collaboratively contributing to change-oriented assets / resources. Learn more about IELOL USA and IELOL Global along the way. And most importantly, develop some leadership skills within the span of this featured session.

About the Institute for Emerging Leadership in Online Learning (USA & Global) Programs:

IELOL USA is a unique leadership development program that was originally launched in 2009 as a way to support the professional growth and preparation of the next cadre of digital learning leaders. IELOL participants collaborate with colleagues from around the globe to explore and understand both the opportunities and barriers to advancing local and global digital learning. In its 13th year, the IELOL USA program now has over 500 graduates who have joined a network of leaders in digital and online education. Focused on improving and advancing the impact of digital learning in all aspects and formats of education, IELOL USA alumni form personal and professional bonds that extend beyond the IELOL USA experience.    

Inspired by the collective need for the field of online, blended and digital learning to address ubiquitous issues of access to education more broadly, OLC gathered the first cohort of IELOL Global in 2020. This new offering focused on the transformative power of global collaborations in enacting change work in digital learning at the local and global levels. Now in its third year, IELOL Global is designed to build global communities of practice around transformative and sustainable digital transformation that collect and amplify international perspectives. Through the program, participants engage with exemplars of impactful cross-institutional/regional collaboration through global coalitions by iterating with and learning from partners from around the world. They also contribute to the curation and dissemination of participant-created artifacts, use cases, and other resources that contribute to connected and aligned global change work. Its ultimate goal is to support the growth of a community of leaders dedicated to collaborative global change efforts.

Sponsored by

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Apr 1, 2022
9:45am - 10:15am (Central)
Virtual Speed Networking Lounge: Filling Your Cup Through Letters of Gratitude | Other

As we close out the virtual portion of OLC Innovate 2022, we'll gather during this Speed Networking Lounge session to amplify our colleagues (new and old) and craft letters of gratitude to thank them for their contributions to your conference experience and lift them up.

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

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Apr 1, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Openness to Otherness: Creating Transformative Online Communities | Education Session

Based on the 2020 title Creating Transformative Online Communities in Higher Education, this interactive conversation will a) describe the common features of transformative learning experiences; b) explain the importance of course design in supporting transformative learning; and c) review ways to apply transformative principles and practices to instructional design processes.

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Extended Abstract

Openness to otherness.

If ever society needed something, it would seem this might be it.

Today, division and outrage seem to be the norm. Side is pitted against side. Person against person. Relationships fall apart as communication breaks down.

The question we should be asking in higher education is--what role can we play in becoming an agent of positive change in a society of discontent.

Institutes of higher education are uniquely positioned to provide significant value by positively affecting society through the learners with whom they engage. Particularly against the backdrop of post-secondary educational competition from competency-based credentialing and micro-training for technical skills, traditional colleges and universities have the opportunity to develop learners in ways that narrowly-focused training programs simply cannot. 

Historically, institutes of higher education stood on the promise of access to otherwise limited supplies of necessary information. However, the internet has replaced colleges and universities as the primary infrastructure for knowledge (Tapscott & Williams, 2008). Adapting to these changes, colleges and universities have more recently prided themselves on developing their learners into critical thinkers (Paul et al., 1997). However, there is little evidence that they have been even remotely successful at this (Schlueter, 2016).

Beyond mere access to information and failed efforts at developing critical thinkers, colleges and universities have the capacity if not to say responsibility to engage learners with and through transformative experiences. 

Transformative learning theory provides a lens through which to understand what it means to learn, to grow, to develop . . . to become human.

In this way, the goal of transformation is not to make leaners into anything in particular. So, the aim of institutes of  higher education is not to consider transformative learning as a path to inculcating learners into some preferred way of thinking and being. It is not about shaping learners to become more conservative or more progressive; to train learners to think a specific way about some pressing issue; or to reach full agreement on all topics of contention. Rather, the goal of colleges and universities who dare to accept the challenge of creating environments for transformation for their learners is simply to walk alongside learners as they authentically engage in the often messy and always incomplete act of human becoming.

Overall, if transformative learning theory wants learners to become anything in particular, it is simply that they become increasingly open and engaged citizens in a society of increasing intolerance and division. Openness to otherness, that is the goal.

While not the primary purpose of institutes of higher education, this goal seems worthy of the charge of traditional colleges and universities and the achievement of this goal is certainly feasible within this context.

The main challenge, however, is that creating transformative experiences is difficult. Transformation is unnatural. Transformation is unpredictable. Therefore, it is not possible to simply apply a few transformative practices in a few places in a curriculum and assume transformation will result.

Instead, what is needed is a coherent vision of and plan for implementing transformative principles and practices throughout an institution, throughout programs, and throughout courses.

Based on the 2020 title Creating Transformative Online Communities in Higher Education, this interactive conversation will a) describe the common features of transformative learning experiences; b) explain the importance of course design in supporting transformative learning; c) review ways to apply transformative principles and practices to instructional design processes.

Apr 1, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Working Hard for a Living: Efficient and Effective Adjunct Faculty Hiring Practices | Education Session

Hiring adjunct faculty often involves merely verifying credentials and teaching experience, and a quick interview. Knowing the needs of the course and institution, and folding faculty classroom expectations into the interview can prove valuable. Learn how a fully online university approaches hiring from a student success and institutional expectation perspective. 

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Extended Abstract

For an institution that hires faculty to facilitate and instruct in a virtual classroom of mainly first generation, first time, post-traditional students, the hiring process must be consistent and efficient. Key to success in the General Education department hiring process is identifying candidates who can enter the fully online classroom knowledgeable about online facilitation and instruction, how to be a work from home employee, along with an understanding of how to approach the institution’s student population. In addition, the interview process is approached as an opportunity for both the interview team and the candidates to determine if the position is a good ‘fit’ for all.

 

From May 2019 through September 2021, the General Education department hired 55 adjunct faculty to teach in a variety of courses, at times bringing on 8-9 faculty during one hiring round. Hiring at this rate takes a high level of organization and planning, a group of interviewers who are experienced at overseeing adjunct faculty classroom performance, along with enough candidates to fill our needs. The attrition rate of newly hired faculty during this period was about 15%, with the majority of new faculty departing during orientation or within their first session of teaching. Reasons for separation ranged from personal challenges, acceptance of full time positions, and pay. Both the rate of hiring and new faculty attrition informed our approach to hiring new faculty, from working with talent acquisition on vetting application materials to the interview questions, as well as hiring decisions.

 

Most often, hiring of online adjunct faculty involves one or more of the following: verification of educational qualifications (highest degree earned), confirmation of online teaching experience (reference checks), and/or an in-person, telephone, or video interview (Magda et al., 2015). Yet the General Education department goes beyond. Similar to what Laura Lohman (2020) recommends in her research on strategic hiring, we begin the hiring process with a review of application materials. This includes a check of credentials and transcripts, moving to what Lohman refers to as a work sample test. As the discussion forum is the cornerstone of our online courses, all candidates are required to provide a written response to a student discussion post prior to the interview. Referencing this discussion response during the interview is a show of respect by ensuring the candidate knows their preparation is part of the interview and selection process.

 

At our institution, hiring is the responsibility of the individual school or department, with assistance provided for job posting and the initial vetting of candidate applications. Interview questions were initially developed to focus on trying to understand if the candidate could grasp our institutional model and wondering if they could be successful following our faculty classroom performance expectations. Questions were multi-layered, clunky, and often needed an explanation; and candidates tended to repeat themselves.

 

In the fifth review of interview questions, we took the faculty classroom approach into account – a student-centered Tenets model focused on what the institution considers the most important elements of faculty engagement in the classroom. This approach focuses on the following five tenets: Presence, Facilitation of Learning, Connection with Students, Instructional Agility, and Innovation. The new questions were framed around the tenets, seeking to understand how candidates facilitate and instruct, adjust their instructional practices, and create a unique classroom experience; while allowing candidates an opportunity to showcase who they are as instructors, illustrate how they support students, and provide examples of problem-solving and critical thinking. In an effort to answer the commonly asked questions up front, we began to outline the components of the classroom and the content topics. What we have experienced with this new set of questions and approach is a more focused interview, allowing plenty of opportunity for shared examples and explanations related to classroom approach, and clarity around expectations and the position.

 

The process does not stop with hiring. Once a candidate joins the General Education department, plans are put into action for new faculty orientation, peer mentoring, and supervisor coaching – all with a focus on prepping the new faculty member for a new classroom experience and ultimately to consistent performance and improvement in the classroom and with students.

 

 The following questions will drive the focus of this session:

  1. Do your hiring practices yield adjunct faculty that meet the needs of the classroom and the institution?
  2. How often do you review and adjust your interview process?
  3. What influences adjustments to your interview process?

Activities:

  1. Participants will share, via polling, the screening techniques they utilize for hiring online adjunct faculty.
  2. Participants will share, via Google Docs, the interview question/s they have found are most impactful and provide the most information from candidates.

Outcomes:

  1. Participants will examine how a student-centered approach to classroom facilitation and instruction was incorporated into a set of interview questions.
  2. Participants will compare several iterations of interview questions to determine if the approach taken may work for their department or school.
  3. Participants will analyze an adjunct faculty hiring process from job posting to new faculty orientation, with a specific focus on the interview process itself.

Lohman, L. (2020). Strategic hiring: Using job analysis to effectively select online faculty. Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration, 23(3).

Magda, A. J., Poulin, R., & Clinefelter, D. L. (2015). Recruiting, orienting, & supporting online adjunct faculty: A survey of practices. The Learning House, Inc.

Apr 1, 2022
10:15am - 11:00am (Central)
Revealing Canvas Features That Can Maximize Student Engagement | Education Session

In this session, participants will discover the lesser-known features of Canvas that, if utilized effectively, can increase student engagement in online, hybrid, or flipped classes. Attendees can expect to learn the “nuts and bolts” of each feature and its application in real-life examples.

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Extended Abstract

With the rapid changes to educational delivery required during the global pandemic, educators have struggled to find the balance between increasing technical skills or pursuing pedagogical strategies to increase student engagement and satisfaction. However, with some of the built-in features of the Canvas Learning Management System (LMS), it’s possible for online instructors to improve student participation, motivation, and progression while saving time and effort. 

In this session, attendees will learn how to encourage student collaboration by allowing student edits in Canvas Pages; use the Mastery Paths feature to differentiate instruction and create individualized learning materials in Canvas; utilize best practices to set up Peer Review for student annotations and feedback; and create collaborative and cooperative learning environments with Group Discussions in Canvas. This session is recommended for all Canvas curriculum designers, from PK-12 teachers to university faculty, interested in exploring real-world applications of student engagement strategies.

Apr 1, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Building the Net: Challenges to Online Course Template Design | Education Session

An effective course template is pedagogically sound, accessible, and abides within the instructional design framework. However, online course template design can be confusing and frustrating. This session will discuss the process, challenges, and considerations necessary for creating effective online course templates.

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Extended Abstract

Designing and building online course templates is an incredibly intricate process that requires knowledge from several disciplines. Creating an online course template is much like constructing a net for a trapeze artist. The net itself consists of many interlocking threads that each provide their strength to the net. In template design, the threads consist of many factors such as accessibility, pedagogy, instructional design, and graphic design. These threads form the foundation from which the instructor designs and builds their instructional content. The intent is for the student, as the trapeze artist, to fly high above the net.

Uniformity is a crucial element in the template design process. However, uniformity does force the designer to walk a fine line between template design and instructor freedom. Templates must provide space for the instructor's individuality and personality to shine through. On the one hand, each course should be unique while also providing a clear and consistent means of organization and structure. As a result, it was necessary to design templates by department or college since each has its ideas and preferences for course design. 

Having a clear and straightforward process for online course template design is crucial. The process begins with an in-depth discussion with the department or college requesting the template. After which, the team creates several rough drafts, each having a unique design. These designs are then presented to the department or college for approval and additional requests. Finally, the team builds the final template. They check it for accessibility and ensure it follows the university course standards before presenting it to the department or college.

Should you start designing online course templates? How do you get started with online course template design? Who needs to be involved in the process? What types of challenges should you expect along the way? What is the process of designing and building an online course template? All of these questions will be answered in this education session. If you're interested in this process, we look forward to discussing this topic with you.

Level of Participation:

This session will consist of a lecture-based presentation while also including interactive gamified elements. Upon completion of the lecture presentation, the presenters will provide time for questions and answers. 

Session Goals:

Individuals attending this education session will be able to identify the various elements of effective online course template design. They will also be able to list the common challenges associated with online course template design. Finally, individuals attending this education session will be able to articulate the online course template design process.

Apr 1, 2022
11:30am - 12:15pm (Central)
Rethinking How to Actively Engage Students in Online Chat Spaces | Education Session

We will discuss how we expanded the use of online discussion forums beyond the stereotypical “post your thoughts and comment on your classmate’s posts.”  Additionally, we will discuss the perceived effectiveness of our activities as expressed by two different student populations.

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Extended Abstract

Have you ever asked yourself how students can be better engaged with course content in an online chat discussion?  And how do you establish clear usable grading criteria to measure and reward participation?  Many of us encountered these questions the hard way in our virtual pandemic classrooms when we no longer had access to our students in a traditional class setting. Discussion boards remain a primary way of engaging students, with the stereotypical instructions sounding similar to “write your thoughts on X and reply to Y number of your peers’ posts.”  While effective in some situations, this format does not work well for all subjects. Another challenge is providing effective feedback to students in online courses (Bonnel 2008). In a face-to-face setting, students can readily interact with the instructor during class time to receive feedback. However, in an asynchronous online course, such options are limited or time-consuming (Baran and Correia 2010). Additionally, there is a lack of support in the literature for developing robust online discussions for certain areas such as mathematics (Bliss and Lawrence 2009). In our experience, it is not easy to have online conversations/arguments in mathematics courses, especially at the introductory level, due to a lack of students’ motivation and students’ confidence with the material.  While our background is in math, none of these challenges are strictly inherent to mathematics courses. If you have experienced a similar struggle in designing online dialogues in the courses you teach, then you might appreciate how challenging it is to successfully and meaningfully engage students online. 

As mathematics instructors, we struggled with the aforementioned challenges and, in response, developed a set of online activities that can be implemented in online discussion boards. We used an online discussion platform embedded in our institution's learning management system where students engaged anonymously with their peers. To encourage students’ participation and assist with motivation, we designated a portion of the final course grade for completing online tasks that we named star point activities.  These included a variety of options for students to choose from, including weekly mind maps, exam reviews, and a few others. After completing an activity students would be awarded a certain number of star points based on a grading rubric.  Students were expected to reach a stated threshold of star points at various points in the semester.

As previously mentioned, each star point activity had an associated grading rubric to award star points.  The goal of each rubric was not to break down the assignment into multiple partial credit opportunities. Instead, they focused on providing a qualitative assessment of the student’s work and allowed students to submit corrections to earn back full points based on instructor comments. Depending on the activity, the rubric was geared towards student effort or the correctness of a student’s response. This grading strategy can be easily adopted in any course. Even the activities can be implemented across most subjects. In the presentation, we will be sharing details about these activities and the rubric.

A study investigating students’ perceptions of the star points activities was conducted in precalculus and differential equations courses. We analyzed five key areas related to student perception of the star point activities: (a) how comfortable they were doing the activities in the online chat forum (b) how helpful they found the activities (c) whether they thought the rubric/grading criterion was fair, (d) which activities were the most preferred, and (e) their thoughts about the workload of the activities. Responses in each of these areas will be discussed. Overall, the activities appeared to be more appreciated in the differential equations course than the precalculus course for a variety of reasons.

Audience Participation:

This presentation will include an opportunity for audience interaction with a sample star point grading rubric.  We will divide participants into groups to grade provided sample mind maps on a fun food classification framework called “The Cube Rule.” The goal of this activity is for instructors to see firsthand how simple grading star point activities can be while also offering a rich experience to students. We will end the presentation with a takeaway group discussion where participants can brainstorm how to adapt star points activities to their own courses.

Session Goals:

At the end of the session, participants will be inspired with new engagement ideas to implement in their online courses, whatever their subject area. In addition, the results of our study will allow participants to make an informed decision about which activities they may want to try in their own classrooms. Participants will also be provided details about a rubric that can be easily used in their courses.

References:

  • Baran, Evrim, and Ana-Paula Correia. Student‐led facilitation strategies in online discussions. Distance Education, vol. 30, no. 3, 2009, pp. 339-361.

  • Bliss, Catherine, and Betty Lawrence. From posts to patterns: a metric to characterize discussion board activities in online courses. Online Learning, 2009. Online Learning Consortium, https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/article/view/1665.

  • Bonnel, W. Improving feedback to students in online courses. Nursing Education Perspective, vol. 29, 2008, pp. 290-294.

Apr 1, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Conversations from the Field: Implementing Positive Strategies for Success! | Education Session

This session will focus on no cost and simple to implement positive communication strategies for faculty and administrators.  Education should be a model for positive communication and inspiration.  Join us for Conversations from the Field.

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Extended Abstract

Maya Angelou said, “People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”  We want students to feel good about their classroom experience, and faculty should feel good about their part in that process.  From an administrative perspective, we want faculty to feel good in their role and have the tools they need to foster student success.

Today, students and faculty alike face a myriad of challenges.  Some challenges are timeless, such as balancing academic, professional, and personal priorities.  While other challenges are relatively new, balancing stress and priorities during a pandemic, with increased attention to social injustice and political unrest.  The classroom is one place individuals can find common ground.  Within the classroom, there are shared goals of learning specific objectives and pursuing one’s academic ambitions.  Students and faculty alike want success.  With everything going on in the world, the classroom can be one place to de-stress, go back to basics, and feel good about those common purposes.

As educators, we often hear the phrase “meet students where they are”, but what does that really mean?  How do you “meet students where they are” with the diverse needs to learners?  Can we also “meet faculty where they are”?  The relationship between administration and faculty is a unique one, and one that needs to be fostered.  A positive relationship between administration and faculty can often lead to further success in the classroom.  Ultimately, these collaborations promote student success.

Fundamental teaching practices can transcend course discipline and delivery structure.  There are best practices for meeting our students and faculty needs.  Many of these are simple to apply and can be implemented immediately regardless of your learning management system.  Positive strategies for students and faculty include: resetting our default, utilizing a growth mindset, developing a trusting environment, demonstrating empathy, and being timely in communications.

Level of Participation:

This session will start with two polls which will serve to determine a baseline for attendees’ current practices.  Throughout the session, best practices for meeting our students and faculty where they are will be presented.  Attendees will then be asked to select two strategies to implement, and individuals will be encouraged to tweet their strategies to #OLCInnovate2022 #mytwothings.  Additionally, those in attendance will be encouraged to share their own positive experiences throughout the session and comment to #OLCInnovate2022 #peoplefirst.

Session Goals:

The goal of this session is relatively simple – to offer those in attendance best practices for meeting our students and faculty needs.  Administrative practices along with facilitation strategies will be outlined which can be implemented almost immediately. 

Apr 1, 2022
12:45pm - 1:30pm (Central)
Individuals, not Groups: Instructional Design as a Key Factor of Success in Personalized Learning | Innovation Studio Design Thinking Challenge

Have you thought of implementing personalized learning, but you do not know where to begin? Or have you already put it into action and want to keep improving student experience?  Join us and explore a complete instructional design model for personalized learning that benefits students, professors, and your institution. 

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Extended Abstract

Students are pressing for a teaching method that is flexible, personalized, and focused on today’s needs. They seek for a teaching method that adapts to their needs as individuals, they do not want a one-size-fits-all approach, they want to be differentiated among the rest of their group. Because of this, the concept of personalized learning has spread fast thanks, on the one hand, to technological advances that have enabled the use of digital content in education, and on the other hand, to institutions that have been willing to move away from traditional teaching. This has let students develop the competencies required for today’s world, while at the same time our institution has become more efficient in the use of resources while assuring education with high quality standards.     

Through this presentation, we would like to share a comprehensive didactic model for personalized learning developed for hybrid courses with weekly live class sessions via a videoconference tool. The model includes in-class and out-of-class activities which require of both technological elements and human expertise. This model is based on five pillars:

(1) Designing an initial diagnosis to determine the knowledge level of each student on the topic of the course. This diagnosis is applied as a test at the beginning of the term.  

(2) Creating technology-enabled content focused on covering the lowest levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy aimed at getting acquainted with each topic. With this, students can individually build their learning route before each class session based on their level of understanding of each topic. These contents are comprised of a variety of digital resources seeking to tailor them to the different learning styles and allowing students to choose which resource best fits their needs. These resources are available at any time and students can access them as many times as needed. For each topic, students can check their level of understanding through a quiz. This quiz provides immediate feedback and is available through the LMS being used. If a student considers that they already master the topic, they can go straight to the quiz without reviewing the content provided.    

(3) Interpreting the learning analytics before each live class session. Prior to each class, professors download the learning analytics to see the individual progress of each student, which will enable them to provide a timely and personalized guidance for those students who need it. Professor will also be able to adjust their class program for each session according to the general level of comprehension of the group.

(4) Designing class content following a flipped classroom approach and using active learning strategies, where students need to go over certain contents before class. Class activities are designed based on the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Professors can adapt class sessions based on the different scenarios provided; each scenario follows a different didactic sequence and activities that professors can use based on the results of the learning analytics of the group and of individual students.

(5) Attending weekly collegiate groupwork between professors and the course coordinator that allows for a space to share best practices in teaching and solving problems, if needed.

In our experience, this model has proven to be useful when implementing personalized learning, which in turn favors an effective development of competencies by considering an active participation of students and tailoring the learning process to their individual needs. Multiple benefits arise from this model:

  • Students benefit from the flexibility and portability of their learning. That is, they can decide when, where, and how to study thanks to the accessibility of all the learning content through the course’s LMS and to the different formats available to review each topic as many times as needed. Students become responsible of their learning process, and they personalize it based on their knowledge level, learning habits, and learning styles.     
  • Professors benefit by decreasing the variance on the level of comprehension of the group, improving academic results, and having tools to take pre-emptive and personalized action in a much more effective way on topics that have not been fully understood. They also benefit from being able to create personalized class dynamics, dedicating class time to what will bring the most value to the group. With this model, professors can more easily become guides for students by orienting and supporting them in a much more specific way than with a traditional learning model. Also, the collegiate work allows professors to solve problems in a faster and more innovative way, as well as having a better teaching experience by learning from what their peers are doing.    
  • Institutions benefit by enabling the adaptability of different curricular structures, creating content that can be reused for different groups or courses, and providing a higher effectiveness in the learning process of students.

Join us and explore a complete instructional design model for personalized learning that benefits students, professors, and your institution.

Level of Participation:

The session begins with an introductory activity to point out the importance of implementing a personalized learning model. We will then explain the comprehensive didactic model, which will be followed by a practical demonstration of the experience of students and professors. The session will end with the results and findings, useful tips, and a reflection on the potential reach of this strategy in the future of education.

 Session Goals:

Participants will learn that a successful implementation of a personalized learning strategy needs to take into account elements during class session, but also out-of-class activities;  that a technological tool on its own, no matter how exhaustive it is, is not enough to guarantee success if the expertise of the human factor is not taken into account and is not part of the initiative; to end, they will obtain useful tips and recommendations. 

Apr 1, 2022
1:45pm - 2:30pm (Central)
Design Instead of Dichotomies: Research-Anchored Practices for Online Learning and Educational Ecosystems

Brief Abstract:

While some have argued that the pandemic has proven that online learning is an abysmal failure, this is inconsistent with decades of online learning research and practice and confuses emergency measures with carefully-designed online instruction and program planning. I contend this is no time for short-sighted dichotomies such as “online versus face-to-face” but instead is a time to define institutional visions and missions around quality online and resilient learning ecosystems. Research on online instruction and institutional planning provide specific principles and actions that can be used to architect learning ecosystems that are both more effective and more resilient. 

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Apr 1, 2022
2:30pm - 3:15pm (Central)
OLC Innovate 2022 Closing Celebration | Other

Join the OLC in closing out the virtual portion of the conference with remarks, reflection, stories, and final community building and fun. The session will start by recognizing all the amazing volunteers and staff that made this conference possible. You'll learn how to get involved, and importantly, how to stay connected following the close of the virtual program. The session will close with our famed "After Party" where there will be music, fun games, virtual celebrations, and organically unpredictable Zoom antics...what's not to love? The OLC Innovate 2022 Closing Celebration will be an experience you don't want to miss, and we hope to see you there!

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Extended Abstract

     

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Leveraging Gamification and PowerPoint to Design an Active and Authentic Online Course | Discovery Session Asynchronous

This presentation reveals my experience as an instructor, in helping a non-economics major student, become excited with the prospect of being an economic consultant. This was achieved by leveraging principles of gamification, active learning and authentic learning strategies elements, within the design and delivery of an online course.

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Extended Abstract

Despite education is about learning, if the interest and attention of students are not captured, then student engagement and active participation becomes severely compromised. Additionally, in a world where online education has to compete with alternative applications and programs each time a student goes on their computer-based device, the challenge to keep them consistently motivated in an online class is a genuine concern. This presentation provides a reflective insight into the strategies that were utilized by the presenter to counteract the challenges that they traditionally faced as a lecturer delivering an online course which required a lot of reading, and with little available video resources in existence. Previous students despite having positive performances in the course in previous years, have indicated their disdain for the high proportion of reading resources for the course. Consequently, the presenter challenged themself to leverage select principles of gamification, active learning and authentic learning strategies to have a positive impact on the learning process.

This presentation ultimately reveals the process whereby the presenter redesigned their traditional online course, into a gamified course utilizing PowerPoint. PowerPoint is mainly adopted by instructors in the classroom for presentation styled activities, but it has the capacity to do much more. Therefore, participating in this presentation will give faculty the opportunity to reflect on their own practice and provide ideas on how to utilize a presentation tool, such as PowerPoint, to design an online gamified, active learning and authentically aligned course.

Throughout the discourse the presenter would give the opportunity to the audience to respond to poll-questions to get an idea of individuals’ own experience with gamification, in addition to their own use cases of PowerPoint. Individuals that comprise the audience for this presentation will get an opportunity to:

  • Share in the presenter’s reflection of their praxis
  • Reflect on how they too can apply the strategies highlighted by the presenter, in their own courses as instructors.
  • Gain new insights on how PowerPoint can be used as a low-level graphic-creation tool
  • Comprehend how to use interactive features in PowerPoint to engage students asynchronously
  • Understand the impact the instructional strategy adopted by the presenter, had on the students that participated in the class.

Ultimately, the unstructured qualitative feedback received by presenter reveals that there is opportunity to engage in more structured research to measure the impact of gamified learning principles and authentic strategies in economics courses that require a high-proportion of reading by students.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Nursing Clinical Experiences Reboot: Incorporating Simulation | Discovery Session Asynchronous

With the onset of COVID-19, nursing programs witnessed student clinical opportunities disappear as institutions worked to maintain client and staff safety. 

To meet clinical experience requirements, nursing leaders flexed their creative muscles to offer these experiences with out-of-the-box thinking.

Discover how one university met this challenge.

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Extended Abstract

Session Theme:

COVID impacted health sciences programs’ clinical experience offerings. With healthcare institutions removing these opportunities, program leaders explored alternative options that allowed for simulated experiences. Based upon the recommendations and approval of its state board of nursing and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing, one educational institution met the challenge by supplanting in person clinical experiences with simulations.

In 2020 across the United States, 80,000+ students were turned away from nursing education due to inadequate numbers of faculty, very limited clinical sites, funding issues, cost of preceptors and classroom space (Wolters Kluwer and National League for Nursing, 2021).  Due to the shortage of clinical sites, many educational institutions were forced to consider other options for clinical experience. 

Another confounding factor is the location of the educational institution in a rural area with limited community health clinical settings, which necessitated finding alternatives for clinical experiences.  Using simulation alternatives allowed clinical experiences to occur during COVID while keeping the nursing staff, the clients, and the students safe.

Research supports that clinical simulation develops clinical reasoning and clinical judgement.  One author even suggested that one hour of simulation was equal to two hours of actual clinical time (Jefferies, 2015; Haerling & Prion, 2021).  Simulation is considered to be much more effective for student learning than actual clinical hours in a clinical setting.  Prior to COVID, up to 50% of the clinical hours required for a course could be completed using simulation per professional nursing organization guidelines.

With research backing, program faculty were confident in investigating simulation alternatives. During COVID community agencies did not allow students to have contact with their staff or their clients. This was a common occurrence across most states and therefore 100% of the clinical hours were able to be completed using simulations per professional nursing organizations. 

As writers of this abstract were developing simulation alternatives to community health clinical experiences, one advantage that emerged was the fact that all students would have opportunities for the same clinical experiences.  In addition, the number and variety of community health clinical experiences available to students increased by using simulations rather than if the students had rotated through a number of in person clinical opportunities.

Another advantage of using simulation is having the capability of crafting common experiences for all students where the real-life opportunities may not be realistic within an actual clinical setting. Simulation has been successfully used with scenarios of developing cultural competence (Weideman, Y. L., et. al., 2016) and care of people of various gender identity and sexual orientation (Luctkar-Flude, M., et. al., 2020). This is an example of where a common clinical experience was available to students through simulation. In a real-life clinical situation, not all students would have this opportunity.

COVID required out of the box thinking by health sciences programs to meet students’ clinical requirements. OLC’s community at large would benefit from learning how programs adapted during the pandemic and the impact of long-term revisions moving forward. For any institution that offers simulation experiences, regardless of the content, this session would provide process blueprints and questions to ponder.

Participant Interaction:

Throughout the session participants will be polled and respond to reflective questions, comparing their experiences in adjusting the clinical experience during COVID. Poll responses will also allow presenters to identify common themes and challenges across the participants, allowing for real time discussion.

While discussion occurs, a resource will be developed in real time based upon the identified challenges proposed by participants.

Session Goals:

Session participants will be able to:

  • Describe the strategies used to adjust simulation requirements for nursing students’ clinical experiences during COVID.

  • Compare the intent of simulation experiences pre COVID and beyond.

  • Assess their institution’s program clinical requirements and simulation possibilities for health sciences students.

References

Haerling (Adamson), K & Prion, S. (2021).  Questions regarding substitution of simulation for clinical.  Clinical Simulations in Nursing, 50, 79-80.  file:///D:/OLC%20Abstract/Questions%20REgarding%20Substitution%20of%20Simulation%20for%20Clinical.pdf

Jefferies, P. R. (2015).  Signs of Maturity . . . Simulations Are Growing and Getting More Attention [Editorial].  Nursing Education Perspectives 36(6).  file:///D:/OLC%20Abstract/Signs%20of%20Maturity.%20.%20.%20Simulations%20are%20Growing%20and%20Getting%20More%20Attention.pdf

Luctkar-Flude, M., Tyerman, J., Zeigler, E., Carroll, B., Shortall, C., Chumbley, L., & Tregunno, D.  (2020). Developing a sexual orientation and gender identity nursing education toolkit. Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing. 51(9). 412 – 419. doi:10.3928/00220124-20200812-06

Weideman, Y. L., Young, L., Lockhart, J. S., Grund, F. J., Fridline, M. M., & Panas, M. (2016).  Strengthening cultural competence in prenatal care with a virtual community: Building capacity through collaboration. Journal of Professional Nursing, 32(5S), S48 – S53. http://doc.org/10.1016/j.profnurs.2016. 03.004.

Wolters Kluwer and National League of Nursing. (2021).  Forecast for the Future: Technology Trends in Nursing Education. ///D:/OLC%20Abstract/report-dean-survey%20technology.pdf

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Pivoting from Emergency Remote Instruction to High-Quality Online Instruction | Discovery Session Asynchronous

The Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine shifted to emergency remote instruction for all courses and programs. After the shift, it became evident that the quality of online instruction must be improved. Partnering with faculty to develop and update professional development opportunities helped significantly improve the quality of online instruction.

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Extended Abstract

In Spring 2020, the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine abruptly moved to emergency remote instruction for all face-to-face courses and programs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.  Like so many other institutions, this disruption was responsible for many anxieties and issues experienced by students, faculty, and administration.  Once the institution transitioned to emergency remote instruction, a new challenge was presented; pivoting from emergency remote instruction to high-quality online instruction.  Strategies used during remote instruction were primarily instruction with a reliance on our web-conferencing platform in an effort to maintain the atmosphere and momentum for students who were also transitioning from face-to-face instruction.  After the term ended, instructors expressed their desire to continue teaching in the same manner.  Over time, enrollment in the online program increased significantly, and there are currently no plans to continue the face-to-face versions of programs in the School of Graduate Education. With this commitment to online instruction, it became imperative that the quality of instruction must be improved.  The online learning team partnered with faculty to develop and update professional development opportunities to improve the quality of online instruction. Since beginning the improvement initiative, online instruction has improved significantly.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Student and Faculty Engagement and Satisfaction with Redesigned Discussion Forums | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Researchers from the University of Arizona Global Campus share a recent course redesign which modified a traditional two discussion posts and replies per week into one robust discussion format each week. In this session, we will discuss this redesigned engagement method and its impact on students and faculty.

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Extended Abstract

In this session, the authors will discuss implementing a research study regarding different formats of discussion forums. In the online classroom at the University of Arizona Global Campus, one of the primary means of student engagement is through course discussion forums. These typically require students to post in two discussions per week with one initial post and two peer responses. In a recent redesign of ECE 315: Language Development in Young Children, a modified discussion structure was implemented. One of the discussions was recreated as an interactive assignment, and the second discussion was reformatted to create a more robust learning opportunity for students. The thought was to allow for more in-depth learning and engagement throughout the week. This discussion requires an initial analysis of the content, three peer responses, and a final post at the end of the learning week in which the students answer questions asked of them, summarize their learning for the week, and respond to any feedback from their instructor.

The rationale for this research project came from the two ECE 315 faculty developers who were interested in students engaging in learning through discussion forums on a deeper level than previously witnessed in prior sections of the courses. ECE 315 is a high enrollment course with a new offering almost every week for students. From June 1, 2019, through May 31, 2020, there were 50 sections offered of this course with a total enrollment of 1,009 students who took the course, with an average course size of approximately 20 students per offering. 

Our research questions include (1) In what ways has the discussion redesign impacted student performance? (2) What are student perceptions regarding the new discussion approach compared to the traditional discussion approach? (3) What are faculty perceptions regarding the new discussion approach compared to the traditional discussion approach? (4) To what extent do faculty and students prefer the new discussion approach compared to the traditional discussion approach? 

In the online classroom, the discussion forum content and design assist in teaching content. Just as on-ground teachers continually assess their teaching practices, online teachers must regularly appraise the content of their courses. Reflection is a “cyclical process, because once we start to implement changes, then the reflective and evaluative cycle begins again” (Mathew et al., 2017, p. 130). Therefore, although the initial research was completed in the fall of 2020, additional data was analyzed one year later. Researchers hoped to understand better the long-term impact of the changes made to this course. 

The research results will be presented, as well as additional data points from these course offerings, specifically related to student success and course retention rates. Participants will engage in conversations and hands-on opportunities with their peers and presenters to dive more deeply into the research findings. The presentation will conclude with opportunities for future research. 

References

Mathew, P., Mathew, P., & Peechattu, P. J. (2017). Reflective practices: A means to teacher development. Asia Pacific Journal of Contemporary Education and Communication Technology, 3(1), 126-131.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Screencasting Tools in Hybrid and Blended Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous

During this presentation, members of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Khalifa University will share their journey of supporting faculty and students in transitioning into Emergency Response mode during the pandemic. Attendees will learn about various LMS tools and technology integration that are conducive to student engagement and faculty satisfaction at a top research institution. Attendees will learn about various screencasting tools and how to use them in facilitating lectures and engaging students.

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Extended Abstract

Based on recent scholarly discussions, it is evident that digital technology has made possible what was deemed impossible, and while the pandemic has been disruptive to higher education, it created pathways for innovation and the restructuring of outdated and inefficient educational practices. For example, the instructional and disruption caused by the global pandemic has provided university stakeholders with an opportunity to narrow the digital divide that once existed between those who preferred in person interactions and those who saw the advantages of operating in virtual spaces. In many ways, the global pandemic has exposed the digital divide and inequalities in educational accessibility, thus compelling the education community to reimagine how teachers and educators teach and support students regardless of their physical location and the tools they can access. Change is inevitable, and in the case of the global pandemic, change has created a new and innovative mindset that defies physical proximity in all aspects of the human connections. The academic community has diverted from its traditional functions and operations to adapt a semi-irreversible structure of flexible and innovative ecosystem. The pandemic has reduced the level of social interactions inside and outside the classroom but the availability of digital resources like Google Classroom, Zoom, Kaltura, and other Screencasting and video conferencing tools has created a new ecology of learning and interaction. The emergency response teaching, which aimed at maintaining instructional and administrative continuity, has redefined the role of the university towards the learner and the larger community.

During this presentation, members of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Khalifa University will share their journey of supporting faculty and students in transitioning into Emergency Response mode during the pandemic. Attendees will learn about various LMS tools and technology integration that are conducive to student engagement and faculty satisfaction at a top research university.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Sequentially Structured Dissertation Model for Timely Student Completion: Evidence for Best Practice | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Time to completion in the Psychology PhD program was significantly lower for students in a sequentially structured dissertation sequence (DSE) focused on quality of research, increased student/chair interaction and timely completion compared to other cohorts who experienced a traditional sequence or transition between the two.

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Extended Abstract

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, most universities in the US shifted to partially or fully online courses. The impact on higher degree research students has been profound, and for many has involved online mentorship, data collection, and defense. These events underscore the importance of identifying best practices and aligning programmatic formatting for success of online students. Indeed, doctoral programs can vary widely by institution in their structure and specific program requirements (Castelló et al., 2017). There is some initial evidence of efficacy for a sequentially structured dissertation process model that leads to timely completion by promoting strategic goal-setting, sustained commitment, and motivated performance despite challenges and obstacles that may arise. Essentially, a sequentially structured model encourages a mindset of conscientiousness and intentionality that is not emphasized in other institutions. Students must constantly keep track of their progress – how far they’ve come and how far they need to go. Students may be more likely to remain focused on their doctoral goal pursuit because they know there are time limits. By staying conscientious throughout a structured dissertation experience, students emphasize to themselves that the dissertation is a prominent, valuable goal pursuit.

Research was conducted at a completely online non-profit university granting doctoral degrees to a very diverse and underserved student body. Students at this open-enrollment university are largely female, African American, employed full-time, with average age of 47. Until 2016, the university utilized a traditional dissertation sequence format based on milestone document completion where students were allowed to continue enrollment in dissertation courses without time limits. Based on institutional data, in 2016 the university implemented a sequentially structured dissertation model based on successful completion of course-based deliverables, evaluated against a faculty-created rubric by 3-member dissertation committees. There were many parties involved in the development of this new sequential model (referred to as the Doctoral Student Experience, or DSE), which focused on timely completion, quality of research, and regular interaction with a committee chair. The course sequence includes a Prospectus course, and 4 sequential dissertation course blocks (with up to 12 additional supplemental courses).

This Doctoral Student Experience (DSE) model involves three broad stages: preparation and approval of the Dissertation Proposal (DP) which includes Chapters 1, 2, and 3; conducting the study’s research (IRB approval and data collection); and preparation and approval of the final Dissertation Manuscript (DM) which includes chapters 1, 2, and 3 with the addition of chapters 4 and 5 to complete the manuscript, culminating in the dissertation oral defense. Within each course, students submit progress on specified dissertation components to scaffold learning. This allows for ongoing feedback, communication, and an iterative process of revision while students construct components of each chapter. Each chapter of the dissertation must meet minimum standards on an associated rubric, scored by committee chair and subject matter expert, for students to progress to the next course sequence block. At the Proposal and Manuscript stages, a third committee member, the Academic Reader, provides rubric-based evaluation. In this theory-focused dissertation process, the student identifies a researchable problem substantiated through evidence, proposes and conducts original research.

Theoretical Underpinnings to the Sequentially Structured Model

Most universities utilize common stages (i.e., 5 chapters) of the dissertation, but traditional models typically place less emphasis on timeliness. The temporally-framed goal progressions of the DSE provide a type of “aft wind” nudging the students forward in a time-bound process, which allows them to better evaluate their progress in measurements of time (see Husman & Lens, 1999). Other models may leave students more vulnerable to being “at-risk” and, may consequently experience greater attrition. The DSE model is enhanced for student and institution alike by implementing accountability measures such as attendance checks, which may serve to promote relatedness to the chair and the institution (see Deci & Ryan, 2017). Relatedness, is a sense of “connectedness” or “being known and understood,” identified by Deci and Ryan as a key psychological component of motivation. Furthermore, identifying a student as at-risk sooner rather than later is likely to more promptly renew their engagement in goal striving, a key determinant of performance (Ericsson et al., 1993; Locke & Bryan, 1969; Locke & Latham, 2002; Rothkopf & Billington, 1979; Wood & Locke, 1990), whereas an at-risk student that goes unnoticed may continue to pay substantial tuition without much academic progress. Such students may be more likely to have negative perceptions of their experiences with institutions, which could decrease goal commitment. Goal commitment of doctoral students must be understood and supported by institutions and dissertation chairs if students are to remain motivated to perform until they complete the doctorate; without commitment to goals, students’ goals do not imply enhanced motivation or performance (see Locke & Latham, 1990, 1991). Finally, the DSE encourages engagement between chair and doctoral student, presenting the groundwork for a mentor-mentee dynamic, wherein the chair may serve as what Ericsson (2018) might refer to as an expert mentor or what Vygotsky (1998) would refer to as a knowledgeable other, who is integral to the student’s success in academic and, often, emotionally supportive ways. Finally, the DSE model promotes student and institutional progress, awareness, and reflection processes due to the consistent sequential course endings and beginnings, such that students, chairs, and other institutional players remain more cognizant of students’ progression over time. Students are consistently encouraged to be reflective (Fishbein & Azjein, 1975) of their doctoral progress and intentional about changes they may need to implement to achieve improved goal task performance. Such reflective processes are emphasized by motivational and psychological principles of intentional behavior as illustrated in (a) deliberate practice, which has been tied to academic performance and expertise (Ericsson (1993), (b) conscientiousness, which has been linked to academic performance (Poropat, 2009), and (c) mindfulness, which improves emotional regulation (Erisman & Roemer, 2010;  Hill & Updegraff, 2012; Nielsen & Kaszniak, 2006). The DSE model’s structure motivates the student to be cognizant of the “ticking clock” of their courses without adding overbearing pressure to finish in an overly tight, restrictive schedule.

Methods

Institutional data for the Psychology PhD program from 2013-2020 included 430 graduating students. 2013-2016 gradating cohorts reflected students who experienced the previous dissertation sequence (n=182); a non-structured traditional model. Students graduating 2017-2018 reflected students who experienced the transition from the previous sequence to the DSE (n=124). Students graduating 2019-2020 experienced only the DSE model (n=131). The outcome of interest for this study was number of days in the dissertation sequence. This variable reflected the number of days from a students’ first vested dissertation course start date to the date of successful dissertation defense.  In this sample, scores ranged from 149-2426 days enrolled in the dissertation sequence. Square root transformation was used to obtain equal variances to meet ANOVA assumption.

Results

There was a statistically significant difference between dissertation sequence cohorts as determined by one-way ANOVA, F (2, 434) = 17.72, p <.001. Cohen’s D was calculated (Lenhard & Lenhard, 2016) and a medium effect size of .68 was obtained. Tukey post hoc test revealed that days in the dissertation sequence was significantly lower for the DSE cohort compared to the previous sequence cohort (p < .001, d = .70) and transition cohort (p < .01, d = .43). There was no statistically significant difference between the previous sequence cohort and transition cohort (p = .082).

Discussion

Timely completion of the dissertation is important in many ways. Prolonging completion of a dissertation research project can result in the research being outdated and therefore less relevant to the field, result in additional financial obligations and might prevent timely career advances. Lastly, delaying a dissertation research project can result in significant additional stress for candidates. Therefore, it is important to create a modality that supports students in timely completion of their dissertation research. The DSE model was developed to support students in this effort. These results suggest a more structured, high engagement, dissertation sequence positively impacts time to completion for Psychology PhD students at an online, open-enrollment, non-profit university. In addition, previous results of a pilot study showed no statistically significant difference in the quality of dissertations between this university and Dissertation Benchmark Alliance Schools (Ackerman et al., 2020).

Following WASC Senior College and University Commission reaccreditation visit to the university in February 2021, the Commission issued a letter stating the following “The Commission commends NCU in particular for the following: Creating best practices in the areas of doctoral dissertation quality… Sustaining an inclusive educational and work environment and seeking new means of supporting diverse students and underserved populations” (WASC Senior College and University Commission, 2021, March).

As more higher education research students must utilize online settings to complete their degree, universities must implement best practices to support student success and support faculty in remote teaching. In the future, based on institutional data [assessment and completion data], additional refinement of the DSE might be suggested. For example, some students struggle to complete the proposal stage during that sequential course block. The university is collecting data on potential changes to the sequence to further facilitate timely completion of the dissertation proposal.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
23 Things For Digital Knowledge (Free Open Online Course)

Brief Abstract:

The University of Edinburgh’s 23 Things for Digital Knowledge is an award winning (LILAC Credo Digital Literacy Award 2017, MERLOT 2022), self-directed online course, run by Information Services Group. The course uses a playful approach to encourage digital exploration and scaffolds essential knowledge including digital footprint and safety, accessibility, diversity & inclusion, and copyright awareness.

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Extended Abstract:

Every day we hear about some new digital app, tool, or thing we should be learning about or using, but when do we set aside time to actually experiment and try out all of these things?

Winner of the 2017 LILAC Credo Digital Literacy Award and MERLOT Instructional and Design Technology Classics Award for 2022, the course launched for its first run in 2016 and provides a structured way for staff and students to set aside that time to build up skills and experiment with new digital tools.

Inspired by 23 Things Oxford and based on the original 23 Things program (Charlotte & Mecklenburg Public Library, 2006), the course uses the established structure of twenty-three Things, with each Thing being a subject or tool. An introduction and a task is provided for each Thing along with suggested readings and resources. How much time and detail is set aside for each Thing is completely optional.

Participants are asked to register a blog (as part of Thing 2), and to share short blog posts about each of the 23 Things they complete. Although optional, blogging provides a space to test out and experiment with many of the Things. It creates a space for interaction with other participants, the opportunity to offer support and advice, and to reflect on what it is that has been learned.

The blog is also used to submit completion of the Things to be eligible for an Open Badge, and could be used as evidence for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) either for work appraisals or towards external accreditation.

The course uses a playful approach to encourage digital exploration and scaffolds essential knowledge including digital footprint and safety, accessibility, diversity & inclusion, and copyright awareness.

 

 

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Teaching a Second Language Fully Online | Discovery Session Asynchronous

The current pandemic forced colleges and universities around the world to transition from in-person to online instruction. Online and distance education have been around for some time, but no one predicted it would become the primary platform for learning and collaboration. This presentation highlights disruption as an opportunity for innovation and cretive thinking. The presenter will discuss how the current pandemic has prompted the development and delivery of a entirely online course (Arabic As a Second Language/ASL) and how the approach might be extended to other languages. The presenter will share best practices in LMS-technology integration as well as tips on how to engage students in learning a second language online.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 Pandemic forced colleges and universities around the world to transition abruptly from face-to-face to online instruction. Online and distance education have been around for some time, but no one predicted it would become the primary platform for learning and collaboration. This notable disruption to the various functions of higher education has also served as an enlightening moment of reflection and envisioning the future of teaching and learning. To this end, as the global community moves through and beyond the Pandemic, colleges and universities will continue on the path of rediscovery and searching for efficient, cost-effective, and flexible degree and program offerings. At Khalifa University, a top research institution in the United Arab Emirates, the transition from in-person to remote learning has generated effective instructional practices conducive to efficiency and student success. Based on the recent scholarly discussions, it is evident that digital technology has made possible what was deemed impossible. While the Pandemic has been disruptive to higher education, it created pathways for innovation and restructuring outdated and inefficient educational practices.

Although KU has never offered online courses, emergency response teaching (ERT) required the transition from in-person to e-learning using Blackboard and Microsoft Teams as essential tools for conferencing and lecturing. This transition has created a departmental discussion about offering an Arabic course required for international students. The Center for Teaching and Learning collaborated with the preparatory program to develop a fully online Arabic course for non-native speakers. Teaching a second language to non-native speakers is a daunting task in itself, but to offer this sixteen-week course entirely online was a fantastic journey that required outstanding course design skills and technology integration. The Modern Standard Arabic course was developed using short video lectures followed by online discussions and quizzes. Students were provided with a Smart Keyboard which allowed for the conversion of letters from English to Arabic. The final project is a culmination of experiences and exposures that students present in Arabic. Rosetta Stone was integrated into the LMS and served as the lab for this course and a secondary mechanism for tracking student engagement. Presenters will share the scope and importance of teaching and learning a second language in a globalized and interconnected world. The presenters will also showcase how the challenges presented by the current Pandemic have led to a creative approach to teaching and learning.

The COVID-19 Pandemic forced colleges and universities around the world to transition abruptly from face-to-face to online instruction. Online and distance education have been around for some time, but no one predicted it would become the primary platform for learning and collaboration. This notable disruption to the various functions of higher education has also served as an enlightening moment of reflection and envisioning the future of teaching and learning. To this end, as the global community moves through and beyond the Pandemic, colleges and universities will continue on the path of rediscovery and searching for efficient, cost-effective, and flexible degree and program offerings. At Khalifa University, a top research institution in the United Arab Emirates, the transition from in-person to remote learning has generated effective instructional practices conducive to efficiency and student success. Based on the recent scholarly discussions, it is evident that digital technology has made possible what was deemed impossible. While the Pandemic has been disruptive to higher education, it created pathways for innovation and restructuring outdated and inefficient educational practices.

Although KU has never offered online courses, emergency response teaching (ERT) required the transition from in-person to e-learning using Blackboard and Microsoft Teams as essential tools for conferencing and lecturing. This transition has created a departmental discussion about offering an Arabic course required for international students. The Center for Teaching and Learning collaborated with the preparatory program to develop a fully online Arabic course for non-native speakers. Teaching a second language to non-native speakers is a daunting task in itself, but to offer this sixteen-week course entirely online was a fantastic journey that required outstanding course design skills and technology integration. The Modern Standard Arabic course was developed using short video lectures followed by online discussions and quizzes. Students were provided with a Smart Keyboard which allowed for the conversion of letters from English to Arabic. The final project is a culmination of experiences and exposures that students present in Arabic. Rosetta Stone was integrated into the LMS and served as the lab for this course and a secondary mechanism for tracking student engagement. Presenters will share the scope and importance of teaching and learning a second language in a globalized and interconnected world. The presenters will also showcase how the challenges presented by the current Pandemic have led to a creative approach to teaching and learning.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Teaching Empathy Online: Empathy Boxes and Empathy Mapping in Virtual Environments | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Being empathetic is an important mindset to possess in many careers, particularly when working closely with diverse audiences. Teaching empathy through skill development is challenging, especially in online environments. Hear how graduate students learned and practiced empathy online using empathy mapping and empathy boxes created with interactive virtual tools.

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Extended Abstract

The diversity of classrooms across the U.S. has changed exponentially throughout the years. Racial and ethnic groups are changing, and the rates of immigrant, low income, disabled, and English learner (EL) populations are also increasing drastically. While diversity in classrooms is not new, recognizing the diverse needs of all students is becoming more of a priority than ever before. With more than half of high school graduates continuing on to higher education, designing instruction for diversity and inclusion is a wide-spread agenda item for instructional designers, school administrators, teachers, and other stakeholders across age ranges. Unfortunately, designing instruction that meets the needs of diverse learners, while also imparting knowledge, skills, and attitudes/beliefs related to improving all students’ empathy are large undertakings.

While the belief that empathy should be taught to audiences of all ages is growing, there is no universal definition of empathy and methods to teach it can be difficult to employ. For educators, learning to be more empathetic, and then teaching their students skills to improve their own mindsets, are both essential and challenging. Instructional designers and educators must continue to find ways to design and teach empathy instruction, as it is a necessary habit of mind when dealing with diverse audiences in varying careers and situations. The pandemic has changed the way the world teaches and learns and we will see the reverberations for years to come. Finding new teaching and learning strategies that can be employed in different modalities for topics and concepts primarily taught in person will open up a range of opportunities for online, experiential learning.

Empathy involves perspective taking and understanding the feelings of others. It is important when working with diverse audiences in that it lets them know they are supported and respected. In turn, students may be more motivated to learn when their instructors practice empathy. Engaging in perspective taking and empathetic experiences could improve individuals’ tolerance of others, their awareness of their own biases, their cultural humility, and their ability to be better communicators and collaborators with diverse audiences in the future. Teaching and practicing empathy are difficult, as empathy is an attitude or mindset. However, it can be improved with skills-based practice, such as empathy mapping and exploring empathy boxes.

Empathy mapping, a popular tool used by design thinkers, gathers data about audiences’ needs to guide decision-making in project development. One way to use empathy maps is to split the maps into quadrants (e.g., Think/Feel, Say/Do, See, and Hear) with two additional boxes for pains and gains. In this example, participants are given a driving question and asked to think about the how that audience might respond to each of the topics in the quadrants and boxes. Data are then gathered and analyzed to determine themes, needs, and insights that emerge. Involving students in the process of empathy mapping, as well as having students analyze the data collected, can both demonstrate the importance of understanding diverse audiences and help them develop their own empathetic practices. An empathy box is filled with an individual’s mementos, treasures, and keepsakes that are meaningfully collected throughout their lives. These boxes can demonstrate what an individual cares about and what they feel is worth saving. Having students look through another person’s empathy box to learn about them can encourage them to thoughtfully consider that person’s interests and perspectives on what they deem is important.

Normally, these activities are completed in the classroom, where students can use post-it notes to stick on the empathy map, touch the items in the empathy box, and have meaningful face-to-face discussions after the activities. Unfortunately, the pandemic required that educators find creative ways to replicate in-person activities in online spaces. Teaching empathy is a challenging task; teaching it online with regularly hands-on activities is even harder. While the intention of this project was to undertake the challenging nature of developing awareness of and empathy for diverse audiences by providing simulated experiential opportunities online, the activities themselves were quite simple.

The empathy map activity was designed using Miro, an online whiteboard tool. Graduate students in a teacher education program were asked to populate an empathy map surrounding the questions, “As a graduate student, what do you see, hear, think/feel, say/do? What are the pains? What are the gains?” In their next synchronous online class meeting, students were split into breakout rooms and were asked to look through the class’s post-it notes on the empathy map board collaboratively and cluster and summarize similar notes that belonged to the same quadrant. For instance, Group 1 clustered and summarized all of the “SEE” notes; Group 2 clustered and summarized all of the “HEAR” notes, and so on. They then had to identify themes, needs, and insights that emerged from the clusters in each quadrant in order to arrive at a shared understanding of the participants by all team members. Once each empathy map topic was clustered and summarized, students then aligned their findings with those of the other groups before answering a series of questions: What do graduate students mention their needs are across the quadrants? Were there outliers (or data points that did not fit in any cluster) in there? What themes were repeated in all the quadrants? What themes only exist in one quadrant? What insights can you derive from these data? What gaps exist in our understanding? This activity encouraged students to learn the importance of empathizing with an audience and practice their own empathy skills.

In the empathy box activity, student teams examined the contents of a virtual box containing a variety of virtual objects. Pictures were taken of real objects with the backgrounds removed. Then, the individual pictures of the objects were placed into a program called H5P that allowed students to move them about and inspect them more closely by clicking on them to make them larger. Students had to closely examine the contents by pulling them out of the virtual box, and think about why the owner may have chosen to save the different objects. They were then asked to generate information about the owner of the box by creating stories, making connections, and trying to understand the owner through their collection of objects and artifacts. They were instructed to determine how they might connect with that individual if they were their student. Students learned to find ways to connect with an individual based on exploring things they felt were meaningful to their lives and memories.

Each of these activities was usually completed in the classroom; however, moving them online allowed students to continue with the practice when in-person meetings were not possible. While the interactions with the objects were now two dimensional and no paper post-it notes were utilized in the activities, students still could practice empathetic design and skills development in an online environment. Replicating authentic, experiential activities in the virtual environment allowed students to continue to learn and practice key skills to help develop an empathetic mindset that were clearly seen in their subsequent course projects.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The Prevalence of Universal Design for Learning Techniques in Distant Higher Education | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Do we esure equity through Universal Design for Learning in distance Higher Education learning modalities? How can we use data from higher education students on the prevalence of UDL strategies in various learning formats (virtual study group, online course, independent study)? 

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Extended Abstract

College students are more diverse in race, ethnicity, and ability than ever before (Espinosa, Turk, Taylor, & Chessman, 2019).  It is imperative that higher education is aware of the needs of its students and has a plan and a guiding framework to ensure that all students are provided the supports they need to achieve the high standards of the learning institution.   This fact increases the urgency for implementation and scaling up of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) in higher education.  Students with disabilities who have seen success in their K-12 education may rely on the consistency, reliability, and effectiveness to achieve academically.  However, the use of scientifically validated frameworks of support may not be widespread in higher education institutions. 
Without the framework and support for diverse students, many will not succeed.  Research is lacking in the completion of a four-year degree program; however, in 2011, research shows that only 34 percent of college students with disabilities complete a four-year program as opposed to 54 percent of students without disabilities. What can higher education do to mimic the continued positive graduation results for students with disabilities from high school? Perhaps it is not to reinvent the wheel but learn from what K-12 schools are implementing in terms of supports and mimic them.
One increasingly supported framework by researchers as well as federal legislation is the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015 (U.S. Department of Education, n.d.) to support students is the Universal Design for Learning (UDL).  UDL is a scientifically validated framework aimed at increasing the learning experience for individuals, by offering flexibility in the way information is presented, in the way students and educators are engaged, and in the forms, students and educators are able to respond or demonstrate learning (CAST, 2018). 
The goal of this framework is to reduce barriers of instruction, provide appropriate accommodations, supports and challenges, and maintain high achievement expectations for all students, especially within a heterogenous and inclusive student population (Novak, 2019). 
Implementation of the UDL principles framework has demonstrated improved learning experiences for students in K-12 classrooms (Meyer, Rose, & Gordon, 2014).  Research also finds that furthering the impact of UDL to higher education institutions would continue the positive effect on students (Gradel & Edson, 2009).  Further, due to the flexibility and adaptability of the framework, higher education institutions can adapt with the institution’s mission, culture, and availability in mind. 
Not only will student outcomes improve, but Tobin and Behling (2015) suggest UDL increases access for everyone, and institutions could measure that impact in terms of improved retention rates, financial savings, increased website traffic, and better student-ratings data.
Additionally, in the time of movement from traditional face to face classrooms and an increase of online learning, how can we ensure justice is served to students with disabilities who enroll in these classes?  Linder, Fountaine-Rainen, and Behling’s (2015) research found, out of over 190 colleges and universities across the United States, few campuses are taking actions to adopt UDL thinking for their online courses or course components.  The most significant reason that the issue is not receiving more attention falls to the lack of time, expertise, and resources that higher education institutions have at their disposal.
           This study looks to see the prevalence of UDL strategies in various learning formats (virtual study group, online course, independent study). Students will be provided a Likert-type survey which is created based on Nine Common Elements of Universal Design for Learning in Higher Education (http://oet.fullerton.edu/accessibility/Nine_Common_UDL_Elements_2-10-12.pdf) to complete in which they will answer "Always Often Sometimes or Never".  Further two open ended questions will be asked at the end of the survey.

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
The “Silent A” in Digital DEI: Accessibility by Design | Discovery Session Asynchronous

At the heart of inclusive design is the idea that people experience learning environments differently. This session introduces an asynchronous faculty learning experience called Accessibility and Inclusive Design which provided guidance that prepared faculty with the foundational skills for developing more accessible content while focusing on inclusive design and pedagogy.

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Extended Abstract

Topic Overview  

This session will tell the story of an asynchronous faculty learning experience entitled Accessibility and Inclusive Design or A.I.D. 

Context & Purpose

To support faculty capacity to ensure academic continuity in preparation for an unpredictable 2021-2022 academic year, our digital learning unit was granted HEERF funds to compensate faculty who completed an online faculty learning experience called Teaching for Learning Continuity (T.L.C.). 

The core of the programming encouraged faculty to reflect and build on the virtual content and courses developed during the previous year of fully virtual instruction. The premise is that all courses, regardless of modality, have an asynchronous environment that, if well-designed, supports learning continuity that is more inclusive than a course without a digital learning environment we call an Asynchronous Backbone.

A course syllabus, assigned readings and videos, class agendas, assignment directions and explanations, work submission, grading and feedback, announcements, even micro-lectures can be organized and available to students asynchronously in the Learning Management System (or other digital platforms). Therefore, any course, in-person, synchronous, or asynchronous, supports learning continuity when it leverages the flexibility afforded by a well-designed asynchronous backbone. However, for the digital course environment to be truly inclusive it must also be designed for accessibility. 

While we have observed that the shift to fully virtual instruction dramatically increased instructors’ skills and knowledge for creating and disseminating instructional digital content, and are encouraged by the flexibility this affords students, our digital learning unit was concerned that without supporting instructors in developing the knowledge and skills for accessible design, the digital course environment could inadvertently pose barriers to learning.

Union Approval and Faculty Completion

While T.L.C. offered a variety of micro-courses on various topics, when seeking Faculty Union approval of completion requirements, completion of A.I.D. was designated as one of three required elements for participants to be eligible for the completion stipend. As a result 121 faculty successfully completed the course, meaning approximately 24% of all faculty have been prepared in the basics of accessible design.

Our Rationale

Anyone who has developed digital instructional content (e.g. documents, presentation slides, videos, online modules, etc) would agree that creating digital materials is a time-intensive process. Yet, many also recognize the affordances of digital content as a means to support equity, providing flexibility (anytime/anywhere) and inclusive student access to instructional content. At the heart of inclusive design is the idea that people experience learning environments differently.

However, for digital content to be truly inclusive, it must also be accessible, meaning it is formatted correctly so students using assistive technology (i.e. screen readers) and/or students with visual or auditory needs can also access digital content. While designing for accessibility is a legal requirement, we prefer to develop a campus culture in which accessible design is viewed as a means to bolster inclusion and student empowerment. To this end we aim to influence a teaching and learning culture that recognizes how more  accessible design supports not only students with diverse physical needs, but also neurodiversity, and the diverse lifestyle or non-academic demands that can present potential barriers to students’ academic success. For example, recognizing that video captioning not only supports students with an auditory need, but increases access to course content for students who need to read and listen, students for whom English is a second language, or when the surrounding environment is not conducive to listening, such as a student watching a lecture while on public transit. 

Therefore, with input from our Learning Design Team our Accessibility Lead developed A.I.D. This lightly facilitated self-paced online course prepared faculty with the basic knowledge and skills for accessible design by providing the foundational guidance for developing more accessible Canvas-housed content with a focus on inclusive design and pedagogy. 

Through A.I.D. faculty met the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate accessible text formatting including use of Heading Styles, List Styles, and unique hyperlinks

  • Identify and apply the use of accessibility checkers (i.e., ALLY and Grackle Docs)

  • Explain why captioning and/or transcripts make videos more accessible

  • Demonstrate the ability to create a video with a transcript

  • Differentiate between more accessible and less accessible color contrast examples

  • Describe best practices for adding alternative text to images

  • Discuss strategies for developing alternative assessments that promote student agency

Showing Rather than Telling!

With this discovery session leveraging video and PlayPosit, we are excited to create a presentation through which we can visually guide participants through A.I.D. to not just describe but show the content and activities participants experienced. Additionally, of particular interest to instructional designers and faculty development professionals will be our ability to showcase the course’s organizational structure and workflow that allowed flexible, asynchronous, self-paced participant engagement while also leveraging knowledge checks and assessment activities to ensure the learning outcomes were being met. Additionally, we will explain how the course was facilitated, feedback provided, and discussion forums utilized to not only provide individual support but model the accessible and inclusive practices presented in the course content. With PlayPosit, we look forward to the ability to answer individual questions through the discussion forum and provide additional resources shared in the video using the web embed option. 

Faculty Follow-up & Planning for Future Scholarship

One of the challenges of faculty development is knowing whether or not the learning experience leads to implementation. Often faculty are enthusiastic about new learning but whether or not the learning experience leads to actual implementation often remains unknown. With 121 faculty completing A.I.D. during the Summer of 2021, we have the opportunity to follow-up with completers interested in sharing implementation of the skills 

and knowledge gained through A.I.D. on their actual course development. Whether faculty share positive or negative feedback, their contributions will provide an opportunity for asynchronous discussion. While we are hopeful faculty did implement their learning, what we learn will reveal interesting topics for group discussion and sharing around challenges and successes in inspiring and measuring faculty application of accessible design. 

We hope this conversation will inspire thinking and uncover solutions for building scholarship into faculty development offerings. This is a shortcoming we have recognized in our own design. A great deal of effort goes into the planning, development, launch, and facilitation of faculty learning experiences, but too often, measuring the impact is an afterthought. Through this presentation we would like to draw attention to planning opportunities for scholarship as part of the planning and preparation phase of faculty development. We hope to learn from those doing this type of work as well as encourage those who have not, like us, to consider how to build scholarship into their work. 

Carrying A.I.D. Forward

This Summer 2021 experience is only the beginning of our focus on accessibility and inclusive design. A.I.D. is a thread we are continuing in our offerings for this academic year and beyond. Ensuring learning continuity is critical to student success, and is not limited to moments of unplanned disruption. We want students to have continuous access to learning; and that means creating digital environments where technology multiplies the pathways through which students can interact with course content and demonstrate their knowledge. 

At the end of our presentation, we will use PlayPosit’s web embed to share a Padlet with links to resources (e.g. content shared in Canvas Commons) to share. Participants will be invited to use the Padlet to ask questions, share resources/solutions, and build their professional support network to continue the conversation after the conference has ended.  

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Using Data Driven Communication: Targeted Messaging That Proactively Supports Student Success in First Year Mathematics Courses at Scale | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Proactive and personalized support is essential to online student success. In this session, attendees will learn about the impact that targeted messaging can have on a student’s sense of belonging in their course, early engagement with course materials, and tendency to utilize support resources.

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Extended Abstract

Online students can feel isolated and be less likely to seek out or engage with resources available to them. For online students in first year mathematics courses the barrier to engagement can often be higher due to math anxiety and fear of asking questions or for help. In this session we will showcase messaging strategies implemented to engage and support online first year mathematics students to connect them to resources, support communities and foster course engagement. We will also discuss how data driven messaging and how personalized, targeted messaging can provide a sense that an individual is invested in their well being. Attendees will reflect on what kind of messages could help their students, discuss their thoughts about whether nudging is effective, and share ideas on how to create connections for online students. Takeaways will include ideas and strategies for nudging student behavior with targeted messages, including:

  • Using mail merge grouping to send targeted messages from Outlook or Gmail (can individualize)

  • Cohort message grouping in LMS (not as individualized)

  • Using formatted announcements

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Using Slack to Mentor Public Health Research Assistants | Discovery Session Asynchronous

A technology application, Slack, created an interactive real-time virtual workspace for research assistants across the nation to receive the same information compiled all in one location with experienced faculty. Interactions increased two-fold while allowing one on one faculty mentorship.  Lessons learned included overwhelming interactions, boundary-setting, time management.

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Extended Abstract

Session Title: Using Slack to Mentor Public Health Research Assistants

Session Purpose: This session aims to discuss innovative strategies for improving virtual collaboration amongst full-time public health faculty and student research assistants.  

Background/ Relevance:

Master of Public Health (MPH) programs train students on health promotion and disease prevention within communities.  One identified gap in our program is the lack of the ability for students to conduct research projects in their area of interest.  It is essential to provide students with opportunities to be involved in the research process, as this is a subset of the field of public health.  Thus, we sought out an online platform to serve as a hub for student research assistants (RAs), where they could have access to information in one place and communicate with mentors and each other. 

Slack is a communication platform that allows for creating a workspace with various“channels” accessible by invitees.  In March of 2021, we created a workspace titled “Public Health Research Assistants”; to compile all needed information and resources for the RAs, thereby eliminating the need for email communication. The following table highlights the 14 channels and their description:

  1. CITI Human Subject Research-training-A step-by-step guide for students to complete CITI training through the university.
  2. Critical-thinking-A guide for critical thinking in research.
  3. Data analysis-A guide for analyzing data in public health.
  4. Everyone connects-A space for RAs to communicate.
  5. IRB-Learn about the current institution’s institutional review board process.
  6. Student inquiries-Each student was provided with a personal channel to ask questions, discuss, meet.
  7. Journals-A list of popular journals in public health.
  8. Random-A channel for “everything else” It’s a place for team jokes, spur-of-the-moment ideas, and funny GIFs. Go wild!
  9. Research questions and hypotheses-A guide for formulating research questions and hypotheses.
  10. Secondary data-A guide on secondary data analysis.
  11. Study design-A channel all about public health research methods and study designs.
  12. Titles for papers-A quick read on how to create a title for a paper (or any research paper).
  13. Webinars-events-A space for the workspace owners to share upcoming webinars/ events with students.
  14. Welcome-A description of the role of public health RAs.

RAs were recruited through faculty courses.  Students were provided with a description of the unpaid public health RA position and encouraged to apply by sending a resume and cover letter to the faculty member.  To participate, students were required to be active members of an MPH degree and self-starter who takes the initiative.  The faculty was to serve as mentors, to assist students with completing a project of their choosing. 

 

Three students were chosen as RAs and granted access to the workspace.  Students were encouraged to start with CITI Certification. The faculty then met with students to discuss their interests and potential projects.  The faculty also offered students the option of collaborating on existing projects or embarking on a project of their choosing.  During this meeting, faculty let RAs know the student-led work, with faculty serving as mentors.

 

Faculty regularly posted resources in the slack channels to encourage student engagement.  After completing the CITItraining, one student began working on the literature review of an existing project with faculty, and the other two chose to develop their research project with mentorship.  In June, one student expressed they would be discontinuing as an RA due to other engagements. The third student stated they are progressing with their research, but communication with faculty has been limited. Furthermore, one RA was able to work on the manuscript submission and abstract submission for presentation. While the manuscript was not accepted, the student could present at this state conference with the faculty. 

Through using Slack, interactions with students increased; however, there were many lessons learned.  Students appeared to be overwhelmed by the provided information AND unsure of where to begin or how to utilize the information.  Students struggled with time management and being able to prioritize the research. Lastly, faculty learned an essential lesson with boundary setting and student expectations. 

Because no project has been completed to date, faculty are interested in research best methods for involving students in research. Through presenting at OLC, faculty wish to gain insight from other institutions regarding improving faculty and student collaboration.

Plan for Interactivity

Before the conference, a Slack workspace will be created with three session-specific topics and descriptions.  Slack will be used throughout the presentation to showcase the platform and allow participants to see its functionality.  To begin the session, presenters will introduce themselves, the conference Slack workspace and provide a background for the session.  Throughout the session, presenters will discuss different scenarios that occurred with RAs to receive ideas and guidance from the OLC Community.  The session outline, including scenarios and questions for collaboration, is listed below.  At the conclusion of the session, presenters will encourage participants to continue the discussion on Slack throughout the conference. Faculty will respond on Slack throughout the conference.

 

Session Outline

 

Presenter Introduction (2 min)

Introduction to Slack (2 min)

Scenario 1 (4 min, presented through Slack): Students are unprepared for a RA role. 

Scenario 1 Discussion Questions: What are effective strategies for preparing students for a RA role? How do you foster student and faculty collaboration?

Scenario 2 (4 min, presented through Slack): Students struggle with time management and prioritizing an unpaid role.

Scenario 2 Discussion Questions:  How can students be motivated to collaborate with faculty on research? 

Scenario 3 (4 min, presented through Slack): Outside of the online classroom, students struggle to maintain professional boundaries. 

Scenario 3 Discussion Questions: What have you found to be the best strategies for meaningful engagement with students beyond the classroom?

Presenter Conclusion (2 min, not presented through Slack): 

Participant Takeaway

Through participation in this session, participants will be exposed to Slack, a tool that can increase collaboration and communication amongst students and faculty. In addition, participants will discuss the importance of collaborating with students on research and learn the best strategies used across institutions.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
What is it good for? Discovering the driving forces, mindset, and perceived benefits of degree seeking for non-traditional students | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Discover the perceptions, motivations, and perceived benefits of degree seeking from the point of view of non-traditional students in online courses. Join us on a road trip adventure to see how you fare in your quest for deciphering mismatches between value to students and current educational processes.

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Extended Abstract

The landscape for higher education is constantly changing. An increase in online course delivery is often met with higher enrollment from non-traditional students. Non-traditional students are typically older (>24 years of age) and may not start their educational journey immediately after high school. Additionally, many nontraditional students have other responsibilities outside of schoolwork, such as a full-time job or dependents. Therefore, their expectations and challenges are unique and are critical to understand for adapting higher education approaches.

Faculty, administrations, recruiters, advisors, and employers can benefit from understanding the background of non-traditional online students, as well as student expectations and perceived obstacles. A better understanding is the necessary first step to begin adapting recruiting materials, advising services, retention models, and course design to tailor offerings and better serve current non-traditional students as well as attract new students. The results of this study will also aid in developing or targeting existing department and university initiatives to adapt and meet the demand of the increasing presence of non-traditional students in traditional and non-traditional degree programs.

To do all of this, we must learn more about the driving factors and barriers to continuing education for these students. Questions we explored include: Why are they a non-traditional learner? What are their barriers to continuing their education? What are their expected outcomes from degree completion? What skills do they perceive they will gain? Do these skills match up with what they believe employers want? Is there a difference by subpopulation?

We have data-driven answers to these questions. We developed and analyzed a survey to provide real insight into the mindset of non-traditional students, specifically in non-traditional degree program modalities (in this case, online learning). Because statistics and research results can sometimes be challenging to interpret, we have created a road trip style presentation where participants begin their “Journey” of discovering the driving forces, mindset, and perceived benefits of degree seeking in e-learning courses for non-traditional students.

The journey begins with the “Current Landscape,” or the trends in characteristics of a non-traditional student. We then move to the “Changing Landscape” where online course delivery infuses work, life, and higher education and can scale tuition at lower costs. This leads us to our “Purpose” for the road trip and the research questions we hope to answer, such as: What are the backgrounds of non-traditional students? How many times have they seriously attempted their degree? Where are students in their career path? If students are out of the workforce, what are the reasons? What are the financial and logistical barriers to degree seeking? What are students’ perceptions of what they will gain from a bachelor’s degree vs. what students perceive employers want?

Then, we dig a little deeper into subpopulation. For example, if I make less than $40,000, left the workforce to raise children, had 50% or more of my tuition paid for by an employer or military benefits, or have a high GPA - does it alter my primary motivation for degree seeking? In our presentation, you can delve even deeper and explore the subpopulations you want making this a quick and fun way to get relevant research results on-demand. It’s your journey!

 

Plan for Interactivity

The presentation is structured as a road trip. As we prepare for the trip, we make sure we have our data and methods in the car! Then we turn on our GPS and keep our destination in mind - discovering the perceptions, motivations, and perceived benefits of degree seeking from the point of view of non-traditional students in online courses. We make discoveries (research findings) along the way. However, this is not just a boring road trip. Participants hit a detour, where they must forecast student perceptions vs. employer perceptions in an interactive poll before viewing the research results.

We later hit another detour, a blizzard! As we wait for the road to clear, participants reflect on one obstacle presented in the research by a subpopulation. They write down a first step of overcoming that obstacle that they could implement. Then, participants wad up the paper and throw those barriers (I mean snowballs!) away! The presentation then moves you to a snowball fight video. As we speed away, we make it back home and unpack (reflect) on our journey. It is a research presentation like no other!

Visit our discovery session and go road tripping! Hop in!

 

Sessions Goals

Faculty, administrations, recruiters, advisors, and employers will be able to discuss the background of non-traditional students, their expectations, and perceived obstacles to seeking a bachelor's degree.

Participants will be able to articulate at least one step in the higher education process that could be adjusted to better serve non-traditional students such as fine-tune recruiting materials, tailoring advising services, adjusting retention models, and adapting course design to reduce barriers.

Lastly, participants will be able to better serve current students and target department and university initiatives to adapt and meet the demand of the increasing presence of non-traditional students in non-traditional degree programs.

 

 

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Learning While Teaching: Exploring the Impacts of Pre-Designed Courses as Faculty Training | Discovery Session Asynchronous

This session will share and discuss faculty experiences with a multimodal pre-designed module in an online first-year writing course with the goal of improving faculty development and training through support and pre-designed curriculum. In this discovery session, participants will be asked to consider pre-designed courses as learning spaces for faculty and designers alike. 

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Extended Abstract

In the Writing Program at a large public institution in the southwest, a designated HSI, we use a required pre-designed course (PDC) with established course outcomes for our online courses. These PDCs are designed to streamline the online teaching experience for new instructors--both graduate students and lecturers from a variety of disciplines with English--as well as offer help and support as they learn to navigate their online writing courses. In the fall of 2019, we developed a multimodal argument assignment for the second first-year writing course in a two course sequence. A multimodal project requires students to craft their assignment using a combination of text, images, video, and/or audio components. Instructors are able to choose this project in place of a more traditional research essay; however, many of our new online instructors still opt for the traditional essay and remain hesitant to include multimodal composition or discuss the transferability of these skills in their online courses.

 

Although writing studies scholarship has long advocated for the inclusion of digital or multimodal composition (Selfe, 1999; 2004; Selber, 2005; Ball, 2004) and digital literacies are essential in college classrooms (Jacobson, et al, 2019), research shows that instructors who might try a multimodal assignment in a face-to-face course are less likely to try it online (Blair, 2015; Borgman, 2019). Even if instructors do feel comfortable enough because they are working with a pre- built curriculum, many do not know how to articulate how these projects can transfer to other writing situations (DePalma, 2015). These professional fears--coupled with the “messy logistics” (Borgman, 2019) that online writing faculty often associate with multimodal projects--led our Writing Program to consider how teaching from the pre-designed module might actually help mitigate these fears and uncertainties as well as offer space for ongoing professional development.

 

In the most recent version of the pre-designed course, the multimodal module and instructor resources were designed to mitigate uncertainty and promote confidence in teaching these assignments by focusing on scaffolding the final project and explaining the rationale behind certain activities. The idea was that faculty who were interested in multimodality but not yet confident in it would gain the tools, language, and resources they needed, as well as clear up any misconceptions that multimodal texts are not the “big and bold” or overly complicated documents they think they are (Borgman, 2019), as they themselves worked through the pre-designed course. In order to assess the usefulness of our pre-designed course and whether or not we were meeting our goal of offering effective professional development, we tracked a variety of new online instructors in Spring 2021 who chose to do the multimodal module to see how well they: 1) felt prepared to teach multimodal projects after teaching the course; 2) understood the transferability of the skills learned in multimodal projects; and to find out 3) whether or not they needed additional professional development or support.

 

In this discovery session, we will share we’ll share our own story developing and teaching this project, we’ll share the story we see in the experience of the instructors who are new to teaching this multimodal project and gaps we see in our support of these instructors who are “learning on the job,” and we’ll ask participants to consider how they’ve learned from teaching a course they didn’t design, how they considered those teaching a course they did design, and how faculty support is managed through their programs and institutions. This session is intended to start a discussion about both the designer and the teacher perspectives when PDCs are required.

   

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Leveraging Asynchronous Design to Explore Issues of Equity in Education | Discovery Session Asynchronous

In this session, the presenters will introduce a collaborative design approach for asynchronous learning that highlights creativity, engagement, and faculty presence throughout each module. The presenters will share a use case to draw on their experience and research with/in asynchronous design to leverage the affordances of this modality.

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Extended Abstract

Title: Leveraging Asynchronous Design to Explore Issues of Equity in Education

Introduction

In March 2020, our college was among the first institutions of higher education to abruptly shut down campus and shift to online learning in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This decision led to the majority of classes being conducted synchronously using the video conferencing software Zoom. The first few weeks of using this format presented numerous challenges causing many faculty and students to vocalize the barriers associated with synchronous learning. These challenges presented an opportunity for faculty and course design instructors to think divergently about online teaching as a means to address emerging issues that were impacting the needs of students.  In this presentation, an Associate Professor of Education and a Principal Instructional Designer at an urban institution of higher education will share how their collaborative design experience during the COVID-19 pandemic created a model for pedagogical innovation that could be used to inform asynchronous online courses at the College. 

In this session, the presenters will introduce a framework for collaborative design that is informed by ADDIE (Branson, 1978), TPACK (Mishra & Kohler, 2006), and Speculative Design (Willis & Anderson, 2013) to engage participants in a discussion about the challenges and affordances of asynchronous course design. They will also share a use case and offer questions and recommendations for administrators and faculty to consider in their efforts to cultivate a student-centered learning environment that promotes a culture of innovation.

Purpose of presentation

The goal of this presentation is to demonstrate the pedagogical affordances of the collaborative process the we used to design an engaging asynchronous course that focused on equity in K-12 education. We will highlight resources and tools we developed along with apps and platforms we integrated into the course to create an asynchronous experience that went beyond the discussion forum and downloadable, voice-over PowerPoint. We will 1) present information about the educational landscape that necessitated the creation of the course; 2) invite the audience to share thoughts and insights about their experiences developing asynchronous online courses; 3) provide an opportunity to explore portions of the course; and 4) share guiding questions to support and enhance their asynchronous programming. 

Collaborative Framework to Support Pedagogical Innovation

Reimagining in-person courses for remote emergency education was a difficult endeavor. Faculty at our college struggled with synchronous online teaching while navigating issues related to digital infrastructure, student concerns about privacy, teaching across multiple time-zones, engagement, and content creation. As a result, asynchronous learning began to gain traction because it provided flexibility for students to access content and accommodated the type of autonomy many students were requesting. Although asynchronous learning has been around for a while, the majority of faculty at our institution had no pedagogical experience with this format and quickly began to encounter a different set of issues related to low student engagement, lack of interaction with students, and providing meaningful feedback. To address these challenges, our team developed a collaborative design process that complements our collective knowledge and experience in technology, content, and pedagogy.

Our design process is informed and adapted from the ADDIE Instructional Design Method (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation). We began the project with an initial meeting where we share and discuss learning topics, objectives as well as pedagogical vision. Next, we have a few follow up meetings to continue the ideation process and to share any artifacts we generated to visualize the project. Then, we create an outline of all the learning experiences with a title, short description, and supporting media in a design document.  Next, we start designing a prototype for the interface which can be in Canvas or in another learning platform. To conclude, we publish the module on Canvas for students to access and provide technical support for students and faculty if necessary. After the course concludes, we take a look at course evaluation and student reflection for feedback to evaluate and reiterate the design next time the course is offered.

During the presentation we will share a use case from a graduate-level asynchronous capstone course to demonstrate our work process and asynchronous learning design approach. The goal of the course was to support students learning about equity in K-12 education with essential knowledge and skills to develop an action research project focused on a problem of practice in their learning community. Our process used a systematic approach to manage multiple aspects within the life cycle of an instructional design project. It also leveraged resources and expertise from various stakeholders in our college such as learning designers, media developers, and technologists.  The design process attended to interactive resources, assessment of student learning, and providing a flexible environment that aligned with the affordances of the asynchronous learning. 

Strategies for Engaging the Audience 

The presentation will offer three opportunities for the audience to engage with the content and speakers. The presenters will begin the session with an overview of the educational landscape that supported the development of the asynchronous course. Next, they will engage the audience using an interactive tool (Mentimeter) to gather ideas about the affordances and challenges of asynchronous learning based on their experiences with the format. Then, the presenters will share their collaborative framework as they provide an overview of the course. After the overview, the presenters will invite the audience to explore three aspects of the course that highlight instructor presence, student engagement, and community building through the use of a [QR code]. At the completion of that experience, the presenters will engage the participants in a discussion about their observation, questions, and take aways using the chat or raise hand feature on the presentation platform. To conclude, the presenters will share questions that remain after the experience and recommendations for engaging in this work in other settings. 

 

References

Branson, R. K. (1978). The interservice procedures for instructional systems development.

Educational Technology, March, 11-14. 

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A

framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers college record108(6), 1017-1054.

Molenda, M. (2003). In search of the elusive ADDIE model. Performance improvement, 42(5),

34-37.

Willis, H., & Anderson, S. (2013). Speculative design and Curriculum development: Using

worldbuilding to imagine a new major in a post-course era. Journal of Media Literacy Education, 5(2), 4.

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Reimagine Online Student Support Post-Pandemic: Explore Possible Tools to Guide the Process | Discovery Session Asynchronous

As institutions rapidly moved online student support services from in-person to online, innovation and challenges occurred. Questions arose as to whether the online students support services were meeting the students needs and which services to continue to offer online post-pandemic. This workshop explores tools to evaluate and make these decisions.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Description:

Engaging students with the institution through student services is valuable when considering quality of distance education students’ experience. Through the student services, students can access the equivalent support services that allow them to be successful academically and reduce the feeling of isolation. More importantly for a distance-learning student is accessibility of services without driving to campus. Home and work can be more than 30 miles away. The support services should improve the experience for the entire life cycle of the students starting with the recruitment process, admissions, enrollment, and as a student. Some institutions are also looking for ways to create online experiences that can replace the experiences of students on campus.

The scorecard was designed to provide guidance to institutions in evaluating support to students that are unable to come to the campus. The elements of the scorecard were developed by a group of individuals with a variety of expertise from both the public college and university system. The group consisted of distance learning and student services leaders from across Florida. This allowed the group to examine the issue of student services from multiple angles. The result is the scorecard and guidebook which will be shared at the presentation. The scorecard has 11 categories of support services and 50 indicators. Each of the indicators is worth 2 points. The 11 different categories include: admissions, financial aid, veteran services, career counseling, orientation, post-enrollment services, library, students with disability services, technology support and graduate students.

2 points: Exemplary Level of Serve is the availability of the service in an off-campus format: on-campus, virtually, extended workday hours and weekends.

1 Point: Service is Available as one or more options beyond on-campus or on-paper.

0 points: Limited of No Service is available in any mode

To complement the scorecard is a guidebook. Within the guidebook are broad descriptions of the activities expected within each of the categories. Following the descriptions are the quality indicators within that category. The quality indicators serve as descriptors of the activities for off-campus students which should be occurring at an institution to replicate the services students on-campus receive. Each of the quality indicators in the rubric has a description of what would be considered full implementation of that quality indicator for 100% off-campus programs and classes. Full implementation allows the student to participate anytime and anywhere without the need to visit the campus. Partial implementation indicates the student can access many services without visiting the campus, but some services might require a visit to campus, or because access is limited to typical work hours. No service would indicate the student must come to campus for that service. Following the indicators and levels of implementation at the institution is a list of suggested practices. This section serves as guidance to the institution related to services or activities the institution can provide to support off-campus students. The suggested items provide guidance for items that are scored within the scorecard. Examples have been gathered through research.

Another tool has also been developed to assist institutions in the evaluation of the services they are providing online called the Online Student Support Quality Survey. The survey has 35 questions that ask the students about the modality they are accessing the service and the responsiveness in receiving answers for their questions. That section is followed by questions that ask the students to rate their experience based upon a 5-point Likert scale from very poor to very good. Because of the pandemic an additional question was added to the survey to determine how students would like their services to be provided in the future. Those results will be shared with the group.

Target Audience:

• Distance learning program administrators.
• Higher education student services personnel.
• Other institutional staff who directly support students: librarians, counselors, advisors, ADA administrators, career coaches, veteran’s advocates etc.
• Work at one of the various types of higher education institutions: community college, public university, private college or university, faith-based college or university and for-profit institution.

Learning outcomes:

• Participants will use the scorecard to determine the level of services for online students at their institution.
• Participants will be able to use the scorecard to identify gaps in services provided for online students
• Participants will be knowledgeable about the guidebook and the Online Student Support Quality Survey for students to evaluate the quality of service.
• Participants will interact with others in the session to gather ideas for how to improve student services at their institution.

Activities:

● Brief description of why and how the scorecard was developed
● The activities of the workshop will walk the group through the life cycle of the student

○ Each phase of the life cycle will contain a case study for groups to evaluate and score
○ The participants will apply the skills they developed to connect current practices at their institution to the scorecard.
○ Groups will have an opportunity to share best strategies for providing support for the online students.

With the conclusion of the group activity, the leaders will discuss the guidebook and the survey that complements the scorecard and the interactive website that institutions can use to evaluate their services.

The identification of quality online education programs satisfies a great need in our field and has been requested by many online education administrators as a tool for program improvement. The assessment of quality online education has never been more important as fierce competition from for-profit programs as well as many non-profit programs continues to increase and students all over the world are clicking to find a respectable degree program.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Launching a (Popular!) Peer Review Program: Fast, Fun and Formative | Discovery Session Asynchronous

A university can implement a voluntary peer supportive review process with the adoption of open-source materials and simple administrative design. Faculty engagement can be high in programs which are voluntary and formative in nature and can set the stage of peer collaboration before more comprehensive peer-review programs are implemented.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

A university can implement a voluntary peer supportive review process with the adoption of open-source materials and simple administrative design. Faculty engagement can be high in programs which are voluntary and formative in nature and can set the stage of peer collaboration before more comprehensive peer-review programs are implemented.

Establishing a Peer-Review Framework

With the expansion of online learning and our growing faculty, MUIH required an expanded and online-friendly peer-review program. While some peer review programs can evoke a groan, our intention was to create a formative and fully voluntary process to promote a culture of collegial scholarship. The voluntary and formative nature of this peer review process assists in creating a refined and mature peer-review process prior to implementing summative or mandatory peer-review evaluation. The initial phase of the peer review process seeks to fulfill three goals:

  • Set a positive, formative process for peer review
  • Utilize a group of voluntary participants to initiate and inform the process
  • Gather data to implement a broader peer review plan

In Peer Review of Teaching: A Sourcebook (2007), Nancy Chism discusses the difference between formative and summative evaluation of teaching as follows: “Within the context of teacher evaluation, the term formative evaluation describes activities that provide teachers with information that they can use to improve their teaching. The information is intended for their personal use, rather than for public inspection, and thus is private and confidential. The information should be rich in detail so that teachers can obtain clear insights in the nature of their teaching strengths and weaknesses. Often, text comments or a multitude of very specific rating items tied to course goals and practices will be employed to provide this… Formative evaluation is informal, ongoing, and wide-ranging. It is the basis for the development of effective teaching throughout one’s career. In contrast, summative evaluation of teaching focuses on information needed for a personnel decision – for example, hiring, promotion, tenure, merit pay. Consequently, the information is for public inspection rather than for the individual faculty member. Since it is not intended to provide rich and detailed data for the improvement of teaching, it is often more general and comparative in nature than data for formative evaluation… The information should provide comparative information as well, enabling the evaluator to determine the quality of the teaching performance with respect to the performance of other peers… The attempt is to judge merit or worth to the institution generally. Summative evaluation, in contrast to formative evaluation, is conducted at given intervals, such as annual or promotion and tenure reviews.” [p5] With limited faculty resources and a desire for speedy implementation we created a simple, yet highly effective, peer review pilot based around open access materials generously provided by Penn State University. This process can easily and effectively be reproduced at other universities. The materials provided by Penn State are designed to be modified for your institutional application (with permission, which was simple to acquire). At our university, there are many faculty who teach courses they have not designed or created, so it was important to assess the teaching of the course and not specifically the design of the course. We modified the forms to this effect and created a modified version for our face-to-face courses.

The Peer-Review Process

Our process as the faculty development and assessment committee to launch the peer review program consisted of the following:

  1. Review, revise and customize the forms provided by Penn State University: http://facdev.e-education.psu.edu/evaluate-revise/peerreviewonline.
  2. Create an online course portal where we offered the following:
    • an overview of the program
    • a flow chart of the process (for both reviewer and instructor)
    • an instructor input form to gather information on their course (which is then provided to the reviewer)
    • extensive instructions for the reviewer and the instructor, both written and in video form e. the forms and resources necessary to complete the review
  3. A category of “peer reviewer” was added to our Student Information System to allow reviewers full and unrestricted access to the course for the purposes of review.
  4. A communication was sent to all faculty which explained the process and included a link to a survey to ask if they were interested in participating, in what role, and if they were teaching online or F2F course.
  5. Instructors were able to choose their course reviewed in this voluntary program. An instructor form was completed with course details and sent to the reviewer.
  6. Review is conducted.
  7. A report is created by the reviewer and presented to the instructor. In this fully voluntary and formative process the instructor is not required to share the results of this peer review although they may choose to reflect upon it in their annual review.
  8. A survey of all participants is created and implemented.
  9. Ongoing revision and evaluation as well as the development of a more summative, required peer review program.

Summary

Our initial two trimesters of the program included instructors from each of our departments as well as a majority of our ranked faculty body. Faculty cited the collaborative and positive peer experience as appealing, the ease of participating (including no required synchronous activities) and many faculty chose to engage without concern of the results being provided as part of their annual formal evaluation. Our intention as a Faculty Development and Assessment team was to create a culture of peer support and collaborative growth prior to creating a more summative and required format. As was reported in our evaluations, faculty were overwhelmingly positive about the experience and many participated in sequential trimesters.

 

References

Taylor, A. (Ed.). (2016). Faculty peer review of online teaching. Retrieved from http://facdev.e-education.psu.edu/evaluate-revise/peerreviewonline

Van Note Chism, N., & Chism, G. W. (2007). Peer review of teaching: a sourcebook (2nd ed.). Bolton, MA: Anker.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Building Learning Collectives into STEM Classes | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Learning collectives are a potentially effective way of supporting students, especially in extremely difficult larger lecture courses. After finding learning collectives effective in several courses, The team at our institution used a Learning Collectives pilot for our Introduction to Biology courses to increase student success, retention, and graduation to great effect. 

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Students often report feeling “lost in the shuffle” in college courses, especially large lecture courses. For this reason (among others), these classes often have lower pass rates and result in lower student retention. Fixing this is a common struggle for college administration, especially as these courses tend to provide the foundational knowledge essential to progress and success in later courses in the department series. 

Learning Collectives are a methodology in which students are arranged into defined or organic collaborative groups to learn and support each other in their education. This uses a variety of resources including student-based (ie: study groups), focused around awareness and utilization of institutional resources (ie: Academic Support Centers and Counseling Centers). One such learning collective project, the “Freshman Year Experience” (FYE) had great reviews and significantly increased rates of increased student retention and success.

Learning Collectives have also been developed and integrated into courses themselves. The Queens College’s Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL) facilitated several courses that utilized learning collectives as part of the pedagogy to great success. However, these were limited to the courses they were developed for, and we wanted to move towards a more encompassing strategy that targeted the areas that they would be most impactful for. Specifically, with our institutional project designed to increase student success rates in our STEM courses.

The introductory Biology courses (Biology 105 and 106) at Queens College are extremely in demand and are the gateway for many of our pre-med and STEM focused disciplines. Unfortunately, they also have the sad distinction of having some of the highest DFWI rates college-wide. Seeking to ameliorate this issue, the HSI-STEM Project launched an initiative to increase student success, retention, and overall access to higher education through (among other efforts), learning collectives. 

Biology 105/6 is structured as an extremely large lecture of over 300 students. One of the earlier projects of HSI-STEM was redesigning the labs to be taught in coordination with the lectures instead of independently. These corequisite labs focus on the in-practice concepts that are covered in the lecture. HSI-STEM launched a pilot initiative to incorporate targeted learning collectives into all sections of these course offerings. These projects involved both making defined learning collectives for groups of students, coordinated by a peer mentor who had recently completed the relevant course, as well facilitating students to connect to each other in organic learning collectives amongst themselves.

Organic Learning Collectives:

Faculty fostered organic learning collectives by giving students resources and frameworks to form learning collectives amongst themselves. For example, making a buddy system to go to peer mentor or faculty office hours to discuss areas of the coursework that they needed some clarification on. The peer aspect of the support ameliorated the intimidation factor that particularly affects first generation students and freshman who are often unfamiliar with that aspect of higher education. 

Organic learning collectives were also given information about creating internal chat and discussion forums including mobile-friendly platforms, and prompts to potentially consider on a given week. Peer mentors reached out to the learning collectives on a regular basis to support them and facilitate group collaboration. 

Defined Learning Collectives:

As part of a course, faculty members can also preselect groups to form defined learning collectives. These are designated groups of students who meet both inside and outside of class to collaborate together and review course material. Advantages to defined learning collectives are they are less likely to leave students behind, and ensure a defined structure. However, we have found that the defined learning collectives were less likely to continue beyond the course series as strongly throughout a student academic career. From our observations, the most impactful collectives were with peer mentors who facilitate the creation of organic community based learning collective, especially in STEM courses.

After the course series, support for student learning collectives continues. Building on prior implementations of learning collectives, the HSI-STEM Learning Commons is structured around supporting students throughout their STEM course progression. Students continue to be supported in similar ways in later courses in the series. The commons ensures that direct resources for supporting all levels of students exist. 

Results

These projects are currently ongoing, and thus we do not currently have complete data at this time, however we expect to have more comprehensive data to present at the conference. The early results have shown to be promising. Thus far, student lecture and lab grades in the learning collectives cohort rose significantly compared to the control and overall DWFI rates decreased significantly for the learning collective cohort.  

Future: 

There are plans to institutionalize and formalize the HSI-STEM Learning Collectives programs beyond the current grant funded instance. Funding is being secured through college resources to support not just the currently supported courses, but expanding to STEM courses in a wide variety of disciplines. Future plans also include launching similar learning collectives frameworks for other disciplines at the college as well. 

Level of Participation: 

This is a highly participatory session. Rather than lecture at the audience for 45 minutes, the presenters will frame the session around conversations of student success in STEM courses, particularly initiatives that increase student success rates for minority and other underrepresented groups. Throughout the session, the presenters will engage the audience through tools such as Mentimeter and the Zoom chat, and frame the conversation around that.

A large chunk of the session will also be spent in scaffolded engagement breakout rooms. Essentially, after presenting the problem to a large audience members will have the option of moving into a breakout room guided by a presenter focused on topics that the audience seemed most interested in earlier in the presentation.

To support and engage our audience at all levels, engagement during the session will be scaffolded. During the breakout rooms participants can also choose to engage: 

  • Discussing with the other members of the session via audio/video in Zoom
  • In the chat
  • By sharing resources and ideas in a shared collaborative resource page.

Session Goals: 

  • Importance of learning collectives, and how they can increase student success
  • Mechanisms of implementing Learning Collectives into courses and programs.
  • Understanding impact Learning Collectives can have specifically for STEM courses, especially for underrepresented groups.
Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
A 'Beacon of Light': Peer Mentors' Experiences in an Online Peer Mentoring Program | Discovery Session Asynchronous

This presentation will explore the implementation of an online peer mentoring program, eSTEM, at two historically black institutions and the impact of the program on racially and ethnically minoritized students’ engagement in and intent to persist in STEM degrees and careers.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Introduction to the Overall Topic and Research Study

This presentation will explore the implementation of an online peer mentoring program, eSTEM, at two historically black institutions and the impact of the program on racially and ethnically minoritized students’ engagement in and intent to persist in STEM degrees and careers. The eSTEM program is a collaborative effort between two historically black institutions. The project extended a previous pilot project by expanding the development, implementation, and evaluation of an online science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) peer mentoring program specifically designed to support historically underrepresented women and racially and ethnically minoritized undergraduate and graduate students. The goal was to examine the efficacy of the eSTEM program to assist students in developing mentoring skills that are culturally responsive; self-efficacy in STEM; science identities; and to promote their intent to persist in their STEM degree and subsequent STEM careers. The overarching goal is to broaden the participation of those who are historically underrepresented in STEM fields.

Women, especially those that identify as racially and ethnically minoritized, continue to be underrepresented in STEM degree programs and career fields (NSF, 2021) despite myriad efforts to broaden participation. While some fields have shown an improvement in equitable representation, such as biology, others demonstrate a dearth in women both pursuing degrees within the field and remaining within the profession, such as engineering, for instance. There are many reasons that have been identified within the research literature, including a hostile climate, incongruence with responsibilities typically shouldered by women (e.g., child rearing), and lack of access to ‘like others’ (see Brue, 2019; Dawson et al., 2015; Fouad et al., 2016; Jensen & Deemer, 2019; Mondisa, 2018).

The study was grounded in social cognitive career theory (SCCT; Lent et al., 1994) and further informed by theories on persistence, self-efficacy, identity, and mentoring. SCCT, however, purports that interest is a key component to promoting individuals’ intent to engage in and persist in STEM degrees and careers. Individuals’ interest motivates their action, which in turn inform their subsequent successes and failures. Throughout this process, feedback is utilized that, in turn, impacts self-efficacy—the belief that an individual has about their ability and the likelihood that a specific behavior will lead to a specific outcome (Bandura, 1977)--and performance outcomes. Individuals who experience a higher level of STEM self-efficacy will be more likely to engage in and persist in STEM degrees and career paths (Fouad et al., 2016). Further, STEM self-efficacy impacts the development of individuals’ STEM identity which may further inform persistence in STEM degrees and careers. Peer mentoring is one promising method for providing support for the development of interest in STEM, STEM self-efficacy, sense of belonging, and STEM identity (see Rockinson-Szapkiw et al., 2020, 2021; Wendt et al., 2019).

In Summer 2020, undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in STEM degree programs at the participating institutions were recruited. A total of 34 students participated in the program to completion (n = 8 mentors, n = 26 mentees). All participants were assigned a role as either a peer mentor or peer mentee, completed a pre-test survey, and then engaged in a series of 8 online training modules (mentors completed mentor training and mentees completed mentee training) in Summer and Fall 2020. After completing the training, mentors were assigned 2-4 mentees in which to engage in an online mentoring relationship. The mentoring relationships, termed STEM Communities, interacted through the Spring 2021 semester. Throughout the 2020/2021 academic year, participants were also provided the opportunity to participate in a series of STEM Webinars featuring women in STEM career fields. Participants then completed a post-survey and participated in individual interviews and focus groups.

The current presentation will focus on the experiences of the peer mentors (n = 7), all of whom self-identified as African American women, from a qualitative perspective. Using a case study approach, with the peer mentors serving as the case, open ended interviews and focus groups were conducted, and data was collected and transcribed for analysis. Using a grounded theory approach (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) data was coded using a combination of inductive and deductive coding. From the codes, themes were identified. The following research questions guided the analysis:

RQ1: How, if at all, was participation in the online peer mentee program useful in furthering students’ STEM self-efficacy?

RQ2: How, if at all, was participation in the online peer mentee program useful in furthering students’ sense of belonging in STEM?

RQ3: How, if at all, was participation in the online peer mentee program useful in furthering students’ development of a STEM identity?

RQ4: How, if at all, was participation in the online peer mentee program useful in furthering students’ intent to persist in a STEM degree program and, ultimately, their intent to pursue a STEM career pathway?

All participants indicated that their experience in the eSTEM program was valuable and an overall positive experience. In discussing their experience, several salient themes were identified: An ‘I Can Do This Approach: Confidence and Self-Efficacy; Motivation through Reciprocity; Utility of Like Others; ‘Beacons of Light’: Intersecting and Malleable Identities; Skills Development; and Acknowledgement of Challenges that Could Be Overcome.

Key Take-Aways

Conference attendees will:

  • Learn about the impetus and structure of the eSTEM program;
  • Learn about the methodology for evaluating the impact of participation in the program on peer mentors’ interest in STEM, self-efficacy in STEM, sense of belonging, STEM identity, and intent to persist in STEM;
  • Learn about the salient themes identified from analysis of peer mentors’ individual interviews and focus groups;
  • Discuss opportunities for future research and potential collaborations; and
  • Discuss the impact of the current study on efforts to broaden participation in STEM.

Plan for Interactivity

This presentation will elaborate on the salient themes identified by providing a robust discussion of participant responses, including quotes. Directions for further research, as supported by the current analyses and analyses from the previous pilot, will be shared. As part of the presentation, conference attendees will be invited to share their perspectives on the themes identified, as well as their suggestions for future implementation and study of the eSTEM program. Importantly, there will be an opportunity to suggest potential collaborations to extend the current project to other historically black institutions and minority serving institutions. Conference attendees will also be provided with the url to the project website where they can further engage with and explore the online peer mentoring training modules developed for the eSTEM program.

References

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. W. H. Freeman and Company.

Brue, K. L. (2019). Work-life balance for women in STEM leadership. Journal of Leadership Education, 18(2), 32–45.

Dawson, A. E., Bernstein, B. L., & Bekki, J. M. (2015). Providing the psychosocial benefits of mentoring to women in STEM: CareerWISE as an online solution. New Directions for Higher Education, 2015(171), 53-62.

Fouad, N., Singh, R., Cappaert, K., Chang, W., & Wan, M. (2016). Comparison of women engineers who persist in or depart from engineering. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 92, 79-93.

Jensen, L. E., & Deemer, E. D. (2019). Identity, campus climate, and burnout among undergraduate women in STEM fields. Career Development Quarterly, 67(2), 96–109.

Lent, R., Brown, S., & Hackett, G. (1994). Toward a unifying social cognitive theory of career and academic interest, choice, and performance. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 45(1), 79-122.

Mondisa, J. (2018). Examining the mentoring approaches of African-American mentors. Journal of African American Studies, 22, 293-308.

National Science Foundation. (2021). Women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering. Retrieved from https://ncses.nsf.gov/pubs/nsf21321

Rockinson-Szapkiw, A., & Wendt, J. L. (2020). The benefits and challenges of a blended peer mentoring program for women peer mentors in STEM. International Journal on Mentoring and Coaching in Education, 10(1), 1-16. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJMCE-03-2020-0011

Rockinson-Szapkiw, A., Wendt, J. L., & Stephen, J. S. (2021). The efficacy of a blended peer mentoring experience for racial and ethnic minority women in STEM pilot study: Academic, professional, and psychosocial outcomes for mentors and mentees. Journal for STEM Education Research, 4, 173-193. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41979-020-00048-6

Saffie-Robertson, M. C. (2021). It’s not you, it’s me: An exploration of mentoring experiences for women in STEM. Sex Roles, 83, 566-579.

Wendt, J. L., Rockinson-Szapkiw, A., & Conway, A. (2019). Using technology to foster peer mentoring relationships: Development of a virtual peer mentorship training model for broadening participation in STEM. In L. Winfield, Z. Wilson-Kennedy, G. Thomas, & L. Watkins (Eds.), Growing diverse STEM communities: Methodology, impact, and evidence. (pp. 255-268).

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Accessibility: Compromised or Favored with the Mass Procession to Online Teaching? | Discovery Session Asynchronous

This presentation will discuss the experience of Wichita State University transitioning to university-wide online teaching through the pandemic times trying to balance the extreme need for technical assistance and the need to make contents accessible for all. The main focus will be to show whether or not accessibility was compromised or favored during the pandemic.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Extended Abstract

In the last couple of years there was a heavy load on the instructional support teams of higher education institutions due to the unexpected shift to online teaching caused by the global pandemic. Instructional support teams, whose roles include to help faculty and other instructional staff make their course materials be accessible for all learners. With the extreme load easing the transition to online teaching for instructors during the early pandemic times, making contents accessible might seem a luxury. How did institutions bring the balance between the quality/seamlessness of the online course delivery and the need for content accessibility?

The transition at WSU

Like many other universities and colleges, moving over a thousand instructors and several thousands of courses in the middle of the semester was very stressing at Wichita State University. There were instructors with limited to no experience of teaching online, families negatively affected by the pandemic in so many ways, and students . The Instructional design and education technology support team was in charge of leading everyone on board. Prior to this pick transition time, this same team was responsible to make sure all courses are accessible to all learners. This includes creating training videos and web pages about accessibility, or how to remediate inaccessible documents; running open labs where instructors can come to get help with accessibility and other LMS and educational technology questions. It was never possible to address the need in the old traditional way, so the team needed to plan a different approach.

What was done different?

Among the many interventions needed, assigning more time for one-to-one assistance and creating on demand tutorials were the major ones. The list can go long but below is what the team mainly did:

  • Extended lab hours
  • Additional lab day for graduate teaching assistants
  • Created play lists of videos for instructors and students on the use of educational technologies required for online teaching
  • Building web pages for a step by step transition to the online environment
  • Created a newsletter with important updates

The team went extra miles by working extended hours to do all of this. However, it was not enough. There were areas that were compromised due to the overwhelming demand on technical assistance; making content accessible for all.

How was Accessibility treated as?

Before the pandemic, accessibility was given a lot of attention at Wichita State University. When the mass transition to online teaching happened during the pandemic, however, it became overwhelming to push the strict accessibility expectations on instructors. With the lot of pressure caused by the unexpected transition, somethings were overlooked and compromised. One was for sure accessibility. While there was a little push back to reinforce the accessibility requirements of the university at the beginning of the pandemic, it also created the opportunity to introduce the creation of brand new digital course materials. That was an amazing opportunity for the support team to help instructors create accessible course materials than the old tradition of document remediation. It is know that it is easier to create an accessible document than remediate an inaccessible one. In that respect accessibility can be considered as favored.

This presentation will discuss the main practices of Wichita State University with respect to transitioning to mass online teaching with main emphasis on how accessibility seemed to be compromised but was favored in a very unexpected way.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Just-in-Time Vocabulary Learning: Designing Adaptive Learning Modules to Support Spanish Language Internship Students | Discovery Session Asynchronous

For Spanish students, internships can pose a challenge regarding industry-specific vocabulary. Personal adaptive learning (PAL) modules were created to build students’ language competency in two internship fields: medicine and law. PAL modules focusing specifically on professional vocabulary, incorporated into Canvas companion course, constitute a new opportunity for  just-in-time adaptive learning.  

 

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Extended Abstract

For college and university students pursuing a major or minor in a second language, internships serve a vital role in preparing graduates to find employment in the competitive fields of translation and interpretation. Internships provide clear benefits to students: 

  • Acquisition of hands-on experience, 

  • Networking,

  • Interpersonal 

  • Intercultural competence,

  • Problem-solving, and 

  • Advanced knowledge of the field (e.g., current terminology, industry norms). 

There is, however, a large gap between communicating in the target language in the classroom and communicating in specific professional contexts (i.e., without their instructors or classmates’ support and in a real-world context).  At our large public university), Spanish language internships are offered through the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures in collaboration with the Division of Teaching and Learning’s Internship Program.  Internships have been conducted in-state (Orlando, Tampa, Miami), out-of-state (Texas, Illinois), and internationally (Argentina, Peru).  For students beginning an internship in what might be a potentially new cultural and interpersonal context, preparation to meet the demands of this new environment may make the difference between a successful experience that builds excitement and confidence. The challenge for instructors of internship courses involves the limited instructional opportunities to interact with students.  To respond to this challenge, the authors of this presentation implemented Cavanaugh et al.’s (2020) Adaptive Learning Design Framework, designing Spanish language personalized adaptive learning (PAL) modules for legal and medical terminology. These PAL modules were created using Realizeit, a PAL platform that allows instructors to create their own content and assessment items.  Industry-specific (medical and legal) Spanish vocabulary modules were added to the Canvas internship companion course, where students could select the Realizeit modules that fit their internship placement.  PAL modules focusing specifically on professional vocabulary, incorporated into an internship Canvas companion course, constitute a new digital potential for just-in-time adaptive learning.  This session will engage attendees by using online polling to elicit feedback.  Takeaways from this session include instructional design suggestions for incorporating PAL in internship courses.

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Administrative Strategies to Foster Civic Engagement: Comparative Study between Campus-based and Online Undergraduate College Students | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Higher education is the purveyor of civic engagement by developing student’s critical thinking, community service, civic attitude, and civic behavior needed in a self-governing society. Current trends reflect the growth and popularity of online learning. In this session, research comparing the civic engagement between campus-based and online students will be presented. Research findings uncovered significant differences between campus-based and online student populations for civic engagement which led to the discovery of both theoretical implications and practical strategies for university leadership, administration, and faculty.

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Extended Abstract

Institutions of higher education play an essential role in preserving the American democratic society by preparing future graduates to become civically engaged. Traditionally, university professors, administrators, and leaders have relied on the physical college campus to create a collegiate experience that fosters community learning, engagement, and social capital. However, not all learning occurs on a physical campus, and in fact online education is growing exponentially and is now an essential part of higher education.

 

Key areas related to the civic engagement of campus-based and online students identified in the literature include higher education and democracy (Bowman, 2011; Fitzgerald et al., 2016; Hyde & LaPrad, 2015; Portes, 2000; Skousen, 1981), campus life and civic engagement (Barnhardt et al., 2015; Herman et al., 2015), online education (Allen & Seaman, 2018; Caruth & Caruth, 2013). As faculty, administrators, and leaders, it is important to recognize that higher education has become the purveyor of citizenship and a democracy agent by grooming students for active citizenship and that the collegiate experience helps students learn to become capable citizens. University leadership have embraced online learning and made it an essential part of higher education; therefore, all student populations must be considered when developing civic engagement.

In this session, research on the civic attitude and civic behavior between campus-based and online students will be statistically compared and presented. Research findings will provide university leadership, administration, and faculty with a fresh perspective specifically on the civic engagement of online students and some strategies to foster civic engagement for all student populations. In addition to the presentation of research findings, faculty and administrators attending this session will be able to brainstorm and strategize new best practices for fostering the civic engagement of all college students.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
An OER for Teaching and Learning Communication Skills in Social Work and other Helping Professions | Discovery Session Asynchronous

This discovery session will showcase an open educational resource for teaching communication skills in social work and other helping professions. This OER is a toolkit consisting of five demonstration videos, an instructor's guide and a student guide for giving peer feedback. We will describe the development of these resources and our experiences in using them as social work educators.

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Extended Abstract

Open Educational Resources (OER) are learning materials openly licensed so that others may retain, reuse, revise, remix or redistribute these materials. OER provides content that can be downloaded and saved, or retained for later use, as well as adapted to better meet the needs of the learner.

In this session we will discuss our experience of creating and using an open educational resource consisting of five videos demonstrating basic communication skills, a teaching guide for instructors and a student guide for giving peer feedback on communication skills. The videos are a series of short vignettes of counselling sessions between a social worker and a client. Four of the videos target one or two basic communication skills so students can learn the skills in manageable segments. The fifth video demonstrates how a counsellor would amalgamate all the skills in a counselling session. The teaching guide provides transcripts, discussion questions and exercises/role plays that instructors can use in both face-to-face and online teaching to enhance student learning of communication skills.

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • describe how demonstration videos can enhance learning communication skills in both online and face to face learning environments
  • describe the benefit of using open education resources in teaching and learning to fit the needs of your students
  • locate an open education resource for teaching communication skills in an online and f2f environment
Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Best Practices for Online Equity-Driven Education Post-Covid: Cultivating Connectedness and Efficacy with Students | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Covid-19 thrust many brick-and-mortar institutions into online education. As the pandemic wanes, many are maintaining the online option as many students desire to remain online. However, online education still presents a deficit in connectedness. Focusing on teaching through engagement (TTE), best practices are discussed for connectedness and efficacy with students.

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Extended Abstract

Online education has been an option for students for nearly three decades; however, it is often critiqued for lacking rigor, being profit centered, not conducive to quality learning, and missing those aspects that only a brick-and-mortar institution can provide such as social connectedness (Hodges et al., 2020; Ruth, 2018). In 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic thrust many grounded institutions into online education. After some initial difficulties, many institutions found their footing, and even though many are currently returning to the traditional in-person model, some are maintaining the online option as many students desire to remain online (Hess, 2021; McKenzie, 2021).

Post-pandemic, online education is likely to remain an emphasis in higher education. However, online education still presents a deficit in connectedness (Ensmann et al., 2021; Linton et al., 2021; Syahputri et al., 2020), a key component of psychological health and motivation identified by Deci and Ryan (2017). As educators at an online institution built on a model of teaching through engagement (TTE), the presenters offer some best practices in creating connectedness that have shown the most efficacy with our students.

Open office hours, virtual co-working sessions, and video calls are synchronous opportunities for all professors to engage with students. Open office hours can be offered weekly, bi-weekly, or monthly for students in courses and students who the professor is supporting as a dissertation chair or committee member. These sessions offer access to the professor to ask questions, get clarification, or simply say, “Hi.” The opportunity for the professor and students to engage allows rapport-building and opportunity to know and be known “off the page” as actual humans with real feelings and real personalities, which can attenuate what would otherwise be conflicts and tension related to feedback, grading, and several other emotional processes within the doctorate. Open office hours also allow students to engage synchronously with one another to build community and comradery. Students often exchange contact information and build relationships that might not otherwise occur at online institutions.

Virtual co-working sessions also allow question-and-answer and community-building opportunities like open office hours, but the goal differs slightly. In these sessions, we often have a scheduled time or send out a spontaneous email to tell students that we will be working via Zoom link if they wish to join. We offer and encourage students who want to feel connected and have the professor “readily available” to bring their own work and sit, often in silence, while we all work on our individual academic tasks. Interruptions to the workflow are expected but can be accommodated to some degree. For instance, Topia is one of many online meeting environments where students can be in a virtual world with the professor and other students. Based on the proximity of their avatar to the professor’s avatar, they can engage, listen, and discuss, or remain in silence at a distance in virtual space from the professor and, perhaps, another student discussing an issue that is not relevant to them. Thus, they can remain focused on their tasks, while still feeling surrounded by peers and their professor. While virtual co-working does have downsides, it offers accountability and connectedness to the professor and peers. Pro-tip: Be prepared for virtual co-working to not be as productive as working alone.

One-on-one video calls are, of course, the most engaging and focused form of guidance. They require the most time and energy due to the one-at-a-time approach to student engagement. Among the various options for engaging with students, synchronous, one-on-one video calls are the most personal and focused. We recommend using them in initial meetings to build rapport and during meetings focused on student-specific issues (e.g., student confusion regarding feedback). It is noteworthy that old technology can be modified, and new technology is built to provide an eye-to-eye experience, which can improve the connected dialogue between student and professor. Using a teleprompter to display students’ images in front of a webcam or buying a mini webcam that hangs down onto the screen (e.g., Center Cam), a professor can observe the student while making eye contact. Pro-tip: Having a “Meet the [student’s] Family” meeting early in the doctoral process can create connection and a “family as a team” dynamic. Families gain some clarity about the seriousness of the student’s endeavor, and they meet the infamous “chair” who will likely be praised and cursed throughout the dissertation journey.

Research has shown that students need to see your face and hear your voice to feel connected (Patterson, 2019). There are several ways to engage students asynchronously in ways that are engaging and relatable. Specifically, video feedback on assignments or manuscript reviews allows a professor to summarize or talk through the feedback while inserting comments tracking changes. We suggest that the professor’s face be included in the corner of the screen on one of the top edges, while the document will take at least three quarters of the screen. This facial and written feedback provides humanized feedback with facial expression and tone of voice so that students can hear the professor’s tone and see their mannerisms as they type the feedback. Thus, “cold” written feedback, which is often “heard” by students as harsh and critical can be softened by the professor’s verbal dialogue in accompaniment. The presenters upload each video feedback to a YouTube channel as a private or unlisted video which only the student can access. In doing so, the student can explore and discover other content that the professor may be sharing on the YouTube channel.

Indeed, video tutorials can be hosted on the same YouTube channel or other hosting service. Such tutorials are extremely efficient and useful to the professor and students. By taking the time to script and record tutorials, the professor saves tremendous time and increases access and prowess of information that is often repeated across students. Lectures, helpful hints, or directions for addressing assignment guidelines, or tutorials walking students through sections of a dissertation can be made publicly available and serve to replicate the professor’s message endlessly across students. Such videos need to be well-crafted and should be updated and modified per feedback and change (e.g., best practices update).

YouTube or podcast shows can be hosted similarly to provide other types of dialogic content. For instance, the presenters host interviews with dissertation chairs and students who have recently completed their dissertation. A similar show, Driven to Doctorate, for example, humanizes dissertation chairs, providing a “behind the curtain” discussion for students to watch to understand and find wisdom related to the dissertation process. The audio from D2D is then presented in podcast form under the same “branding.” It is apropos, then, that the second pro-tip be to spend a little bit of time creating or purchasing simple graphics to improve the student experience with the content. Be optimistic and forward-thinking with your videos, imagining that the public ones will be viewed hundreds, if not thousands, of times over the years. With the help of YouTube, you can use Canva, webcam, and low-cost video software to improve the personal and professional framing of the content. So, spend time to create or buy reusable elements (e.g., logos, graphics, animations, audio introductions, and salutations), dress professionally, buy a pair of box lights and a ring light to illuminate yourself, and modify your background to enhance the student engagement experience.

Just as professors can replicate their messaging across students and the video elements that can be reused, we found virtual certificates to be simple, but significant motivators for students. We give an unofficial “PhD Finished” certificate on the day of their completed defense. We often show the certificate to the student during a screenshare in our initial meeting as if to say, “It’s yours. Come and get it. I believe in you.” Additionally, we have certificates celebrating finishing each dissertation chapter and more personalized awards that celebrate any student achievement (e.g., “getting unstuck,” “Longest lit review,” or “working super-fast”) that can be easily created and emailed to students. In a doctoral journey that often feels like a seemingly endless, iterative process, markers of progress, albeit virtual, often tell the student that you have noticed their effort and success along the way. These small tokens of acknowledgement and are often framed or stuck to the family refrigerator.

Finally, attending graduation together is an invaluable experience to acknowledge and process the successfully completed doctorate. In addition to the hooding experience, it is sometimes the only time that an online professor will be physically with their student. Make the most of the time together by scheduling a meet-and-greet with the student and their family. Take pictures with them. Make plans to work with them to publish their dissertation in a journal, to develop new research, or to discuss career opportunities. Connection is essential to the doctoral experience success and to the long-term relationship that a professor and their university’s relationship with the student. Indeed, a solid, healthy relationship between the student and professor, especially when continued post-graduation, can lead to more success for the student and increased likelihood of student’s giving back in the form of scholarships, endowments, and referrals.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Boosting Engagement with Interpersonal Feedback Tools in Online Collaborative Learning | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Collaborative learning is a critical part of education, yet facilitating fruitful peer-to-peer interactions is more difficult online than in-person. This session summarizes how real-time feedback about interpersonal dynamics of peer interactions leads to higher levels of engagement and better individual and team performance.

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Extended Abstract

Topic and Relevance

Online instruction often lacks a social collaborative environment, which limits opportunities for immediate feedback on engagement and interpersonal dynamics, which are easier to foster in traditional, in-person instruction. This deficiency can make collaborative activities such as group projects and discussions especially challenging online. Indeed, many online courses fail to engage students and advance their progress toward achieving learning objectives, especially for small groups.

Although online instruction may never replicate the in-person alternatives, there are tools available for improving engagement and social interactions in online courses. This session will introduce attendees to “interaction instrumentation” for facilitating engagement in collaborative learning contexts. First, we will discuss the initial development of three foundational user-facing applications and supporting backend frameworks:

  • Video chat (with real-time meeting mediator)

  • Post-meeting metrics

  • Text chat (which includes video chat and post-meeting metrics)

Researchers have discovered that richer modes of communication lead to higher rates of trust, cooperation, engagement, and social presence (Bos et al. 2002). For example, video conferences, which include real-time video and voice, are richer modes of communication than asynchronous discussion boards. Authentic interactions are accompanied by subtle signals such as vocal tone, body language, and speech patterns. We designed our tools with artificial intelligence (AI) to detect these kinds of signals and provide feedback to users, both in real-time and after online interactions.

Interactivity

Attendees will have the opportunity to watch live demonstrations of the communication tools being used and participate in live discussion.

Second, we will describe recent results from studying the impact of the communication tools in online courses. We implemented the video communication tools as part of an online course that required students to collaborate on a group project. Overall, we found that the frequency of using video communication tools with AI-guided feedback was strongly related to engagement and performance:

  • Each video chat made during the first four weeks of the course was associated with twice the probability of receiving a certificate of completion.

  • Each additional video chat made during the first four weeks of the course was associated with increased grades.

  • Most benefits were accrued after participating in the first four to five video chats. Students who participated in more than four calls (an average of one per week) received final grades 80% higher than those who did not and were twice as likely to earn a certificate.

Although this study was conducted before the 2020 pandemic, the study offered insights into the factors that contribute to successful transition of programs to online environments. The platform was designed to foster virtual engagement, providing course developers and instructors new tools for offering online experiences likely to capture and keep learner interest. This is especially critical in a time when the pandemic has forced millions of students and professional learners around the globe to use online platforms, replacing the traditional in-person instruction.

The last part of our session will discuss more recent advances to our communication tools and opportunities for using them to facilitate online collaboration in a variety of different educational and workplace environments. Attendees will leave this session with knowledge of the latest advances in AI applications for supporting collaborative learning, the latest research on how these tools are used in practice, and inspiration for implementing technology to improve learning and social experiences online.

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Addressing the Communication Performance Gap in an Online Environment through Innovation: Students' Self-perceptions of Their Ability to Communicate Effectively | Discovery Session Asynchronous

What is the best way to design a course online to help students learn effective communication that can be replicated in the workforce?  This session will describe a preliminary study of online students’ perceptions of their ability to communicate effectively and innovative strategies to engage students online with communication skills.

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Extended Abstract

In their 2019 research study “Genre Chameleon,” Patricia Droz and Lorie Jacobs concluded that “writing is essential in the workplace for salaried and unsalaried workers alike, and it travels with employees at every stage of their careers” (p. 79). Additionally, they learned that "effective writing and communication play a large role in hiring and promotion decisions" (p, 19) and that "the primary complaint from employers and senior employees is that recent graduates 'don’t sound professional' in their emails and that recent graduates do not consider their audience" (p. 80).

The findings of Droz and Jacobs echo those published by The College Board in 2004, which stated, "writing appears to be a 'marker' attribute of high-skill, high-wage, professional work. This is particularly true in sectors of the economy that are expanding, such as services, and the finance, insurance, and real estate sectors. Educational institutions interested in preparing students for rewarding and remunerative work should concentrate on developing graduates’ writing skills" (p. 19).  Additionally, The College Board’s report stated that “opportunities for salaried employment are limited for employees unable to communicate clearly" (p. 19). 

Despite the importance of writing and communication in the workplace, as demonstrated in the research, many graduates are not prepared to meet the demands of writing in the professions, thereby creating a communication performance gap between the needs of the employers and the capabilities of the students. To assess and better understand the performance gap in students’ communication capabilities, we intentionally created a study to gauge students’ perception of their ability to communicate effectively. Based on the findings of that study, we were able to identify some of the communication challenges in the online environment and students’ perceived abilities to meet those challenges. 

According to the College Board’s study, "developing the kinds of thoughtful writers needed in business, and elsewhere in the nation’s life, will require educators to understand writing as an activity calling for extended preparation across subject matters" (2004, p. 20). Additionally, given that so many courses and potential careers are in the online environment or, at a minimum, require communication in the online environment, educators need to not only address the performance gap in students’ communication capabilities but also to ensure students possess the necessary skills to write and communicate well in the online environment in order to ensure students have the ability to succeed in their chosen professions.

To help students bridge the communication performance gap, it is imperative that we as instructors take the time to provide innovative assignments, exercises, quizzes, and/or discussion boards that offer students the opportunity to enhance and further develop their communication skills.  With the overwhelming increase in online courses, instructors teaching these courses are provided with the ideal opportunity to guide students in improving their online communication abilities. 

Given the challenges faced by our students when they enter the workforce and our awareness of the performance gap in graduates’ writing skills as observed by employers, we wanted to examine students’ perceptions of their own ability to communicate effectively. Our preliminary findings include learning whether students’ abilities to communicate align with the communication needs of the workplaces they will be entering upon graduation.  Drawing on the findings of this study and the principles of threshold concepts, we will provide direction regarding how writing assignments in the online environment can be restructured across disciplines to help students develop or enhance their communication skills and better align their capabilities with the needs of the professional communities they will join after graduating.    

Teaching in the online environment can be challenging but innovative learning design and delivery methods to further engage the students to communicate effectively can lead to student success. During our session, we will share highlights of our preliminary study and provide innovative strategies for design and delivery to guide instructors in creating activities that engage students in learning opportunities that foster effective communication. These strategies, drawing on the principles of threshold concepts, will equip participants with the ability to engage students in thinking about their ability to communicate effectively and with assessment ideas to enhance the online communication and writing skills of students in all disciplines. Additionally, we will ask participants to share their challenges and/or insights into additional assessment opportunities that help bridge the communication performance gap.

Citations:

College Entrance Examination Board. College Board, 2004, Writing: A Ticket to Work . . . Or a Ticket Out.

Droz, Patricia Welsh, and Lorie Stagg Jacobs. “Genre Chameleon: Email, Professional Writing Curriculum, and Workplace Writing Expectations.” Technical Communication, vol. 66, no. 1, Feb. 2019, pp. 68–92.

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Business Growth and Expansion Through the Lens of Conscious Capitalism and Core Personal Values | Discovery Session Asynchronous

 This interactive presentation shows how students can use the principles of conscious capitalism and core values to plan for business growth

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Extended Abstract

The core of this presentation will be based on a multi-unit assignment and discussion question that has been developed for the Purdue University Global (PUG) MBA program capstone course. This classroom project is meant to encourage out of the box thinking in working with different cultures and is useful both in the classroom as well as the boardroom.  This assignment shows a unique approach for students to assess governments through a business lens to determine global expansion suitability and then integrate this information into a country profile, resulting in recommendations for expansion using a linkage to the company values and mission created by the student teams.

 

PUG students are adult learners, many of whom do business internationally, may have positions of managerial responsibility and may be in the military oftentimes in leadership roles. This classroom project is meant to encourage out of the box thinking in working with different cultures and is useful both in the classroom as well as the boardroom.  The course integrates the Conscious Capitalism model using a business simulation, entitled Conscious Capitalism, a collaborative effort between the Conscious Capitalism, Inc.,(http://www.consciouscapitalism.org/)  and the makers of Marketplace simulations. (http://www.marketplace-simulation.com/conscious-capitalism) . As conscious capitalism is usually applied to business, a gap is created within the simulation when trying to understand these concepts in considering expansion possibilities.

 

The Multi Unit Assignment and discussion question is geared to have students, examine personal decision-making using core values, and extrapolate these concepts into creating a plan for business startup launch and expansion There are several benefits to these exercises.

  • Students gain a greater appreciation for the difficulties that leaders face when trying to operate as a conscious capitalistic businesses.
  • Increased visibility to the process of working with company leadership when trying to gain funding for growth opportunities
  • Increased understanding of how the tenets of Conscious Capitalism can be applied more broadly when seeking out strategic partners or M&E opportunities can aid in growth strategy success.  If we can view the Conscious Capitalism model through the lens of government, which regulates business models in most countries, it will provide new levels of understanding which can help determine how and if the business leader wants to move forward with this relationship. 

 

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
From Ordinary to Extraordinary: Designing a Blended Learning Training Program with the COI Framework | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Due to an institutional migration from Blackboard to Canvas, a faculty training program on blended learning was re-designed for both transition and program enhancement. This presentation will share how the COI framework guided online course design to engage learners and build a community of learning in the faculty development program.  

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Extended Abstract

Blended learning thoughtfully integrate face-to-face classroom meetings and online learning with reduced seat time for students (Garrison & Kanuka, 2004). Blended learning provides students increased access to higher education because of its convenience, less seat time, and flexible schedule. For faculty who have never taught online, blended courses can be challenging to design and teach as they need to develop new technological and pedagogical skills for this teaching modality. Research shows that professional development is crucial to prepare and support faculty to teach blended courses (Owens, 2012). Faculty must have the technological skills to design and maintain the online portions of blended courses. They also must have pedagogical skills needed for instructional methods unique to blended learning (Korr et al., 2012).

In Fall 2019 our institution started to use the new Canvas learning management system, including all courses for students and all training courses for faculty. One of our training programs is to prepare faculty to design and teach blended courses. During the institution-wide learning management system migration time, we took the opportunity to re-design the training program from a three-week workshop to a four-week mini-course guided by the community of inquiry framework.

The community of inquiry has been widely used in the design and study of online environments (Garrison, 2017; Halverson et al., 2014). Garrison et al. (2000) first introduced this framework through their own work on computer-based conferencing, and it is the “most widely referenced framework associated with the study of online and blended learning” (Garrison, 2016, p. 68). The framework suggests that deep and meaningful learning results when there is evidence of sufficient levels of the various component presences composed of social presence, cognitive presence, and teaching presence.

Anderson et al.  (2001) defined social presence as the extent to which a learner’s true self is projected and perceived in an online course. It is composed of three subfactors: affective expressions, open communication, and group cohesion. Cognitive presence is defined as the extent to which learners can construct and confirm meaning through collaboration and reflection in a learning community. It consists of four subfactors: triggering event, exploration, integration, and resolution. Teaching presence is defined as the design, facilitation, and direction of cognitive and social processes to realize personally meaningful and educationally worthwhile learning outcomes. It is made of three subfactors: design and organization, facilitation of discourse, and direct instruction.

This discovery session, guided by the community of inquiry framework, will share how we re-designed the training program and engaged faculty in online learning to construct their knowledge about blended learning through social presence, teaching presence, and cognitive presence in the training course.

Session goals:
Participants will have a chance to see how the faculty training program on blended learning is designed using the community of inquiry framework. After the session, participants will have a better understanding of the COI framework and learn to apply it in online course design. They can also take away practical ideas and digital tools to apply in their own online courses or training programs.

Level of Participation

In addition to a presentation with visuals and examples, the presenters will provide an opportunity for all participants to ask questions and share ideas and resources related to the presentation topic. A free online resource will be provided for all participants to explore and implement in their own online courses or training programs.

 

References:

Anderson, T., Rourke, L., Garrison, D. R., & Archer, W. (2001). Assessing teaching presence in a computer conferencing context. Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks, 5(2), 1-17.

Garrison, D. R. (2016). Thinking collaboratively. Routledge.

Garrison, D. R. (2017). E-learning in the 21st century: A Community of Inquiry framework for research and practice. Routledge.

Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2), 87-105.

Garrison, D. R., & Kanuka, H. (2004). Blended learning: Uncovering its transformative potential in higher education. The Internet and Higher Education, 7(2), 95-105.

Halverson, L. R., Graham, C. R., Spring, K.J., Drysdale, J. S., & Henrie, C. R. (2014). A thematic analysis of the most highly cited scholarship in the first decade of blended learning research. The Internet and Higher Education, 20 (1), 20-34. 

Korr, J., Derwin, E. B., Greene, K. & Sokoloff, W. (2012). Transitioning an adult-serving university to a blended learning model. The Journal of Continuing Higher Education, 60(1), 2-11.

Owens, T. (2012). Hitting the nail on the head: The importance of specific staff development for effective blended learning. Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 49(4), 389-400.

 

 

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Connect, Engage, and Inspire All Learners At Scale: Optimizing Course and Learning Outcomes With Standardized Multiple-Solution Technology | Discovery Session Asynchronous

As institutions increasingly expand hybrid and blended learning options, educators must innovate and adapt to meet students where they are with creative instructional solutions. How are instructors effectively maintaining classroom continuity and building connectedness across multiple modalities without compromising learner outcomes? During this presentation you will learn how Nearpod’s multiple-solution platforms allows faculty to create interactive lessons, improve engagement, and limit distraction across in-person, online, and asynchronous settings.

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Extended Abstract

The call for colleges and universities to meet students where they are and effectively serve them across multiple modalities continues to grow quickly. The pandemic acted as a catalyst for institutions to adapt to hybrid, HyFlex, and blended environments for their learners. This shift in learning environments requires educators to innovate and adapt teaching practices and technologies while not sacrificing learner performance.

Regardless of participation mode, maintaining consistent pedagogies, supporting equivalent learning outcomes, and hearing from all students are often top of mind for educators promoting equity and inclusion in the classroom. Implementing multiple-solution engagement tools, like Nearpod, enable instructors to both reach their students and ensure their voices are heard through interactive slides, dynamic media, formative assessments, and more.

During this Discovery Session, Jon Poole, Nearpod Vice President of Higher Education will discuss a successful hybrid instructional experience highlighting the proven Nearpod multiple-solution platform. Mr. Poole will share classroom examples and strategies to increase participation, unlock learning insights, and improve student and course outcomes across online, in-person, and asynchronous settings.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Create Learning Content that People Feel: The Know/Feel/Do Framework | Discovery Session Asynchronous

The LAPU learning model and the Know|Feel|Do framework create human-centered courses that engage learners from a holistic perspective. We use this as our guide to ensure a holistic, memorable, well-rounded experience meant to integrate with both the brain's cognitive and affective domains.
Bring your project and add in the humanity.

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Extended Abstract

Creating learning experiences that connect the affective and cognitive domains can be challenging.  When you add the need to be built from a mobile-first perspective, it requires challenging current learning paradigms and looking at learning from a new perspective.  It is relatively simple to create responsive content-based learning that leaves out the affective domain.  We see this all the time.  When courses are built with only the cognitive domain in mind, the students are seen as a one-dimensional being rather than the holistic being they are.  The critical question is how do we create mobile-first learning that inspires, empowers, and equips students to succeed.  The only way to do this in a meaningful way is to create learning experiences that connect the affective and cognitive domains.  

Mobile learning is different, and we must think from a different perspective to leverage the untapped potential of mobile learning (mLearning.) In 2009, Herrington, Herrington, and Mantei found that "Despite the significant potential of mobile technologies to be employed as powerful learning tools in higher education, their current use appears to be predominantly within a didactic, teacher-centered paradigm." Unfortunately, from our research, we see that this is still the predominant focus today.  In order to facilitate student's success, an effort is needed in the design process to heavily focus on the learning experience and emotional connection outlined by Cavanagh (2016).

Today our guiding light for course design is the Know/Feel/Do framework.  This framework allows us to keep the student at the center of the design process and facilitate meaningful learning experiences. McDonagh, Denton & Chapman (2009) state, "Excellence in design is about more than the final product itself. It is about creating positive, rich and meaningful user experiences." We use the Know/Feel/Do framework to consistently design these types of experiences. Figure 1 shows how the framework is seen in our course design toolkit.

Join us and bring your projects so you can use the Know|Feel|Do framework to put humanity back into learning.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Cultivating the Next Generation of Instructional Designers with Remote Internships | Discovery Session Asynchronous

The need for experienced instructional designers who are ready to create quality online courses right now is greater than ever before. How do we meet this need as a field and cut down on the time it takes for new IDs to gain the professional skills they need? Remote internships!

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Extended Abstract

When it comes to instructional design we all know that, like anything else in life, we learn so much more by actually doing the work as compared to learning about how to do the work. The experience we get by jumping in and immediately beginning to solve authentic problems  is a huge boost to our learning in any context. 

The changes we have all experienced as a result of the pandemic have only increased the need for quality online courses, meaning that the need for experienced instructional designers who are ready to begin working with faculty to create quality online courses right now is greater than ever before. How do we meet this need as a field? How do we cut down on the time it takes for new IDs to gain the professional skills they need to be successful? Remote internships to the rescue!

This session, designed specifically for higher education instructional design/educational technology professionals, education faculty who teach in instructional design programs, and instructional design students, will focus on important elements to consider when creating a quality, remote instructional design internship. The presenters will share their own story about designing a remote internship from scratch, lessons they learned from the experience and practical tools they created to make it easier for others to get their own remote internship programs launched.  The session will have a particular focus on connecting and making an internship meaningful, for both the student and the sponsor, in a remote environment.

Specific resources from the session will include:

  • Planning Framework Tools for ID professionals and faculty to use to create and organize a quality remote internship for a student
  • Resources for students seeking internships

This interactive, asynchronous session will also include:

  • Polling features, to provide both attendees and presenters with more information about specific needs in the field that ID internships might address
  • The opportunity to schedule follow up one-on-one meeting with presenters to engage about specific questions and experiences
  • A “design your own internship” challenge in which participants have the opportunity to explore what an ideal internship might look like 
Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Employing Character Strengths to Connect with Diverse Student Populations | Discovery Session Asynchronous

With increased diversity in the higher education student population, connectedness becomes especially important to fostering effective online learning communities and enhancing student learning experiences. Learning to employ character strengths based strategies to connect with diverse student populations will be the focus of this discovery session. Join us!

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Extended Abstract

The higher education student population is becoming increasingly nontraditional. Over 40% of today’s undergraduate students are nontraditional students, who are 25 years old or older and have at least one of the following characteristics: delayed entry to college, is a parent, is employed full-time, is enrolled part-time, has dependents, is considered financially independent, or does not have a high school diploma. While many students have taken at least one online course, the majority of students who enroll in online education exclusively are nontraditional students.

As the number of nontraditional students in higher education grows, the diversity of the online student population will also grow. Increased diversity brings many benefits to learning communities. For instance, nontraditional students with work experience may stimulate classroom discussion by connecting examples from work to course materials. They may also bring wisdom pertaining to how one may juggle between school and other responsibilities. In addition, as students engage and collaborate with one another, increased diversity in a learning community may promote perspective taking, empathy, and creativity.

However, managing diversity can be challenging. For example, students from diverse backgrounds may have different learning needs and communication styles. These differences may lead to conflicts that disrupt the connectedness of online learning communities. Connectedness is generally characterized by belongingness and relationships. It is associated with participation, academic performance, motivation, persistence, and holistic development. It is key to fostering effective learning communities and enhancing student learning experiences.

An effective way to cultivate connectedness in the online classroom with diverse student populations is for faculty to leverage their character strengths and employ character strengths based strategies. Character strengths are positive personality traits that manifest in our thinking, feelings, and actions. The character strengths model adopts a positive view on human behavior. It assumes every one has positive personality traits in varying degrees. It also enables us to utilize our existing inner resources to approach challenges as opportunities. Through the focus on character strengths, online faculty tend to the positive aspects of self and others when collaborating with students to problem solve in the learning community.

Research indicates several character strengths based strategies are especially useful to cultivating connectedness, such as Turning Our Strengths Other-oriented, Character Strengths Appreciation, Mindful Listening and Speaking, and Boosting Humility. This discovery session will illustrate how online faculty may put these strategies in practice to cultivate connectedness in online learning communities. Attendees of the discovery session will 1) recognize the importance of connectedness, 2) understand the unique advantages of the character strengths model, and 3) apply specific character strengths based strategies to cultivate connectedness in online learning communities. Come prepared to learn and share!

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Integrating JEDI in Management Course Development and Review: Practices, Problems, and Potential | Discovery Session Asynchronous

Colleges vary in the extent to which online management curricula and courses have integrated justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI). In smaller colleges with limited resources especially, the scope and goal can appear overwhelming. This asynchronous discovery session explores the challenges and opportunities associated with JEDI integration in online management programs and courses.

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Extended Abstract

Colleges vary in the extent to which curricula and courses have integrated diversity, equity, inclusion, and accessibility (DEIA). With many colleges struggling to institutionalize many contextually-contingent effective practices of DEIA in all aspects of the online student experience. Meanwhile there is growing awareness of the urgency of DEIA in supporting learner success and to further social justice plus global perspectives and community-based learning . This is occurring as colleges and universities are forced to make rapid adjustments related to the pandemic, stretching resources thinly. For smaller colleges especially, the scope and goal can appear overwhelming.

This presentation explores a scaled approach to achieve a contextually-contingent effective project plan and timeline reflecting a coordinated approach between instructional development and college administrators. 

How do we achieve a total student experience that integrates DEIA concepts? How does an institution assess where it is on this journey? How do we prioritize the most urgent actions and in what order? How do we translate that into an actionable plan and timeline that reflects pandemic realities, institutional resource constraints, faculty and staff burnout, etc?

To develop a realistic DEIA plan, several factors play a role and, in addition, there are institution-specific practices to consider. What is faculty governance’s role in Instructional design practices? What are the benefits of and challenges of committee-based approaches at our  institutions? How to set up collaborative faculty-instructional designer approaches.What are the various levels of buy-in for resource allocation? How is the management function structured at the institution and its impact on maintenance of DEIA standards? How are DEIA practices reflected in performance evaluation and rewards? 

Level of participation:

Session facilitators will engage the audience extensively throughout the session, mixing short presentations with activities, polling, and discussion. Participants will engage in exercises to prioritize DEIA initiatives based on a worksheet / template that will be distributed to participants as a resource. Participants will share their experiences and lessons learned as part of the session activities. 

 

Session goals:

Individuals attending this education session will be able to share their own lessons learned from integration of DEIA work and experiences. Participants will look at the challenges and solutions from the perspectives of the student, the educator, and the administration, in charting out a plan and timeline to improve DEIA in courses such that the plan reflects resource constraints, pandemic challenges, etc. 

 

SPEAKERS

William Prado, D.B.A., is the Program Director of the Sustainable MBA and Sustainability Management BA programs, and Sustainable Business Professor at Prescott College. Prior to this role, Bill served as the Dean of Graduate and Online Programs at the College, leading teaching and learning support. With 20 years of experience in higher education, curriculum and course design, and educational consulting, Bill has also taught courses in leadership, strategy, international business, finance and accounting. Bill has served as a consultant for publishers and universities in the development of online academic programs and courses. His research interests are in the area of ​​cross-cultural factors in organizational management. Bill is a Latinx first-generation American and first generation to attend college. His passion is helping marginalized student populations.

Danica Stitz is the Director of Instructional Design and Learning Technology at Prescott College and holds an MA in Instructional Technology and Media from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her professional experience includes learning design in both corporate and academic environments, providing instructional design and professional development guidance to clients such as Forrester Research, New York Law School, and New Haven University. From ideation to implementation, she brings a unique skill set: deep knowledge of learning experience design and the technological know-how to bring programs to life.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Instant Gratification: Effective Behaviors of Successful Faculty | Discovery Session Asynchronous

At Colorado Technical University, the Academic & Career Success course (UNIV104) is typically the first course students take. Our students are reflective of our society – instant gratification is important!  In our course, our most successful faculty harness the power of instant gratification to provide motivation and positively impact student success.

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Extended Abstract

At Colorado Technical University, the Academic & Career Success course is typically the first course students take and serves as a foundation student success course. The focus of this course is to help students create a foundation for future personal, professional, and academic success. Our students are reflective of our society – instant gratification is important!  In our first course, our most successful faculty are harnessing the power of instant gratification to provide motivation to our students and impact their success.

Over two sessions, students enrolled in our first course completed a course introduction survey.  This survey asked our students what they wanted the most from their faculty.  One of the top requests was for faculty to provide them with encouragement.  When examining what makes our highest performing faculty so successful, we found that many were already providing this to their students through communications with students. Faculty who provide consistent communication to their students offer instant gratification through congratulatory messages when students complete assignments.  Additionally, consistent communication with students and regularly demonstrated presence helps faculty to forge relationships and build rapport with their students. 

In this session, we’ll explore strategies used by our most successful faculty in the classroom and how we’ve adapted as faculty leaders in mentoring adjunct faculty to help improve the success rates of our students both in our classroom and beyond.  A simple effort of providing instant gratification helps pave the way for success.

Apr 2, 2022
9:00am - 9:00pm (Central)
Challenges and Opportunities for Secondary Students and Teachers During COVID-19: Teachers' Lived Experiences | Discovery Session Asynchronous

COVID-19 has impacted teaching and learning at all levels.  This presentation synthesizes research that explored the challenges and opportunities faced by secondary students (grades 6-12) during the COVID-19 pandemic through the lived experiences of secondary teachers. Results of a qualitative study utilizing open-ended interviews with secondary teachers are presented.

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Extended Abstract

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected teaching and learning in almost every context and at all levels of instruction. Most K-12 and higher education institutions in the United States were forced to provide emergency remote learning in place of traditional on-ground instruction beginning in March of 2020. The COVID-19 pandemic disrupted education for over 1.5 billion students worldwide (UNESCO, 2020). During the early wave, nearly 124,000 public and private schools in the United States shuttered, affecting approximately 55.1 million K-12 students (Blad, 2020). The abrupt closures and rapid transition to remote learning forced educators into what Mutton (2020) labeled crisis teaching.

The challenges of online teaching require significant expertise in  three presences, cognitive, social, and facilitatory, particularly the social presence (Rapanta et al., 2020). In a previous study focused on the experiences of online dissertation students during COVID-19, Lyn et al. (2020) found an increase in students’ desire for communication and connection. This need for social emotional support accompanied greater use of the university’s resources, and higher levels of productivity despite the challenges brought on by the pandemic. In this parallel study the focus is on the experiences of secondary students. Like graduate students, secondary students typically engage with technology independently. Unlike K-5 students, secondary students do not tend to require parental assistance for managing controls, reading, or typing. 

One lens through which to view the challenges and opportunities of secondary students forced to abruptly shift to online and hybrid education during COVID-19 is the perceptions and experiences of the teacher, who plays a pivotal role in the life of a student. Positive student-teacher relationships foster students’ sense of belonging and connection (OECD, 2019). When students feel connected to their teachers, perseverance and learning are strengthened (Kotok et al., 2016). Furthermore, research shows teacher-student relationships influence students’ mental health and dropout rate (Holen, 2018; Krane et al., 2016; Schwab, 2019).

On the general topic of online learner-instructor interaction and engagement, Baker’s (2010) findings strongly suggested a positive relationship between instructor presence and the degree of instructor immediacy. Further, Baker found a linear relationship between both of these instructor qualities and students’ affective learning, cognition, and motivation, making them clear predictors of these desired outcomes.  Furthermore, “Students perceive a sense of belonging when they can interact with instructors and perceive that they are at least accessible through multiple means” (Bolliger & Martin, 2018, p. 569).  Research and recommendations from Peacock and Cowan (2019) and Meyer (2014) echoed these sentiments, with specific strategies and tips for online instruction.

The presenters for this session synthesize research on the unique challenges and opportunities that today’s online secondary students typically face, along with a discussion of how the COVID-19 pandemic may influence the online or hybrid learning experience. Qualitative analysis of the results from open-ended interviews with eight  secondary teachers of various content areas and from diverse types of schools will be presented. The research methodology for this study entailed recruiting volunteers via snowball sampling using social media (LinkedIn and Facebook personal social networks). Eight secondary teachers participated in live, open-ended interviews via Zoom. Interviews followed a 13-question protocol of open-ended questions developed by the researchers/presenters. Regarding the use of Zoom as a data collection method, Gray, Wong-Wylie, Rempel, and Cook (2020) specified the current relevance of utilizing Zoom for one-on-one interviews for qualitative research when in-person interviews are not feasible.  Interviews of the participants were divided between the three presenters for this session using a random order for who would conduct each interview.  This design helped to ensure trustworthiness and dependability of data, while reducing any potential bias.  The in-depth interviews allowed for rich analysis with a phenomenological focus/design.  The presenters for this session will discuss several themes that emerged from the qualitative inquiry and will explore how these emerging themes relate to the current research literature on secondary students’ online and hybrid learning experiences, online learning in general, mentoring, social-emotional learning, student engagement, and persistence.

This presentation will be interactive, with opportunities for both small group break-out room interaction and ongoing participant chat within the chat box. Interactive polls and prompts throughout will help foster discussion. Toward the end of the session, the presenters will engage the audience in a whole-group activity in which participants can relate the session material to their own specific contexts. For example, attendees who have switched abruptly to online teaching and learning from a more traditional modality could reflect on the specific challenges and opportunities that have been faced by secondary students at those institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Session-flow and timeline:

  • Welcome and introductions (5 minutes)

  • PowerPoint presentation, including both small group moments, polls, and ongoing chat (25 minutes)

  • Whole group participant engagement and Q &A (15 minutes)

The presentation exemplifies effective practice by illustrating both the challenges and opportunities faced by secondary students during COVID-19 and helps to inform best practices in secondary education, especially with regard to serving all students’ social and emotional needs during the pandemic.

References

Baker, C. (2010). The impact of instructor immediacy and presence for online student affective learning, cognition, and motivation. Journal of Educators Online, 7(1), 1–30. Retrieved from https://www.thejeo.com

Blad, E., Riser-Kositsky, M. Mitchell, C., Peele, H., Ujifusa, A. & Will, M. (2020). COVID-19 rates go up among schoolchildren as schools reopen. Education Week, 40(80), 2. 

Bolliger, D. U., & Martin, F. (2018). Instructor and student perceptions of online student engagement strategies. Distance Education, 39(4), 568-583.

Gray, L. M., Wong-Wylie, G., Rempel, G. R., & Cook, K. (2020). Expanding Qualitative Research Interviewing Strategies: Zoom Video Communications. The Qualitative Report, 25(5), 1292-1301.

Holen, S., Waaktaar, T., & Sagatun, Å. (2018). A chance lost in the prevention of school dropout? Teacher-student relationships mediate the effect of mental health problems on noncompletion of upper-secondary school. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 62(5), 737–753. https://doi.org/10.1080/00313831.2017.1306801

Kotok, S., Ikoma, S., & Bodovski, K. (2016). School climate and dropping out of school in the era of accountability. American Journal of Education, 122(4), 569–599.

Krane, V., & Klevan, T. (2019). There are three of us: Parents’ experiences of the importance of teacher-student relationships and parental involvement in upper secondary school. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, 24(1), 74–84. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673843.2018.1464482

Lyn, A., Babcock, A., Broderick, M., Gillenwater, C., Kamm, B., & Collins, L. (2021) Academic and social emotional support from teachers in higher education and k-12 education during covid-19. Journal of Innovative Educational Strategies 7/8.

Meyer, K. A. (2014). Student engagement in online learning: What works and why. ASHE Higher Education Report, 40(6), 1–114.

Mutton, T. (2020, August). Teacher education and COVID-19: Responses and opportunities for new pedagogical initiatives. Journal of Education for Teaching. https://doi.org. /10.1080/02607476.2020.1805189

OECD. (2019). PISA 2018 results (Volume III): What school life means for students’ lives. PISA, OECD Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1787/acd78851-en

Peacock, S. & Cowan, J. (2019). Promoting sense of belonging in online learning communities of inquiry at accredited courses. Online Learning, 23(2), 67-81.

Rapanta, C., Botturi, L., Goodyear, P. et al. (2020). Online University Teaching During and After the Covid-19 Crisis: Refocusing Teacher Presence and Learning Activity. Postdigit Sci Educ. https://doi.org/10.1007/s42438-020-00155-y

Schwab, S., & Rossmann, P. (2020). Peer integration, teacher-student relationships and the associations with depressive symptoms in secondary school students with and without special needs. Educational Studies, 46(3), 302–315. https://doi.org/10.1080/03055698.2019.1584852

Apr 11, 2022
8:00am - 5:00pm (Central)
Join an Innovation Crew! | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action. Join a crew now at https://bit.ly/IN22Crews.

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Apr 11, 2022
9:00am - 9:30am (Central)
OLC Live!: Gearing Up We're back! | Other | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Welcome to #OLCInnovate 2022! With so many session options, tracks, and activities join OLC Live! host Brandon Poulliot for a preview. We will highlight the experience for both on-site and remote participants, so tune in and get up to speed!

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Extended Abstract

        

Apr 11, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
Establishing Quality and Impactful Methods for Blended Education | Master Class | Dallas 1-2

The transformation of our educational landscape over the past two years has been unprecedented. As institutions explored online teaching modalities, many decided that blended learning was the most suitable modality for their institutions. However, for an effective blended learning program, there must be the acceptance of the core principles of blended learning by the teaching and learning community, the effective use of technology, reflection for sound pedagogical decisions in designing, developing, and delivering a blended design program. This workshop will engage participants in establishing quality and impactful methods for designing, developing, and delivering blended courses/programs. 

 

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Extended Abstract

The transformation of our educational landscape over the past two years has been unprecedented. On reflection, the COVID-19 pandemic forced many learning institutions into unfamiliar learning modalities. One primary concern associated with these unfamiliar learning modalities was that little consideration was given to basic pedagogical principles that govern these spaces. As institutions explored the most appropriate modality, many decided that blended learning was the most suitable modality for their institutions. 

However, for an effective blended learning program, there must be the acceptance of the core principles of blended learning by the teaching and learning community, the effective use of technology, reflection for sound pedagogical decisions in designing, developing, and delivering a blended design program. Furthermore, it will be necessary to consider enhancing inclusivity at all stages of the blended course design process. The reality is that quality blended learning initiative provides a pathway for students' ownership of their learning, personalizing their learning, and opening educational opportunities via greater flexibility (Thompson et al. 2020 & Recco, 2018). Central to the blended teaching and learning experience will be the need for active engagement between students and instructors. This workshop will engage participants in establishing quality and impactful methods for designing, developing, and delivering blended courses/programs.  

The workshop will:  

  1. Define and explore definitions of blended learning 
  2. Articulate the fundamental principles for designing, developing, and delivering a blended course or program.   
  3. Outline quality indicators for assessing blended courses 
  4. Highlight impactful methods for blended education that will lead to active engagement in the blended learning environment. 
  5. Engage participants in drafting their blended learning course. 

Participants of the workshop will have access to various materials that they can use to design, develop, and deliver blended courses/programs.  

Activities in the workshop include: 

  • PowerPoint presentation  
  • Discussions 
  • Workshop Activities 
  • Paired group activities 
  • Beginning draft - blended learning course 

Note: Participants should consider accessing a course syllabus and schedule that they would like to design for blended learning or any current work in progress associated with blended learning. 

References 

Recco, R. (2018, December 27). What Separates a Good Blended Learning Program From a Bad One? - EdSurge News. Retrieved from https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-02-20-what-separates-a-good-blended-learning-program-from-a-bad-one 

Thompson, K., Jowallah, R. & Cavanagh, T (2019). “Solve the Big Problems:” Leading through Strategic Innovation in Blended Teaching & Learning (In Leading through Strategic Innovation Blended Teaching and Learning. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. 

 

Apr 11, 2022
1:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Centering The Margins: Principles and Strategies for Inclusive Design and Design Justice | Master Class | Dallas 3-4

Inclusive design is intentional and iterative design work aimed at supporting a range of human diversity. In education, inclusive design focuses on the creation of learning spaces and materials, and policies and processes, that support diverse learners and that help to counteract biased and exclusionary designs that pervade education. This workshop will offer participants a chance to learn about inclusive design and design justice through an interactive, hands-on approach. Participants will also learn practices they can apply to their institutional context.

 

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Extended Abstract

Inclusive design is intentional and iterative design work aimed at supporting a range of human diversity. In education, inclusive design focuses on the creation of learning spaces and materials, and policies and processes, that support diverse learners and that help to counteract biased and exclusionary designs that pervade education. Inclusive design can be a collaborative process through which teachers thoughtfully re-imagine their classrooms, sparking creativity and inspiration in teaching and learning. Using design justice and critical race design lenses, inclusive design can (and should) also be a way for teachers and learners to embrace anti-racist principles and actively work against systemic racism and other entrenched inequities in education and in our society.

Through an interactive, hands-on approach, participants in this workshop, participants will:

  • Develop an understanding of the values and principles that drive inclusive design and design justice
  • Hone their noticing skills to identify exclusions and mismatches at their own institutions
  • Explore and experiment with co-design approaches that can be used to authentically center the perspectives of folx who are typically marginalized or excluded by designs

Who should attend this workshop?

Everyone is a designer, and design shows up in all kinds of contexts. If you’re an instructional designer or instructor creating learning experiences, this workshop is for you. If you're an administrator designing policies for online programs, this workshop is for you. If you're a student advisor, helping develop retention programs for students, this workshop is for you. If you’re interested in learning more about inclusive design and design justice, this workshop is for you!

 

 

Apr 11, 2022
1:00pm - 4:00pm (Central)
Move That Bus! Extreme Makeover - Online Engagement Edition: Mastering creative technologies to increase engagement | Master Class | Dallas 1-2

Are you tired of seeing the same old dusty, outdated ways of teaching in the online space? Your course doesn’t have to be the worst house on the block - in this workshop, we’ll show you how to update your curriculum with technologies that authentically engage your learners. We’ll start by showing you a “fixer upper” course, and provide inspiring examples of innovations in the digital learning space, along with a tool kit of contemporary technologies that will get your learners collaborating and engaging with your content.

 

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Apr 11, 2022
3:00pm - 7:00pm (Central)
Custom Conference Consulting (Field Guide Base Station) | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, custom consulting on making the most of your conference experience, or even directions!

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Apr 11, 2022
3:00pm - 5:00pm (Central)
OLC Cafe & Mercantile | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - OLC Cafe

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

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Apr 11, 2022
3:00pm - 3:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: Ahead of the Pack | Other | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Where do we go from here? With so many questions around the future of learning and the shape of educational institutions, we turn to experts. and at #OLCInnovate 2022. Join Brandon Poulliot and special guest(s) for a look into our collective crystal ball.

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Apr 11, 2022
3:00pm - 5:00pm (Central)
Exhibit Hall Preview - Remixed Edition | Evening Event | Texas Ballroom A-B - Exhibit Hall

Join us for some fun and casual networking as a way to build community with our industry partners. There will be games, there will be prizes, there will be snacks and refreshments...and there's bound to be some amazing new connections made at this remixed OLC Innovate Exhibit Hall Preview.  Don't forget to bring your Mission Passport and exhibit stamp cards to get a head start on some awesome prizes!

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Apr 11, 2022
3:00pm - 7:00pm (Central)
Early Registration | Other | Texas Registration C

Don't wait in line Tuesday morning and miss portions of a workshop, Field Guide events, or the Research Summit.  Check-in at conference registration Monday evening from 3-7pm ET to pick up your conference badge and materials. After you check-in, take part in the Monday evening Exhibit Hall Preview (3-5pm, Texas Ballroom A/B - Exhibit Hall), where you will have an opportunity to get a jump-start on your Mission Passport and exhibitor stamp cards (for fabulous prizes) and enjoy some snacks and fun refreshments.   

OLC Innovate 2022 registration is located at the Texas Registration Desks on Level 3 of the Gaylord Texan Convention Center.  Take the crosswalk from the hotel to the convention center.  Take the escalators up two levels.  

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Apr 11, 2022
5:00pm - 5:45pm (Central)
Field Guide Tour of the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

Join us for a guided tour to familiarize yourself with the conference center layout to ensure your conference experience is off to a great start!

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Apr 11, 2022
7:00pm - 8:00pm (Central)
OLC Innovate's Musical Bingo (An OLC Game Night) | Evening Event | Texas Ballroom A-B - OLC Cafe | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Want to connect with other conference attendees while playing games and winning prizes? Join us for musical bingo! Not sure if you want to join in person but fancy some evening fun? No worries! You can join us virtually right from the comforts of your hotel room.

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Apr 11, 2022
8:00pm - 9:00pm (Central)
Conference Volunteer Appreciation Nightcap | Evening Event | Mission Plaza

Volunteers are the heart of our community. If you are a volunteer for OLC Innovate 2022, join us in celebration and thanks for a late-night social.

***Our evening gathering will be held in the Gaylord Texan's Mission Plaza, located in the hotel atrium (Lower Level)***

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Apr 12, 2022
7:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
Custom Conference Consulting (Field Guide Base Station) | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, custom consulting on making the most of your conference experience, or even directions!

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Apr 12, 2022
7:30am - 9:00am (Central)
Attendee Breakfast (Tuesday) | Other | Texas Ballroom C-D

Check in at conference registration (Texas Registration Desk, Level 3, Gaylord Texan Convention Center), then head to Texas Ballroom C/D to start your day with breakfast while our Field Guides deliver our "Field Guide Power Hour" orientation session.

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Sponsored by

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Apr 12, 2022
7:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
Join an Innovation Crew! | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

Innovation Crews are groups of conference attendees clustered by interest, facilitated by a “Crew Leader” for ongoing check-ins and community building. Crews gather during meet-ups synchronously and asynchronously to connect with others, share ideas, and make your plan of action. Join a crew now at https://bit.ly/IN22Crews.

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Extended Abstract

     

Apr 12, 2022
8:00am - 9:30am (Central)
Research Summit - Part 1: The Questions of Our Time | Summit | Texas 1-2

As researchers, instructors, instructional support staff, and leaders across our institutions, it is inevitable that we have questions about how emerging pedagogies, modalities, and technologies impact the teaching and learning experience. Join us in unearthing the burning questions of our time in a session that will engage participants in discussing opportunities for online, blended, and digital learning research. 

 

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Extended Abstract

As researchers, instructors, instructional support staff, and leaders across our institutions, it is inevitable that we have questions about how emerging pedagogies, modalities, and technologies impact the teaching and learning experience. Join us in unearthing the burning questions of our time in a session that will engage participants in discussing opportunities for online, blended, and digital learning research. 

During this session, participants will engage in a series of activities that will help our collective to: 

  • Identify key topics in need of research to better support scholarship and practice in teaching and learning; 
  • Prioritize topics of interest, connecting interested participants around areas of synergy and exploration; 
  • Share literature that has inspired them around their topic of interest; 
  • Create a case (e.g., What’s the challenge? Why is it important?) for research exploration for their topic of interest; and   
  • Generate possible research questions around their topic of interest to drive future research.  
Apr 12, 2022
8:00am - 9:30am (Central)
Dare to Engage: Accessible Tools for Engaging Students | Workshop | Texas 3

The Pandemic changed how we interact and engage with our students. This interactive, hands-on workshop will explore various online tech tools you can use to maximize student engagement and participation.  Accessible gamification, collaborating and creation tools will be discussed and shared. Please bring an Internet Enabled Device to fully participate.

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Extended Abstract

The pandemic caused us to dramatically pivot to remote learning. With students returning to campus, student expectations have changed. Students expect flexibility, support, and a personalized experience. This workshop will discuss how you can leverage accessible online tools to drive inquiry, differentiate instruction, and allow you to create student-centered learning opportunities that encourage communication and collaboration. 

We now have a whole new set of learners that view and interact with the world differently. Web 2.0 technologies have allowed faculty to reach students in a whole new way. When these tools are used effectively, they can help focus the attention of students and help faculty reach different kinds of learners on different levels. Not all Web 2.0 tools, however, are accessible to people with disabilities.  f you are using Web 2.0 tools to engage your students, you need to look at how accessible those tools are. This presentation will discuss and illustrate Web 2.0 tools that allow for collaboration/innovation and have strong grades for accessibility.  Details about each tool will be provided as well as report card grades for how the tools rate in terms of accessibility.

-Upon completion, participants will be able to identify at least 5 web 2.0 tools that they can use to reach different learners in engaging ways. 

-Participants will be able to identify how the Web 2.0 tools shared can be used to reach different learners for a variety of subject areas. 

-Participants will be able to identify the potential and limitations of the Web 2.0 tools assessed. 

This will be an interactive presentation where participants will get hands on experience with the various tools shared. All participants will have access to the presentation at the same time and will be able to provide real time data/feedback. All participants will also have printable resources that they can refer to after the presentation. The presentation will also be made available in a digital format.   

 

 

 

Apr 12, 2022
8:00am - 9:30am (Central)
Applying Research to Practice: Creating an Inclusive Community for Online Adjunct Faculty | Workshop | Texas 4

Using a framework based on emergent research findings, workshop participants will identify one or more practices they can implement within the next 12 months to foster a sense of community among online adjunct faculty at their respective institutions. The session will include brainstorming, conversation, and planning!

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Extended Abstract

Overview:

Higher education institutions are increasingly turning to adjunct faculty to teach online courses to accommodate online course enrollment growth. While many adjunct faculty are attracted to the flexibility of online teaching, they also face several challenges, such as feelings of isolation and disengagement, negative stereotypes, and lack of professional development opportunities. These challenges can be detrimental to their instructional performance and, therefore, the student learning experience. Thus, fully integrating online adjunct faculty into an institution’s community and creating an environment in which they feel supported is critical to the success of an institution’s online programs.

In this workshop, participants will learn about emergent findings from a recent dissertation study focused on the practices of 17 higher education administrators who intentionally foster a sense of community among online adjunct faculty. The findings provide a framework for creating an inclusive working environment for online adjunct faculty. Using this framework, participants will identify one or more practices they can implement within the next 12 months to foster a sense of community among online adjunct faculty at their respective institutions. This workshop is intended for anyone responsible for supervising, supporting, developing, and/or engaging online adjunct faculty.

Outline of Workshop Activities:

  • 15 minutes: The presenter will provide an overview of the framework mentioned above and activity instructions.
  • 40 minutes: Working in small groups, participants will brainstorm and share what they currently do at their institutions to foster a sense of community among online adjunct faculty using the framework to guide their conversation.
  • 20 minutes: The presenter will ask each group to share one community-building practice with all workshop participants.
  • 15 minutes: Using the ideas shared within and across groups, participants will identify one or more practices they can implement within the next 12 months to foster a sense of community among online adjunct faculty at their respective institutions. The presenter will share a digital template through Google Drive to guide their plans. 
Apr 12, 2022
8:00am - 9:00am (Central)
Field Guide "Power Hour" - Onsite Program | Other | Texas Ballroom C-D

If you’re looking for support in orienting to the conference, the Field Guide Power Hour is a must! Get support in planning your conference experience and kick things off with some casual networking.

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Sponsored by

Symbiosis Educational Consultants logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
OLC Cafe & Mercantile | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - OLC Cafe

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

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Extended Abstract

      

Apr 12, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
Innovation Studio | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Innovation Studio

Join us for the first Innovation Studio program block and explore gamification and interactive video tools that you can use to engage with your population in innovative ways. The Innovation Studio has always been a hub for networking and a space to explore the pervasive challenges we face in the classroom and to craft innovative approaches for better reaching our unique populations of learners. Join us anytime during the conference! We've prepared a series of challenges for you to improve your design thinking skills (which double as models for you to take with you into your own educational spaces).

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Extended Abstract

          

Apr 12, 2022
9:00am - 12:00pm (Central)
Speed Networking Lounge | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

Not sure what to do between sessions or looking for a place to sit back and have some fun with colleagues? Head to the Speed Networking Lounge, a reflective and collaborative space where you can recharge your brain (and maybe even recharge your devices). There you’ll find puzzles, games, and activities, as well as new opportunities for “slow networking” to engage in while you chat and get to know people (old and new).

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

D2L logo

InSpace Proximity logo

PlayPosit logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
9:00am - 9:30am (Central)
Custom Conference Consulting | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

The Field Guide program was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Following the Field Guide Power Hour, Field Guides are available for custom consutling in order to make the most of your conference experience.

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Apr 12, 2022
9:00am - 9:30am (Central)
OLC Live!: All Together Now | Other | ***LIVE STREAMED***

How do we provide a high-quality learning experience for all learners at our institutions? Dr. Kelvin Thompson is joined by special guest(s) as we dive into a conversation about effective practices for fostering inclusive teaching and learning.

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Extended Abstract

        

Apr 12, 2022
9:30am - 10:30am (Central)
Networking Coffee Break (Tuesday AM) | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Exhibit Hall

Join us in the Exhibit Hall (Texas Ballroom A/B) for our first official networking coffee break of the conference.  Not only is this an opportunity to recharge with a fresh cup of coffee or tea, but you will also have the opportunity to network with other attendees.  Check out the Innovation Studio, relax in the OLC Cafe, or meet with other attendees for fun activities in the Speed Networking Lounge.  Bring your Mission Passport to start checking off engagement activities for raffle tickets! 

Don't forget to visit our conference exhibitors and start getting your exhibitor card stamped by them.  You could win additional grand prizes at the end of the conference!

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Sponsored by

Examity logo        Proctorio logo       Science Interactive logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
9:30am - 10:15am (Central)
Field Guide Tour of the Gaylord Texan Resort and Convention Center | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

Join us for a guided tour to familiarize yourself with the conference center layout to ensure your conference experience is off to a great start!

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Apr 12, 2022
9:30am - 10:30am (Central)
Speed Networking Lounge: Quick Prompts Style | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

With only 30 minutes to get to know each other better, join us for quick rounds with some of our favorite (and fun) networking prompts. Not sure what to do between sessions or looking for a place to sit back and have some fun with colleagues? Come join us in the Speed Networking Lounge, a reflective and collaborative space where you can recharge your brain (and maybe even recharge your devices). There you’ll find puzzles, games, and activities, as well as new opportunities for “slow networking” to engage in while you chat and get to know people (old and new).

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

D2L logo

InSpace Proximity logo

PlayPosit logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
10:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
Research Summit - Part 2: Our Research Incubator - Finding Answers to our Questions | Summit | Texas 1-2

Connected to our shared work in Research Summit Part 1: The Questions of our Time, participants will explore ways to incubate their research with a variety of methods and approaches, including opportunities to conduct, collaborate on, and publish research through the OLC Research Center. 

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Extended Abstract

Connected to our shared work in Research Summit Part 1: The Questions of our Time, participants will explore ways to incubate their research with a variety of methods and approaches, including opportunities to conduct, collaborate on, and publish research through the OLC Research Center. 

During this session, participants of all research experience levels will engage in a series of activities that will: 

  • Explore methods (i.e., quantitative, qualitative, and mixed method) and related data collection approaches (e.g., surveys, interviews, focus groups) that commonly support investigation of research questions related to teaching and learning;  
  • Share tools (e.g., DETA Research Toolkit) for digging deeper into research; 
  • Showcase a few current examples of research being conducted around teaching and learning, highlighting different methods and approaches;  
  • Determine effective methods and data collection approaches that would help to answer their topic’s research question; 
  • Discuss publication venues for disseminating research to various audiences; and
  • Create space for sharing and establishing next steps (maybe you just found your very own research team!). 
Apr 12, 2022
10:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
PowerPoint - Advanced Tips, Tricks, and Techniques | Workshop | Texas 3

This workshop presents advanced techniques for visual storytelling by designing clear and compelling PowerPoint slides in new and creative ways to create amazing transitions and interactions. This hands-on workshop explores advanced interactions to create a fully interactive slideshow that will engage students. Participants should bring their laptops with PowerPoint. 

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Extended Abstract

Many people have heard the term "death by PowerPoint." which has come to represent unsightly slides full of text with no visual appeal. Bland presentations often fail to engage the audiences. Sometimes people try to search for alternative tools, but the PowerPoint platform is often not the issue - the issue is that content creators need inspiration and skills to be able to create slideshows with compelling visual elements and clear structure that tell a story and help their learners to understand and master the presented content.

This workshop will inspire you to revisit PowerPoint with a fresh perspective and explore features and techniques that you have never considered. You will learn how to make dynamic title slide and transition effects, create interactive and animated branching scenarios, use the morph function in a myriad of applications, design multimedia and interactive hotspot slides, design hand-drawn lettering, explore video applications and elements, and more. This will be a fast-paced session with a wealth of opportunities for application (and inspiration). Throughout the session, we will be working together to create a PowerPoint template full of dynamic interactions. 

In this session, you will learn:

  • Advanced features and techniques for creating compelling PowerPoint slides and shows
  • Various applications for the PowerPoint morph tool
  • How to create amazing transitions, slide effects, and title sequences
  • How to incorporate advanced video elements into their slideshows

Dr. Sean Nufer is the Senior Director of Teaching and Learning at TCS Education System, a current Canvas Educator of the Year, and recipient of the Online Learning Consortium 2020 Excellence and Innovation in Online Teaching Award and the OLC 2021 Effective Practice Award. 

Apr 12, 2022
10:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
Guess Again: How to Get Better at Estimating Online Course Development ID Capacity and Workload | Workshop | Texas 4

Join us for a hands-on workshop to learn how to estimate ID online course development capacity and workload. You will score a course with a provided rubric, test relationships in time-tracking data, identify strategies to gain buy-in for time tracking, and leave with a step-by-step process you can implement at your own institution.

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Extended Abstract

**This session was originally presented as an education session at OLC Accelerate 2021. The session was highly attended with a lot of follow ups from attendees around details that weren’t able to be covered in the 45 minute presentation. As a result, I am proposing this as a workshop that would allow a more comprehensive look into the process, more opportunity to teach attendees how to handle the data collected with this method, and more opportunity for participants to collaborate together to solve the sticky online course development challenge of how many courses an ID can develop and how  long it takes. 

It is scientifically proven that humans are terrible at estimating the time required to complete a task. As a species, we continually disregard how long it’s taken us to complete tasks in the past and what complications may arise...and we consistently believe that things will be better next time (Kahneman, 2011). 

In a course development process, it is vital to understand the constraints and details that impact how quickly a course can be developed, how open the subject matter expert (SME) is to change, and what sort of factors require additional staffing such as accessibility and media development. Answers to these questions are vital to ensuring appropriate staffing of course development teams, accurate time estimates to completion for stakeholders, and clear communication with faculty SMEs around expectations. 

One common practice when attempting to answer these questions is to refer to the research on how long an hour of eLearning or online, interactive training takes to develop. However, as instructional designers know, building an online course in a Learning Management System is not the same as building an interactive eLearning activity. 

There is little information available about realistic estimates for online course development that take into account common constraints. The result is that every instructional designer (ID) provides their own best guess at capacity and load for projects, relying on their own competencies, working speed, and intuition. While intuition from experienced IDs is mostly correct, intuition only works as an estimation tool when project situations fall within the realm of an ID’s experience. This leads to inaccurate time estimations for course projects with unique elements IDs have not yet encountered.

Some of the questions that are asked about course development projects are: 

  • How much ID time will a course project take? 

  • How much faculty SME time will be required? 

  • Will a course development project be “difficult” or “easy” and what does that mean?

  • How much time will accessibility take? 

 Using the answers to these questions, we can begin to answer: 

  • How to balance course assignments across a team of IDs 

  • How to balance course assignments across cohorts/semesters

  • How to account for IDs’ individual working styles 

This workshop will include a walkthrough of a process for answering these questions and findings used within an actual online course development process with a team of 5 instructional designers over 4 cohorts and 70 course projects. 

By the end of the workshop, attendees will be able to:

  • Explain the role of an instructional designer’s intuition in an online course development project management process

  • Identify biases, blind spots, and surprising findings in regards to questions about capacity and course load

  • Use a rubric to score course development projects for “easiness” or “difficulty” in regards to time expectations

  • Practice identifying relationships with a sample data set

  • Identify strategies to gain buy-in around time tracking

  • Identify next steps to implement a capacity tracking project at their own institution

This workshop will include numerous interactive games, small group work, and hands-on practice. 

  1. Polling software will be used to help demonstrate how difficult it is to overcome intuitive thinking, even when we know that intuitive thinking leads to inaccurate decision making. 

  2. Attendees will be asked to score a sample course using a provided rubric and discuss their findings in small groups. 

  3. The audience will be asked to share their own experiences around time management in instructional design course development projects after small group work with question prompts.

  4. After using the course scoring rubric, attendees will get the chance to practice data analysis of a sample data set to identify relationships and trends.  

  5. In small groups, attendees will identify issues with time-tracking and identify strategies for gaining buy-in from instructional designers for time tracking.

  6. Discuss and sign-up for a research collaborative for participants to implement strategy at their own institutions and present at a future OLC event.

Attendees will receive a copy of the presentation, a course scoring rubric, a sample dataset to practice the method, and the step-by-step process to start to answer the questions around estimating course development time at their own institutions, as well as the opportunity to join a larger research collaborative around the topic for continued work and presentations. 

References: 

Kahneman, D. (2011). Thinking, fast and slow. Farrar, Straus and Giroux. 

 

Apr 12, 2022
10:30am - 12:00pm (Central)
Project Management, Change Management, and Now F’ing Management: Strategies for Managing Teams Managing Innovations in Higher Education | Workshop | Texas 5

Strategies for managing academic technology teams in higher education can make or break a campus initiative.  The F’ing Management strategy covers the principles of Family First, Friendship, Forgiveness, Fun, Fairness, Facilitation, and Flexibility.  The sessions will discuss the application of these principles and why they work in higher education.

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Extended Abstract

After 36 years in higher education, about 20 years leading academic technology initiatives for the largest 4 year higher education institution in the US, and 25 years leading MERLOT, I have developed team management principles that I have found very helpful in empowering a team of people in institutions that under-resource, over-commit, and under-compensate the people who design and deploy academic technology innovations. While a foundation of project management and change management are essential foundations for planning and implementing innovations in higher education, more is needed.   F’ing Management is needed.  The presentation will review the principles of F’ing Management, with discussions after each principle about how it works in real life.   The principles are:

  • Family First:  Our employees are people before they are personnel.  Employees at all levels of the organization should choose to put family first for the well-being of all.   We work as a team so others can adjust their work to support people’s choices.   Enable people to choose when then need to be with their families enables people to choose when they need to be with colleagues.
  • Manage through Friendships:   Friends help each other, strangers do not.   Friendships take time and effort to develop and develop through shared collaborative experiences. Whether people are team members, stakeholders, partners, vendors, or others, building friendships builds trust in communications and willingness to take collective risks.  We do our best to create teams to complete assignments and create opportunities for shared collaborative experiences. Trust results from friendships and trust enable us to achieve our goals more successfully and productively.  (Steven Covey:  You work at the speed of trust).
  • Manage with Forgiveness:  We all make “wrong decisions”/mistakes.   We need to learn from our past decisions and decisions of others AND then forgive and continue to trust your colleagues to make better decisions in the future.   Fear of making mistakes/failure does not foster creativity and humanity, forgiveness does.
  • Manage Fairly:   Fairness is achieved through equality when appropriate and equity when appropriate.   Transparency in decisions and actions is critical to achieve fairness. Communicate with colleagues so everyone has an equitable opportunity to understand and support the work.   We all must be fair to each other in our working interactions and check to make sure that each person is feeling that they are being fairly.  Compensations will be equitable and bonuses will be equal.
  • Have Fun:   Joy is good for the soul, the heart and the head. Be a source of Joy for your colleagues.   If we don’t laugh at least once during a meeting, we are doing something wrong (which we then have to forgive and learn to do it right).
  • Facilitate:  Give a Gift and Not a Burden.  Focus on enabling other’s success.   Enable other’s individual and organizational agendas to be achieved through positive support.
  • Be Flexible:   Adjust your work schedule and priorities to support projects that fulfill the institution’s mission.  (Remember to balance this with the Family First principle).   You commit to do what you can contribute and you don’t commit when you can’t do it.

The session will prompt participants to reflect on these principles and suggests ways that they might adopt these principles to improve the functioning 

Apr 12, 2022
12:00pm - 1:15pm (Central)
Innovation Crew Kick-Off Luncheon | Other | Texas Ballroom C-D

Lunch, facilitated networking, new friends, and gameful ways to kickoff your conference experience...what could be better? Grab your seat now for this ticketed event and chance to start your OLC Innovate experience off with community. Join an Innovation Crew and start growing your OLC Innovate community over good food and great company. Join a crew now at https://bit.ly/IN22Crews.

***You must be registered as an All Access Pass attendee and addtionally sign-up for an Innovation Crew (no fee; see link above) in order to attend this lunch***

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Extended Abstract

          

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Cidi Labs Design Tools for Canvas: A Scalable Delivery Model that Texas Reading Academies Program Leverages to Improve the User Learning Experience in Canvas | Industry Showcase - Presentation | San Antonio 3

Texas House Bill 3 (2019) requires that all K-3 teachers in the State, including special education teachers, and principals to complete the Texas Reading Academies program by 2023. To accommodate the state requirement, the Reading Academies program delivers courses online via the Canvas LMS. With the help of Cidi Labs tools, course developers have created a scalable delivery model that improves the participant’s learning experience in Canvas.

Texas House Bill 3 (2019) requires that all K-3 teachers in the State, including special education teachers, and principals to complete the Texas Reading Academies program by 2023. To accommodate the state requirement, the Reading Academies program delivers courses online via the Canvas LMS. With the help of Cidi Labs tools, course developers have created a scalable delivery model that improves the participant’s learning experience in Canvas.

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Extended Abstract

The Texas Reading Academies program (aka HB3 Reading Academies) delivers courses online via the Canvas LMS. With the help of Cidi Labs tools, course developers have created a scalable delivery model that improves the participant’s learning experience in Canvas.

Creating accessible courses for K-3 teachers is critical to the success of the program. The TEA team has used Cidi Labs tools for instructional designers, to build beautiful and accessible courses quickly using DesignPLUS, check accessibility for existing courses with UDOIT Cloud, and identify published pages and documents for remediation using TidyUP.

Texas House Bill 3 (2019) requires that all K-3 teachers in the State, including special education teachers, and principals to complete the Texas Reading Academies program by 2023.

With DesignPLUS course creators with the TEA program can build beautiful and accessible courses in minutes without knowledge of CSS and HTML. The UDOIT accessibility checker (developed by the University of Central Florida and Cidi Labs SaaS hosted UDOIT Cloud) checks for accessible course content. TidyUP saves time by giving designers the ability to identify files and pages in use in the course, and an easy way to delete extra files and pages no longer needed.

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Instructional Design Summit Meet-Up | Summit | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

Want to use your time wisely? Not sure what the Instructional Design Summit is all about? Connect with your fellow instructional design colleagues in this 45 minute networking break that will introduce you to some of the folks involved in the sessions coming up on Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Come as you are and make new connections. Whether you are looking for a brain break, looking for new ideas, or looking for new colleagues, this meet-up was designed with you in mind! You are encouraged to attend any and all parts of the summits and the meetups, with no requirement to attend the summit to make the most of the meetups, and vice versa

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Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Let Your Voice Be Heard! Create a Podcast to Build OER Content, Promote Your Programs, Share Your Expertise, and Contribute Your Voice | Workshop | Dallas 7

In response to the 2020 Pandemic, I created a podcast to help educators new to the online modality learn how to get started through online best practices, video and tech tips, student engagement strategies, and healthy work-life balance as an online educator. Now 80+ episodes later, I'll walk you through the basic tips and tricks of getting started with your own podcast, whether to build OER content for your courses, to promote your programs, to share your own expertise, or to simply contribute your voice.

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Extended Abstract

In response to the 2020 Pandemic, I created a podcast to help educators new to the online modality learn how to get started through online best practices, video and tech tips, student engagement strategies, and healthy work-life balance as an online educator. Now 80+ episodes later, I'll walk attendees through the basic tips and tricks of getting started with a podcast, whether to build OER content for courses, to promote programs, to share expertise, or to simply contribute a voice.

 

The podcast featured in this workshop began in April 2020 as a solo production. The first 25 episodes were created weekly and focused on topics of interest to teachers and faculty members who were newly teaching online. Some topics included ideas about getting quality sleep while teaching online, helping students who were new to online learning, making videos for an online class, and battling imposter syndrome in an online career. Beginning with episode 26 through the present time, the podcast has been produced by our University content team, still maintaining a consistent weekly output, the same four main topics, and the same theme song.

 

Podcasting is an inexpensive and fun way to create open educational resources. When podcasts are created with learning in mind, educators can develop stand-alone content that students can listen to at their own convenience. Individual episodes can then be integrated into classes as "evergreen" content to be used indefinitely into the future. Podcast recordings personalize the learning experience to some degree by sharing the instructor's voice with his or her students, increasing students' "excitement, interest, enjoyment, and learning motivation" (König, 2021). 

 

Podcasting is one less-expensive avenue to promote programs. Episodes can focus on specific programs and what listeners might gain from studying in that field or in that school's program. Episodes can introduce individual faculty members and their specialty areas, helping listeners feel connected to these professionals more personally and the program itself. Through sharing quality content about various issues, disciplines, and subjects of interest to listeners, programs get promoted along the way.

 

Podcasting is an avenue to share expertise in specific areas, where individuals might not normally have an outlet. While sharing and presenting to one's professional community at a conference or writing an article or book can contribute to the field, a podcast reaching potential listeners in many diverse fields all around the world. This is a great way to share one's expertise on a larger scale through simple methods.

 

Podcasting gives each individual a means through which to simply contribute a voice. Podcasts gain a following whether they are short or long, detailed or general, and deep or superficial. The opportunity to contribute one's thoughts, ideas, and energy to the wellbeing and learning of others empowers the individual contributor significantly. Where other avenues of promoting into leadership or rank advancing may not be available, individual contributors can find this a creative place to add their "voice," feel that they are able to make significant contributions, and keep the creative fire alive.

 

In this workshop, participants will learn the basics of getting started with a podcast from the idea stage through developing the first episode. Planning documents to help them build out their ideas and prepare a new podcast will be shared, with examples of equipment that can be used from the less-expensive variety through the more substantial and expensive options.

 

Examples will be used to illustrate potential parts of the podcast, such as selecting a theme song, narrating a short introduction and closing element, uploading to a hosting platform, and distributing to multiple media outlets such as Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Audible, Amazon Podcasts, and other distribution channels.

Plan for interactivity:

  • Attendees will receive downloadable worksheets, links, handouts. etc., and can complete these during the workshop.
  • Participants will engage in dialogue with each other to flesh out potential plans.
  • Interactivity will occur regularly throughout the workshop, focused on attendees needs and ideas. 

What the attendees are going to learn from the presentation (the takeaways):

  • Choosing a podcast purpose
  • Selecting/narrowing the topic and audience
  • Naming the podcast
  • Choosing the format (content type, length, narration, solo/interview)
  • Planning intro/outro music tracks and narration
  • Creating cover art
  • Selecting a hosting platform and website
  • Choosing recording equipment
  • Choosing audio recording software
  • Processing audio files for a final MP3 or similar product
  • Tips for success
  • Transcription methods
  • Distributing the podcast to gain a following
  • Promoting the podcast for marketing a program or sharing one's voice
  • Checking podcast listener statistics and other analytics
  • Embedding in a course for OER content

Selected Resources Consulted include:

 

Aufderheide, P., Lieberman, D., Alkhallouf, A., & Ugboma, J. M. (2020). Podcasting as public media: The future of US news, public affairs, and educational podcasts. International Journal of Communication14, 22.

Barnes, J., Carraway, C., & Jones, S. (2021). Using lecture podcasts in the COVID‐19 transition to virtual post‐secondary education in agriculture. Natural Sciences Education50(2).

Costa, S. F., Costa e Silva, E., & Correia, A. (2021). Guidelines for Creating Video Podcasts in Mathematics Higher Education. International Journal for Technology in Mathematics Education28(2).

Cox, D. D., & McLeod, S. (2014). Social media marketing and communications strategies for school superintendents. Journal of Educational Administration.

Ferrer, I., Lorenzetti, L., & Shaw, J. (2020). Podcasting for social justice: Exploring the potential of experiential and transformative teaching and learning through social work podcasts. Social Work Education39(7), 849-865.

Graw, D. (2009). Using podcasts to support distance education for adult learners.

Hazlett, K. (2011). Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) that Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business. Journal of Product & Brand Management.

Kaplan, H., Verma, D., & Sargsyan, Z. (2020). What traditional lectures can learn from podcasts. Journal of Graduate Medical Education12(3), 250-253.

König, L. (2021). Podcasts in higher education: teacher enthusiasm increases students’ excitement, interest, enjoyment, and learning motivation. Educational Studies47(5), 627-630.

Lee, D. (2006). marketing 101: iPod, You-pod, We-pod: Podcasting and Marketing Library Services. Library Leadership & Management20(4), 206-208.

Lin, S. (2012). Critical Factors in Adoption of Podcasting for Educational Uses. In CONF-IRM (p. 32).

McNamara, S. (2018). Effectiveness of podcasts as professional development for Texas special education administrators (Doctoral dissertation).

 

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Brainpower! How to Create a Synergetic System for Course Development | Education Session | Dallas 5

The road to quality course development is paved through the collaboration and "brainpower" of many. Join us as we share the journey of one university's evolution in creating systematic, structured partnerships, focusing specifically on faculty training and preparation, support, quality assurance, and meaningful feedback.  

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Extended Abstract

There is no doubt that the global pandemic has wreaked havoc on our educational institutions. In a blink of an eye, courses hastily transitioned online with little to no time for faculty training and preparation, much less quality control. In fall 2020, over 80% of higher education institutions relied on fully online or emergency remote learning. (CHLOE 6, 2021) Nevertheless, while the pandemic forced an emergency move to online learning that in some cases resulted in dismal progress, education has been transformed in lasting ways. Higher education institutions have increased their online course offerings, and faculty members who never imagined they would teach online are now interested in doing so. The great majority of Chief Online Officers predicted growth rather than flight from online learning when asked about the long-term impact of the pandemic on online enrollment (CHLOE 6, 2021). With this distinctive rise in remote learning, we must create effective systems at the institutional level to ensure well-planned and developed courses.

Course development is a collaborative process between the learning design team and the content expert, all working toward the common goal of engaging students in a dynamic online educational experience. The foundation of this partnership is built on the respect and value for the role each person plays in the design process. With varying levels of technical skill yet proficiency in their respective subject areas, how can faculty and the design team collaborate to develop high-quality and engaging courses? How does the design team share their expertise in a way that considers the busy schedules and increasing demands placed upon faculty, particularly during this pandemic? What does faculty training look like and how is it delivered? What systems can higher education institutions create to ensure that their online courses represent the university's proper rigor and the rigor necessary to meet accreditation guidelines? How can meaningful feedback be communicated to promote collaboration and enhance professional relationships? All of these questions and more will be discussed in this session.

Join us as we discuss how the "brainpower" of many is involved in quality course development and share one university's journey in creating systematic, structured partnerships for online course development. Participants will walk through the steps outlined in the design process, focusing specifically on faculty training, support, and effective feedback along the way.  

 

Level of Participation

While this is an education session, participants will be actively involved in the conversation around creating partnerships and systems for quality course development. They will post a meme representing their online experience during Covid in a collaborative space, share current practices using a live poll, participate in "Turn and Talks," and draft a goal based on the evaluation of their current practice. Participants can track their goals throughout the year in a collaborative space that allows them to visualize progress and share what is working for their institution as they continue to grow and evolve.

 

Session Goals:

Individuals participating in this session will evaluate their current system for course development and identify needs. They will discuss steps in creating a systematic process and describe strategies to do so. Lastly, participants will be given a handout that they can use to create an action plan by formulating a goal for moving forward based on the evaluation of their current practice.

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Advancing Digital Transformation Through International Coalitions and Partnerships

Brief Abstract:

As the world looks to address ubiquitous challenges to access to education in both global and local contexts, innovative models for partnerships including global coalitions continue to serve as a powerful strategy and practice for creating sustainable and impactful change. This session will focus on creating and implementing a culture of digital transformation in online, blended and flexible learning across the globe through international communities of practice. Presenters will share findings from their work on developing leadership and change management skills across a series of programs, trainings, and services, and provide participants with resources to implement similar strategies within their own institutional contexts to support digital transformation.

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Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Blended Learning Summit - Part 1: Blended Courses, Programs, and Institutional Strategy: Recent Research and Innovative Practices | Summit | San Antonio 1-2

Highlighting recent research and resources on blended learning, this session will explore findings that have emerged over the last year to guide course and program development, as well as institutional strategy. 

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Extended Abstract

Join Dr. Patsy Moskal and Dr. Nicole Weber as they reflect on three blended learning resources that were released in the past year: 

Together, these resources highlight key pieces of research and practice that offer emerging insight into the state of blended courses (e.g., defining blended, pedagogical shifts, reconceptualizing the blend, effective practices), programs (e.g., blending course modalities to meet students where they are), and institutional strategy (e.g., integrating modalities across the institution to center student needs and success).

Want to plan for your blended future? This one is not to miss! During this session, participants will be able to contribute to the discussion of opportunities and challenges impacting the evolution of higher education toward a blended future. 

 

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Aligning Process to Values: Transitioning to Canvas | Conversation, Not Presentation | Dallas 6

In 2021, OLC’s Institute for Professional Development began transitioning our workshops and programs from Moodle to Canvas. Seeing this as an opportunity to transform our offerings, we collaborated with an advisory council consisting of internal and external stakeholders and used a values-driven approach to inform our DLE course redesign.  Join us for this Conversation Not Presentation Featured session.

 

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Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Custom Conference Consulting (Field Guide Base Station) | Other | Texas A-C Pre-Function - Field Guide Base Station

The Field Guide Base Station was designed as a ‘just-in-time’ resource to enhance the conference experience. Stop by anytime for help, guidance, recommendations, custom consulting on making the most of your conference experience, or even directions!
 

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Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Speed Networking Lounge | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

Not sure what to do between sessions or looking for a place to sit back and have some fun with colleagues? Head to the Speed Networking Lounge, a reflective and collaborative space where you can recharge your brain (and maybe even recharge your devices). There you’ll find puzzles, games, and activities, as well as new opportunities for “slow networking” to engage in while you chat and get to know people (old and new).

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Speed Networking Lounge is Sponsored by

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Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Innovation Studio | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Innovation Studio

During the second program block within the Innovation Studio, we'll explore Augmented and Virtual Reality tools that we can use for face to face and online situations. Also, join us to take the one page escape room challenge! Can you figure out the clues? The Innovation Studio has always been a hub for networking and a space to explore the pervasive challenges we face in the classroom and to craft innovative approaches for better reaching our unique populations of learners. Join us anytime during the conference! We've prepared a series of challenges for you to improve your design thinking skills (which double as models for you to take with you into your own educational spaces).

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Extended Abstract

          

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 4:30pm (Central)
OLC Cafe & Mercantile | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - OLC Cafe

Inspired by local cafes and coffee shops, OLC's Cafe and Mercantile is designed as a space for community to gather around music, food, and all things local. With each conference, our community travels from location to location. Through the OLC Cafe and Mercantile, we are able to connect with local arts and change-makers with the collective goals of critically situating our work in a sense of place and advancing more diverse, equitable, inclusive, and socially just learning environments. Throughout the conference, we will welcome a variety of local artists as they "take the stage" to perform and engage in storytelling with us. We will also invite OLC community members to hop on mic or the stage to share their own talents.

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Extended Abstract

      

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Fostering Campus Partnerships that Support Adoption of Open Education Access Materials | Education Session | Dallas 1-2

While the adoption of open instructional materials has gained merit in recent years, effective integration of open educational resources requires collaboration among a number of campus stakeholders (including faculty, instructional designers, technologists, librarians, etc.).  This presentation provides insights to foster campus partnerships that enhance the integration and maintenance of OER. 

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Extended Abstract

In our 2020 OLC Innovate presentation entitled “Creator or Curator? An OER Decision-Making Strategy for Content Development in Online and Blended Courses,”  we mapped a process that faculty members could follow when deciding whether to use Open Education Resources (OER) content in their courses. Building on this model at the 2021 OLC Innovate Conference, we delved more deeply into this topic by reviewing selected open education resource (OER) collections in our presentation entitled “Supporting Faculty Adoption of Open Ed Access Materials Through MERLOT.” Inspired by feedback from conference participants hailing from a variety of higher ed job roles, we now propose an expanded focus that will explore the benefits of fostering campus partnerships to support the implementation of OER in service of high-quality course development and pedagogy.

Open education resources offer a vast and continuously expanding array of options and opportunities that inform creativity and excellence in teaching and learning across the disciplines, including both student- and faculty-developed content, as well as a wealth of publisher-developed content at free or reduced costs.  Freely available learning materials such as open texts, animations and simulations, collections, assessment tools, apps, and open online courses provide much-needed access and affordability for students, and they offer faculty a high degree of flexibility in shaping courses and curricula. In a nod to the growing prominence of OERs in the higher ed environment, 89% of the CIOs who participated in the 2019 Campus Computing Survey agreed that “OER course materials and textbooks will be an important source of instructional resources in the next five years.” Moreover, participating CIOs confirmed a six-year, steady rise in the number of higher education institutions with policies that “encourage faculty to use OER content for courses” and that provide “formal institutional support for OER course materials.” Nonetheless, only 43% reported that “faculty at my campus believe that the quality of OER course materials is about the same as comparable commercial products.” 

These results illustrate that enhanced institutional emphasis on OERs does not automatically lead to adoption, as some hurdles as well as hesitancies remain in faculty adoption. Faculty continue to express concerns about the quality as well as the availability of open educational resources, a trend that speaks to the value of  focusing on the processes and approaches that institutions can implement to encourage and support high-quality OER implementation.

In this presentation, we explore the importance of fostering collaboration between multiple institutional stakeholders (faculty, instructional designers, instructional technologists, librarians, and others) to create a sustainable approach to the integration and maintenance of OER. Recognizing that incorporation of OER can be a daunting task for individual faculty, it is essential to foster a collaborative approach that taps into the expertise of the campus community. Further, we discuss solutions to administrative hurdles, the influence of institutional context and structure, and the impact of institutional policies and procedures related to OER. Presenters will discuss recommendations for successful OER integrations applicable across the spectrum, including for individual courses as well as standardized curriculum and programs. 

The presentation will offer the following primary objectives for participants:

  1. OER PARTNERSHIPS: Identify key institutional stakeholders essential for an effective collaborative approach to OER integration. 

  2. OER IMPLEMENTATION CHALLENGES: Outline challenges and potential solutions inherent in OER integration and maintenance. 

  3. OER IMPLEMENTATION EXAMPLES: Explore the role of institutional context as it influences policies, procedures, and utility of OER. 

  4. OER SOURCES: Cover a spectrum of OER content and resource providers (including MERLOT) selected as top tier recommendations from the presenters.

 

Takeaways and Engagement Activities: 

  • All attendees will leave the session with a framework for bringing together relevant OER stakeholders at their institution. 

  • The presenters also will develop and share a reference document listing high-quality, OER-related resources.

  • Throughout the presentation, on-screen prompts will engage the audience with interactive feedback, and general questions will be solicited at the end of the presentation

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 3:15pm (Central)
The Playbook for Adaptive Learning: From Project Initiation Through Successful Implementation | Workshop | Texas 6

The recent, rapid growth of adaptive and personalized learning cannot be ignored, and now is the time to jump in.  Fortunately, we have developed a framework to help negotiate the decisions necessary for you to build your own campus strategy for adaptive learning.

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Extended Abstract

Why Adaptive Learning Is Timely and Important

To be frank, trying to undertake an adaptive learning project is a big, hairy beast.  It has lots of tentacles, and it is very intimidating to even the most seasoned ID professionals.  However, it is truly an exciting time in our field that the backend technology is finally powerful enough to fulfill the promise of academic technology--a truly personalized way for learning and learner support on a mass scale.  The dreams of the early progenitors of programmed instruction and teaching machines, like Edward Thorndike and Sidney Pressey, are now a reality through personalized and adaptive learning systems.  

However, our ID-geekery and excitement about this is not the same thing as having an achievable plan for making this kind of innovation happen on your campus.  Fortunately, we have been working on adaptive learning projects for the past four years and have learned the hard way what it takes to be successful.  This workshop will leverage our own lessons learned to help you develop your own plan on how to get started or to move your early efforts into a more sustainable model towards an enterprise-wide implementation of personalized and adaptive learning.   

At the outset, we believe it is important to note that higher education leaders “should approach adaptive learning projects less as technology projects and more as large-scale curricular redesign undertakings” (Gartner Hype Cycle for the Digital Workplace, 2019).  With this in mind, it is not overstating things to say that the courseware development piece is the easy part: the hard part is fundamentally redesigning curriculum--and the attendant processes and people involved.

 

How to Get Started in Creating Your Campus Strategy

During this workshop, we will walk you through the major decision points and phases for building out your campus strategy for this kind of innovative curriculum redesign. We will identify pain points, emphasize methods for success, and help create realistic timelines and cost models for sustainability.

A planning toolkit will be provided to support the workshop activities. Working in groups, participants will work on the following phases towards a “campus plan” to take back to their home institutions: 

Phase 1: Initiation

  • Launching Points 

    • Getting Plugged In

    • Awareness and Capacity Building

    • Marshalling Support & Resources

    • Alignment to Bigger Strategic Needs

    • Philosophy and Mindset

  • Technology and Support Considerations

    • Adoption, Vendor Selection

    • LMS Integration

    • IT Infrastructure

    • IT Governance

    • Bookstore Coordination

    • External Tools

    • Accessibility

Phase 2: Project Planning

  • Creating Realistic Timelines

    • Mapping Out Project Phases

    • Multi-Year Scope

    • An Unending Project
       

  • Stakeholders

    • Doers, Champions, and Cheerleaders

    • Key Leaders and Staff

    • Stakeholder Roles

    • Levels of Involvement

  • Size and Scope of Projects

    • Institutional Approaches to Adaptive Solutions

    • Start Small vs. Go Big

    • Intra- and Inter-Departmental Co-Design 

    • Pilot Approach

    • Scalpel Approach

    • Chainsaw Approach

Phase 3: Design and Delivery

  • Designing Curriculum

    • Outcomes

    • Evidences

    • Mapping  

    • Strategies for Personalization and Adaptivity

  • Building the Course

    • Courseware Development Methodology

    • Course Blueprints

    • Blending In-Class and Out-of-Class Activities

    • Adaptive Content, Questions, Feedback

  • Teaching the Course

    • Course Integration and Testing

    • Cleanup

    • Grades and Analytics

    • Just-in-Time Teaching 

    • Student and Faculty Readiness

    • Room Scheduling

Phase 4: Scaling Up

  • Widening Faculty and Student Support

    • Faculty Onboarding and Development

    • Troubleshooting

    • FAQs

    • Ongoing Care & Feeding

    • Growing Staff and Resources

    • Course Revisions

    • Role of Faculty 

    • Role of Academic Advisors

    • Bookstore Coordination 

  • Evaluation Plan and Reporting

    • KPIs & Metrics

    • Evaluation Process and Instruments

    • Who Needs What Data

    • ROI & TCO

    • Soft Goals and Hard Goals

  • Anticipating and Mitigating Risks / Threats

    • Points of Conflict

    • Resources - Money & Staffing

    • Difficult Stakeholders

    • Opportunity Cost

    • Changing Priorities

  • Strategic Engagement / Communication

    • Telling Your Story

    • Giving Back to the Field

    • Communicating With Senior Leaders

    • Networking and Community Building

Phase 5: Sharing and Reflection

The last segment of the workshop will require participants to share their “campus plan” in group discussions and present their ideas for feedback and determine next steps to make adaptive learning a reality on their home campus.

 

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 3:15pm (Central)
Reimagining Student Satisfaction and Persistence is as Easy as 1–2–3 | Workshop | Texas 5

Three practical areas where quality online instruction is clearly visible and easily achievable are determined by . . . ONE: Exhibiting “The Rules of the Road for Online Presence,” TWO: Using “Fun Ways to Enhance Forum Discussions,” and THREE: Employing “Innovative Strategies for Creating Assignments.” Student satisfaction and persistence will soar!

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Extended Abstract

Online education professionals continue on the lookout for the most effective tools and strategies for teaching and learning that are also among the most easily facilitated. With all the responsibilities that go into online instruction, maintaining a vital collegial role among other faculty members, and fulfilling your institution’s initiatives and mandates, having sufficient time to find those most-appropriate tools and strategies for teaching and learning may seem a bit out of reach. After all, what are the key areas of teaching “investment” that tend to result in the greatest student satisfaction and continuing persistence? Don’t we tend to glean many of our ideas when we come together and share them together? Plus, perhaps you have an inkling about some tools that you would like to discuss with others in the teaching community.

You likely know that there are three areas of online teaching that continue to rise to the forefront of importance for those who desire to inspire the best from their students: Online Presence, Creative Forum Discussions, and Innovative Assignments. The first area, Presence, has to do with Being There and Being Seen There in the classroom. This is critical for students as they develop a connection to the classroom. Knowing and practicing the rules of the road for communication and presence are, therefore, foundational to student satisfaction, and best of all, they are achievable by any faculty member who wants to be a memorable instructor in the minds and hearts of their students. The second and third areas—dealing with forum discussions and assignment development—have to do with the adoption of Innovative, and Interesting Ideas for the hands-on part of learning engagement. Learning can be FUN and it can incite creativity among students, resulting in an unforgettable experience in your classroom.

LEVEL OF PARTICIPATION: By coming together and sharing ideas—both by the session leader and by some of those in attendance—we will discover fresh and exciting ways to enhance the overall learning experience in our online classrooms. One of the ways we will accomplish this is by hearing from the session leader and then forming groups that come up with “the best idea of the group” to share with the corporate body of attendees. The “room” will vote which of the ideas from groups is the best for each of the three areas covered in the session. The impromptu “sharers” will each receive a participation gift.

SESSION GOALS: Attendees will benefit from hearing about important practices and strategies related to Online Presence, Creative Forum Discussions, and Innovative Assignments for higher education. They will be able to hear contemporary ideas from colleagues that relate to the enhancement of three important areas of online practice. Finally, attendees will come away with useable ideas for their own online classroom(s) and have some fun along the way.

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Just Say No: Busting the “Woman Can Do It All” Myth to Equip Women in Online Higher Ed for Career Longevity & Success | Career Forum Roundtable | Texas 4

This roundtable explores the message women receive across higher education and in society, to “do-it-all” and do so without imposing on anyone. Women's role in online higher education continues to increase, yet without the support to sustain. Come discuss how to implement practical strategies for success without sacrificing self-care.

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Extended Abstract

The last two years of the COVID pandemic have completely disrupted many aspects of life; however, gender-based disparities, which while still definitely visible prior to the pandemic, have now been magnified. The COVID pandemic revealed how disparate the expectations remain for women of all backgrounds, but especially those with advanced degrees and those who work in higher education. In higher education, female faculty and administrators are still expected to be the caregiver to the children, climb the University ladder or obtain tenure, and be a homemaker. These leaders often face not just societal pressures but pressure they place upon themselves to do it all without ever asking for help. Demonstrating the need for additional discussion and research on this topic could not be easier--articles expressing this challenge and its fallout show up in our inboxes virtually daily; clickbait on this topic also litters our social media feeds. So, the good news is that people are ready to talk; the bad news is we are still short on solutions.

In this Round Table session, we will seek to move beyond a recognition of the problem and into imagining and developing solutions. To accomplish our goal, we will harness small group conversations at our tables to ask important questions and encourage attendees to share stories with their group. Participants will kick off the session by participating in an interactive activity as a large group designed to paint a collective picture of how the “do-it-all” myth impacts our lives today. Participants will then move into small groups, where they will reflect on their own experiences as higher education faculty and leaders, exploring key pressure points in their lives and receiving guidance and suggestions from others on how to mitigate and relieve those points. Then, we will shift back to a broader conversation to allow participants the opportunity to carefully consider their organizational culture and where it contributes to pressure its female employees face; they will also share best practices for methods that their organization has found to ease that burden. Finally, participants will consider the economic impact this approach has not only on individual companies but on the economy at large. 

The session will close with a practical application small group brainstorming session, offering individual participants immediately applicable avenues to “just say no” and to leave this conference ready to implement short-term adjustments while building towards longer-term gain within both their organizations and across higher education. Each group will note their practical application strategies, which will be compiled and shared out with all attendees.

The presenters will bring forward research-based practical application strategies for the group’s consideration, such as effective negotiation strategies. Snider’s (2002) Shattering Negotiation Myths: Empirical Evidence on the Effectiveness of Negotiation Style  actually showed that adversarial bargaining is not more effective than problem-solving. In fact Sinder (2002) found that using a problem solving approach is not only more effective, but during the negotiation the view of others is that problem solving is the best route. How does this impact women in higher education? 

According to Mari Barletta’s (2015) research, women are natural problem solvers - even when making purchasing decisions. Women seek options, gather information, and are more open to solutions. Barletta (2015) further states that women adjust to the context of the given situation as it changes. Why is this so important? Women are able to find options that may have not been previously considered. By tapping into the natural inclination to problem solvers women have a practical, well-researched, approach to bring into scenarios without continuing to take on additional responsibilities due to the societal pressures for women to simply be ‘agreeable’ (Weisberg, Deyoung, & Hirsh, 2011).

Weisberg, Deyoung, & Hirsh (2011) researched personality traits by gender and found women are often found to be more agreeable than men. Women in turn are less likely to say no and more likely to take on more.  Additional practical, researched, and applicable strategies include accepting desired constraints. It’s important to notice that desire is part of this strategy. And when the desired constraint is met asking for help from a partner and support system. 

In addition, we will reconsider how we define what “success” looks like when balancing a career and a family. We will think about the expectations we perceive of our parenting and our professional commitments and ask hard questions about both their feasibility and their necessity. For example, do mothers really have to create that Pinterest-ready school lunch for their children every day? Are we taking on work tasks that could be effectively delegated to others simply because we believe we “can do the better job”? Is the job another would do truly insufficient, or can we let go of some of the pressure of perfection?

Informing this session will be research we have seen related to trends emerging specifically for women who earn degrees and those working in higher education. Many women have been on the front lines of the COVID-19 emergency in a different way than just stereotypical roles such as nurses and childcare providers. Lack of paid leave, family caregiving responsibilities, traditional gender roles, and health concerns have placed many of the burdens of the pandemic squarely on the shoulders of women. Women have fought so hard for gender equity, and yet with a pandemic we see women leaving the workforce in waves never seen before. How does this movement impact not only women’s rights but also our economy? 

As the economy, and all institutions of higher learning, reshapes in the wake of Covid-19, important conversations must begin regarding what professional success looks like for women and how women can more effectively balance professional and personal pursuits. Women in higher education must be at the forefront of this conversation, finding ways to model balance and better equipping future generations of female leaders to advocate for equitable and manageable expectations and workplace environments. This roundtable will give attendees the opportunity to reflect on their own experiences and the experiences of other attendees, to network with others seeking to address the same concerns, to begin to envision long-term solutions to this ongoing disparity, and finally to walk away with some smaller, immediately applicable practical strategies for better balance.

 

References 

Barletta, M., (2015, March 10). Why Can’t Women Make Up Their Minds? | Marti Barletta. Martibarletta.Com. http://martibarletta.com/why-cant-women-make-up-their-minds/ 

Schneider, A. K. (2002). Shattering Negotiation Myths: Empirical Evidence on the Effectiveness of Negotiation Style. Marquette Law Scholarly Commons. https://scholarship.law.marquette.edu/facpub/272/

Weisberg, Y. J., Deyoung, C. G., & Hirsh, J. B. (2011). Gender Differences in Personality across the Ten Aspects of the Big Five. Frontiers in psychology, 2, 178. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2011.00178

 

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Mission to Mars: Group Interactions in a Virtual Reality Learning Experience | Education Session | Texas 3

Go on a Mission to Mars! We discuss our research on student interactions utilizing virtual reality, where students role-play, explore Mars, establish a base, and decide how to grow crops to sustain human life. The virtual Mars environment is demonstrated; role-playing, communication, and team work using virtual reality is discussed.

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Extended Abstract

The topic for this session is research on group interactions in virtual reality (VR). At this session, we present the results of our research on role-playing, communication, and team work in a team-based laboratory botany project—a mission to Mars—using the virtual reality platform Acadicus as well as Blackboard Collaborate.  For their project, botany student pioneers use virtual reality to become explorers on Mars, establish a base, and decide what kinds of crops to grow to sustain human life indefinitely.

We analyze the results of these group interactions in virtual reality by observing the students’ reflection assignment responses about their experience with the project.  The purpose of the research is to understand more about students’ experience with the virtual reality platform Acadicus in connection with the assignment, how students communicated with their teams during the course of the project, and lastly, what their thoughts and feelings are about role-playing the characters for the mission. 

To illustrate the importance of our research for this community, we must first provide some context. Dr. Carlson is a biologist who specializes in botany and Dr. Gulbis is a sociologist who specializes in forming and sustaining healthy relationships, and in this case, teams.  Both researchers are full-time faculty members at Madison Area Technical College and have long been interested in innovation in teaching and learning. One impetus for this research was the COVID-19 pandemic and the transition to emergency remote teaching (ERT), which has had a negative impact on students (e.g. Perets et al., 2020; Wester et al., 2021).  Drs. Carlson and Gulbis recognized that ERT might make it difficult for students to engage as teams, particularly when the teams had never met in person.  This is of particular importance for Dr. Carlson’s botany class, where laboratory and team-based project work is key and involves the occupation of roles, teamwork, and communication.  The researchers pondered how to create an engaging project for students that they can conduct together virtually as a team that will also teach them vital “soft” skills that all lab workers and scientists need, such as teamwork and communication skills, which are in the realm of Dr. Gulbis’s areas of specialization. 

Luckily, the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) at Madison College had invested in virtual reality long before the pandemic and was therefore in a position to help us launch a VR-based project immediately.  In collaboration with Jon Bouchard and his team at Acadicus, we seized the opportunity to utilize this important tool during the pandemic and ERT to discover an innovative and engaging way for students to work on a project as team and learn the course material as well as employer-sought “soft” skills without actually having to come together in the real world. The resulting “Mission to Mars” project assignment was born, inspired by both the National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science (2015) case study assignment “Farming in Space?” by Helen S. Joyner and Michael L. Allen as well as the novel The Martian (2011) by Andy Weir. 

The Mission to Mars project starts by dividing botany students into teams.  Each team must first choose and designate project roles by using their choice of a virtual roll of the dice or by deciding on their roles together using team work and communication. Students play the following roles throughout the project: Mission Control, the Colony Manager, the Agricultural Advisor, and the Astrobiologist.  The Astrobiologist is the only student who “explores Mars” as an avatar in virtual reality using the Acadicus platform; the other team members remain “on earth” in Blackboard Collaborate but are able to experience Mars through Acadicus in viewer mode. 

Next, the team works together in virtual reality as the Astrobiologist explores Mars. The team must find their base, determine where to place their colony infrastructure, and work together to select and justify the crops and agricultural practices that would result in a lasting and sustainable Mars colony.  When the mission is compete, students individually reflect on their experiences not only as botanist pioneers on Mars, but as role-players in a team who rely on group communication in virtual reality to carry out their mission. 

The results of our research are mixed.  On the positive side, we find that most students enjoyed the activity and were able to identify specific learning outcomes.  Overall, students enjoyed the role-playing aspect of the Mission to Mars project as well as the innovation of using virtual reality to create a Mars environment for students to explore in Acadicus.  One student writes, “It added reality and immersion to the experience and made it easier to get into character for the role play”.  Another student adds, “The idea of virtual reality in Mars is awesome. I wish that we could actually build or design in Mars to make it even more realistic”. 

As popular as the project was for its fun and innovative aspects, many students experienced technical difficulties given the novelty of the virtual reality experience for most of them.  Themes in commonly reported problems include installing and using Acadicus, using Blackboard Collaborate, and arranging to meet simultaneously with project teammates. For example, one student expressed that virtual reality diminished the project experience for them because “none of our computers (which were mostly laptops) were  able to open the software. As for my classmates they were able to download it fine, but as they opened the software it eventually crashed and shut down the computer. As for my laptop (MacBook Pro) couldn’t even open the file in order to completely download the software since it needed a separate app in order to open, but it resulted that it wasn’t available in the U.S. It was very complicated to use it”. 

The researchers recognize that there are technical improvements that will need to be made moving forward. Some important improvements can include securing laptops and VR equipment from CETL for future classes instead of having them use their own laptops, which tend to vary in quality and capacity.  In addition, it will be important to include new and innovative improvements from the company Acadicus, such as helping the researchers to improve the Mars environment itself.  Lastly, it is clear that there are numerous factors that impede students’ ability to schedule time with one another; understanding these factors is critical to successful virtual team work. 

This research has implications for the OLC community because this community was created to advance the quality of online education, which aligns with the goals of the project we created for our students. Beyond OLC, this research has much broader implications for the scientific community.  If we can learn how to create great virtual learning experiences for students in laboratory settings, we may be able to apply these findings to create great virtual work experiences for scientists in laboratory settings as well, who have also been affected by the pandemic (Korbel & Stegle 2020), may not be able to access their laboratories or places of employment, and may desire new and innovative methods to connect with their peers and places of work. 

Our plan for interactivity in this session is to offer the audience a question and answer period at the end of the presentation as well as to demonstrate the virtual Mars environment in Acadicus.  Participants who have laptops with the minimum requirements for installing Acadicus can use viewer mode go to our virtual Mars environment along with us!

Key Learning Outcomes

At the conclusion of this session, participants should be able to:

  1. Define virtual reality.
  2. Describe the challenges of emergency remote teaching (ERT) unique to a laboratory sciences course.
  3. List and implement strategies to establish online teams in an laboratory science course.
  4. List and describe “soft skills” associated with working in a team or group environment.
  5. Describe examples of how virtual work may be employed in the classroom and beyond.

References

Korbel, J.O., & Stegle, O. (2020). “Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Life Scientists”. Genome Biology, 21. Article 113. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13059-020-02031-1

Perets, E.A., Chabeda, D., Gong, A. Z., Huang, X., Fung, T. S., Ng, K.Y., Bathgate, M., & Yan, E. C. Y. (2020). “Impact of the Emergency Transition to Remote Teaching on Student Engagement in a Non-STEM Undergraduate Chemistry Course in the Time of COVID-19”. Journal of Chemical Education, 97(9), 2439-2447. DOI: 10.1021/acs.jchemed.0c00879

Wester, E.R., Walsh, L.L., Arango-Caro, S. & Callis-Duel, K.L. (2021). “Student Engagement Declines in STEM Undergraduates during COVID-19–Driven Remote Learning”. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education, 22(1). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v22i1.2385

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
An Investigation of Resiliency: The Relationship between Prior Online Course Enrollment and College Outcomes during COVID-19 | Education Session | Texas 1-2

In this session, we explore the extent to which college students who chose online courses prior to COVID-19 were more resilient when forced online during Spring 2020. We also consider outcomes in courses that transitioned online to those courses that were originally fully online at the beginning of the semester.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Session Goals

Attendees will be able to identify the extent to which taking a fully online course prior to the COVID-19 pandemic correlated with more resilient course outcomes when students were forced into emergency remote teaching. They also will be able to describe differences in student course outcomes by original course mode (originally fully online vs. not originally fully online) and how observed trends compared to outcomes in prior non-pandemic years.

Study Motivation

Research on the relationship between online course-taking and college outcomes is conflicting; some studies suggest that online courses are critical to academic progress (Johnson & Mejia, 2014), while others suggest that online course-taking is correlated with poorer outcomes (Jaggars & Xu, 2010; Xu & Jaggars, 2014). Due to ethical and practical concerns, no large representative randomized controlled trials comparing fully online versus face-to-face students have occurred. However, the spring 2020 term allowed us to leverage the unique circumstances presented by the COVID-19 pandemic to explore the relationship between online course-taking and course outcomes in college for all students, not just those who initially selected the online modality. Specifically, our study explored 1) the extent to which students who chose online courses prior to the onset of the pandemic were more resilient when forced into courses relying on emergency remote teaching, and 2) as all classes were forced fully online during the spring pandemic term, this also allowed for comparison of outcomes in courses which were forced to transition online to those courses that were originally fully online at the beginning of the semester.  

Theoretical Framework

This research draws on the concept of resilience, defined as “a phenomenon or process reflecting relatively positive adaptation despite experiences of significant adversity or trauma” (Luthar, 2006, pg. 6). In this context, we conceptualize resilience as relative—the extent to which a student’s course outcomes improved, stayed the same, or worsened during the pandemic term when all courses were forced online.  

Method

This study uses a dataset consisting of all courses taken by students (N= 241,080) enrolled in either fall 2019 or spring 2020 at CUNY, the third largest university system in the U. S. Courses were classified by instructional mode. Fully online was any course that was originally listed as a fully online course at the beginning of a semester. All other classes were classified as traditional courses. These classifications describe the semester-long delivery mode during the fall semester, but during the spring pandemic semester, this only describes the mode at the start of the term (before the pandemic hit). Course-taking behaviors were also used to classify students. Traditional mode students were students who did not enroll in any courses that were originally fully online in either the fall or the spring semester. Dual mode students were students who enrolled in at least one course section that was originally fully online and at least one traditional course, in both the fall and the spring terms. Our main outcome of interest was successful course completion, defined as course completion with a C- or better. Additional control variables were included: gender, race/ethnicity, age, G.P.A., first-semester freshman status, the median household income of a student’s zip code, and college level (two-year vs. four-year).

Stata was used to conduct statistical analyses: mixed for multi-level linear probability models and melogit for multi-level logistic regression models. We report the results of multi-level linear probability models because our primary concern is in estimating particular parameters and not forecasting a specific outcome and since we cannot otherwise compare coefficients across logistic regression models (Buis, 2010). The multi-level models included: (level 1) the individual course record; (level 2) the particular student; and (level 3) the college where that student took that course. This allowed us to control for clustering by student and by college, accounting for the tendency of grades in different classes for a given student, and grades for classes at the same college, to be more similar to one another. KHB decomposition (Kohler et al., 2011) was used to calculate direct and indirect effects for mediation analysis. 

While it is impossible to make causal inferences based on the observational data collected in this study, it is possible to use the data, along with the conditions surrounding the pandemic, to consider various hypotheses about the relationship between voluntary online course-taking, ERT and course outcomes. The patterns that we observe may have many different possible explanations, and these will be explored through our results and in conjunction with interactive discussion during the session.

Results and Discussion

  1. We ran separate models to evaluate course outcomes by term for traditional vs. dual mode students. Dual mode students had higher overall successful course completion rates compared to traditional mode students, at both two- and four-year colleges in both terms ()However, the interaction by term was not the same for two-year versus four-year colleges. At four-year colleges, the gap between dual and traditional mode students remained almost the same across terms, increasing slightly. However, at two year-colleges, the gap between the dual and traditional mode students grew substantially larger from fall to spring (): traditional mode students did significantly worse in spring than fall, whereas dual mode students did significantly better in spring than fall (). These differences in slope for each group were statistically significant ().

This difference by institution type is puzzling…. what explanations could be the reason behind the trends observed? Come to the session to find out!

  1. We next looked at patterns comparing outcomes in fully online vs. traditional mode courses across semesters for dual mode students, which allowed us to consider course mode while holding student characteristics constant. Dual mode students at both two- and four-year colleges did significantly better () in both fully online and traditional courses in the pandemic vs. pre-pandemic term. However, the gap between fully online and traditional mode courses remained unchanged—in both terms, at both two- and four-year colleges, students were significantly less likely to successfully complete fully online than traditional mode courses (), even after all traditional mode courses were moved fully online during the pandemic. There was no significant interaction between term and course mode in 2019-2020. This, too, is puzzling, given the fact that all courses moved to a fully online mode early in the spring: we would have expected this gap to disappear once both types of courses were being taught fully online; or even reverse, given the rushed nature of the transition to an online mode for traditional mode courses and the relative inexperience of most instructors and students in the fully online medium. 

So, what could explain this counter-intuitive finding? Come to the session to find out!

Implications

While findings from this study are not causal, they do indicate that institutions should be particularly cautious about forcing students into a course medium not of their choosing, as well as overgeneralizing which courses are “good” or “bad” for all students. Until more data is available, the patterns observed in this study suggest that institutions may do better to err on the side of ensuring that students are able to take courses in the mode that they feel is best for them.  Institutions might want to be especially mindful of indirect ways in which offering online and on-campus sections might force students into a mode that they would otherwise not choose. Further, some interesting patterns were observed in this study between traditional and fully online courses during the pandemic term that call into question assumptions that have been made in the past about online courses. Persistent differences in outcomes between courses that students chose to take on-campus vs. online even after all courses are shifted fully online suggest that future research into online course outcomes may be best served focusing not on the online medium itself, but rather on the characteristics of students who self-select into online courses (e.g., time poverty, stressors, skills, resources, etc.); or the characteristics of the courses themselves (e.g., importance to a student’s major; alignment with student interests; level of synchronicity, interaction or community; etc.).

Interactivity Plan

This session will include an interactive discussion organized around a series of provocative questions grounded in our research results and intended to inspire future research and policy/intervention direction. After an overview of the research, questions showcasing different types of possible explanations for the findings will be posed to the participants. Attendee responses will be compared to supplemental analyses conducted and the literature, followed by probing discussions of how assumptions about online course-taking may be impacting policy. Take-aways for future research directions will be elicited, aimed at identifying policy and interventions that could be continued or developed to either support promising pandemic trends or counter new problematic developments. This interactive discussion format will help the online research community, as well as faculty, staff and administrators who support online students, understand our results and to consider how they may be applied in future institutional research and campus support efforts.

 

[proposal word count not including references: 1482 words]

References

Buis, M. L. (2010). Stata tip 87: Interpretation of interactions in nonlinear models. The Stata Journal10(2), 305-308. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1536867X1001000211

Jaggars, S. S., & Xu, D. (2010). Online learning in the Virginia Community College System. Community College Research Center (CCRC), Teachers College Columbia Universityhttps://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/media/k2/attachments/online-learning-virginia.pdf

Johnson, H. P., & Mejia, M. C. (2014). Online learning and student outcomes in California's community colleges. Washington, DC: Public Policy Institute. https://www.ppic.org/content/pubs/report/R_514HJR.pdf

Luthar, S. S. (2006). Resilience in development: A synthesis of research across five decades. In D. Cicchetti & D. J. Cohen (Eds.), Developmental psychopathology: Risk, disorder, and adaptation (p. 739–795). John Wiley & Sons. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470939406.ch20

Kohler, U., Karlson, K. B., & Holm, A. (2011). Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models. The Stata Journal11(3), 420-438.

Xu, D. & Jaggars, S.S. (2014). Performance Gaps between Online and Face-to-Face Courses: Differences across Types of Students and Academic Subject Areas, The Journal of Higher Education85(5), 633-659, https://doi.org/10.1080/00221546.2014.11777343

Apr 12, 2022
1:15pm - 2:00pm (Central)
Human Focused, Technology Assisted Proctoring: A Guide for Faculty and Students | Industry Showcase - Presentation | San Antonio 4

Join us as we address some key points faculty should consider when adopting an online proctoring solution when assessed against the measures of fairness and reliability.

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Extended Abstract

PSI operates under the principal that proctoring student’s exams remotely is a human-centric process that can be assisted, but never wholly facilitated by, technology. Reliance on AI and machine learning algorithms alone, without human objectivity, for a task like making determinations on human behavior, is a risky proposition. Join us as we address some key points faculty should consider when adopting an online proctoring solution when assessed against the measures of fairness and reliability.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Strategies for Increasing Instructor Presence | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 5

Studies have shown that there is a correlation between perceived instructor presence and student motivation and learning.  This proposed session would provide an opportunity to learn from each other by sharing and discussing ways to increase instructor presence and immediacy in any class setting.

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Extended Abstract

Instructor immediacy can be described as the actions taken by the instructor to decrease any perceived psychological distance between students and the instructor.  This is especially important in an online class where there is often a great deal of physical distance.  Studies have shown that there is a correlation between perceived instructor presence and student motivation, learning, and retention.  Studies have also shown that instructor immediacy can have a positive impact on honor code compliance, thereby promoting a culture of academic integrity in the classroom.

One such to improve immediacy and increase instructor presence would be to proactively contact students who may be struggling.  A quick email to the student will let them know that you’ve noticed their struggle and that you are there to help.  It shows the student that you care about them and about their learning.  Students may respond to your outreach when they may have been to shy or afraid to reach out to you initially. 

We can also periodically reach out to students who are doing well.  We all like to know that our hard work and accomplishments have been recognized. 

Another suggestion would be to send a weekly video announcement rather than (or in addition to) an email or text announcement.  This would give students an opportunity to see your face and hear your voice.  It shows that you are a real person who is there to help. 

This proposed session would provide an opportunity to learn from each other by sharing and discussing tips/strategies/methods for increasing instructor presence and immediacy in any class setting.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
IELOL Meet-Up | Summit | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

Calling all IELOL Alumni and those interested in learning more about the OLC's leadership opportunities! We'll be gathering in the Speed Networking Lounge for casual networking and community building. Like all good learning experiences, OLC is very interested in amplifying the ways that we can engage with new ideas and the community. As such, the onsite meetups are meant to be a direct connection to the findings, ideation, and collaborations happening in the onsite summits during the conference You are encouraged to attend any and all parts of the summits and the meetups, with no requirement to attend the summit to make the most of the meetups, and vice versa. We encourage you to explore both spaces as you can to contribute to the shaping of new collaborations and future calls to action for this special interest group.

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Extended Abstract

                

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Insights into the Student Experience: Leveraging Messenger Technology to Enhance the Student Experience in the Online Classroom | Education Session | Dallas 1-2

In 2018, CTU introduced a texting feature within our mobile application, allowing students to communicate with faculty. These messages offer unique insight into how students experience classroom technology, content, and the learning process. Leveraging these insights has allowed us to improve the student learning experience based upon direct student feedback.

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Extended Abstract

Smartphones and devices are a staple in the life of college students; the results of a University of the West Indies survey found that 67% of the respondents never turn off their mobile phones, always have the device with them, and check for text messages a minimum of one hundred times a day (Ahmed, 2019). Leveraging the communicative capabilities of mobile devices to inform, support, and engage with students has been utilized to varying degrees by universities worldwide. Text messaging features specifically can be utilized to gain real-time feedback and create real-time connections with students.

The informal nature of a text-style communication tool has the potential to change not just how, but what our students communicate with faculty. Utilizing a text-messaging style messaging feature to connect faculty and students can offer unique insight into how students experience classroom technology, content, and the learning process. These insights can then inform innovative initiatives at a multitude of levels around the University from technology to instruction to student support.

Messages provide a real-time understanding of the ways in which the students are interacting with a Learning Management System. Instructors often become the first line of defense when students have questions regarding navigating the classroom environment. Messages highlight the student (user) experience. An analysis of messages from student can help to identify technological or navigation barriers can then inform faculty and student trainings along with future technological advancements.

Messages also provide real time insight into how students are thinking and feeling about the learning they are doing. Is a student feeling overwhelmed, discouraged, or empowered?  Analysis of messages offer insight into barriers and/or successes that students encounter as they navigate their online course. Understanding the student user experience (UX), allows instructors and student support staff the ability to provide needed on time support for students. When faculty take advantage of these “messenger moments”, they can personally encourage students when it may be needed to persist. CTU has evidence that with effective messenger communication, students are more likely to stay engaged with faculty and with course content. Messenger data analysis can also inform both administrative and instructional strategies.

In this session, panelists will share the trends in terms of the types and timing of student messages at CTU. Each panelist will discuss some of the insights they have gained from the messages and how they have actioned on those insights from an administrative, instructional, and student support perspective. The panelists will examine a sample of messages and discuss response strategies both from an immediate instructional perspective and from the perspective of enhancing the student experience longer term.

The individuals attending this panel discussion will gain insight into how to leverage new technologies and the data coming from those new technologies to enhance the student experience. Attendees will be able to analyze trends within the data, developing an awareness of both implicit and explicit meanings within student communications. And attendees will be able to discuss strategies for leveraging those findings across various levels of support from instructional to technological.

References

Ahmad, T. (2019). Mobile phone messaging to increase communication and collaboration within the university community. Library Hi Tech News.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Expanding Blended Professional Development Capacity by Leveraging Faculty Fellows in a Course Design Feedback Loop | Education Session | Texas 4

We’ll share our process for expanding the capacity of a blended/hybrid faculty development program by integrating faculty fellows in a course design feedback loop. We’ll also explore how other institutions may be able to incorporate a similar faculty fellow model to support and expand faculty development.

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Extended Abstract

Even before the pandemic, many institutions were adopting the hybrid (or blended) teaching modality by reducing in-class time and replacing it with asynchronous activities for students. Now, it is not only clear that hybrid courses are here to stay but that demand for this modality continues to grow. How can teams of faculty developers, instructional designers, and administrators work together to ensure success for faculty new to teaching hybrid courses?

This presentation will share the model for a professional development and teaching certification program for hybrid course design based around a feedback loop facilitated by faculty fellows. With continual revision since its establishment in 2015, this program has allowed our institution to quickly, efficiently, and affordably scale professional development capacity based on demand while continuing to uphold quality expectations even in times of exceptional need.

We will discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the major aspects of this program and the involvement of faculty fellows, such as the concept of the feedback loop, selecting and preparing faculty fellows, supporting mechanisms for the program overall, and some surprising outcomes based on feedback from the faculty fellows themselves. Participants will be asked to reflect on the needs of their institutions and how a faculty fellow system and feedback loop could help them address their needs for preparing faculty to successfully teach courses in new modalities.

Level of Participation

This session will consist of approximately 25 minutes of presentation (lecture) along with approximately 20 minutes for guided self-reflection and discussion.

Session Goals

Individuals attending this education session will be able to reflect on their institution’s need for a feedback loop in faculty development, identify opportunities for expanding faculty development capacity, and develop the beginnings of a plan for incorporating faculty fellows in faculty development programs.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
My Virtual EdTech Helper | Education Session | Texas 3

The participants will develop a chatbot using Voiceflow. A chatbot is so useful, especially when your office has limited staff; the chatbot will automatically redirect people to what they are looking for.  I will outline the process that I used to develop the chatbot, from its conception to its deployment. 

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Extended Abstract

In 2020, the need for virtual help was a necessity, after everybody was working from home due to the pandemic. I started looking at virtual assistants like Google or Alexa that could help me to answer tickets or provide an answer to common questions that faculty, staff, and students had about academic technologies, especially after 5pm or during the weekends. A chatbot seems like a good idea for a team  of just one person. I haven’t seen chatbots in higher education besides the office of the registrar or admissions offices, that is why I thought of using the chatbot to respond and train others while I am not in the office.  

After looking several options, Voiceflow was my choice. It is a very accessible tool that helps you to program a voice assistant or chatbot without having coding skills. Their platform is very user-friendly, that with the help of a few tutorials and videos you can set up a nice FAQ flow. Even, kids from intermediate and middle school can program voice assistants with this platform.

The chatbot has answers to the most common questions related to the technologies that we use at the School of Public Health. Also, it can be used to train users on specific things, for example, a quiz, from its creation to its deployment. The chatbot has constant updates with FAQs that faculty, TAs, and students ask via email. This project is in progress. I have started to send the chatbot to those users that ask during the weekend, to test its functionality. Some of those users have reported that the chatbot is very useful.

In this session, I will show how I started creating the chatbot from its conception, the workflow that I used, and the process to start building a chatbot with Voiceflow. The vendor is currently working on a widget so you can connect your chatbot to your website easily.

This session is for instructional designers and academic technologist, and faculty that have an interest in educational technologies, especially in chatbots. 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
A Summer to Remember: Leveraging the Power of the Group to Individualize Faculty Development | Conversation, Not Presentation | Texas 1-2

Supporting faculty in the creation of resilient learning experiences will remain an ongoing goal for institutions of higher education, but how can we provide individualized support and still serve the number of instructors who need us? Learn how our Summer Institute provides an individualized, innovative approach to group-based faculty development.

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Extended Abstract

In the spring of 2020, faculty professional development and support became an exercise in helping as many instructors as possible with the limited time and resources that were available. To meet the overwhelming demand for training and support, many institutions created online tutorials, self-paced training modules, and led large-scale workshops to help instructors succeed in the transition to remote teaching. The needs of the moment did not allow for as much individualized coaching and support as many would have liked to provide.

In the summer of 2021, our instructional design team offered its first annual Summer Institute for instructors who sought to strengthen and augment their online and hybrid course offerings. The institute was designed as an “academic incubator,” in which instructors could refine their goals for professional improvement and use university resources to help in reaching those goals. The resulting experience provided a group setting in which instructors could learn from and inspire one another while keeping focus on goals that were personally meaningful and valuable to them.

The Summer Institute began with a series of keynote speakers, institutional leaders and experts in their field, as well as a student panel. Following, faculty participants worked with their assigned instructional designer and course developer to create a fully ready to be taught course over 9 weeks of engagement. The Institute ended with a faculty showcase celebration. Because the Institute was meant to also be an opportunity to grow the university Community of Practice, faculty who successfully completed the Institute were also invited to become members of our Faculty Mentor Corps – a group of faculty representing disciplines across the university that serve as outreach to support distance teaching and learning good practices with peers.

Level of Participation

Attendees will hear from three instructors who successfully completed the Summer Institute. Organizers will share planning tips as well as share samples of work that were completed during the institute. Participants will be invited to ask questions or comment on each segment of the panel discussion as well as share out their own faculty professional development experiences and stories.

Session Goals

In this session, attendees will discuss innovative strategies for creating a series of transformative learning experiences for distance learning instructors. Presenters will address:

  • Institutional support
  • Attendee selection process
  • Expectations for completion
  • Goal refinement
  • Group learning experiences
  • Showcasing instructor work

At the conclusion of the session, attendees will be able to identify key considerations for planning and executing a Summer Institute faculty development initiative.

 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
That Wasn't Easy: A Faculty-Led LMS Transition | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 6

This session will share how our multi-campus community college used a faculty-first process for successful LMS RFP, LMS Evaluation, LMS Selection, and new LMS Training. This college district had a faculty lead the way on every step of the LMS change process.

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Extended Abstract

This session will share how a multi-campus community colelge used a faculty-first process for successful LMS RFP, LMS Evaluation, LMS Selection, and new LMS Training. This college district had a faculty lead the way on every step of the LMS change process, from creating a list of functional components, to reviewing the RFP and its responses, through selection and training thousands of faculty. This session will include time for attendees to ask questions and share their own advice about the LMS evaluation, adoption, and training processes. Attendees will have access to most of the documents created and used during the entire process.

This session is ideal for those interested in cultivating faculty leadership, involving faculty in governance, reviewing or changing their LMS, or scaling up a faculty training initiative.

Attendees will have access to our documents (except those bound by NDAs / contracts), process, and lessons learned. This will help leaders, faculty, and staff involved with technology be better prepared for evaluating, training, or changing their LMS.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Discover the Benefits of Peer Reviewing: You Had Me at MERLOT! | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 3

Open Educational Resources are more popular than ever. How do you find quality materials that are reviewed by experts? You turn to MERLOT. We are hoping that you, in turn, will consider becoming a MERLOT reviewer. Viewing this session will help you discover all the benefits of peer reviewing.

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Extended Abstract

Open Educational Resources are more popular than ever. How do you find quality materials that are reviewed by experts? You turn to MERLOT. We are hoping that you, in turn, will consider becoming a MERLOT reviewer. MERLOT Peer Reviewers have the opportunity to look at online materials in depth, to examine how they can benefit student learning, to check on their ease of use, and quality of content. Becoming a MERLOT peer reviewer is quite simple. Learn about the easy route to peer reviewing and discover the benefits of reviewing for MERLOT: community, recognition, and rewards. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions, to sign up for our orientation to reviewing (GRAPE Camp), and to connect with other members of the MERLOT community.

 

 

 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Instructor Success Drives Student Success: Learning Experience Solutions to Help Faculty Thrive! | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 4

Northeastern University and O’Donnell Learn will summarize 3 years of research leading to the creation of a personalized and scalable faculty support solution for creating humanized, inclusive and engaging learning – Faculty Concierge. Northeastern University will discuss how this learning design support and technology platform is simplifying and reducing course preparation time and equips faculty with the tools they need for creating successful, contextualized learning experiences. 

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Extended Abstract

As screens rapidly replace classrooms and technology revamps traditional learning modules, a vital and yet unanswered question lingers: are teachers being provided with the tools they need to keep up? O’Donnell Learn has, over the last 3 years, conducted exploratory research aimed at answering how much time are instructors spending on learning design? Where are they spending their time – and how effective is it? What are instructor-stated needs for learning design support? Finally, how do instructor needs align with administrator perceived needs for faculty learning design support?

 

O’Donnell Learn and Northeastern University will share how the outcomes of this research framed the development of a personalized faculty support solution for creating contextualized and humanized learning while simultaneously simplifying and reducing instructor course development time. Further, Northeastern will share how this service, Faculty Concierge, and complementary technology platform, Nectar, has successfully increased the University’s capacity for providing personalized faculty development and learning design support.

Engagement: Brief discussion around the need for humanizing learning; the current condition of faculty, staff, and students and why students seek better learning experiences. Discussion on research of how much time instructors spend on online course development. We will also be sharing research on what instructors are interested in improving while also inviting the audience to add their ideas for classroom improvements. 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Community College Summit - Part 1: Communicating Equity and Inclusion Through Syllabus Design | Summit | San Antonio 1-2

Join us to discuss how instructors and designers can establish equitable and inclusive student learning environments through their syllabus design and language. Presenters will provide an overview of research that informs a framework for more equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist pedagogy. 

Participants will also learn more about an inquiry tool to guide reflexive practice.  

 

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Extended Abstract

For many learners, our syllabus is the first impression they get of us as educators, the course, and our teaching approach. As a result, we’ve likely sustained the language, norms, and expectations handed to us when we began teaching a specific course. As we’ve come to realize, previous approaches were not always equitable or inclusive and often contributed to the maintenance of disparities we see with particular demographics and identities. 

Understanding how our syllabus design could sustain or disrupt how some learners are systematically disadvantaged is essential.  Our syllabus has the power to contribute to a counter narrative to structural racism, stereotype threat, micro and macro aggressions, imposter syndrome, and a lack of familiarity with higher education in the United States. 

Using an extensive research review by the Center for Urban Education, presenters will provide evidence-based practices that inform a more equitable, inclusive, and antiracist syllabus design. 

 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
You Don’t Really Want A Culture of Learning Innovation | Industry Showcase - Presentation | Austin 1

Silos of innovation aren’t enough to solve the problems facing education anymore. We need scalable, sustainable, and intentional innovation to stay relevant and successful. Dr. Jeff Borden will share his blueprint for such initiatives he has leveraged to create a culture of Learning Innovation, at scale, across the entire organization.

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Extended Abstract

"We cannot solve a problem by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”  When Albert Einstein said that, he had education in mind. And the problems in education are plentiful – retention, enrollment, cost, diversity, accountability, and on and on. But education problems do not simply impact schools, they impact living. By 2025, the Lumina Foundation and George Washington University report that the United States will have 23 million jobs which require at least an undergraduate degree with no qualified American to fill them. Racing toward 10 billion people on this planet will result in challenges of epic proportions. Never before in history have we needed more ideas.

Every school has a few innovation “pockets” to showcase. From pioneering instructors to first-adopter technologists, innovation exists at most schools. But disparate, silos of innovation likely are not enough to solve the problems education is facing anymore. We need scalable, sustainable, intentional innovation impacting multiple streams of education context (like retention, content delivery, instruction, assessment, etc), if we want to stay relevant and successful as teaching and learning organizations.

Dr. Jeff Borden, former Chief Innovation Officer and current CAO at D2L, will share his blueprint for such initiatives as leveraged in formal, higher education settings, so as to create a culture of Learning Innovation, at scale, across the entire organization. Utilizing the latest frameworks from organizational psychology, creating efficiencies through strategic technology, and tapping into resources across multiple stakeholder groups, this methodology is comprehensive and attainable. While re-imagining some old processes, strategic Learning Design and Innovation can help us move into the next century, helping solve some long time problems and addressing others before they manifest.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Coaching for Connection: A playbook for successful implementation of an eFaculty coaching model | Education Session | Dallas 3-4

Improving the outcomes of faculty teaching online courses is paramount for the success of the students enrolled in eLearning courses and programs. TCC Connect Campus established an eFaculty Coach program, to assist, guide and support faculty through coaching, training and the utilization of data. In this session, the presenters discuss the outcomes of the initiative, now at a more mature phase. 

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Extended Abstract

This presentation covers the implementation of an e-mentoring program for online faculty at TCC Connect Campus, the online campus of Tarrant County College District. In 2018, TCC Connect Campus established an eFaculty Coach program designed to assist, guide, and support faculty through the utilization of data, coaching, and training. In its fourth full year, the model supports faculty in developing critical aspects of quality and compliance related to community, communication and active presence, substantive and regular interaction, and the administration of the virtual classroom. The eFaculty coach also ascertains areas where s/he can deliver just-in-time training (JITT) in areas for faculty to improve their skills.  

eFaculty coaches work closely with faculty to ensure student outcomes, faculty expectations, strategic plans, and institutional goals are met. The initiative goals aspire to reach 100% of the faculty in an ever-present and long-term road map. Moreover, this initiative reduces the distance between faculty teaching online courses and mid-level administrators while ensuring the teaching and learning endeavor is under continuous support. Departmental data produced via observations by eFaculty coaches are sent to Department Chairs and Deans for further analysis and utilization, allowing the campus to expand its data-informed planning and operating process. In a similar fashion, the results lead to creating Institutional Effective Plan or IEPs for the campus and the college.     

Located in Academic Affairs, the online faculty-mentoring program is a part of the retention plan and quality assurance strategies for the Campus.  Attendees will receive information about the benefits and results of the initiative.  Aspects of academic, administrative, selection/hiring and technical components, and best practices and lessons learned after several implementation cycles will also be discussed. The presenters discuss the outcomes of the initiative, now at a more mature phase. Specifically, the session will be organized to address stakeholder needs (students, faculty, campus leadership, external accreditors), develop goals based on SWOT analysis and measurable outcomes, share short and long-term implementation strategies, present sample forms and observation criteria, discuss how to ensure buy-in and support, and share data. Links to external resources, platforms, and audio files will be embedded in the traditional presentation format. 

 Following the session, attendees will be empowered to utilize data to plan and implement a similar model within their institutions or campuses. Alignment to national quality standards and requirements for compliance in distance education is critical as the demand for online delivery continues to grow. TCC Connect Campus and Tarrant County College are pleased to share their experiences. 

Keywords: Coaching, Mentoring, LMS Support, Quality, Compliance 

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
(NOT) Lost in Translation: A Program Development Perspective in Transitioning Back to Face-To-Face Teaching | Education Session | Dallas 5

After a year online, our faculty wanted to dive deeper into inclusive teaching practices but weren't sure how to transition those practices into the physical classroom. We will share how we reimagined our programming by inviting faculty to share what they needed most. Bring and share your stories, too!

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Extended Abstract

Summer is often preparatory time for the upcoming Fall semester and most institutions provide wide ranges of faculty support in the forms of institutes, peer learning communities, and so on. In our office of online learning, we are familiar with the concept of providing opportunities for faculty to redesign their face-to-face teaching practices and reimagine them for an online modality in a space where they can share their concerns and apply new knowledge confidently (Eiselein et al., 2019). Transitioning back to campus instruction also necessitated a need to revisit the teaching practices and bring the skills gained in remote teaching into the classroom with more inclusivity, diversity and equity in mind. 

Originally, our office of online learning had created a program to support faculty who wanted to create online and blended learning. In the summer of 2020, many of our faculty members were needing support to develop and teach online courses for both fall and spring semesters.  The 2020 summer programming focused on online teaching practices where our office partnered with several other units to support this need in the form of workshops, peer learning communities and technology training support. Based on all of this programming, our office had to reimagine and redesign programming to support faculty in a new way.

Through an intentional and participatory design process, the theme of our faculty development programming began to center around supporting faculty in transitioning back to campus teaching with a focus on inclusive teaching practices.  The participatory design element, which took into account institutional and faculty voices in the development stage resulted in a one-week semi-unconference style program which we called Summer Teaching Colloquium. Our program accepted 12 faculty members from various departments in the undergraduate college and professional schools.

Prior to the Colloquium week, we adopted a mentality of “going with the flow” by embracing flexibility (Enoch Hale & Lee Skallerup Bessette, 2016) to uncover the concerns of these 12 faculty members and give them a space for sharing their experiences and teaching methods.  We did this by asking faculty in their applications what they felt they needed most before coming back to campus to teach.  The contents for each day of the Colloquium was developed based on the faculty responses. We then took their most common concerns and made those topics the ones discussed in detail during the colloquium. We then allowed for faculty voices in conversational forms and provided opportunities to learn and reflect on various on-demand resources such as design justice, UDL, trauma-informed pedagogy, and equity and inclusion in digital and face-to-face learning environments.

During the colloquium week, faculty were engaged with peers by reflecting on teaching experiences past and upcoming, and encouraged them to think through a change that they could implement in their classes to reflect inclusive pedagogy. We asked them to think about this in terms of both “big and small moves”(Collier, 2020).  Following the colloquium, small faculty groups were assigned an instructional designer from our office to work through their ideas on how they would bring at least one idea on inclusive teaching into their course. Over the coming fall semester, faculty will share their stories with us as they implement these small and/or big changes in their classrooms.  We are excited to see where these changes lead them and their students!

In this session, we will:

  • Provide historical context and framework of our faculty development program

  • Share design and structure of our one-week online design of colloquium

  • Share an example of one day’s content focused on Design Justice practices

  • Share resources, such as discussion prompts, readings and other materials based on inclusive teaching practices

  • Share reflections from our faculty and final project information

We will include resources on the various topics, as well as how we set intentions for each day, pre-session work for engagement with topics, and an outline for the week.  We will share how we think we can grow and develop our program and what might be our next steps.  

During our session, we hope to engage participants with polling, shared note taking and small group discussion.  We plan on providing prompts to engage others in their own faculty development redesigns, what worked/what didn’t and share resources with each other to help promote and grow programs. We hope to gather information so that everyone attending the session (and those not able to attend) will be able to come back and review resources, ideas, and connect with participants. We invite all participants to share their own stories as they support faculty transitioning back to a physical classroom after a year away.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Build Your Course Quality Assurance Team and Don’t Forget the ID! | Education Session | Dallas 6

Join this session to explore an example of how an active instructional team collaboration can impact the quality and consistency of course design and delivery for an entire academic program. Discover ideas and resources for building an effective project partnership across faculty, academic program leadership, instructional designers, and related stakeholders.

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Extended Abstract

With the swift movement of courses and learning processes to online modalities in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, educators have developed an increased awareness of the importance of design consistency and quality assurance for all learners. As faculty and students transition back to the classroom, while still relying on digital tools for organization, communication, and collaboration, it is more important than ever to provide dependable, accessible, user-friendly experiences.  This awareness has prompted the need for strategic conversations around design and delivery practices across all courses within an academic program, and the challenges a non-standardized design can bring. Some of these challenges include increased faculty workload and inefficient learning experiences. Embracing a collaborative approach to evaluating these challenges and potential solutions can be a powerful and inspiring endeavor. 

Leveraging a task force that includes faculty, academic program leadership, and instructional designers enhances efficiency, quality, and sustainability when creating solutions for course design and effectiveness issues. Faculty provide subject matter expertise, teaching style, and feedback from their student learning experiences. Including instructional design input can be pivotal to achieving design and consistency goals, but knowing how and when to bring instructional designers into the conversation isn't always apparent. 

An instructional designer's expertise can be a key asset when reviewing multiple courses and exploring how best to curate and present digital content relative to anticipated student learning outcomes.  Instructional design skills can elevate a collaborative effort, highlight pedagogical methodologies and bring objective perspectives on how to support practical functionality and positive learner experiences. 

Cultivating relationships with colleagues who bring multiple perspectives, valuing the diversity of expertise, and incorporating stakeholder inputs are important elements of achieving a successful project outcome.  Implementing effective communication, collaboration, and creation processes for the consistent design and development of courses will ultimately lead to a more positive learning experience for all students. Join this exploration of how creative collaborations can support and enhance quality assurance outcomes across multiple courses in an academic program. 

This session will use interactive discussion, polling, and ideation opportunities to engage the audience in considering how joint course design efforts within programs can deliver successes that positively affect all stakeholders.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Online Science Labs with Hands-on Lab Kits | Industry Showcase - Presentation | San Antonio 3

There are many ways to teach lab science courses online. Why use a hands-on approach with a lab kit? Can it help to make an engaging learning experience for online lab science students? Let’s experiment together.

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Extended Abstract

There are many ways to teach lab science courses online. Why use a hands-on approach with a lab kit? Research shows that students who only view experiments (rather than engaging in them) perform worse on conceptual knowledge exams than those who participate in physical or virtual labs (Zacharia and Olympiou, 2011). An online or hybrid course with hands-on experiments, created following carefully designed learning outcomes with safety and rigor in mind, make a very engaging learning experience for online lab science students. Let’s experiment together.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Certify This: PlayPosit Playlists for Micro-credentialing | Industry Showcase - Presentation | San Antonio 4

Are you tired of watching video after video to complete required certifications, mandatory training, or professional development? Learn how our partners create and deploy engaging curated playlists with customizable certificates.

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Extended Abstract

Are you tired of watching video after video to complete required certifications, mandatory training, micro-credentialing, or professional development? Learn how our partners create and deploy engaging curated playlists with customizable certificates.

This session will offer examples of how we're changing the micro-credentialing game. PlayPosit Playlists offer easy to create and take curated experiences that integrate with or without an LMS. Each playlist can feature Bulbs (PlayPosit interactive videos), PDFs, images, docs, sheets, forms, and more. You can also integrate with BADGR for easy tracking and badging. Playlists will amp up your learning experiences and offer data tracking to ensure all participants complete each experience with fidelity.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Vineyards and Villainy - An OLC Mystery Event | Other | San Antonio 5-6

Inspired by the picturesque landscapes of vineyards, join us for the conference-long mystery game where we explore hidden messages, dive into collaborative storytelling, and explore the boundaries between hero and villain. While you can play anytime, use this dedicated time slot to join others to advance the story and try your best to solve the mystery at hand.

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Extended Abstract

           

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Course Redesign: Scaffolding and Collaboration | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 2

This session will explore the redevelopment of an undergraduate course at The University of Arizona Global Campus. Specifically, we will look at collaboration with associate faculty during course redesign and how scaffolding supports student success.

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Extended Abstract

Designing courses that engage online learners to achieve the highest level of mastery of course learning outcomes is at the forefront of online course development at The University of Arizona Global Campus. In Spring 2021, full-time faculty in the Department of Education and Liberal Arts had the opportunity to redesign one of their core courses, ECD315: Curriculum Planning and Design for Early Learners. In the online classroom, the presentation of learning activities, guidance, and assignments holds a teaching role. Just as on-ground teachers must reflect on their teaching and student learning, online teachers must reflect upon course content. “Reflective teaching is a process where teachers think over their teaching practices, analyze how something was taught and how the practice might be improved or changed for better learning outcomes” (Mathew et al., 2017, p. 127). This course redesign sought to use reflection to strengthen the course material.

Additionally, during the redesign, the full-time faculty connected with associate faculty familiar with the course to seek their feedback.  Adjunct faculty members are valuable members of higher education, and universities should provide them with “opportunities to participate in decision-making” and providing input in curriculum and course design (Ridge & Ritt, 2017, p. 58). Both the reflection and collaboration provided the opportunity for a more meaningful and scaffolded course to support student success.

Since this was the redevelopment of an existing course, the subject matter experts utilized existing data from the class to inform their approach. This data allowed the subject matter experts to see where the course needed more scaffolded support for students to master the course learning outcomes.

Throughout this presentation, we will explore this process and highlight specific examples of how scaffolding and collaboration allowed for redeveloping a course that would increase student mastery of learning outcomes. Similarly, the co-construction of content by full-time and adjunct instructors alike sought to deepen the partnership between these groups while increasing the self-efficacy and sense of connection to the university for the participating adjunct instructors. Through intentional collaboration, adjunct faculty partner as key stakeholders (Ridge & Ritt, 2017).

Participants will engage in conversations and hands-on opportunities with their peers and presenters to learn about scaffolding courses. Participants will leave the session with practical strategies that can be used immediately for developing comprehensive and effective courses and curriculum.

References

Mathew, P., Mathew, P., & Peechattu, P. J. (2017). Reflective practices: A means to teacher development. Asia Pacific Journal of Contemporary Education and Communication Technology, 3(1), 126-131.

Ridge, A., & Ritt, E. (2017). Adjunct faculty as key stakeholders in distance education. Journal of Faculty Development, 31(2), 57–62.

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
Enabling a Culture of Innovation: Leadership within Complex Adaptive Systems | Featured Session | Texas Ballroom C-D | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Higher education has a weak history of academic innovations that have led to sustained and truly meaningful transformation. This is not due to some extraordinary resistance to change or to a fundamental lack of trying, but rather because there are complexities inherent in the academic culture that keep higher education from fitting neatly into traditional innovation leadership models. This 45-minute featured session presents a new lens for thinking about leading change based on complex adaptive systems theory and the University System of Maryland’s 10-year history supporting academic innovation across our institutions.

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Extended Abstract

Eckel, Hill, and Green (1998) defined transformational change as that which “1) alters the culture of the institution by changing select underlying assumptions and institutional behaviors, processes, and products; 2) is deep and pervasive, affecting the whole institution; 3) is intentional; and 4) occurs over time” (p. 3). But, to date, higher education has a weak history of academic innovations that have led to these kinds of transformations. This presentation explores the hypothesis that this is not due to some extraordinary resistance to change by educators or to a fundamental lack of trying across the field, but rather that there are complexities inherent in the academic institutional culture that keep higher education from fitting neatly into traditional innovation adoption models. It appears that bringing academic innovations to scale for transformational change may be as much about understanding and addressing the complex institutional culture as it is about adopting emerging technologies and incorporating evidence-based practice (Kezar & Eckel, 2002a, 2002b). Stated differently, achieving meaningful and lasting change from innovations in higher education is a cultural process, necessitating a more nuanced approach than simply getting sheer numbers of faculty, staff, and students to participate in an initiative. The change must come from full engagement of institutional staff and faculty focused on learning outcomes beyond grades on a transcript from courses taken. This transformation will require new communication strategies across “silos” and more effective, purposeful, and consistent messaging from leadership.

Unfortunately, determining the best approach to enabling a culture of innovation within higher education institutions has been somewhat elusive. Dynamic social systems such as education have far too many interacting variables to be reduced easily to a set of linear, cause-and-effect relationships (Banathy, 1991). Instead, we have recently been exploring how complex adaptive systems theory can inform our efforts to enable a culture of academic innovation.

Utilizing support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, we reflected on the University System of Maryland’s eight-year, system-wide course redesign initiative to evaluate the System’s role in enabling this academic innovation to generate transformational change. The goal of this research was to determine opportunities for –and limits on– system action in support of academic change; to describe how circumstances combined to make it difficult to scale an innovation like course redesign; and to outline a strategy that, over time, may have a better chance of creating transformational change from System-led initiatives in the future. Reflecting on the organic and evolutionary development of these changes has provided insights and opportunities to capitalize on our initial successes and refocus our activities on areas where gaps were identified. Complex adaptive systems are “neural-like networks of interacting, interdependent agents who are bonded in a cooperative dynamic by a common goal, outlook, need, etc.” (Uhl-Bien, Marion, and McKelvey, 2007, p. 299). Keshavarz et al. (2010) identified the key characteristics of complex adaptive systems, which they have observed

  • learn and adapt in continually changing ways depending on the context;
  • retain distributed network control rather than centralized hierarchical control;
  • are “nested”; and,
  • exhibit “emergence” (the interplay of agents shape a hidden but recognizable regularity in the behavior of the whole system).

These characteristics of social complex adaptive systems can make it difficult to know how a higher education system will react to change –much less to know how to lead change within it. In fact, complexity scholars have argued that existing leadership theory is not particularly well suited to address the intricacies of these rapidly changing environments because traditional models are often premised on a particular individual’s efforts to create stability and eliminate uncertainty through organizational structure and hierarchy (see Child & McGrath, 2001; Ilinitch, D’Aveni, & Lewin, 1996; Levin & Fullen, 2008). Uhl-Bien, Marion, and McKelvey (2007) argued that leadership in complex adaptive systems “should not be seen only as position and authority but also as an emergent, interactive dynamic –a complex interplay from which a collective impetus for action and change emerges when heterogeneous agents interact in networks in ways that produce new patterns of behavior or new modes of operating” (p. 299). Hazy (2011) further suggested that understanding complex adaptive systems –and transformational leadership within them– requires a shift from thinking about system structures to focusing analyses on interrelations within the system instead. In this context, leadership is viewed not as a top-down function of corporate decision-making; rather, leadership is just one of several “organizational capabilities that directly relate to an organization’s performance and adaptability” (p. 168).

In this featured session, the presenter will begin by discussing the leadership approach the University System of Maryland (with 12 diverse institutions) has been taking with regard to academic innovation. The speaker will then present the complex adaptive systems theory framework for the attendees to consider as a potential change model for higher education, drawing from our experiences in leading change across the USM institutions over the last 10 years and our more recent experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic. The remaining time will be reserved to provide concrete examples that can be informed by framework, how the framework relates to shared leadership and learning organization leadership approaches, and how it might be applied in specific institutional contexts. The goal of this session will be for attendees to leave with a framework for thinking in new ways about what leadership may need to look like within the complex adaptive higher education systems in which we all operate.
 

Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
2:15pm - 3:00pm (Central)
An Investigation Into a Team-Based Online Statistics Class | Discovery Session | Texas Ballroom Pre-Function | Position 1

By taking a modified team-based learning (TBL) approach to online statistics classes, two professors increased student engagement and satisfaction. A descriptive, phenomenological research study is currently looking into how and finding that synchronous, team-based quizzes conducted via Zoom are a large reason why.

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Extended Abstract

In this session, participants will learn how two statistics professors used an adapted form of team-based learning in an online statistics class, and what a qualitative research study is revealing about the student experience in that class.

This session will benefit faculty, students, instructional designers, program planners, or anyone interested in how students responded to a team-based learning approach in a statistics class. Anyone interested in how more collaboration and student-to-student interaction could impact students into math or statistics classes is also encouraged to attend.

The main focus will be on the design and implementation of the team-based learning approach, and how students have responded to it. Student comments are taken from interviews conducted by educational researchers after the course was finished and grades released.

Particular emphasis will be on the collaboration and social interaction that developed between the students as a result of synchronous team-based quizzes conducted via Zoom, the benefits students reported getting from the collaboration and social interaction; and how and why the professors kept improving their design and moderation of these synchronous sessions.

The following challenges will be discussed: designing a team-based learning approach for an online environment; overcoming initial student reluctance to meet synchronously; scheduling a choice of synchronous sessions in an asynchronous course format; preventing, mitigating, and dealing with student conflict within teams; helping students understand that a teammate’s wrong answer would not affect their own score in the course; and more.

We will also examine the following how the course structure was introduced to the students, and some other findings the research study has uncovered.

Apr 12, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Central)
Iron Chef Battle | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Innovation Studio

We invite you to join us in the Innovation Studio for the Iron Chef Battles, featuring some fiery pedagogical competition. In this renaissance of emerging technology, being able to craft a killer recipe for engagement on the fly is an invaluable skill. Join in as the audience as four teams compete head-to-head for the chance to claim the ultimate prize: winner of OLC Innovate's 2022 Iron Chef Battle.

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Sponsored by

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Instructure logo

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Apr 12, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Central)
Speed Networking Lounge: Progressive Stories | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

A mix of storytelling and community building, come have some fun as we build collaborative stories together. You never know where the story will turn when a new storyteller takes on the challenge of determining what happens next.

Not sure what to do between sessions or looking for a place to sit back and have some fun with colleagues? Come join us in the Speed Networking Lounge, a reflective and collaborative space where you can recharge your brain (and maybe even recharge your devices). There you’ll find puzzles, games, and activities, as well as new opportunities for “slow networking” to engage in while you chat and get to know people (old and new).

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Apr 12, 2022
3:00pm - 3:30pm (Central)
OLC Live!: Mind Your Full Mind | Other | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Between support for remote teaching, demand for course design services, compassion fatigue, and uncertainty, something has to give. All too often that something is you. OLC Live! host Dr. Kelvin Thompson welcomes special guest(s) to discuss the role self-care can play in our lives and careers.

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Extended Abstract

     

Apr 12, 2022
3:00pm - 3:45pm (Central)
Networking Coffee Break (Tuesday PM) | Other | Texas Ballroom A-B - Exhibit Hall

Join us in the exhibit hall (Texas Ballroom A/B) this afternoon for a networking coffee break.  Not only is this an opportunity to recharge with a fresh cup of coffee or tea, but you will also have the opportunity to network with other conference attendees.  Check out the Iron Chef Battle in the Innovation Studio, relax in the OLC Cafe, and join in activities in the Speed Networking Lounge.  Make a point to meet with our conference exhibitors to get your Mission Passport stamped.  You could win raffle tickets for fun prizes!

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Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Backwards Design and Forward Thinking | Education Session | Texas 1-2

During this presentation, an explanation of the backwards design process will be explored. Educators will learn to design comprehensive and effective courses and curriculum that benefit the diverse needs of the learners in their classrooms. Participants will leave with practical strategies to use immediately to develop comprehensive courses and curriculum.

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Extended Abstract

During this presentation, a detailed explanation of the backwards design process to design comprehensive and effective courses and curriculum, which will benefit the diverse needs of the learners in classrooms, will be explored. Teacher educators will explore practical ways to strengthen student learning in a variety of disciplines. Creating strong and engaging courses will determine the success of their students and in turn, their programs. Participants will learn about each step of the process as well as various approaches that can be used in order to ensure the process aligns with the individual course design requirements of various institutions and schools. A connection to the importance of the assessment process and how this information can and should be used to inform curriculum decisions will be included as well. A critical part of this process is making sure that the design of the course supports mastery of the course learning outcomes. Therefore, exploring the connection between program learning outcomes, course learning outcomes and weekly learning outcomes will be an area of focus. Examples and opportunities to practice alignment of the backwards design process to course learning outcomes will be integrated into the presentation. Engagement is critical as it leads to stronger mastery and takeaways of learning outcomes for students. Therefore, along with making sure alignment is in place, ensuring that the content of the course is engaging is another element that will be discussed during the presentation. Various examples of engagement strategies will be shared. Participants will engage in conversations and hands-on opportunities with their peers and presenters to learn about making the content in courses engaging. Finally, the various ways in which collaboration contributes to the course design process will be discussed. Participants will leave the session with practical strategies that can be used immediately to develop comprehensive and effective courses and curriculum.

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Advancing Impactful and Equitable Digital Strategy: A Fireside Chat on Institutional Transformation | Featured Session | Texas Ballroom C-D | ***LIVE STREAMED***

Digital leaders are guiding initiatives at traditional academic institutions and non-profits, attempting to maintain vision through crises, developing new partnerships and approaches within the private sector, and working to establish policies and regulations within government. Focusing on digital strategy to promote institutional transformation, this fireside chat comprises one of a selection of special sessions held at OLC Innovate 2022 for online, blended, and digital learning leaders.

 

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Extended Abstract

Digital leaders are guiding initiatives at traditional academic institutions and non-profits, attempting to maintain vision through crises, developing new partnerships and approaches within the private sector, and working to establish policies and regulations within government. We see ever increasing demand for cross-sector collaborations led by digital leaders across an increasingly diverse educational landscape. Join us for OLC’s spring leadership network event, where we bring together digital leaders from academics, non-profits, and the private sector to discuss online, blended, and digital learning strategy in times of great change. Focusing on digital strategy to promote institutional transformation, this fireside chat comprises one of a selection of special sessions held at OLC Innovate 2022 for online, blended, and digital learning leaders as a teaser for the 2022 Leadership Network Symposium to be held onsite at OLC Accelerate 2022 on November 14 in Orlando, Florida.

 

Sponsored by

Digital Ed logo        Carolina Distance Learning logo       Harmonize by 42Lines logo

     

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Blended Learning Summit Meet-Up | Summit | Texas Ballroom A-B - Speed Networking Lounge

Join the Blended Summit presenters for a conversation about blended learning at the course, program, and institutional levels.  Bring your problems of practice for this engaging dialogue!  Join thought leaders and experienced practitioners for an engaging discussion about blended learning!

 

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Extended Abstract

          

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Dipping Our Toes Into CBE Waters with a Learning Technology and Leadership Innovation Graduate Certificate | Education Session | Dallas 1-2

Struggling to create a competency-based program? In this session we will take you through the steps used by a university new to competency-based education to design a Learning Technology, Leadership, and Innovation graduate certificate within the constraints of accreditation requirements and will describe the importance of partnerships between academic units. 

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Extended Abstract

Struggling to create a competency-based course or program? In this session, we will take you through the steps used by a university new to competency-based education (CBE) as we designed a Learning Technology, Leadership, and Innovation graduate certificate comprised of four courses. In this session, the participants will learn to: 

  • Evaluate the applicability of a novel model of CBE for their own institution. 

  • Apply instructional design processes to create CBE templates for consistency across the certificate 

  • Establish successful teamwork between faculty, administration, and instructional designers 

  • Use student feedback to inform the continuous quality improvement of a CBE program 

This session is divided into three parts: (1) phases of development, (2) competency structure, (3) and quality assurance and improvement. Participants will have multiple opportunities to share their perspectives,  approaches, and strategies to CBL through online interactive tools such as Jamboard and Mentimeter

Competency-based education (CBE) is a way to move teaching and learning from time-bound constraints within a classroom to a more personalized model of learning focused on mastery of specific and measurable learning objectives. CBE offers many benefits in higher education but also involves implementation challenges in a university focused on traditional course delivery. Moving a program into an online CBE model requires collaboration between partners across the university to address program and course design, accreditation, technology, financial aid, faculty workload, compensation, and more. The partnership between the program and the e-learning division of ITS was key to initial success of our program and will be the focus of this session. Our instructional designers work within an elearning center under the ITS umbrella. Our journey to delivery of the first CBE program at our university started with a call for grant proposals for innovative teaching and learning projects. These grant proposals were funded through ITS under the direction of the Associate Vice President (AVP) of Academic Technologies who served a key role in facilitating a dialogue with university stakeholders.

The focus of this session will be on describing our unique model of CBE, developed to offer students maximum flexibility and personalized learning while fitting within the constraints of a 15-week term and accreditation requirements. We will briefly describe the ITS/Academic project team and share the preparatory steps taken by the members of the project team to launch the program. We will describe how academic technologies including Canvas, Zoom, Portfolium, InScribe and Flipgrid were used to support asynchronous CBE delivery, optional synchronous sessions, and student engagement. 

Phases of Development 

The team approached the development of this new CBE program in three phases- planning, design and implementation, and quality assurance and evaluation.  

Phase I Planning, Spring 2019 - Fall 2019 

The faculty developing the courses were funded by a university grant through Innovation and Technology Services (ITS) and supported by the instructional team at the E-Learning and Research Center. During phase I the team addressed the four project goals below: 

  1. Review examples of competency-based education in higher education 

  1. Identify the infrastructure and stakeholders needed for collaboration in the development and implementation of a CBE program 

  1. Determine core competencies for the LTLI program 

  1. Develop program structure  

During Phase I, the team reviewed several CBE models in the United States and worked with university stakeholders including the Faculty Development Center, Registrar, Financial Aid, HLC accreditation coordinator, Chief Academic Officer, Chief Technology Officer, and others to explore options in the structure and length of the CBE courses. During this phase the following occurred: 

  • Worked within existing university schedules to maintain current course start and end dates,  

  • Determined enrollment processes, 

  • Developed competency-based structures within each course,  

  • Identified a list of competencies based on job trends for educational technology leader’s national standards by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) and Consortium for School Networking (COSN).

Phase II Design and Implementation, Spring 2020- Fall 2020 

During phase II, the process was heavily weighted on formulating the learning objectives for the courses and program and aligning these to ISTE and COSN standards. The instructional design team worked with four subject matter experts (SMEs) to develop the content and strategies for each course. Specific activities and decisions during this phase included: 

  • Establishing four competencies per course, 

  • Creating a template for each competency set including the design of a flow for tasks,

  • Developing media and content for each competency set, 

  • Requiring mandatory instructor-student meetings for each competency set, 

  • Encouraging student-student interaction through optional monthly webinars and online discussion,

  • Developing and mapping the evaluation rubric back to letter grades, and,

  • Creation of a Canvas community site for sharing cohort related information and as a consistent resource for program-related information.  

Phase III Quality Assurance and Evaluation, Spring 2021-ongoing

The first course in the certificate, Instructional Design for Leaders, was taught Spring 2021. The flexibility offered by this model was appreciated by the students, many of whom were K-12 educators, as they faced the challenges of teaching during a global pandemic with the need to pivot to in-person or online teaching at short notice. In addition to the end-of-term IDEA evalutions, students were surveyed following each competency set to elicit their suggestions for improvement with immediate improvements made as appropriate and other suggestions integrated into the design of the subsequent courses. Ongoing evaluation will determine future modifications to the program.

PROGRAM Structure 

In this session we will discuss how we structured this CBE program to meet the needs of our university and accrediting body.

Course Duration 

Each course in this certificate program adheres to the regular 15-week semester schedule and uses the standard registration process. Students can complete the course work within this timeframe at the pace they choose. No changes to the semester schedule will be incorporated into the initial certificate offering. Only one course in the certificate is offered at a time and students may register for a maximum of one additional course per term. 

comptency sets and Mastery ProjectS 

Each course is structured to include four modules designated as competency sets. Each competency set consists of an overview, baseline assessment, self-rating of proficiency, development of a mastery plan, and final mastery project.  While students must complete each step in in a competency set, they are graded solely on the four mastery projects that they submit in each course. Instructors work individually with students to develop a plan for mastering each competency and this mastery plan must be approved before students can proceed to the mastery project. These mastery projects allow students to demonstrate their competency within an authentic context. Mastery projects are graded using a standardized rubric and a score of  >80% is required for passing. Deficiencies in mastery of a competency are typically identified in the individual meetings and through formative feedback and students are given the opporunity to improve their work. In select situations, students may be allowed to submit artifacts and a reflection to demonstrate alternative mastery of a competency (i.e. QA reviewer). This will be agreed upon during the mastery plan discussion for each competency.

Additional Program Details

Our presentation will address the Canvas templates used to support consistency across courses, the technologies and techniques used to support student engagement, and our ongoing evaluation and continuous quality improvement measures. 

Successful completion of the mastery projects in each course would reflect learning time equivalent to a 3-credit course. The first offerings of each course will allow us to evaluate the work submitted across all students, and assign “credit” value to each assessment.   

III. Quality Assurance and Program Evaluation 

Before a course is published, the instructional design team uses an Online Course Readiness Checklist adapted from the online learning literature to ensure the completion of basic online components such as homepage, syllabus, modules, assessments, course navigation and settings, course facilitation, and plan for first week. Program evaluation will be conducted at mid-point and at the end of the program. Since the program is still in progress, we will report this finding at the conference. 

Participant Engagement in This Session

Jamboard or Mentimeter will be used in for participant engagement and will include prompts related to participant understanding of CBE, how they have structured their own CBE programs, and how our presentation might influence current or future CBE offerings at their institution.  

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
“Quality Assurance Re-Imagined”: Leveraging a “Perfect Storm” of Factors to Redefine Online Course Quality Assurance | Education Session | Texas 6

Through a “perfect storm” of factors, we “re-imagined” our Quality Assurance process for online courses, developing different pathways to support faculty and departments better. We will share our experiences and showcase our Guidelines for Course Quality Assurance, created in-house to help all faculty teaching online courses at the university.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Course quality assurance (QA) has become an indispensable option since pivoting to online with the pandemic in Spring 2020.  The “pre-pandemic” era in online education found many institutions not realizing, or perhaps even entirely ignoring, the importance of checking and ensuring online course quality.  Due to the overall need and urgency in this space, Spring 2020 changed that perception forever!  Before Spring 2020, our Digital Learning (DL) Team experienced a limited number of instructors who pro-actively sought out and appreciated online course QA, readiness checks and reviews, conducted by our team.  We also found that most faculty often were defiant to formal quality assurance of their courses.  Even at online program levels, there was a lack of active pursuit to leverage QA services for the most part, which led to most online faculty being unaware of the services and resources for course quality assurance that our DL team offered.  Specific training to ensure quality online course design and online teaching was also limited. Online education was growing at our institution pre-pandemic, yet online was not a central focus for students, faculty, or administrators. 

It took that "perfect storm" of factors to allow re-vision, re-design, and re-focus of our process, while leveraging the timing of the pivot.  While it takes a whole village to initiate, implement, and be successful in a process, we acknowledge the multifaceted actions to shift and align faculty and program mindsets.  Ever since the “pandemic pivot” to online, stakeholders at our university (e.g., students, faculty, and higher administrators) all have expressed interest and concern about the “quality” of fully-online asynchronous courses.  Additionally, with greater competition for students in higher education, particularly in the online space, ensuring quality online courses has become a critical and pressing need.  Through a “perfect storm” of factors, online courses, programs, and resources are now in the spotlight at our university.  Our Digital Learning team revisited and re-imagined online course quality assurance, sharing the expertise and leadership across the university to provide consistency and clarity with a more formalized QA process through multiple pathways.

We will share our experiences in “re-imagining” our QA process for online course quality in this Education Session. We will talk briefly about our past practices and how we moved forward quickly to meet the critical needs of online course quality reviews requested by faculty and from departments and programs.  We then will describe our QA Process and the different pathways we adopted to support faculty and departments.  We also will showcase our Guidelines for Course Quality Assurance, created in-house to help all faculty teaching online courses at the university.  These guidelines provide key indicators and examples for quality in course design and/or re-design and online teaching.  While there are multiple QA instruments and checklists already out there  (e.g., Baldwin et al., 2018; Baldwin and Yu-Hui, 2019; Bigatel and Edel-Malizia, 2018; Karam et al., 2021), we have developed our own QA instrument (Online Quality Checklist) so that it represents the needs, language, and culture of our institution. Our quality indicators are research-based, guided, and inspired by open resources (e.g., Open SUNY and OLC OSCQR Course Design Review Scorecard; OLC Quality Course Teaching and Instructional Practice Scorecard).  We will also review how our QA Team communicates feedback for improving online courses and empowers faculty, departments, and programs to make decisions on the next steps for quality improvements, directing them to relevant resources at the university.  Thus our QA Process “closes the loop” on how feedback is provided, received, and finally incorporated into course improvements. 

How can you apply our “lessons learned” to your institution?  What is the “perfect storm” of factors influencing QA at your institution (e.g., deNoyelles et al., 2017)?  How can you take action to leverage these factors and improve QA at your institution?  This session will be of particular interest to administrators, university leadership teams, faculty, and instructional designers at institutions seeking to conduct “in-house” quality assurance.

Session’s Key Learning Outcomes

By the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the importance of quality assurance as part of the continuous improvement cycle for online course design and teaching quality. 
  • Identify the perspectives of stakeholders across the university for online course quality, reflecting on their own institutions. 
  • Apply our shared experiences to re-imagine quality assurance, and consider their own quality assurance processes.   
  • Expand their networks within OLC by sharing best practices and ideas in interactive exercises during the session. 

Proposed Agenda for 45-minute Education Session (with estimated times for each part)

  • Introduction and Review of Agenda (5 minutes): Introduce the Education Session, co-facilitators, and the plan for the session.
  • Quality Assurance Process Overview (20 minutes): Share the Quality Assurance Process, the different pathways to support faculty, and our Quality Assurance Guidelines for Online Courses.
  • Small-Group Discussion (10 minutes): Participants share ideas for online course quality assurance, how to implement online course quality assurance at their institutions, and assess effectiveness. 
  • Closing and Q&A (10 minutes)

References Cited

Baldwin, S., Yu-Hui, C., & Yu-Chang, H. (2018). Online course design in higher education: A review of national and statewide evaluation instruments. TechTrends, 62(1), 46-57. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11528-017-0215-z  

Baldwin, S. J., & Yu-Hui, C. (2019). An online course design checklist: Development and users’ perceptions. Journal of Computing in Higher Education, 31(1), 156-172. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12528-018-9199-8 

Bigatel, P. M., & Edel-Malizia, S. (2018). Using the “Indicators of engaged learning online” framework to evaluate online course quality. TechTrends, 62(1), 58-70. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11528-017-0239-4  

deNoyelles, A., Major, A., Lowe, D., Calandrino, T., & Albrecht, A. (2017). Perfect storm for the quality course review at UCF. Distance Learning, 14(4), 1-12.

Karam, M., Fares, H., & Al-Majeed, S. (2021). Quality assurance framework for the design and delivery of virtual, real-time courses. Information, 12(2), 93. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/info12020093  

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Survey Says… Now What?: Translating Data into Practice in Higher Ed | Education Session | Texas 5

Design, data, and dissemination- oh my! Using research to promote changes in practice and policy is no walk in the park. Join our research team for a down-to-earth discussion on how to engage in data-informed decision-making at your institution.

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Many universities collect staggering amounts of data. Unfortunately, it often collects dust instead of being used to drive decision-making. In this session, we will explore how to engage in research that leads to action. This session is rooted in a mixed methods study that our team conducted in May 2021 on the experiences of fully-online undergraduate and graduate students at a comprehensive regional university. After providing an overview of our study design, we will discuss the process of collecting and analyzing quantitative and qualitative data. From there, we will highlight challenges that emerged in disseminating our findings and translating them into practice and policy. Next, we will explore how we documented data-informed decision-making for our accrediting body. Finally, we will share lessons learned during this process and our plan for future iterations. To promote interaction during our presentation, participants will be encouraged to submit questions, insights, and anecdotes pertaining to each stage [study design; data collection and analysis; translation; documentation; iteration]. The final 10 minutes will be set aside for discussion and idea-sharing. Attendees will depart this session with a list of key considerations and questions for each of these five stages. While this session is accessible to all attendees, it is particularly geared towards researchers, administrators, instructional support staff, and technologists.

Apr 12, 2022
3:45pm - 4:30pm (Central)
Designing hybrid-accelerated programs: A model for healthcare education and beyond. | Education Session | Texas 4

This session will highlight the distinct, yet interconnected, design and implementation of the multi-modal components of a hybrid-accelerated program. Sample learning activities and instructional design elements showcasing the application of the Community of Inquiry Framework will be shared with the audience. Attendees will receive job aids to facilitate design planning.  

Evaluate Session

Extended Abstract

Efficiency, flexibility, and effectiveness; today’s students are seeking these three features when exploring higher education options. With an abundance of programs available, institutions must rethink how education is delivered and embrace new models of instructional delivery.  Delivery of professional graduate education requires additional rigor with accrediting bodies raising the degree-level for entry into the professions, while also struggling to meet growing gaps in the workforce. Hybrid-accelerated programs may be the solution to these challenges. With the flexibility of online learning, the efficiency of an accelerated model, and opportunities for collaborative discovery during face-to-face learning, hybrid-accelerated programs have the potential to revolutionize healthcare education.

 

Hybrid-accelerated programs are a growing trend in higher education because of the positive research demonstrating improved student satisfaction, increased diversity among students, and improved learning outcomes (Castro, 2019). Current research supports accelerated and blended or hybrid learning models as effective methods for preparing healthcare students, though a paucity of literature explores these two learning models in combination (Posey, & Pintz, 2017). Given the need to increase diversity among healthcare providers, fill growing employment gaps, and develop efficient and effective educational programs, two hybrid-accelerated healthcare programs were developed. This session showcases the design and implementation of a hybrid-accelerated Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) program and Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program.

 

The OTD and DPT programs have three distinct educational processes, online learning, face-to-face immersive laboratory experiences, and clinical education. Each of these components of the educational process had to be reimagined with a hybrid-accelerated learning model in mind. Based on Carman’s Blended Learning Process, the OTD and DPT program include face-to-face lab immersions (Live Events), asynchronous online content (Online Content), synchronous class meetings (Collaboration), formative and summative assessments (Assessment), and learning artifacts (Reference Materials). Each of these elements of the blended learning process was carefully designed, keeping in mind the accelerated and competency-based nature of the programs. Further, the critical elements of student engagement, collaboration, and communication necessary for success in classroom and clinical settings, was essential to highlight in the program design and implementation. The Community of Inquiry Framework was used to develop learning activities and create an environment of collaboration through the social-constructivist model. This session will highlight the distinct, yet interconnected, design and implementation of the online, face-to-face, and clinical education components of the curriculum, while providing attendees with specific and flexible examples they can utilize in their own programs, regardless of the discipline. 

 

Leveraging Carman’s Blended Learning Process, with an emphasis on integrating the Community of Inquiry Framework, the OTD and DPT programs provide a model for other programs exploring new avenues for teaching and learning.  Example course designs, technology utilization, and curricular planning templates will be discussed with the audience as the presenters describe the development of the five components of Carman’s Blended Learning Process in each program. Sample learning activities and instructional design elements showcasing the application of the Community of Inquiry Framework will be shared with the audience. Presenters will describe opportunities and challenges for designing and implementing a hybrid-accelerated graduate professional program from the student, faculty, and institutional perspective.

 

Level of Participation:

This session is structured as an educational session. Participants will hear presenters describe their experiences with designing and implementing hybrid-accelerated education in two healthcare programs. Following the informational portion of the session, participants will receive a job aid that promotes transfer of learning to their own work environment to include learning activities, emphasizing the application of the Community of Inquiry Framework, to each of the five elements of Carman’s Blended Learning Process.

Session Goals:

Individuals attending this educational session will be able to design learning activities for hybrid-accelerated courses utilizing principles of the Community of Inquiry framework for asynchronous online, synchronous online, face-to-face laboratory, and clinical education scenarios. Participants will be able to describe the opportunities and barriers associated with designing and implementing a hybrid-accelerated program. Lastly, they will be able to evaluate opportunities for hybrid-accelerated learning models within their institutions.

 

References:

Castro, R. (2019). Blended learning in higher education: Trends and capabilities. Education and Information Technologies, 24, 2523-2546. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10639-019-09886-3

Posey, L., Pintz, C. (2017). Transitioning a Bachelor of Science in nursing program to blended learning: Successes, challenges & outcomes. Nurse Education in Practice, 26, 126-133. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2016.10.006

Apr 12, 2022